PDA

View Full Version : What are the tubes extending down to the hubs on this truck?


minor7flat5
08-28-2005, 04:48 PM
Here is a picture (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v186/minor7flat5/brazilian-truck.jpg), with an unidentified smiling Brazilian trucker.

Here are the wheels (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v186/minor7flat5/wheels.jpg) at full resolution.

These are very common in Brazil, and I asked once before (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/showthread.php?t=249283), but did not get a definitive answer. So, when I was down there last week I took the opportunity to take a photo of one of these trucks so that we have something concrete to work with.

Ethilrist
08-28-2005, 04:54 PM
Sensors to let you know if a tire blows? They're only in the back, where there are multiple tires, so blowing one wouldn't be as immediately obvious as losing one of the front ones...

Chronos
08-28-2005, 06:33 PM
My guesses would be some sort of static discharge device, or some sort of odometer. One occasionally sees a device on truck hubs with a weight in it to keep it right-side-up and an odometer display to show how many times the wheel has rotated (presumably to keep track of when maintenance is needed). This might be a similar device, if one doesn't trust the weighting to keep the odometer device right-side-up.

Q.E.D.
08-28-2005, 08:39 PM
I bet it's an automatic tire inflation system, like the ones written about here (http://etrucker.com/apps/news/article.asp?id=29620). The photograph is obviously of a totally different type of unit, but the similarities are very telling.

minor7flat5
08-28-2005, 09:57 PM
I thought about it being an inflation mechanism.
On trucks that I see with these tubes (including the one in the picture), there are tubes on all wheels, (even the front wheels).

I would buy that as an explanation if they weren't so common. Why would a fancy auto-inflation mechanism be on every other João and José's beater truck?
The odometer idea doesn't make sense because they are on every wheel (unless there really is a need to measure each wheel's travel).

Perhaps some different laws -- some requirement there that we don't have?
Maybe whatever those tubes do is not necessary in the US?
Maybe they are not approved by the US DOT, so we never see them?

minor7flat5
08-28-2005, 10:00 PM
Of course, I realize that I could have simply walked over to the fellow and asked...
But that's not as much fun, is it?

sunstone
08-28-2005, 10:05 PM
Well, as a wild-eyed guess, I would suggest that they are brake actuation devices. As the truck slows, the load will shift, pulling up on the "tube", and actuating the lever and actuating the bakes in step.

Hey...that's my guess!

mike1dog
08-28-2005, 10:21 PM
My guess is that they are manual tire inflation tubes. Why have such a thing in Brazil and not the U.S? I would guess that a lot of roads in Brazil aren't paved. If you get stuck, the best way to increase your traction in such a truck would be to let air out of all the tires. This device would make it easier, especially if your truck was stuck up to the hubs. They didn't appear to be hooked up to any kind of system. The driver probably uses the trucks air brake system to reinflate the tires after he gets it unstuck.

The Hamster King
08-29-2005, 12:29 AM
My guess is that they are manual tire inflation tubes. Why have such a thing in Brazil and not the U.S? I would guess that a lot of roads in Brazil aren't paved. If you get stuck, the best way to increase your traction in such a truck would be to let air out of all the tires. This device would make it easier, especially if your truck was stuck up to the hubs. They didn't appear to be hooked up to any kind of system. The driver probably uses the trucks air brake system to reinflate the tires after he gets it unstuck.

Or maybe truckstops with compressed air are much rarer in Brazil than in the United States. So it's standard to equip the trucks with inflation devices that work off the airbrake system. In the United States truckers can count on always being able to find compressed air when they need it, but that might not be the case in Brazil.

Princhester
08-29-2005, 04:33 AM
Sorry but that doesn't really make sense, Pochacco. Why do you need fancy tubes and hubs just to inflate tyres off the airbrake system? All you'd need is an air line to the regular ole' valves, surely?

Dorjän
08-29-2005, 10:11 AM
Regular Old valves tend to rotate along with the tires. Any auto-inflation device will have to route through the hub for this reason. I agree that they are not that common in the U.S. because most trucks have regular access to pneumatic air, and they are rather expensive to install. I have seen them on SOME trucks, and they are pretty common on military vehicles, although they look different. A google search on "trucks auto-inflation system" will bring you loads of info.

Balthisar
08-29-2005, 10:26 AM
I see these on tourist-style busses in Mexico all the time. By this, I mean the non-municipal busses, but rather the city-to-city busses that are usually first class service. I've always asked myself this, too, i.e., what they hell are they. The thing is, they're not on every tire on most busses. I can't recall seeing them on cargo trucks, either, and I always associate them with busses.

