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View Full Version : Ketchup on Pizza?!? and other wierd international eating habits


BluePitbull
02-29-2008, 06:07 AM
In Trinidad, ketchup is a typical dipping sauce for pizza. Never got around to trying it, it just sounds too gross.


Any other wierd eating habits around the world?

Jonathan Chance
02-29-2008, 07:08 AM
More Pizza stuff.

My mom's second husband is from Tehran and his thing with pizza was thousand island dressing.

Happily, she's moved on to #3 who is from Chicago. His only weirdness that I've found is liking Spam.

guizot
02-29-2008, 07:10 AM
In Trinidad, ketchup is a typical dipping sauce for pizza. Never got around to trying it, it just sounds too gross.


Any other weird eating habits around the world?I find dipping french fries in mayonnaise to be weird, but if you go around the world, you'll find all kinds of "gross" eating habits. Weird is as weird does.

Sophistry and Illusion
02-29-2008, 07:18 AM
When I visited my sister in Japan, we ordered a sausage pizza, and received a pizza with sliced Vienna sausages all over it. And, of course, ketchup squirted all over it. :: pukey smiley ::

guizot
02-29-2008, 07:20 AM
His only weirdness that I've found is liking Spam.I can't say if I like Spam, because I've never tried it, not even once. It seems to me too much like cat food. Which is ridiculous, because I sometimes eat tuna, which is packaged like Spam. And I've eaten ants in Colombia, but I still won't eat Spam. My refusal to eat Spam is probably weirder than someone's liking Spam.

Max the Immortal
02-29-2008, 07:22 AM
When visiting New Zealand I was nonplussed when I discovered that they consider canned beet (aka "beet root") a legitimate hamburger topping. I tried it and did not care for it. On the other hand, I wish that potato wedges with sour cream were more common here in Canada. Those are sheer brilliance.

A few of the British backpackers I met during that trip could not be convinced that peanut butter and jam go well together in sandwiches.

singular1
02-29-2008, 07:31 AM
My mom's second husband is from Tehran and his thing with pizza was thousand island dressing.

Happily, she's moved on to #3 who is from Chicago. His only weirdness that I've found is liking Spam.

The Tehranian would do well in Louisiana and Mississippi. That, and French dressing (isn't that just ketchup and mayonnaise anyways? I'm an O&V gal, so I don't know), are quite common there.
#3 ain't that weird. He'd be happy in Hawaii, where they love the stuff.cite by the master (https://academicpursuits.us/classics/a5_229.html)

nd_n8
02-29-2008, 07:36 AM
Nonsense, every one knows the proper dipping sauce for pizza is ranch dressing.

And the proper dip for fries and potato wedges is ranch dressing.

The proper condement for any sandwich (especially BLT) is ranch dressing.

And the best way to get unsightly stains out of the carpet is...

...Ranch dressing.

- N8, a true hoosier for life.

Khadaji
02-29-2008, 07:44 AM
A vendor from Denmark said that his kid put ketchup on spaghetti - and since he is originally from Italy he found that to be sinful.

Baldwin
02-29-2008, 07:48 AM
My girlfriend likes to dip her PB&J in chicken noodle soup. She's from exotic Pittsburgh.

(Could a mod fix the thread title?)

One And Only Wanderers
02-29-2008, 07:50 AM
I can't say if I like Spam, because I've never tried it, not even once. It seems to me too much like cat food. Which is ridiculous, because I sometimes eat tuna, which is packaged like Spam. And I've eaten ants in Colombia, but I still won't eat Spam. My refusal to eat Spam is probably weirder than someone's liking Spam.

Catfood comes out of the tin in one big solid block?

CalMeacham
02-29-2008, 07:54 AM
In Dave Barry Does Japan he talks about the Japanese putti ng corn of pizza


CORN!!!


Of course, I was surprised when I ordered spaghetti in Rome, Italy, and found that, among the pasta and the sauce, it had peas.

