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View Full Version : What derogatory names do other races use for white people?


Trillionaire
02-07-2004, 07:32 PM
A white, English-speaking person wanting to use a racist slur against another culture might use words like nigger, coon, spic, kyke, etc. I was wondering what some equivalent terms were that other cultures use, to refer to caucasians in the same way.

I'm especially interested in foreign language words and their translations.

Eleusis
02-07-2004, 07:41 PM
Cracker, honky, whitey, white trash... these are all in use today in the U.S.

friedo
02-07-2004, 07:45 PM
"Honky" is my personal favorite. It just sounds too silly to be offensive.

ltfire
02-07-2004, 07:47 PM
Cracker, honky, whitey, white trash... these are all in use today in the U.S.

..but not one of them even comes close to the OP's first example. I'm white, but you'd never insult me with those words. A black person, on the other hand, would probably..and rightfully so..kick your ass.

Eleusis
02-07-2004, 07:48 PM
Oh, I agree 100%. I'm white, and I don't think you could come up with a slur that would offend me.

Eleusis
02-07-2004, 07:54 PM
Moving on...

I believe gringo is still used in Mexico.

toque
02-07-2004, 08:08 PM
Mr. Charlie, Ofay, Peckerhead, Peckerwood...

I'm blanking on the Xicano term for white people- it's more jovial than offensive- please remind me.

Spezza
02-07-2004, 08:10 PM
American!

That's the worst somebody could call me.

BarnOwl
02-07-2004, 08:31 PM
American!

That's the worst somebody could call me.

It's one of the finest things anyone could call me!


:)

BarnOwl
02-07-2004, 08:33 PM
American!

That's the worst somebody could call me.

It's one of the finest things anyone could call me!


:)

mangeorge
02-07-2004, 08:39 PM
I remember hearing "splib" in the Navy, but I don't remember what group it referred to.
Peace,
mangeorge

Eleusis
02-07-2004, 08:49 PM
American!

That's the worst somebody could call me.
This from a Canadian who's only listed interest is "beer". :rolleyes:

satu largi
02-07-2004, 08:52 PM
..in Thailand, Westeners are called Falang (guava)..the personally very clean Thais react to the body odour of Westeners by calling out "'Faleng"', or "'Ferang"", with a smile, and if you have ever had a ripe guava in your home you will understand the reference... :D

Extraneous
02-07-2004, 09:00 PM
One is Chinese, the other Japanese (don't remember which is which)

"Round eyes"

"White Devil"

Ukulele Ike
02-07-2004, 09:20 PM
"The Man."

Really Not All That Bright
02-07-2004, 09:21 PM
One is Chinese, the other Japanese (don't remember which is which)

"Round eyes"

"White Devil"

Round-eyes is Chinese, as in "Look at the funny round-eyes!"

pravnik
02-07-2004, 09:54 PM
During a trade off of racial slurs and one upmanship between two friends, one white, one black, both filthy mouthed, I heard the following: "Mayonnaise Monkey." Now that's a slur!

Japanese also has "Dog Face" for whites, because we apparently have snoutlike faces, and "Bata-kusai", or "butter stinker", becasue our high dairy diet make us smell funny. China has "Gwailo", white devil.

Ringo
02-07-2004, 10:46 PM
Japanese also has "Dog Face" for whites, because we apparently have snoutlike faces...

Or could that possibly trace its origin to the common slang for occupation era U.S. Army infantry soldiers?

"Shine" is another, likely archaic, one.

Jervoise
02-07-2004, 10:55 PM
Japan also has "gaijin", but that's used to refer to all foreigners, not just whites.

"Gweilo" is actually Cantonese; in Mandarin, "laoguei", or "old outsider" (which has nothing to do with actual age). The Chinese also have "lao wai" ("old foreigner") and "da bi zi" ("big nose").

Chefguy
02-07-2004, 11:04 PM
In Uganda, we were called "mazungu", which I think just means "white person". In Mali, we were called "tubab", which is Bambara for "foreigner". Neither term is insulting.

And let's not forget "paleface".

Jervoise
02-07-2004, 11:10 PM
Crap, forgot to delete a sentence; "laoguei" and "lao wai" are the same.

syncrolecyne
02-07-2004, 11:12 PM
Mr. Charlie, Ofay, Peckerhead, Peckerwood...

