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Colophon
04-03-2007, 05:17 PM
You know, the hydraulic things that bolt onto the exit doors so you can walk directly through to the terminal.

Is there a proper word for them?

Sparklo
04-03-2007, 05:19 PM
Are you thinking of jetways (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jetway)?

Colophon
04-03-2007, 05:26 PM
Are you thinking of jetways (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jetway)?

Apparently I am, but I don't think that was the word on the tip of my tongue. Air bridge, perhaps.

Thanks.

jjimm
04-03-2007, 05:27 PM
From watching that 'Airport' programme on ITV, I believe in the UK they're called simply "tunnels".

Dewey Finn
04-03-2007, 06:13 PM
The Wkipedia article mentions that Jetway is a trademark. The generic term I've heard is passenger boarding bridge. And I don't think they bolt onto the exit doors, but instead just kiss the fuselage.

Shagnasty
04-03-2007, 06:20 PM
They are still referred to as Jetways as a generic term at least in the U.S.

chambraigne
04-03-2007, 07:03 PM
On my flight on Sunday, I remember that the gate attendant referred to it as a "Jetbridge." I don't know if that's what you're looking for.

Sublight
04-03-2007, 10:29 PM
I heard Arlo Guthrie call it The Time Tunnel once, and that's what it's been for me ever since.

Kevbo
04-03-2007, 10:46 PM
Bottlenecks.

In much of the rest of the world, airdraft park on the ramp. Passengers are transported to the aircraft on busses, and board via wheeled starways. If you have ever landed "on time" and then waited 45 minutes to an hour for an available gate, you can appreciate the virtues of this austere system.

Beyond the avilability of the gates, airport design often creates ground traffic bottlenecks, expecially with "hub and spoke" designed airports.

brad_d
04-03-2007, 11:42 PM
FMC Technologies (http://fmctechnologies.com/AirportEquipmentServices/GateEquipment/BoardingBridges.aspx) is apparently the company that owns the Jetway® brand - they refer to them as "passenger boarding bridges" on the linked page.

I, too, have hear the term jet bridge used by airline personnel in my travels.

Richard Pearse
04-04-2007, 12:41 AM
They are air-bridges down here.

The Scrivener
04-04-2007, 11:58 AM
In much of the rest of the world, airdraft park on the ramp. Passengers are transported to the aircraft on busses, and board via wheeled starways. If you have ever landed "on time" and then waited 45 minutes to an hour for an available gate, you can appreciate the virtues of this austere system.

Beyond the avilability of the gates, airport design often creates ground traffic bottlenecks, expecially with "hub and spoke" designed airports.

There's always a tradeoff. How do passengers cope with their carryons, small children and babies, baby strollers, and wheelchairs with the stairs? Isn't there a rate of passenger injury related to slips and falls on the stairs? And even when everyone manages to get through it safely, isn't there a bottleneck in getting on and off planes when they have to wait for the other passengers to [slowly] navigate those stairs?

And who wants to have to contend with the weather complications from boarding/disembarking via stairs exposed to the elements? To pick but one pointed example: South Florida is the thunderstorm capital of the world. Do you really want to be standing on an elevated metal staircase in the middle of a tarmac during a pouring-cats-and-dogs thunderstorm at MIA? Didn't think so! To say nothing of the cold-weather extremes elsewhere... and rain/snow/sleet etc. messing with people's hair & clothes; the smell of soggy-wet woolens in the close cabin air of a plane... ugh. No, thanks!

Colibri
04-04-2007, 02:18 PM
To say nothing of the cold-weather extremes elsewhere... and rain/snow/sleet etc. messing with people's hair & clothes; the smell of soggy-wet woolens in the close cabin air of a plane... ugh. No, thanks!