WarmNPrickly
02-29-2008, 08:01 AM
Nonsense, every one knows the proper dipping sauce for pizza is ranch dressing.

And the proper dip for fries and potato wedges is ranch dressing.

The proper condement for any sandwich (especially BLT) is ranch dressing.

And the best way to get unsightly stains out of the carpet is...

...Ranch dressing.


Are you my wife? I just came in to mention her ways, and here it is. We go through a big bottle of ranch ever other week. No matter what we are eating, I have to put a dollop of ranch on her plate. It's madness I tell you!

Harmonious Discord
02-29-2008, 08:04 AM
Spam is not terrible. It's also not great. They'd have to sell it for way less a pound than ham to get me to buy it. Maybe about 50 cents a pound.

Ketchup on pizza isn't what I'd want, but it's still a tomato sauce, so it's not gross. In the 70's a number of fast snacks kids can make articles had ketchup for the pizza sauce on english muffin pizza or the like. Not the best tasting, but not inedible for a hungry kid.

chowder
02-29-2008, 08:05 AM
I find dipping french fries in mayonnaise to be weird, but if you go around the world, you'll find all kinds of "gross" eating habits. Weird is as weird does.

I thought this until I tried it, It's bloody good I tells ya.

The maple syrup/bacon thing that Americans indulge in, is, I feel quite disgusting

Shecky
02-29-2008, 08:07 AM
Sheckstress enjoys corn, olives (green, not black) and a chopped egg on her pizza.

Up here, however, it's all about pizza and mayo!

When eating pizza hut in brasil, I had to get garlic, oregano, basil and salt. The sauce was nothing more than ketchup!

guizot
02-29-2008, 08:17 AM
I thought this until I tried it, It's bloody good I tells ya.Yeah, but you're from England, where they eat chip sandwiches. Good nutrition, innit?The maple syrup/bacon thing that Americans indulge in, is, I feel quite disgustingI'm with you on that.

Seriously, in any country, you find some people who eat something weird. And there are also a lot of misconceptions. Many Latin Americans think that all Asians eat dog.

Dead Badger
02-29-2008, 08:25 AM
I can't say if I like Spam, because I've never tried it, not even once. It seems to me too much like cat food. Which is ridiculous, because I sometimes eat tuna, which is packaged like Spam. And I've eaten ants in Colombia, but I still won't eat Spam. My refusal to eat Spam is probably weirder than someone's liking Spam.I went through a phase of trying various supposed classic food items recently, and you're quite right; Spam smells pretty much exactly like catfood, and tastes pretty much as I imagine catfood would. The texture is very different, though - think a sort of slimy sponge rubber with gristly overtones, and you're nearly there. Fried, it's not quite so repulsive, but this is assuredly not a recommendation.

I baited our mousetraps with some, and while we didn't catch the mouse, he left shortly afterwards, presumably for a house with better food.

Bovril also turns out to be disgusting, and surprisingly flavourless. I gave up on this phase before long.

Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party
02-29-2008, 08:31 AM
Wait - Papa John's Pizza in the UK supply all their pizzas with dipping sauces - one of which is ketchup. Is this just a British peculiarity?


Yeah, but you're from England, where they eat chip sandwiches. Good nutrition, innit?


Nothing better than a chip barm, melted butter oozing down the sides.

nd_n8
02-29-2008, 08:53 AM
Are you my wife? I just came in to mention her ways, and here it is. We go through a big bottle of ranch ever other week. No matter what we are eating, I have to put a dollop of ranch on her plate. It's madness I tell you!
No but your wife and my wife may just be related.

Until I married her I never realized how many varietys of ranch dressing there are, and at one point had at least 8 different flavors in the fridge.

nd_n8
02-29-2008, 09:04 AM
I thought this until I tried it, It's bloody good I tells ya.