I'm blanking on the Xicano term for white people- it's more jovial than offensive- please remind me.

Maybe you are thinking of "bolillo" (literally a white breadroll). In Mexico it is often used against light skinned Mexicans too, people who are "güeros". Or "gabacho", which is a somewhat harsher version of "gringo". Interestingly that word is a slur for "French" in Spain; the Mexicans simply appropriated the word for their own northern neighbors. It is usually a little angrier than "gringo", and usually limited to Anglos.

"Gringo" means American, English speaking, or simply non-Latin American foreigner depending on the area. In Mexico I have heard it directed at African-Americans or even "Hispanic" Americans at times. It's not necessarily a racial slur, or even mean spirited; the word usually conjures up images of sunburned tourists with sandals and cameras, warning each other not to drink the water.

Revtim
02-07-2004, 11:39 PM
Is there any explanation/origin/etymology of "ofay"?

pravnik
02-07-2004, 11:39 PM
Or could that possibly trace its origin to the common slang for occupation era U.S. Army infantry soldiers?

You'd think so, but it's apparently older than WWII. I saw an old group of paintings of white naval officers (English or American, can't remember which) from the mid-late 1800's, shortly after the Meiji restoration, where their faces are portrayed in almost a caraciture, really long and snoutlike. It was being used to demonstarte the way that Japanese people viewed us at the time; uncultured barbarians with doglike faces.

How's Houston, anyway? I'm back in my old hometown now. Say hi to 'em at the next dopefest for me.

don't mind me
02-07-2004, 11:50 PM
Since you mentioned "kike", there's "goy" or "shiksa" (the female equivalent) for gentiles, but I don't think it's a big insult. At least I hope not; I often refer to myself as a shiksa gringa.

Captain Amazing
02-08-2004, 12:00 AM
there's "goy" or "shiksa" (the female equivalent) for gentiles,

The male version of "shiksa" is "shegetz". They're Yiddish for "detestible", and "shegetz" and "shiksa" are offensive terms. "Goy" means "nation", with the implication "foreigner" or "non-Jew", and isn't particularly derogatory.

robo99
02-08-2004, 12:46 AM
I'd be offended if the term "Bushman" was used against me.

Manatee
02-08-2004, 02:03 AM
Is there any explanation/origin/etymology of "ofay"?

It's Pig Latin for "foe."

John Mace
02-08-2004, 02:08 AM
In Lakota, whites are called wasichu (pronounced wah-SHE-choo). Sometimes it is written as "wasichun". I've seen two definition offered, one deriving from a term related to "ghosts", indicating white skin, and a second meaning "one who takes too much".

Tentacle Monster
02-08-2004, 02:13 AM
Native Hawaiians use the term "haole" (pronounced "howly"). I have no idea what that means.

elmwood
02-08-2004, 02:35 AM
When I lived in New Mexico, many Hispanics used the term huedo (sp?, pronounced like hway-doh or weh-doh) to describe Anglos. I also heard penche huedo (sp?, pronounced like "peen-chay-weh-doh), which roughly translated to "foolish whitey."

Add "the devil" and "neck" to another anti-white slur used by blacks. I also found that whenever blacks spoke of "the white man," it usually wasn't a very good thing, compared to just saying "whites."

Jack Sarang
02-08-2004, 02:44 AM
Koreans says "yang nom" or "waygook nom".

The suffix "nom" in Korean can be applied to almost anything, denoting it as something that is negative or bad.

In these two examples, yang is west or westerner. waygook simply means foreign. "Nom" in these two instances is probably best translated as "bastard" or "fucker". So "Western bastard" or "Foreign fucker". However, waygook can be applied to any non-Korean whereas they can get specific by country for instance:

wei nom (japanese bastard)
chung-gook nom (chinese bastard)
mee-gook nom (american bastard)

And so on.

Ranchoth
02-08-2004, 02:57 AM
To a proud Irish (or other) American, "Anglo" might be taken as an insult.

t-keela
02-08-2004, 03:36 AM
Not enough folks hatin whitey now? Let's see how many slurs we can come up with. That's cool :D

How about... "needle dick"

or I've heard it said...ya fuckin noodle

My dad said "limey" used to put some folks into a rage.