Exactly. I once had to transit Charles DeGaulle airport in Paris in February en route between Panama and Gabon. Since I was unaware they used this bus/stairs system there, I had not bothered to include a jacket in my carryon. It was pretty chilly riding on the buses en route to and from the main terminal. That was just one of the factors making me decide that CDG is one of the worst airports in the developed world.

Kevbo
04-04-2007, 07:22 PM
There's always a tradeoff. How do passengers cope with their carryons, small children and babies, baby strollers, and wheelchairs with the stairs?

Now that you mention it, they cope by either checking luggage or leaving some of that crap at home. Makes for a faster and more pleasant disembarkation. The stairways frequently have awnings, and the busses pull to within a few feet.

Practicality aside, I just LIKE to look over the airplane, if only from a distance, before boarding.

Canadjun
04-04-2007, 09:11 PM
Now that you mention it, they cope by either checking luggage or leaving some of that crap at home. Makes for a faster and more pleasant disembarkation. The stairways frequently have awnings, and the busses pull to within a few feet.
I do agree that people bring way to much carry-on stuff on board aircraft these days, but it's rather tricky for people in wheelchairs to either check them or leave them home! I have been carried off aircraft several times, but I'd really rather not experience that in inclement weather (particularly in icy conditions - I'd really rather not be dropped and go bouncing down the stairs).

King Friday
04-04-2007, 09:14 PM
At the airport I work for, you need an "L" on your badge to be able to operate the Loading Brigde. But I always call it a jetway.

KCB615
04-04-2007, 09:52 PM
Add another vote for jet bridge.

But I only work at an airport, so YMMV.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
04-05-2007, 12:17 PM
Bottlenecks.

In much of the rest of the world, airdraft park on the ramp. Passengers are transported to the aircraft on busses, and board via wheeled starways. If you have ever landed "on time" and then waited 45 minutes to an hour for an available gate, you can appreciate the virtues of this austere system.

Apparently, from remembering Airport '75', they've come up with a more comfortable variation of this at Dulles. At least this is how it was then and I assume it still is: there's only one large terminal building, where the passengers board specially designed transports with floors more or less at terminal and airplane cabin level, that take them out to the plane. Once there, a short bridgeway extends from the bus to the aircraft door, and the passengers board.

If you go to the Prelinger Archive and watch the Boeing 707 promotional film 6 1/2 Magic Hours (really a lot of fun and very retro), you'll see they made a big point of how they speed operations by boarding and deboarding through both the front and the back doors, but I've never seen this done. Is there any reason that this simple procedural improvement never caught on? It seems like it would make the aggravation of getting off the plane a lot less.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
04-05-2007, 12:25 PM
Do any large airports in the developed world still use the stairs for regular operations? San Diego's airport only had the stairs when I was there in the 1970s, and so did Burbank the last time I went through there around 1986.

Scuba_Ben
04-05-2007, 01:01 PM
Apparently, from remembering Airport '75', they've come up with a more comfortable variation of this at Dulles. At least this is how it was then and I assume it still is: there's only one large terminal building, where the passengers board specially designed transports with floors more or less at terminal and airplane cabin level, that take them out to the plane. Once there, a short bridgeway extends from the bus to the aircraft door, and the passengers board.These are called mobile lounges. They generally came in three kinds: Ones that stayed at entry-way height; ones that used an accordion-type structure to raise and lower the lounge; and ones that used an elevator-type method (with two distinctive "smokestacks") to raise and lower the lounge.

Starting roughly the mid-80s, boarding aircraft from mobile lounges was phased out in favor of mid-field terminals that used conventional loading bridges. The mobile lounges were used to shuttle people to and from the various secondary terminals.

Dulles is in the (I think) final stages of building underground walkways, tramways, or various other methods of moving passengers from the main terminal out to the mid-field terminals. Once this project is completed, the mobile lounges will be retired.