The maple syrup/bacon thing that Americans indulge in, is, I feel quite disgusting
I don't know so much about bacon but some nice pork sausage links swimming in maple syrup makes my mouth water.

Hell, I've had bangers before and even they would be awesome floating in maple syrup next to a couple of fluffy buttery flapjacks. Not that there was anything wrong with the chutney and smashed up turnips that came with them of course.

What is it about Americans and our aversion to eating cooked blood anyway? I've had conversations about how revolting blood pudding and sausages sound yet seen these exact same people drool over a sack of White Castles. Say sparky, you know that gooey bottom bun on the White Castle? You don't think that's just grease and onion juice do ya? And that soft and yummy greyish matter on the side of that meatloaf or home cooked hamburger? Ever wonder where that comes from anyway?

Spoke
02-29-2008, 09:06 AM
I should hope England has gotten the hang of pizza by now. But when I went there as a kid, we got served a square pizza with bland tomato sauce (no oregano, so essentially ketchup) and cheddar (!) cheese.

CalMeacham
02-29-2008, 09:07 AM
I should hope England has gotten the hang of pizza by now. But when I went there as a kid, we got served a square pizza with bland tomato sauce (no oregano, so essentially ketchup) and cheddar (!) cheese.


Forr several years there was a restaurant in Boston/Cambridge that specialized in "British-style Cheddar Cheese Pizza". It was called Warburton's. It's gone now.

chowder
02-29-2008, 09:57 AM
[QUOTE=guizot]Yeah, but you're from England, where they eat chip sandwiches. Good nutrition, innit?I'm with you on that.

Chip sandwiches?

It's Chip Butties my good fellow, butties.

And yes, it is good nutrition especially when accompanied with battered cod and mushy peas.

Innit?

Lunar Saltlick
02-29-2008, 10:03 AM
Pizza with egg and cream.
Hot dog bun with fries and cole slaw stuffed inside.
Two slices of bread with a different type of bread as the filler.
Peanut butter and Smarties sandwich.

Zsofia
02-29-2008, 10:14 AM
What's really weird to me is when you order, like, olives on a pizza in Italy, where you'd think they have this pizza thing down right, the olives have pits in them! How the hell are you supposed to eat that? Pick the olives off, pit them, put them back on?

Also, the Subway in the Vienna train station put ketchup on my turkey sub. Which was suprisingly good. Especially since I had to order it, because he had no English and I had no German, by making the French noise the turkey makes. (I couldn't remember the French word for turkey, either (dindon) but it got the job done.) Glouglouglouglouglou!

And to think my mom sent me to order because "I'm sure you can talk to them, they all speak a million languages."

fessie
02-29-2008, 10:21 AM
In Holland they put an egg, sunny-side-up, on their hamburgers. And they fry them with some kind of weird onion. It's not a normal onion, that would be good (mmmm, sliders), but some bastard relative thereof.

Ketchup on cheese pizza (frozen-type) = yum
Ketchup on mac 'n cheese = yum
Ketchup on scrambled eggs = yum
Ketchup on potato chips = hum
Ketchup on those orange cheese/peanut butter crackers = yum
Ketchup and grape jelly as a bbq meatball sauce = not as bad as it sounds

Sophistry and Illusion
02-29-2008, 10:23 AM
I'm pretty sure foreigners would be horrified by Pump Cheese like they have at Fuddruckers. Hell, many Americans are horrified by it.

An Gadaí
02-29-2008, 10:25 AM
In Dave Barry Does Japan he talks about the Japanese putti ng corn of pizza


CORN!!!


Of course, I was surprised when I ordered spaghetti in Rome, Italy, and found that, among the pasta and the sauce, it had peas.

We do that too. Corn is delicious on a pizza as I've said in another thread recently.

Shagnasty
02-29-2008, 10:27 AM
What's really weird to me is when you order, like, olives on a pizza in Italy, where you'd think they have this pizza thing down right, the olives have pits in them! How the hell are you supposed to eat that? Pick the olives off, pit them, put them back on?