Of course you could just call him a redneck or better yet try calling a redneck a fuckin Yankee. Them is fightin words.

I just hang the name "Bubba" on his ignorant pastey ass and that says just about everything. Yeah, whatever you say BUBBA.

or Dubya...now that's even worse. ;)

You said white, right? Not necessarily American. So do micks, wops, Hebes, pollocks and cannucks count.

mmmiiikkkeee
02-08-2004, 03:56 AM
I either heard it or imagined it, but perhaps "spook" (as in little white ghosty-thing).

Brown Jenkin
02-08-2004, 04:24 AM
Indonesian: bule (pr. boo-lay). If you are one, bank on hearing it at least a dozen times in your first 10 minutes in the country. My Indonesian-English dictionary has bulai (almost the same pronunciation) meaning albino, but no Indonesian I've met has heard that meaning before!

Thai, as satu largi mentioned above, is farang. Farang also means guava, but I had never heard the BO theory satu largi mentioned. Is that a private theory sl, or did you hear it from someone? I've tried to work this out before, but most Thai language authorities I've read are a bit confused about the etymology of farang-honky. Some think that it comes from the Thai word for French - Farangset (a Thai-ism for Francais), but others simply admit they have no idea. This page (http://linguistlist.org/issues/4/4-573.html#2) links it to the much older words frank and ferenji. Cambodia has adapted this word as barang, which means thing or object in Indonesian -- not sure if there's a connection there!

Quick hijack -- satu largi: are you in Indonesia? (his/her user name is phonetic Indonesian for 'one more' - every drinker's first phrase in a foreign language. I made sure I knew that one, and where's the toilet?, in Indonesian, Thai and Vietnamese).

OM Waterfall
02-08-2004, 06:15 AM
I was passing the time with a bunch of asians one day, when one of them said something in Chinese which made them all gasp and stop talking. Of course it made no sense to me, until one of them explained that he had referred to me as a ghost. This still didn't really compute until he said, "as in pale" .
Now I understood, but the only trouble was, that when these guys were all studying or posting on a message board like sad losers, I was generally down at the beach or working on some hare-brained scheme OUTdoors, so when we compared arms I was actually darker than the guy who said it!

NiceGuyJack
02-08-2004, 06:17 AM
In Singapore "Ang Moh" is used for whites and is Hokkien Chinese meaning "Red Hair". Ang Moh on it's own is not meant to be insulting, or should I say, is more commonly used as slang to mean whites. But occasionally you hear the term "Ang Moh Kwee" meaning "Red Haired Devil" and that does have a more insulting connotation.

TeaElle
02-08-2004, 07:03 AM
My favorite comes from the Delany sisters (http://amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0440220424/), referring rather specifically to the meanspirited, bigoted southern white men they encountered in their lifetimes: rebby boys.

11811
02-08-2004, 09:43 AM
I think "spook" is more generally understood as a slur against African Americans. I believe George Clinton made reference to whites as "Caspers" on the cover of an album, R&B Skeletons from the Closet.

Revtim
02-08-2004, 10:00 AM
It's Pig Latin for "foe."After I posted my question about its origins, I did a Google search on it, and several definitions said it was more likely from a West African language.

http://bartleby.com/61/67/O0036700.html
http://urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=ofay
http://abc.net.au/classic/breakfast/stories/s861770.htm

mangeorge
02-08-2004, 10:56 AM
Mayonnaise, or mayonnaise lookin'.
Most of the time I've just heard "white ____", as in "white boy", etc. Whether it's derogatory or not depends on context.

Rick
02-08-2004, 11:25 AM
Growing up in the Barrio, the term most often used was Paddy. As in Irish. It was an all purpose term for white folks.

Loopydude
02-08-2004, 11:40 AM
Back when I lived in Washington DC, I was called a "lima bean" by a homeless man I didn't give money to.

I had to ask another guy at work if this was bad.

He starged giggling and said "Lima bean! Shit, I haven't heard that in years! Yeah, it's like honkey or cracka!" At that time, I hadn't even heard of "cracker", so he had to explain to me what that was too. By the end of the conversation I had the poor man in stitches. It's not often a black man from Virginia gets to explain the etymology of "cracka" to a very white kid from Maine.

