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View Full Version : King Of The Hill: Honey?


Johnny L.A.
02-17-2008, 11:49 AM
KOTH is a show that I can take or leave, so I'm not a regular watcher. There's one character that calls Hank 'Honey'.

Why?

ZipperJJ
02-17-2008, 11:58 AM
That's Joe-Jack. He calls everyone Honey, not just Hank. Regardless of gender.

Johnny L.A.
02-17-2008, 12:15 PM
Why?

Larry Borgia
02-17-2008, 12:17 PM
Why?It's my understanding that in parts of the south "Honey" is a general term of affection, not a signifier of love like it is in most other places. Could be wrong about that.

TWDuke
02-17-2008, 12:21 PM
Because it's funny?

Zsofia
02-17-2008, 02:09 PM
My dad calls all waitresses "Honey". It's too late to stop him now.

Walloon
02-17-2008, 03:22 PM
In Huckleberry Finn, the slave Jim calls Huck "Hon".

Ephemera
02-17-2008, 05:18 PM
It's my understanding that in parts of the south "Honey" is a general term of affection, not a signifier of love like it is in most other places. Could be wrong about that.

It's not a widespread phenomenon and I have only heard of one man, my uncle, ever using it as a general term of affection. He's a pretty cantankerous man on the whole but uses it without any kind of irony for all of his grandchildren and has even called me honey once or twice and I'm very much a guy.

KneadToKnow
02-17-2008, 06:22 PM
It's my understanding that in parts of the south "Honey" is a general term of affection, not a signifier of love like it is in most other places. Could be wrong about that.
I think the main issue Joe Jack would have with that explanation is that, by and large, Texans don't consider themselves Southerners.

:)

Otto
02-17-2008, 06:54 PM
I second the "it's funny" explanation with a dash of "Southern/Texan colloquialism" for flavor. Clearly if there were any sexual component to it Hank would be quite uncomfortable with Joe Jack's calling him "Honey" but Hank isn't flapped at all by it (although honestly I think for a cartoon it's kinda hot).

middleman
02-18-2008, 12:41 PM
I think the main issue Joe Jack would have with that explanation is that, by and large, Texans don't consider themselves Southerners.

:)


I don't get this impression at all. I live in Houston and while people would normally consider themselves "Texans", most people also identify themselves as Southern.

I have never heard a man refer to another man as honey in a heterosexual context. I, too, found this kind of weird.

Scumpup
02-18-2008, 12:52 PM
“Come back to the raft ag’in, Huck honey!”

KneadToKnow
02-18-2008, 01:16 PM
I don't get this impression at all. I live in Houston and while people would normally consider themselves "Texans", most people also identify themselves as Southern.
You would certainly have a better take on it than I would. I'm mostly going by the general feeling of "Texan-ness" I get from KotH characters in general, and the occasional comedian (like the one, whose name escapes me, who said "Texans don't consider themselves Southerners, because Texas doesn't want the South. Texas wants Mexico.")

Edit: I remembered who it was. Jebus help me, it was Gallagher. Please don't hold that against me.

middleman
02-18-2008, 04:32 PM
You would certainly have a better take on it than I would. I'm mostly going by the general feeling of "Texan-ness" I get from KotH characters in general, and the occasional comedian (like the one, whose name escapes me, who said "Texans don't consider themselves Southerners, because Texas doesn't want the South. Texas wants Mexico.")

Edit: I remembered who it was. Jebus help me, it was Gallagher. Please don't hold that against me.

Not to say there aren't people who feel that way. Most of the people I associate with just think of themselves as Americans who play the whole Southern/Texan thing up as a bit of a joke. Hell, my Southern accent (I was raised in Alabama until my teen years) only comes out when I am talking to someone expecting it (or I am drunk.)

I own boots, but they stay in my closet until Rodeo days. Otherwise, it is Johnston-Murphy loafers.

Tough to peg down Texas. It is so big and diverse. There may well be large number of people who feel as you suggest.

tremorviolet
02-18-2008, 04:49 PM
I don't get this impression at all. I live in Houston and while people would normally consider themselves "Texans", most people also identify themselves as Southern.

I have never heard a man refer to another man as honey in a heterosexual context. I, too, found this kind of weird.

I think of Houston as being the most Southern part of Texas. (it's practically West Louisiana) I'm from the deep South and I don't consider Texans Southern.

middleman
02-18-2008, 05:19 PM
I think of Houston as being the most Southern part of Texas. (it's practically West Louisiana) I'm from the deep South and I don't consider Texans Southern.

You live in Austin. That's practically Massachusetts! :D

Hampshire
02-18-2008, 05:49 PM
Isn't this the same show where Dale's wife calls Hank's wife "Suge" short for sugar.

WarmNPrickly
02-18-2008, 05:56 PM
Tough to peg down Texas. It is so big and diverse.

Texans listen to both country and western.

Zsofia
02-18-2008, 07:31 PM
Isn't this the same show where Dale's wife calls Hank's wife "Suge" short for sugar.
It is weird to me that this is weird to you.

pepperlandgirl
02-18-2008, 09:15 PM
Nancy calls everybody "Sug."

Zsofia
02-18-2008, 09:23 PM
My aunts call me "Sug", "Sugar", "Sweet Pea", "Sweetheart", and "Honey". Sometimes "Darlin'." I don't think they ever, ever call me by my given name.

KneadToKnow
02-18-2008, 09:27 PM
Maybe they've forgotten it?

:)

Katriona
02-18-2008, 09:35 PM
It's my understanding that in parts of the south "Honey" is a general term of affection, not a signifier of love like it is in most other places. Could be wrong about that.

I remember noticing one of the killers from "In Cold Blood" saying it to his partner in crime. While I remember that the crime took place in KS (about an hour from my hometown, though a few years before I was born), I don't recall where the perps hailed from.

Crocodiles And Boulevards
02-19-2008, 02:04 AM
My aunts call me "Sug", "Sugar", "Sweet Pea", "Sweetheart", and "Honey". Sometimes "Darlin'." I don't think they ever, ever call me by my given name.

My grandmother calls me "Sugar Booger"

:dubious:

neutron star
02-19-2008, 07:11 AM
I remember noticing one of the killers from "In Cold Blood" saying it to his partner in crime. While I remember that the crime took place in KS (about an hour from my hometown, though a few years before I was born), I don't recall where the perps hailed from.
Dick Hickock was from Kansas City, KS. Perry Smith was born in Nevada, but bounced around so much during his youth that it would be difficult to really call any state his home.

As for King of the Hill, I think this is the first thread about the show since the twelfth season started, so I guess it's as good a place as any to mention how thoroughly impressed I am. The show really just gets better and better. I've noticed a marked improvement over the eleventh season, which was better than the tenth, which was much better than the ninth!

middleman
02-19-2008, 10:10 AM
Dick Hickock was from Kansas City, KS. Perry Smith was born in Nevada, but bounced around so much during his youth that it would be difficult to really call any state his home.

As for King of the Hill, I think this is the first thread about the show since the twelfth season started, so I guess it's as good a place as any to mention how thoroughly impressed I am. The show really just gets better and better. I've noticed a marked improvement over the eleventh season, which was better than the tenth, which was much better than the ninth!


What has been interesting for me is the growth and development of Arlen over the 12 years (good lord) it is been on the air. It has gone from an essentially rural town in central Texas to an exurban area somewhere between Dallas and Austin (this is a general consensus I have reached with the help of a great Dope thread from a few years back.)

Over the course of the show, the characters really have adapted to this change and I think it reflects a lot of people in rural areas that wake up one morning and realize that civilization has reached their front doors.

Great show.

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