Dewey Finn
04-05-2007, 01:19 PM
Do any large airports in the developed world still use the stairs for regular operations? San Diego's airport only had the stairs when I was there in the 1970s, and so did Burbank the last time I went through there around 1986.
Ever flown into San Jose Airport? I've been amused that the airport in the middle of one of the richest, highest-tech areas of the country mostly makes the passengers walk out to the plane to board via the stairways. (I think they're adding a new passenger terminal that will use jetways.) On the bright side, they do sometimes use two stairways; at the front and back of the plane to speed boarding. And at least one of the gates has a jetty from which you can watch the passengers disembark.

jjimm
05-07-2007, 03:11 PM
Hope it's OK to bump this. I have just come back from a flight into Heathrow, and have confirmation of what they are called officially: under the thingummy we're discussing, there was a big notice that said "DO NOT PARK UNDER THE JETTY". So Dewey Finn inadvertently has it for the UK at least. Should have known it would have been nautical.

GorillaMan
05-07-2007, 03:24 PM
Do any large airports in the developed world still use the stairs for regular operations? San Diego's airport only had the stairs when I was there in the 1970s, and so did Burbank the last time I went through there around 1986.
Using stairs for boarding is one way in which European low-cost airlines have speeded up turnarounds.

Sunspace
05-07-2007, 03:49 PM
Do any large airports in the developed world still use the stairs for regular operations? San Diego's airport only had the stairs when I was there in the 1970s, and so did Burbank the last time I went through there around 1986.The mobile stairs are still used at Toronto (Pearson) airport for boarding smaller planes, the thirty- or fifty-seater turboprops (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Canada_Dash_8) that go on local flights to places like Sault Ste. Marie.

The planes pull up outside a part of the terminal where the waiting room is built at pavement level and doors open directly onto the pavement in fromt of the aircraft. When I went to the Soo, it was raining and I got a bit wet. I can see how it would be a problem in more adverse conditions

Most of the terminal uses passenger boarding bridges.

Sunspace
05-07-2007, 03:51 PM
Do any large airports in the developed world still use the stairs for regular operations? San Diego's airport only had the stairs when I was there in the 1970s, and so did Burbank the last time I went through there around 1986.I was going to say that the mobile stairs are still used at Toronto (Pearson) airport for boarding smaller planes, but I seem to remember that, on the plane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Canada_Dash_8) I went on to Sault Ste. Marie, the stairs were part of the plane.

The planes pull up outside a part of the terminal where the waiting room is built at pavement level and doors open directly onto the pavement in fromt of the aircraft. When I went to the Soo, it was raining and I got a bit wet. I can see how it would be a problem in more adverse conditions

Most of the terminal uses passenger boarding bridges.

(Well, bother. I somehow doubleposted instead of editing. Please ignore that first post.)

Billdo
05-07-2007, 04:01 PM
If you go to the Prelinger Archive and watch the Boeing 707 promotional film 6 1/2 Magic Hours (really a lot of fun and very retro), you'll see they made a big point of how they speed operations by boarding and deboarding through both the front and the back doors, but I've never seen this done. Is there any reason that this simple procedural improvement never caught on? It seems like it would make the aggravation of getting off the plane a lot less.

Back when they were still using 727s for the New York-Washington shuttle, they sometimes unloaded (never loaded) by opening the rear stairway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airstair) along with the front door at the jetway (passenger boarding bridge, for those worried about trademark infringement). Passengers in the back could walk down the rear stairs and across the tarmac to a door in the terminal near the jetway, where they would go up stairs to get to the gate area. There were airline employees guiding the passengers so they didn't wander off into some other plane's jet intake or someplace else unpleasant.

The reason that this worked was, of course, that the 727 had the internal rear stairway that could be used without the time and trouble of maneuvering a portable stair to a secondary door. Also, most shuttle passengers were experienced air travellers who regularly flew the route and appreciated faster and more efficient service than on a normal route.

Most modern jetliners don't have such a rear stairway, and though the wait to get off the back of a plane may be annoying, it really doesn't take much relative time. The new terminals for the A380s are being built with dual jetways to load/unload both levels of the plane, but otherwise, it generally isn't worth the trouble.