Pizza as we think of it was invented and perfected in the U.S. The Italian versions can be reverse engineered as a foreign food just like everywhere else.

An Gadaí
02-29-2008, 10:30 AM
My girlfriend finds it strange that we have coleslaw in sandwiches and rolls here.

Pizza here comes usually with garlic sauce.

Peanut butter and jam sandwiches do sound horrible to me.

I got tea in Spain with powdered milk in it (bleh)

Iced Tea I find strange too but love hot tea.

JohnT
02-29-2008, 10:31 AM
I, er, put mayo on my fries*. It's something I tried after watching Pulp Fiction, during a trip to McD's to get a Royale with Cheese.

*Technically, I dip the fries into some mayo as opposed to actually putting the mayo on a pile of fries.

Wee Bairn
02-29-2008, 10:36 AM
When visiting New Zealand I was nonplussed when I discovered that they consider canned beet (aka "beet root") a legitimate hamburger topping. I tried it and did not care for it. On the other hand, I wish that potato wedges with sour cream were more common here in Canada. Those are sheer brilliance.



I had the potatoes and sour cream at a schwarma take out palce in downtown Montreal- very yummy indeed. Same place also put the standard onion, tomato, cucumber type things on the chicken sandwich, but on the lamb put these dark red beet looking strips that were repugnant.

Mahna Mahna
02-29-2008, 11:05 AM
I've had egg on a burger before. It's actually much tastier than you'd imagine, especially when said burger is also topped with cheddar cheese and bacon. Mmmmm.

The only thing mentioned so far that I'm utterly grossed out by is the chip buttie. I'm all for fries in sandwiches (in fact, a gyros sandwich ain't the same unless it's got a generous helping of greasy fries in the middle)... but JUST fries? with butter? Gag.

RealityChuck
02-29-2008, 11:18 AM
My daughter is in the Peace Corps in Namibia, and their habits are much different than in the US.

They eat a lot of meat. Red meat. So much that, if you say you prefer chicken and fish, they think you're a vegetarian. The government keeps trying to support the local fishing industry but no one eats fish.

They don't eat many vegetables (it's a very dry country, and the only farming is actually ranching). They serve what veggies they get (usually canned) with mayonnaise.

Max the Immortal
02-29-2008, 11:27 AM
I'm pretty sure foreigners would be horrified by Pump Cheese like they have at Fuddruckers. Hell, many Americans are horrified by it.

A little bird once told me that many many people in southeast asia find the the very concept of cheese to be revolting (it's kinda just spoiled milk, isn't it?). Hopefully a Doper who actually lives in the area can confirm or deny this.

Harmonious Discord
02-29-2008, 11:28 AM
I'm pretty sure foreigners would be horrified by Pump Cheese like they have at Fuddruckers. Hell, many Americans are horrified by it.

Pump cheese is to cheese for food, as what bacon grease is to K-Y jelly for lube. The FDA should ban the word cheese from the bucket of that slop.


I always look at mayo on fries the same as sour cream on a potato.

Zsofia
02-29-2008, 11:28 AM
Pizza as we think of it was invented and perfected in the U.S. The Italian versions can be reverse engineered as a foreign food just like everywhere else.
You'd think people would complain, though. Like, "Hey, dude, how the hell am I supposed to eat these olives?" only in Italian so it sounds sexier.

Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party
02-29-2008, 11:32 AM
The only thing mentioned so far that I'm utterly grossed out by is the chip buttie. I'm all for fries in sandwiches (in fact, a gyros sandwich ain't the same unless it's got a generous helping of greasy fries in the middle)... but JUST fries? with butter? Gag.


Not fries - proper chips.

