PDA

View Full Version : Song recommendations based on Debussy's "Claire de Lune"


Doctor Who
02-13-2008, 11:30 AM
Debussy's "Clair de Lune" is one of my favorite pieces of classical music. I really like the overall soundscape / impression / etc. (I even like it despite it being virtually ubiquitous in commercials and movies!) In a similar vein, I really enjoy Satie's "Trois Gymnopedies".

Anybody got any specific song recommendations for pieces that I would like based on my appreciation for "Claire de Lune"? (Also: I don't want to necessarily limit this to piano pieces. Sure both "Claire de Lune" and "Trois Gymnopedies" are piano, but I'm easy.)

Solfy
02-13-2008, 01:48 PM
Debussy's "Deux Arabesques No.1" comes to mind, and a quick google shows me that it's frequently paired with "Claire de Lune" on recordings.

There's a piano piece by Ravel I have that is also similar, but I can't think of the title at the moment. That's going to bug me now. (Sonatine? Anyone?)

Slithy Tove
02-13-2008, 01:59 PM
There's a piano piece by Ravel I have that is also similar, but I can't think of the title at the moment. That's going to bug me now. (Sonatine? Anyone?)

"Pavane for a Dead Princess?"

Saitie also compsed the Gnossiennes.

For another soigne Frenchie, give Gabriel Faure's Sicilienn a listen, or, even though its just as over-expoesed as Claire de Lune, Saint-Saens' Aquarium

Walloon
02-13-2008, 02:10 PM
When you say "song", do you mean song as in a piece of music that is sung? Or do you just mean other pieces of music?

Robot Arm
02-13-2008, 02:53 PM
(I even like it despite it being virtually ubiquitous in commercials and movies!)I was going to recommend Ocean's Eleven and The Right Stuff, a very good movie and a brilliant movie (respectively), but it sounds like you may have already seen them.

3acresandatruck
02-13-2008, 03:12 PM
"Pavane for a Dead Princess?"
Maybe that's a different translation or am I thinking of a different work? I've always seen the Ravel piece as "Pavane Of The Sleeping Beauty", from "Pavane De La Belle Au Bois Dormant". Joe Walsh has an interesting version on his album So What.

Slithy Tove
02-13-2008, 03:25 PM
Oh, she's really dead, not just pining for the fijords, but Ravel does have a different pavane, for Sleeping Beauty, in his Mother Goose Suite.

rowrrbazzle
02-13-2008, 03:31 PM
Different works. "Dead Princess" is stand-alone. "Pavane of the Sleeping Beauty" is the first section of Ravel's Mother Goose Suite. In its original piano duo form, most of the suite would fit the OP's bill.

Also check out Ravel's "Miroirs" and "Valses Nobles et Sentimentales". He wrote more piano music, all worth a listen.

Debussy wrote many other piano pieces and collections. Check out "Pour le piano", Images I and II, Children's Corner suite. You'll also like many of his preludes (books I and II), such as "La cathédrale engloutie" ("The sunken cathedral"). And "Clair de lune" is just one section of his "Suite Bergamasque". Listen to the whole thing.

BTW, Debussy's Arabesque No. 1 (in Tomita's electronic realization) is the theme for Jack Horkheimer, Star Gazer.

Zebra
02-13-2008, 03:57 PM
The Sunken Catherdral or Catherdral Elgontain (sp) by Debussy is my favorite piano work by him. I like Clair and Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun played on piano as well.

bytheway
02-13-2008, 04:10 PM
"Clair de Lune" and "Gymnopodie No. 1" are on this 2-disc compilation: The Most Relaxing Classical Album In the World...Ever! (http://amazon.com/gp/product/B00000I93Z/ref=s9_asin_title_1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-6&pf_rd_r=1RG4B9BEGZCABCAX5GQX&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=320449101&pf_rd_i=507846)

The other selections on the compilation may be what you're looking for.

rowrrbazzle
02-14-2008, 05:38 PM
You might like the orchestral works of Debussy and Ravel, too.

Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, La Mer, 3 Nocturnes, Iberia

Ravel: Rapsodie Espagnole, Daphnis and Chloe

Doctor Who
02-14-2008, 05:50 PM
When you say "song", do you mean song as in a piece of music that is sung? Or do you just mean other pieces of music?I'm using the colloquial definition of "song".

I'm listening to some of the suggestions right now. I'll return shortly with feedback.

Doctor Who
02-14-2008, 06:26 PM
Ok, first of all, let me say that I dislike OPs who ask for recommendations and then don't provide any response. I'm going to try hard not to be "that guy".

Solfy: "Deux Arabesque No. 1" I'm a pretty big Debussy fan, so I'm familiar with this piece. I really like the recurring bit where he walks down on the high notes. I don't find it quite as evocative as "Claire de Lune", but it's a very pretty piece all around.

Slithy Tove: Ravel: "Pavane for a Dead Princess" - Not *bad*, but maybe a little slow for me. It just doesn't grab me like "Claire de Lune," although I liked it well enough once it got going. I've never listened to much Ravel, however, so I appreciate the rec.