Since my boss was Israeli, I was also regaled with all the fun things you can call a gentile, which have been mentioned above.

I seem to remember one Chinese word for "foreigner" translates to something likes "foreign devil". I'll have to ask my boss for the definitive list.

My stepmom is Greek, and the term for "non-Greek" is something like "ouflo"...I don't know how to spell it exactly. I also don't know what the translation is, but from what I understand, calling someone a "piece of shit" is about on par.

Chefguy
02-08-2004, 11:42 AM
Opie-lookin' mutha fucka.

Acsenray
02-08-2004, 12:13 PM
All along a nearly straight east-west line from Ethiopia to Indonesia (and perhaps even farther west; I'm not sure), variations of the term "Ferengi," "Firang," "Phiringi," etc. are used to mean foreigners, Europeans, white people, or Americans, depending upon the context. Sometimes it's a neutral term for "foreigner," but often it's a derogatory term as well.

I don't know which language it originated in, but considering its extent and the history of the region in question, my guess is Persian.

ParentalAdvisory
02-08-2004, 04:00 PM
I still like "cracka-ass cracka". I just has that certain ring to it!

Boppy
02-08-2004, 04:16 PM
New Zealand's indigenous people, Maoris, have traditionally called everyone else Pakehas which is supposed to be a politically-correct term nowadays. However, pakeha translates as white, foreigner or pig, none of which I'm particularly comfortable with. I don't know whether you could apply this tag to New Zealanders who are Samoan, Tongan, Chinese, Vietnamese or any of the other races who make up our society these days - perhaps another passing kiwi could clarify that.

When I lived in Asia, all white people were assumed to be American. I found it really weird to hear a Filipino refer generally to a group of me and my classmates as Americans when perhaps only one or two out of ten actually were from the US or Canada.

The Batman
02-08-2004, 04:33 PM
by elmwood:
When I lived in New Mexico, many Hispanics used the term huedo (sp?, pronounced like hway-doh or weh-doh) to describe Anglos. I also heard penche huedo (sp?, pronounced like "peen-chay-weh-doh), which roughly translated to "foolish whitey."

It's not "penche huedo" it's "Pinche Guero" (peenchay gwehroh). It means f :eek: cking blondie.

Also, gavacho is usually used to refer to american things and not people.

Gringo comes from the time general Pershing lead an expedition into Mexico to look for Pancho Villa, after he attacked a town in Texas. The people in Mexico shouted " green, go!" to the soldiers because of their olive uniforms.

toque
02-08-2004, 04:39 PM
Maybe you are thinking of "bolillo" (literally a white breadroll). In Mexico it is often used against light skinned Mexicans too, people who are "güeros". Or "gabacho", which is a somewhat harsher version of "gringo". Interestingly that word is a slur for "French" in Spain; the Mexicans simply appropriated the word for their own northern neighbors. It is usually a little angrier than "gringo", and usually limited to Anglos.

"Gringo" means American, English speaking, or simply non-Latin American foreigner depending on the area. In Mexico I have heard it directed at African-Americans or even "Hispanic" Americans at times. It's not necessarily a racial slur, or even mean spirited; the word usually conjures up images of sunburned tourists with sandals and cameras, warning each other not to drink the water.

Thank you! "Guero" (I knew it as "huero") was the term I was looking for.

pravnik
02-08-2004, 04:43 PM
Gringo comes from the time general Pershing lead an expedition into Mexico to look for Pancho Villa, after he attacked a town in Texas. The people in Mexico shouted " green, go!" to the soldiers because of their olive uniforms.

"Gringo" appears to be older than Pancho Villa. This from Dictionary dot com's definition of "gringo": (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=gringo)

"Its first recorded English use (1849) is in John Woodhouse Audubon's Western Journal: “We were hooted and shouted at as we passed through, and called ‘Gringoes.’”

It suggests that gringo came from griego, or greek, as in speaker of a foreign language: "that's greek to me."

pokey
02-08-2004, 04:46 PM
What about mangi cake?

Eleusis
02-08-2004, 05:18 PM
"Shine" is another, likely archaic, one.
I either heard it or imagined it, but perhaps "spook" (as in little white ghosty-thing).
I've only heard both of these slurs referring to black people.