Boer
03-04-2013, 10:55 AM
Its called "rodoar", is used to keep tires inflated

beowulff
03-04-2013, 11:57 AM
Kind of amazing that the OP's links still work after almost 8 years...

Cheesesteak
03-04-2013, 12:30 PM
Its called "rodoar", is used to keep tires inflated

Awesome, I looked up rodoar, and got this insightful response from Yahoo Answers

"Rodoar® monitora e mantém a pressão dos pneus mesmo com o veículo em movimento."

Which I found surprisingly understandable even though I speaketh not a word of Portuguese.

naita
03-04-2013, 01:12 PM
Awesome, I looked up rodoar, and got this insightful response from Yahoo Answers

"Rodoar® monitora e mantém a pressão dos pneus mesmo com o veículo em movimento."

Which I found surprisingly understandable even though I speaketh not a word of Portuguese.

And still there's a huge "Proto-Indo-European is a myth"-movement.

dstarfire
03-04-2013, 01:20 PM
Which I found surprisingly understandable even though I speaketh not a word of Portuguese.

That's the power of cognates (words that look like their foreign-language equivalent) and imported words (i.e. croissant, sangfroid, etc.), though I doubt "imported words" is the correct technical term ( and I don't have the time right now to look it up. )

TriPolar
03-04-2013, 01:21 PM
And still there's a huge "Proto-Indo-European is a myth"-movement.

I don't know anything about that debate, but the Latin roots of Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese make those languages fairly easy to read for people who speak English. I do surprisingly well reading them with just a little background in Spanish and Portuguese. Of course speaking and comprehending them when spoken is a whole other matter.

Really Not All That Bright
03-04-2013, 01:22 PM
...doubt "imported words" is the correct technical term...
Loanwords.

Jake
03-04-2013, 01:55 PM
The thing that bothers me is that the device is out in the open and vulnerable to damage. If the truck threw a recap, it would certainly destroy it.

Gatopescado
03-04-2013, 03:11 PM
.... with an unidentified smiling Brazilian trucker.



Clearly that is Jesus. His name is right there on the truck!

pete66
03-04-2013, 04:36 PM
With the rear wheels set pretty deep under the truck, they could be Dummy Sticks. Lets the driver know where his tires are in tight turns so they dont rub up against curbs. We have them on the front of our dump trucks. kinda lets us know where the front end edge is when were backing into a tight area.

minor7flat5
03-04-2013, 05:45 PM
Kind of amazing that the OP's links still work after almost 8 years...I like having durable links. Let's see if they are still functional at the end of the decade :).

Awesome, I looked up rodoar, and got this insightful response from Yahoo Answers

"Rodoar® monitora e mantém a pressão dos pneus mesmo com o veículo em movimento."

Which I found surprisingly understandable even though I speaketh not a word of Portuguese.And that little bit of Portuguese says everything to me, now that we know the brand name. Thanks to Boer for popping in with that useful bit of information.

I don't know anything about that debate, but the Latin roots of Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese make those languages fairly easy to read for people who speak English. I do surprisingly well reading them with just a little background in Spanish and Portuguese. Of course speaking and comprehending them when spoken is a whole other matter.I think the last bit is the kicker.

My daughter is 20 and has been around Portuguese for many years in our home but doesn't speak the language. She speaks and reads college level Spanish, but even today I got a blank stare from her when I said a few short Portuguese phrases (nothing fancy, it was something like: "The nurse took her daughter to the doctor this morning, so she was late").
The extra vowel sounds of Portuguese and the random different words between Spanish and Portuguese are just enough to make it quite difficult for a speaker of one to understand the other, spoken at speed. I can't understand Spanish at normal conversational speed.

moriah
03-04-2013, 06:15 PM
Loanwords.

When do we have to give them back?

CurtC
03-04-2013, 06:19 PM
Its called "rodoar", is used to keep tires inflated

So why are those common in Brazil, but not in the US?

Lord Mondegreen
03-04-2013, 06:26 PM
With the rear wheels set pretty deep under the truck, they could be Dummy Sticks. Lets the driver know where his tires are in tight turns so they dont rub up against curbs. We have them on the front of our dump trucks. kinda lets us know where the front end edge is when were backing into a tight area.