Satie: "Gnossiennes" - I'm familiar with these pieces - I really do like Satie, but these have never excited me as much as the "Gymnopedies".

Faure: "Sicilienn" - Now THIS I really liked. Can't tell you exactly why yet, but as soon as I put my finger on it, I'll get back to you.

Saint-Saens: "Aquarium" - Yes, quite ubiquitous, but I really like it. I have been a fan of the Carnival of the Animals since I was tiny.

Robot Arm: Yep, I've seen them. ;)

rowrrbazzle: Ravel: "Pavane of the Sleeping Beauty" - I'd actually heard this one before (from way back). Again, like the other Pavane, just a little bit slow for me.

Ravel: "Miroirs" - working my way through it, I'll let you know.

Ravel: "Valses Nobles et Sentimentales" - I like this a lot. I'm searching for a good version right now. Any recommendations?

Other Debussy works: Like I said upthread, I'm a pretty big Debussy fan. I'm fairly familiar with most of his works. I enjoy most everything.

Other Ravel: Since there were so many Ravel recs in this thread, I'm going to spend some time listening to his stuff.

Zebra: Debussy: "Sunken Cathedral" - great work. Love when it gets going.

Debussy: "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun" - very relaxing piece. Again, not quite as evocative for me, but I like it.

bytheway: I'll look into that CD, thanks!

eleanorigby
02-14-2008, 06:29 PM
:eek: Not a song, but I just painted our master bedroom, "claire de lune" (that's the name of the paint! It's a light caramel color). :eek:

TLDRIDKJKLOLFTW
02-14-2008, 07:11 PM
I would guess that you'd probably like Steve Reich quite a bit.

pulykamell
02-14-2008, 07:38 PM
I'd try some of Chopin's Nocturnes. Not nearly as impressionistic and abstract as Debussy, but as a kid I always loved both of these composers.

Here's Op 9 No 1 (http://youtube.com/watch?v=cFhaBEtmHeU)
Here's Op 9 No 2 (http://youtube.com/watch?v=EvxS_bJ0yOU)

Thudlow Boink
02-14-2008, 07:52 PM
"Pavane for a Dead Princess?"Is that the one about the defunct infant?

Slithy Tove
02-14-2008, 08:03 PM
Is that the one about the defunct infant?

Well, yeah, only because "Pavane pour une infante défunte" sounds nicer than "Dead Princess."

- just like "Claire de Lune' sounds nicer than "Clear the Saloon."

petew83
02-15-2008, 12:05 AM
Claire de Lune is actually the 3rd part of the 'Suite bergamasque.' I also like 'Reverie' a lot by him. It sounds like u like songs with a dreamy feel. How about the theme from 'Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind?"

petew83
02-15-2008, 12:25 AM
sorry just wanted to add that the Glenn Miller version of this song is AMAZING

percussion
02-15-2008, 01:20 AM
I would guess that you'd probably like Steve Reich quite a bit.

I am totally baffled by this recommendation based on a request from pieces like Clair de lune, not that someone who likes Debussy cant like Reich or vice versa, Just that the two composers are almost worlds a part

Parthol
02-15-2008, 01:36 AM
I am totally baffled by this recommendation based on a request from pieces like Clair de lune, not that someone who likes Debussy cant like Reich or vice versa, Just that the two composers are almost worlds a part

As a Debussy fan you may be familiar with it already, but if not, let me suggest L'Isle Joyeux. It's my favorite piece of his.

-P

bundykala
02-15-2008, 01:49 AM
Debussy: "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun" - very relaxing piece. Again, not quite as evocative for me, but I like it.Maybe not for you, but it was certainly.. evocative enough for choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaslav_Nijinsky).

Wikipedia says:
As the title character in L'après-midi d'un faune the final tableau, during which he mimed masturbation with the scarf of a nymph, caused a scandal; he was accused by half of Paris of obscenity, but defended by such artists as Rodin, Odilon Redon and Proust.
And if you like Claire de Lune, perhaps you would also like.. Claire de Lune, on the theremin! (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Xn4TgYkqdi8&feature=related)

jovan
02-15-2008, 04:20 AM
Other suggestions from Ravel:
Gaspard de la nuit
The second movement, "Le Gibet", might be the closest to what you are looking for, though you might find it a bit slow.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ez1s9JCzvQg
http://youtube.com/watch?v=BXdwmrT2A1k
http://youtube.com/watch?v=sMRrcSEVzgI

Anyway, it's probably one of the best piano pieces ever written, and so is his sublimely evocative Jeux d'eau:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=rL69LfS_x80&feature=related

Still sticking with Ravel, you should check out his piano concerto, the second movement comes closest to Clair de Lune's athmosphere.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=ftJ-gJ-l5HQ

I'll also throw Toru Takemitsu out there. For piano, his Litany is the piece that most approaches the impressionist composers:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=7aoSMI8Ww84

You might also want to check out his later orchestral works, like A Flock Descends Into the Pentagonal Garden and the lesser-known Vers l'arc-en-ciel, Palma. Both are available on this record (http://amazon.com/Iwaki-conducts-Takemitsu-Toru/dp/B000003IVQ).

rowrrbazzle
02-15-2008, 04:43 PM
Ravel: "Valses Nobles et Sentimentales" - I like this a lot. I'm searching for a good version right now. Any recommendations?There seem to be some well-regarded performances, but I can't give a recent one of my own knowledge.