Laughing Lagomorph
02-08-2004, 05:18 PM
I've heard that poor whites in the Bahamas are referred to as "redlegs" but I don't know if it is true.

elmwood
02-08-2004, 05:48 PM
by elmwood:


It's not "penche huedo" it's "Pinche Guero" (peenchay gwehroh). It means f :eek: cking blondie.

Thanks for the clarification. Maybe it's just the New Mexico accent ... I always heard it as "huedo."

mangeorge
02-08-2004, 08:13 PM
When I lived in Asia, all white people were assumed to be American. I found it really weird to hear a Filipino refer generally to a group of me and my classmates as Americans when perhaps only one or two out of ten actually were from the US or Canada.
Some Canadians would be a little uncomfortable with the idea of being lumped in with Americans.
See how freakin' easy it is to be non-pc? ;)

gytalf2000
02-08-2004, 08:58 PM
..but not one of them even comes close to the OP's first example. I'm white, but you'd never insult me with those words. A black person, on the other hand, would probably..and rightfully so..kick your ass.

That is an interesting perspective. I have always found it a bit disturbing, though, that it would ever be considered legitimate for someone to respond to a racial verbal insult (as much as I dislike the "N"-word and other such insults; I would be very happy to never hear them again!) by turning to violence.

E. Thorp
02-09-2004, 01:35 AM
I'm enjoying this thread. I'm white and have heard some of these terms before, but a lot of them are new to me.

I can't stop thinking of something odd: that history, which has made so many racist epithets so wounding for so many, has made me (and perhaps most whites?) more or less immune. I've just read an entire page of insults directed at my race and not felt a thing.

Jervoise
02-09-2004, 02:21 AM
I'm enjoying this thread. I'm white and have heard some of these terms before, but a lot of them are new to me.

I can't stop thinking of something odd: that history, which has made so many racist epithets so wounding for so many, has made me (and perhaps most whites?) more or less immune. I've just read an entire page of insults directed at my race and not felt a thing.Not so odd, I'd say. As an analogy, "big nose" would cease to be an insult if most people in the country had great honking noses, and big-nosed citizens were historically a privileged class of society. Equally, "whitey" doesn't hurt so much since most people I know are white, and I have not/will not experience widespread discrimination for being white.

I guess our nonplussedness stems from the fact that few of us whities have experienced racial slurs coupled with a lifetime as a member of a disadvantaged minority group. It's easy to laugh off a few insulting words when your majority racial group has not historically been subject to oppression, discrimination or unequal civil rights; it's harder to ignore racial slurs when one has lived as a minority group member through systemmatic prejudice and inequity.

... but I'd also venture a guess that white people living in predominantly non-white countries feel the sting of anti-white racial insults much more than we do.

Sorry if this is dragging away from GQ.

notquitekarpov
02-09-2004, 02:42 AM
All along a nearly straight east-west line from Ethiopia to Indonesia (and perhaps even farther west; I'm not sure), variations of the term "Ferengi," "Firang," "Phiringi," etc. are used to mean foreigners......I don't know which language it originated in, but considering its extent and the history of the region in question, my guess is Persian.

Yup, roger that - it's Ferengi in Malaysia. There is even a Batu Ferengi (beach) on the island of Penang, which now appropriately is filled with terrible beach hotels for package tourists.

As to its roots, well according to Linguist List (http://emich.edu/~linguist/issues/) it was probably due to the Arabs.

In a general "West" to "East" progression:

"frangos" ("Westerner") - Greek
"ifrangi" - Greek ("Latins (Catholics)", Turkish, Arabic
"frang" "a European" and "frangiya" "The Country of the Franks; Western
Europe; Latin language or church" - Syriac, the classical Aramaic
(Semitic) language used in some Middle Eastern Christian churches,
"afrangui" - In Arabic (in Egypt and in some North African countries)
"ifranji" or "franji" - Arabic dialects
"faranji" - Arabic, "farangi" - Egyptian
"ifranji" (nom masculin singulier, "ifranj" or "ifranjiyine" au pluriel -
Arabic "ifranji (pl., more precisely collective) "ifranj" 'European',
"firanja" "Land of the Franks, Europe" - Modern Standard Arabic
"afrang,faranj, ferang, ferangi" - Modern Persian
"feringhi" - Persian
"farengi, farangi, pirangi" (Tamil version) etc.- Dravidian in India
"farangi" - Malayalam (borrowed from Portuguese in 16th century)
"farang" ("Westerner") in Thai
"barang" - Cambodian
"farang" - Thai from Persian "farangg" in 16th century(?)
"pha-rang", "pha-lang-xa" - formerly Vietnamese
"barang" - Bahasa Indonesia (reduplicated) "goods", "stuff" things such as
might be brought by traders
"paalagi/papalangi/vaalagi/papa-'aa" - Samoan
("four layers"--Rarotongan)/Maori "paakehaa" (likely a coincidence)
"Ferenghi" on Star Trek.

Really Not All That Bright
02-09-2004, 02:45 AM
"Foocracka" and "Fruit Booty" spring to mind, though they may be limited to the little-known cult of Stevie Ray. (http://ddtdigest.com/)

Really Not All That Bright
02-09-2004, 02:49 AM
My stepmom is Greek, and the term for "non-Greek" is something like "ouflo"...I don't know how to spell it exactly. I also don't know what the translation is, but from what I understand, calling someone a "piece of shit" is about on par.

The Greek term for "foreign" is xeno (from which we get xenophobia). I believe the father in My Big Fat Greek Wedding uses it liberally.

syncrolecyne
02-09-2004, 03:01 AM
Thanks for the clarification. Maybe it's just the New Mexico accent ... I always heard it as "huedo."


Actually, you heard it correctly - a single "r" between vowels is tapped behind the teeth almost like an English 'd' or 't' is...and the güe or hue usually sounds nearly the same, I have seen it spelled "weto" too.

There is big a difference between the Mexican (i.e. from Mexico itself) and the "American" or border use of these words. In Mexico "gringo" means primarily and American citizen and "güero/a" means "blonde" but in the USA or border both words usually means "white" as opposed to "mexican" (since a "white Mexican" is an oxymoron here) I am Mexican and light skinned but not blonde by most standards (I'm Spanish, Irish, and at most 1/16th Indian), and I remember being confused when I started school in Texas when the local Hispanic kids asked me confrontationally if I was a "güero" or a "Mexican". My dad would just tell me to pay the dumb "gringo" kids (who were self described "Mexicans") no mind.

gytalf2000
02-09-2004, 08:31 AM
... but I'd also venture a guess that white people living in predominantly non-white countries feel the sting of anti-white racial insults much more than we do.

Actually, you do not have to go out of the country to experience this. I have some white friends that grew up in predominantly non-white neighborhoods who say they encountered quite a bit of hostility and even physical intimidation from people in their neighborhood and schools. I experienced this myself when I went to graduate school at a predominantly black college. Sorry if I am veering off-topic!

psychotropic
02-09-2004, 10:54 AM
In Australia, whites are sometimes referred to as "skip" or "skippy" as in Skippy the Bush Kangaroo. I have also heard us referred to as "colonials" or "convicts". I don't take offence to any of these, especially when I think of some of the terms used to describe Aborigines.

shijinn
02-09-2004, 02:34 PM
Crap, forgot to delete a sentence; "laoguei" and "lao wai" are the same. 'gweilo' is literally cantonese for "ghost man"; 'lao guei' is literally mandarin for "old ghost"; and 'lao wai' is literally mandarin for "old outside". ... I seem to remember one Chinese word for "foreigner" translates to something likes "foreign devil". ... how about mandarin for 'yang2gui3zi'?

ElvisL1ves
02-09-2004, 04:26 PM
John von Neumann is said to have begun a mathematics lecture once; "The goys have proven the following theorem."

Some Canadians would be a little uncomfortable with the idea of being lumped in with Americans.Those unclefuckers from Canuckistan? Their problem.

Maastricht
02-09-2004, 04:45 PM
In Dutch: "bleekscheet" (translated literally, it means pale-fart).

My half-Moroccan nephew once informed me of an Arabic sentence that meant: "less then dogs and pigs" and that was supposed to be used by Moroccan youngsters amongst themselves when talking derogatively about the Dutch.