MarcusF
05-07-2007, 06:23 PM
In Britain the Air Accident Investigation Branch use either "airbridge" or [manoeuverable] "jetty".

wendigo1974
05-07-2007, 06:38 PM
Do any large airports in the developed world still use the stairs for regular operations? San Diego's airport only had the stairs when I was there in the 1970s, and so did Burbank the last time I went through there around 1986.

All the BA Boeing 777s out of Heathrow use busses and stairs.

Driver8
05-07-2007, 06:58 PM
I would consider Cape Town International Airport as part of the developed world (it is more modern and easier to go through than practically any other airport I have been through, although it does benefit from being somewhat smaller) and it uses a combination of jetways and buses / stairs. I think it is phasing out the buses / stairs, especially for international flights.

Civil Guy
05-07-2007, 09:56 PM
Long Beach, California uses 'outside' stairways. It's a small but pretty cool airport - still feels a bit 1930-ish.

Lama Pacos
05-07-2007, 11:19 PM
For some reason I was always brought up to think they were called catwalks. Is this some sort of idiosyncratic family thing, a regional thing, or what?

Wendell Wagner
05-08-2007, 12:05 AM
jjimm writes:

> Hope it's OK to bump this. I have just come back from a flight into Heathrow,
> and have confirmation of what they are called officially: under the thingummy
> we're discussing, there was a big notice that said "DO NOT PARK UNDER THE
> JETTY". So Dewey Finn inadvertently has it for the UK at least. Should have
> known it would have been nautical.

Ah, yes, the jetty. Every time I hear that word I have a flashback to an incident that happened to me as a child. That was before the war, of course. I was on the jetty at the airport. There was a beautiful woman there. And a man was shot. But why does everyone speak French in my memory of that incident?

GorillaMan
05-08-2007, 02:02 AM
All the BA Boeing 777s out of Heathrow use busses and stairs.
Is this for some technical reason? They don't do so at Gatwick.

Indistinguishable
05-08-2007, 03:09 AM
Ah, yes, the jetty. Every time I hear that word I have a flashback to an incident that happened to me as a child. That was before the war, of course. I was on the jetty at the airport. There was a beautiful woman there. And a man was shot. But why does everyone speak French in my memory of that incident?

That's odd; in my memory, only the music is French, and there's some nonsense about monkeys.

Richard Pearse
05-08-2007, 05:15 AM
[QUOTE=Sunspace]I was going to say that the mobile stairs are still used at Toronto (Pearson) airport for boarding smaller planes, but I seem to remember that, on the plane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Canada_Dash_8) I went on to Sault Ste. Marie, the stairs were part of the plane.[QUOTE]

You remember correctly. The stairs are built into the inside surface of the passenger door.

Broome has no fancy "Airbridge" or "Jetway" or "Jetty" or "Wharf" or whatever. We make do with mobile stairs for the larger aircraft and inbuilt stairs for the smaller ones. It's a small town; it can't really justify such extravegance.

It's a good thing. It means the passengers get to experience the full glory of our tropical heat without being pampered by airconditioned walkways.

Dead Cat
05-08-2007, 10:04 AM
I flew in and out of Dublin airport (with Ryanair) last month and used the stairs both ways.

cornflakes
05-08-2007, 10:11 AM
Salt Lake City uses stairs in at least one terminal for turboprops and smaller passenger jets.

jjimm
05-08-2007, 02:36 PM
I flew in and out of Dublin airport (with Ryanair) last month and used the stairs both ways.You were lucky. Normally Ryanair loads the passengers on with a trebuchet and unloads them with a water cannon.

wendigo1974
05-08-2007, 03:49 PM
Is this for some technical reason? They don't do so at Gatwick.