The reason is that my favorite is a CD reissue of 50s-era LP recordings I owned as performed by Robert Casadesus. The sound is 50s quality. However, Ravel himself heard Casadesus play "Gaspard de la Nuit" and liked his interpretation enough that Ravel struck up a friendship on the spot. For myself in this case, performance approved by the composer trumps sound.

One more recommendation: Holst, Hymns from the Rig Veda, third group, for women's chorus and harp. It has qualities similar to "Venus" and "Neptune" from "The Planets".

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
02-15-2008, 10:26 PM
Dear Doctor:

I know you meant 'song' in the generic sense, but Debussy, Ravel, Fauré, Duparc, Satie and Poulenc all wrote masterpieces of vocal music.

Recommended performers include Gérard Souzay (Baritone) with Dalton Baldwin (piano), Pierre Bernac (Baritone) with various pianists including Francis Poulenc. Many people prefer the sound of Souzay's voice, though some of the same people would say that Bernac is the better interpreter. There is also a very fine recording with Sanford Sylvan, David Breitman and the Lydian String Quartet called "L'horizon chimérique" which is a lovely introduction to Fauré.

Of Duparc there are only 13 pieces in the main repertoire and they all fit on one disc.

Of Ravel, if I had to narrow it down to only one or two if his song cycles, I'd suggest '3 songs of Don Quichotte à Dulcinée' or 'Histoires naturelles', both of which show his sense of humour.

Of Poulenc, I would recommend the cycle 'Banalités' or 'Le travail de peintre'

If you listen to no other Debussy song, it must be 'C'est l'extase'! (My opinion only, but strongly held!) I also deeply love the '5 poems of Baudelaire', in particular 'Le jet d'eau' and 'La mort des amants'.

I am not hurt (much) if you can't stand classical singing, but some of the above pieces represent some of the greatest settings of French poetry ever. There is a glorious effect unique to French song - French is a highly inflected language with a very strong rhythm of its own, and French composers delighted in setting French poetry so that the strong accent of the word was not on the strong accent of the music. This sets up a wonderful tension between the text and the music, and the subtle phrasing that the singer must use approaches what some of the finest jazz singers accomplish. Okay, I will get off this hobby horse now.

But there are hours of delight that await you in French song...

gallows fodder
02-16-2008, 12:17 AM
Other suggestions from Ravel:
Gaspard de la nuit
The second movement, "Le Gibet", might be the closest to what you are looking for, though you might find it a bit slow.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ez1s9JCzvQg
http://youtube.com/watch?v=BXdwmrT2A1k
http://youtube.com/watch?v=sMRrcSEVzgISeconding this. Absolutely gorgeous. "Le Gibet"'s repeated b flat is supposed to evoke the tone of a church bell sounding for the hanged man. *shivers*

Are you familiar with Debussy's first piece (Lent?) of his Images Oubliees trio? (http://youtube.com/watch?v=ebYHoUJjcKQ)

Best Topics: esse slang bunnies anya popcorn movie definition comrade in russian nemo scared adrian rogers wiki playgirl penis lv employee benefits street numbering system ethyl fuel gary indiana smell legal giant height wasp protection suit wrong recipient hotslog butcher executive bathroom unavailable phone number gulf gift card what is munchen hydro lawn mower police car rims stapling papers navy coffin rack general contractor rates no jake break dope imbd heterosexual bath house french waitor climate ashland oregon sperry warranty buses from staten island to new jersey on birth control late period bugs bunny little red riding rabbit food tastes bad after quitting smoking bar leaks radiator stop leak reviews do hotdogs need to be refrigerated what was wrong with the doll in rudolph why can't i get a credit report sony dvp sr370 region free back to the future timeline foam filled bike tires plugging in refrigerator after moving what is branch water how long to reheat chicken wings in oven sleep 24 hours straight animals that see infrared what time does the mail run near me side of beef cost plunger measuring cup bed bath and beyond years between episode 3 and 4 how long can i take sudafed iocane powder i bet my life on it does chloroform kill you wearing sweatpants in public think about it think again seinfeld removing a cyst yourself bleach in spray bottle someone knocking at my door swimming pool depth recommendations put a little english on it the princess bride hardcover book ruths chris steakhouse dress code wart after freezing pictures why are dimes smaller than pennies how long does a gunshot wound take to heal what happens in a jeopardy tie how to cut frozen meat