Ranchoth
02-09-2004, 04:48 PM
Ferengi (http://home.netvigator.com/~cyw/image/ferengi.jpg) as an insult?

Yeah, I can see that.

Sofa King
02-09-2004, 05:47 PM
Well, since you asked: http://rsdb.org/

elmwood
02-09-2004, 07:48 PM
Well, since you asked: http://rsdb.org/

Not much love for French Canadians, is there?

You know, a former friend of mine might have invented a word on that list. I remember a conversation we had about ten years ago, regarding a co-worker of his. He kept talking about the follies of a gentleman with the last name of Spoda, and usually referred to the name in a nagative way, like "Damn Spoda." I said "you know, that sounds like a racial slur," and from that point on he used the word "spoda" as a substitute for the n-word.

Great ... I probably scored an assist in that linguistic creation. :(

Remember ... former friend.

Geek Mecha
02-10-2004, 01:35 AM
Native Hawaiians use the term "haole" (pronounced "howly"). I have no idea what that means.
Haole means foreigner but its modern meaning is "Caucasian". It can be used as a slur, but isn't always. People conversationally refer to Caucasians as haole (though not to their faces if they're unsure if the term will offend), and local Caucasians may call themselves haole. When they do, it's dissimilar to black folks calling themselves niggers. When a Caucasian calls himself haole, he's conveying he's local-born or has adopted the local culture as his own; there's no defiant political sentiment involved.

matt_mcl
02-10-2004, 04:41 PM
"Mangia cake" was mentioned above; I think it may be unique to Canada. Apparently it's a term used by people of Italian origin to mean Canadians of British descent.

Still in the Canadian context, I'll mention qaallunaaq (probably misspelled -- another spelling is "kabloona"). This is the Inuktitut word for "white person"; the Inuinnaqtun word for the English language is "kablunatun." I don't know whether it's derogatory or not, but the Inuinaqtun section of the Government of Nunavut website uses "kablunatun" to refer to English.

This country has a depressing history of barbs slung between British- and French-Canadians; when simply 'the French' and 'les Anglais' didn't suffice as insults, one side supplemented the usual anti-France varieties with 'pea soup' and 'pepper', and the other had 'rosbif' (roast beef) and 'tête carrée' (square head). Another is that, for a long time, should a French-Canadian dare to express himself in French, he might be greeted by a brusque "Speak white!" There are probably others which, mercifully, I do not know.

Finite Elephant
02-10-2004, 05:56 PM
Haole means foreigner but its modern meaning is "Caucasian". It can be used as a slur, but isn't always. People conversationally refer to Caucasians as haole (though not to their faces if they're unsure if the term will offend), and local Caucasians may call themselves haole. When they do, it's dissimilar to black folks calling themselves niggers. When a Caucasian calls himself haole, he's conveying he's local-born or has adopted the local culture as his own; there's no defiant political sentiment involved.

I concur that the degree of offense meant by "haole" depends on the context.

A sufficiently "local" white is referred to as "hana haole."

I can also report from first-hand experience that the use of "haole" to denote "caucasian" has spread to Guam (not a surprise given the number of Guamanians that go to UH or vacation in Hawai'i). I've also heard that it has spread to Saipan.

snafiasco
02-11-2004, 12:42 AM
On Saturday Night Live, the comedian Chris Rock once tried to come up with a term to insult white people. After discarding "white nigger," he suggested "Yaku." A black kid actually used this on a bunch of us when we wouldn't give in to his pan-handling on a Chicago subway car. \\

Arturius
02-11-2004, 01:23 AM
Heres some ones from the street:

Gook

Wigga (white nigger, usually a white guy pretending to be 'black')

Wigga's more used by white people to describe white people though.

RobertP
02-11-2004, 03:51 AM
Yup, roger that - it's Ferengi in Malaysia. There is even a Batu Ferengi (beach) on the island of Penang, which now appropriately is filled with terrible beach hotels for package tourists.

As to its roots, well according to Linguist List (http://emich.edu/~linguist/issues/) it was probably due to the Arabs.
That's awesome notquitekarpov. I knew that the term was widespread, but hadn't realized quite how far. In the North Indian languages (Hindi, etc), it is firang also, which I assume came from the persian, as many Hindi words do.