BA get the lions share of traffic through Terminal 4
You can only run x number of planes to x number of gates but you have x+10 flights in any given departure period.
So you get bussed out to the 777 parking lot.
On the plus side you get a good view of the aircraft and whether they are fitted with ETOPS.
Sadly the ones I've travelled on weren't :(

Is that supposed to make me feel 'safer' when I travel BA :smack:

fortytwo
05-08-2007, 04:38 PM
On the plus side you get a good view of the aircraft and whether they are fitted with ETOPS.
Sadly the ones I've travelled on weren't :(

Is that supposed to make me feel 'safer' when I travel BA :smack:

I'd like to know more about you spotting aircraft "fitted with ETOPS".

All Boeing 757,767, and 777 are capable of flying ETOPS. You just can't see it by looking at the aircraft though.

Once the aircraft series has been passed for ETOPS by the relevant authority (eg the CAA) then as long as each individual aircraft of that series conforms to the ETOPS maintenance standard then it can fly ETOPS.


You would only know by looking at the aircraft's log book and associated records.

I'd like to put my name down for aircraft jetty as the walkway on to an aircraft too. It's what we always referred to it as in my days at Heathrow.

wendigo1974
05-08-2007, 04:45 PM
I'd like to know more about you spotting aircraft "fitted with ETOPS".

All Boeing 757,767, and 777 are capable of flying ETOPS. You just can't see it by looking at the aircraft though.

Once the aircraft series has been passed for ETOPS by the relevant authority (eg the CAA) then as long as each individual aircraft of that series conforms to the ETOPS maintenance standard then it can fly ETOPS.


You would only know by looking at the aircraft's log book and associated records.

I'd like to put my name down for aircraft jetty as the walkway on to an aircraft too. It's what we always referred to it as in my days at Heathrow.

For all aircraft which are serviced to the ETOPS standard the word 'ETOPS' is painted in white on an orange background on the nose wheel door cover.
It's pretty unmistakable.

Dewey Finn
05-08-2007, 05:04 PM
Hope it's OK to bump this. I have just come back from a flight into Heathrow, and have confirmation of what they are called officially: under the thingummy we're discussing, there was a big notice that said "DO NOT PARK UNDER THE JETTY". So Dewey Finn inadvertently has it for the UK at least. Should have known it would have been nautical.
Actually, my use of the word jetty was regarding an area at Mineta San Jose International Airport from which one can watch the passengers disembark (via stairway) from a particular gate and walk into the terminal.

Sunspace
05-08-2007, 05:51 PM
For all aircraft which are serviced to the ETOPS standard the word 'ETOPS' is painted in white on an orange background on the nose wheel door cover.
It's pretty unmistakable.What is ETOPS?

fortytwo
05-08-2007, 05:53 PM
For all aircraft which are serviced to the ETOPS standard the word 'ETOPS' is painted in white on an orange background on the nose wheel door cover.
It's pretty unmistakable.

An aircraft marked with ETOPS is no guarantee that is is actually in compliance and used for ETOPS flights. There are dozens of reasons why a particular aircraft is out of compliance. BA doesn't maintain its entire fleet of 757s, 767s and 777s to ETOPS standards, although they may or may not be marked as such. The only way to know is to check the aircraft's paperwork.

Looking at one as you drive past doesn't "give you a good view of whether they are fitted with ETOPS"

wendigo1974
05-08-2007, 06:13 PM
What is ETOPS?

The acronymn stands for Extended Twin-engine Operations (Over seas)
The over seas bit is implied as that is what it is meant to cover.

An ETOPS serviced two engined aircraft is permitted to continue a journey on one engine for a maximum of 2 hours.

In contrast a 4 engine 747 is only permitted to fly 30 minutes on 3 engines over sea.