Did you read post 13? If you Google "rodoar" there are plenty of images to confirm that is exactly what can be seen in the photos. It is a tyre/tire pressure monitoring and maintenance system.

electronbee
03-04-2013, 06:51 PM
Here's even a video! I even got the link where they put the cover on and it looks like the picture:

http://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=PNwh6Msvfdg#t=390s

Really Not All That Bright
03-04-2013, 08:16 PM
So why are those common in Brazil, but not in the US?
They're common here too, just more integrated into the wheel/axle/suspension assemblies so you can't see them.

minor7flat5
03-04-2013, 09:00 PM
Here's even a video! I even got the link where they put the cover on and it looks like the picture:

http://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=PNwh6Msvfdg#t=390sIn that video at about 4:45 or so he is explaining the purpose. He says that not only does the system keep the tires at proper inflation, but if you have a leaking tire it will provide enough air to keep the tires inflated until you get to the nearest service station to replace the tire. In addition it monitors the pressure and lets you know if there is a problem.

So, if you have a slow leak from less than perfect roads and you are many miles from the nearest borracheiro, this system would come in very handy. Sweet!

electronbee
03-04-2013, 09:05 PM
They're common here too, just more integrated into the wheel/axle/suspension assemblies so you can't see them.

Yeah, this is a retrofit for older vehicles. Which, is something rare in the US as we just buy new stuff. But, in other places where the credit to buy new stuff for the sake that its new stuff, you have to make something work with what you have.

US needs that mentality.

pete66
03-05-2013, 05:17 AM
Never saw those before. sorry, i didnt follow up on the rodoar thing. that will teach me to read the whole thread.

richw211
03-05-2013, 02:15 PM
When I was in Sao Paulo last year, I was told those tubes were to automatically inflate the tires in the event "bandits" shot the tires. I was told this sort of thing is not uncommon in rural areas. I was also told about (and saw) cars painted black with "armada escordita" (armed escort?) painted in large white letters on all sides. I was told that these cars were hired to escort particularly valuable shipments - booze, guns, etc. If the truck is stopped, supposedly several people would jump out with their guns drawn. Yi-Hah!

minor7flat5
03-05-2013, 02:36 PM
When I was in Sao Paulo last year, I was told those tubes were to automatically inflate the tires in the event "bandits" shot the tires. I was told this sort of thing is not uncommon in rural areas. I was also told about (and saw) cars painted black with "armada escordita" (armed escort?) painted in large white letters on all sides. I was told that these cars were hired to escort particularly valuable shipments - booze, guns, etc. If the truck is stopped, supposedly several people would jump out with their guns drawn. Yi-Hah!Last summer my wife and I went to Rio to visit family. On our last day there her cousin invited us to her home for lunch and then they gave us a ride to the airport.

There were two things that I found unusual about her car: It was a Land Rover, an expensive make that is rare on Brazilian roads, and something just wasn't right about the windows.

I noticed when she rolled down the window to speak with someone that the glass was about an inch thick(!). I asked her husband "What's up with the army tank we are riding in?"

They told us a harrowing tale about a late night ride home from a distant city after a wedding, where they were being followed by (presumably armed) bandits on motorcycles. The only thing that had saved them at the time was that they had another friend in a different car following them. A quick cell phone call and the other guy drove up with the intent of squashing the motorcyclist in front of him. As soon as they saw that there was another vehicle, the bandits disappeared.

They took the car to have it blindado (bulletproofed) the next day.

There are many things I love about Brazil, but this is not one of them :(.
I can't imagine living in a place where I would need an inch of Lexan protecting me as I drove through town. It's creepy to think that there is a bustling business of bulletproofing cars down there. And it was a very professional job.

Best Topics: buypass as pyrrhus aeneid mouse paws tcm directv smell of snow ncis smoked marilyn milian hot garfield nermal addams family gomez jaime gleicher exploding cake nero caligula does chloroform vomiting without warning apartment numbers rosanjin scholar pex expansion javelin spear cat drank coffee squash soda bovine pig butterface slut potusa lump rts mail toe prints spiked trees xramp security old lady leary mercury tipped bullet toilet garbage disposal reheating bww zipcar tolls connect dishwasher to garbage disposal what to say instead of praying for you how to light a chiminea where does urine come out of the female body is your blood type on your birth certificate what does born and bred mean visit niagara falls without passport check void after 90 days tips for counting money fast frequent urination not diabetes why is celtics pronounced wrong how long is applesauce good after opening bleach and ammonia chemical equation can an employer lower your pay without notice popular colors of the 70s shows like malcolm in the middle where to place mouse traps cry wolfe on id how long does sperm live after death why are they called g strings how much do newspaper delivery drivers make how long does it take to get replacement social security card driving off with gas pump hose still attached does usps still work on sunday housewarming party invitation wording funny nerve ending coming out of nipple a pump submerged at the bottom of a well elle fanning benjamin button does advil make you drowsy best neighborhoods in olympia wa