What I love best is the implication that the whole thing is probably dervied from a term for the French :)

Other Hindi slur words for white people would include

gora (white skin)
angrez (Hindiized word for 'English')
amrici (Hindiized word for 'American')
gora behenchod (white sisterfucker -- my favorite!)

EhhMon
02-11-2004, 06:06 AM
I always use "Trailer Trash", "Inbreeders" or "Ya bunch of Inbreds" on my friends, but it never insults them, they just laugh and reply, "I ain't from the South".

Dung Beetle
02-11-2004, 10:12 AM
In Stephen King's The Stand, the Rat Man refers to someone (Larry?) as "graymeat" and "Wonder Bread".

noname
02-11-2004, 02:49 PM
gora (white skin)

Actually, it should Gori Chamdi for 'white skin' Gora just means 'White'

angrez (ung-rays) can be used as a racial slur as in 'angrez ki aulaad' (ung-rays ki awe-laa-the) meaing, 'son of an englishman'

amrici (um-ri-ki) is not a racial slur. At least not yet :)


gora behenchod (white sisterfucker -- my favorite!)

The funny thing is, whenever we use this, the 'gora' (whitey) just smiles warmly and says "oh really?" :D

An interesting story:

A few years ago, I met a swiss student on a bus in Gujarat, and he told me that the Gujarati people referred to him as Micheal Jackson, all in good humor, which he didn't like. And this was before the first lawsuit against him.

RobertP
02-12-2004, 03:32 AM
Actually, it should Gori Chamdi for 'white skin' Gora just means 'White'

Yes, you are right of course, gora is an adjective, but I have heard it often used as a noun as well, as in "ohe, gora!". By white skin, I wasn't referring so much to the skin as the person wearing it -- in other wrds, Whitey!



amrici (um-ri-ki) is not a racial slur. At least not yet :)

Well, I'm an amrici, and I am not sure it has always been used nicely on me....

Oh and another thing I have been called in Indian villages is "World Bank". Not derogatory, but interesting nonetheless.

noname
02-12-2004, 11:17 AM
Yes, you are right of course, gora is an adjective, but I have heard it often used as a noun as well, as in "ohe, gora!". By white skin, I wasn't referring so much to the skin as the person wearing it -- in other wrds, Whitey!

Its like this, when they call you 'oye, gora!', they do not mean it spitefully. But when they want to hurt you, they will call you 'gori chamdi!' A very fine distinction between the two, but thats where the the slur comes in.


Well, I'm an amrici, and I am not sure it has always been used nicely on me....

to the best of my knowledge, america is still in the good books of indians.


Oh and another thing I have been called in Indian villages is "World Bank". Not derogatory, but interesting nonetheless.
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D World Bank!! :D :D :D :D This is really funny. *makes note to use it in the future*

another racial slur:
australians are bloody kangaroos.

The Flying Dutchman
02-12-2004, 12:02 PM
Several years ago I heard a South African ex-patriate refer to Afrikaaners as "Yawnnies" with a clearly derogatory intent. The origin no doubt based on the prevalence of the Dutch name for "John" among the Afrikaaners.

BMalion
02-12-2004, 01:58 PM
Here's one sent in by Mrs No-Supper-For-You from Norwood in Lancashire ...


Miserable Fat Belgian Bastards!

sinjin
02-12-2004, 06:33 PM
I saw T-shirts on Maui with a white guy on a spit like a pig with the following caption:

Haole, the other white meat

That's pretty rude.

mangeorge
02-12-2004, 07:13 PM
I saw T-shirts on Maui with a white guy on a spit like a pig with the following caption:

Haole, the other white meat

That's pretty rude.
It's funny as hell, given that that's often one of the the first questions (so I hear) asked by a haole upon meeting a Maui person.

Geek Mecha
02-13-2004, 12:13 AM
I saw T-shirts on Maui with a white guy on a spit like a pig with the following caption:

Haole, the other white meat

That's pretty rude.
Context takes the edge off. On a rack it would elicit laughs or offense; on a Caucasian guy it'd be funny as hell; on a Polynesian or Samoan behemoth, it'd be scary; and on a restaurant employee or anyone eating, it'd be unnerving.

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