A hotly debated subject in pilots forums everywhere.

jjimm
05-08-2007, 06:18 PM
I just read the very informative Wikipedia article about ETOPS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ETOPS), but your comment about 4-engine 747s makes me wonder - how the hell do they get across the Pacific? :confused:

wendigo1974
05-08-2007, 06:29 PM
I just read the very informative Wikipedia article about ETOPS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ETOPS), but your comment about 4-engine 747s makes me wonder - how the hell do they get across the Pacific? :confused:

If you have Google Earth on your PC then find Heathrow and crank the globe down a bit.
The 747s fly UK - Greenland - Iceland - Canada - US, longest period over uncharted water is approx 40 minutes give or take.

EDIT: Oops your talking Pacific, theres Hawaii, Guam, Phillipines et al.
That is only if they lose an engine though.

racer72
05-08-2007, 08:52 PM
No one has mentioned a feature of some 737's, airstairs. It is a built in folding stairway the extends from just under the forward passenger door. Ryanair and a couple of Chinese airlines are the only planes that are currently being built with them. It allows an airline to land, pull up to the terminal and dispatch the passengers without any help from a ground crew.

GorillaMan
05-09-2007, 01:50 AM
No one has mentioned a feature of some 737's, airstairs. It is a built in folding stairway the extends from just under the forward passenger door. Ryanair and a couple of Chinese airlines are the only planes that are currently being built with them. It allows an airline to land, pull up to the terminal and dispatch the passengers without any help from a ground crew.
That's what I was referring to when I mentioned European low-cost carriers. IIRC Ryanair have a scheduled turnaround at many airports of 25 minutes.

jjimm
05-09-2007, 04:27 AM
EDIT: Oops your talking Pacific, theres Hawaii, Guam, Phillipines et al.
That is only if they lose an engine though.Maybe I misunderstand. I thought you were saying that a 747 must never be more than 30 minutes' flight from a landing place in case it loses an engine. Is that incorrect?

Richard Pearse
05-09-2007, 09:43 AM
The acronymn stands for Extended Twin-engine Operations (Over seas)
The over seas bit is implied as that is what it is meant to cover.

An ETOPS serviced two engined aircraft is permitted to continue a journey on one engine for a maximum of 2 hours.
Some domestic Australian routes require ETOPS (not overseas) though you are right, normally only long over water flights require ETOPS approval. Also, ETOPS for three hours is available.

In contrast a 4 engine 747 is only permitted to fly 30 minutes on 3 engines over sea.
Not sure where you've got this from. A BA B747 recently flew from the USA to the UK on three engines. It was entirely in accordance with UK CAA and BA company rules. Though the FAA wasn't too impressed.

In reality the B747 does not require any kind of ETOPS approval. It can be as far away from an airfield as it likes provided it has adequate contingency fuel.

Zambini57
05-09-2007, 09:50 AM
What is ETOPS?

Engines Turn Or Passengers Swim.

Rayne Man
05-09-2007, 12:28 PM
I prefer mobile stairs to air bridges, where usually only one is in use. With stairs both the aircraft's doors are used. This suits me as I like to sit at the back. It also means getting on and off is quicker, and you are not stuck behind some idiot blocking the gangway while he is trying to force an oversize bag into the locker.

fortytwo
05-09-2007, 04:04 PM
I prefer mobile stairs to air bridges, where usually only one is in use. With stairs both the aircraft's doors are used. This suits me as I like to sit at the back. It also means getting on and off is quicker, and you are not stuck behind some idiot blocking the gangway while he is trying to force an oversize bag into the locker.

I don't suppose many of them are still flying now but the BAC 111 would have suited you down to the ground (so to speak), it had rear air stairs which lowered between the engines.

King Friday
05-11-2007, 11:11 PM
No one has mentioned a feature of some 737's, airstairs. It is a built in folding stairway the extends from just under the forward passenger door. Ryanair and a couple of Chinese airlines are the only planes that are currently being built with them.

...and of course BBJs (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/13/RAAF_BBJ_1.jpg/800px-RAAF_BBJ_1.jpg)

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