Kid_A
02-29-2008, 11:41 AM
I had the potatoes and sour cream at a schwarma take out palce in downtown Montreal- very yummy indeed. Same place also put the standard onion, tomato, cucumber type things on the chicken sandwich, but on the lamb put these dark red beet looking strips that were repugnant.
It was probably pickled turnip. IMHO, without it, shwarmas just aren't right.

Spoke
02-29-2008, 11:43 AM
...I had to order it, because he had no English and I had no German, by making the French noise the turkey makes. (I couldn't remember the French word for turkey, either (dindon) but it got the job done.) Glouglouglouglouglou!

This reminds me of when I tried to order chicken in a small town in the Czech Republic once. I didn't have a phrase book with me at the restaurant, and I couldn't get my point across, so I wound up drawing a picture of a chicken on a napkin. It got a smile out of the waitress, but there was no chicken on the menu.

Frylock
02-29-2008, 11:43 AM
In Trinidad, ketchup is a typical dipping sauce for pizza. Never got around to trying it, it just sounds too gross.


Any other wierd eating habits around the world?

In Japan, "American Style" pizza includes corn and mayonnaise.

-FrL-

CalMeacham
02-29-2008, 11:44 AM
A little bird once told me that many many people in southeast asia find the the very concept of cheese to be revolting (it's kinda just spoiled milk, isn't it?). Hopefully a Doper who actually lives in the area can confirm or deny this.


Anthropologist Marvin Harris, in his book Good to Eat, says that Chinese and southeast Asians see drinking a glass of milk as roughly equivalent to drinking a glass of cow saliva. The Chinese don't have a tradition of drinking milk or eating dairy products, which is tied up with their general lactose intolerance, so you can understand their lack of enthusiasm.

Taboo foods generally get the "Ewwww!" treatment from the people who hold the taboo. Muslims and Jews writing about the disgustingness of pork radiate such dislike. Or ask your average American how he or she feels about eating bugs.

chowder
02-29-2008, 12:31 PM
Not fries - proper chips.

Yeah, big fuck off fat chips at that.

You tell 'em Dom.

Bloody colonials

Sophistry and Illusion
02-29-2008, 12:32 PM
A little bird once told me that many many people in southeast asia find the the very concept of cheese to be revolting (it's kinda just spoiled milk, isn't it?).
But how would they feel about gooey, runny, pumpable spoiled milk? Mmmm.


Pump cheese is to cheese for food, as what bacon grease is to K-Y jelly for lube.
Well, if you got all of the grit out first...
mmm...bacon-flavored genitalia...

Johnny L.A.
02-29-2008, 12:39 PM
Up here, however, it's all about pizza and mayo!
When I was a kid I used to put mayonnaise on (Straw Hat) pizza. Tried it again as a teenager and didn't like it so much.

wolf in second hand clothing
02-29-2008, 02:21 PM
The pizza places in Mexico give ketchup packets along with delivered pizzas, too. Also, I knew a guy there who was disgusted by peanut butter, but would slather ketchup on peanuts and eat them with a spoon.

My mom is from Hawaii, so I love spam. I also never realized how uncommon it is to eat chilli served over a bowl of rice.

Indistinguishable
02-29-2008, 02:23 PM
They put ketchup on pizza in India too. I was wary at first, but it turns out it's actually really good.

CalMeacham
02-29-2008, 02:38 PM
Isn't putting ketchup on a pizza a bit like putting ketchup on a tomato?

Or mayonnaise on an egg?

pulykamell
02-29-2008, 02:44 PM
This reminds me of when I tried to order chicken in a small town in the Czech Republic once. I didn't have a phrase book with me at the restaurant, and I couldn't get my point across, so I wound up drawing a picture of a chicken on a napkin. It got a smile out of the waitress, but there was no chicken on the menu.

Similar anecdote, whilst living in Hungary, my roommate and I went out to eat with some Hungarian friends. He ordered some dish that could be made from a variety of different meats and, when the dish came out and he began eating, he was curious to find out exactly what it was. So, wanting to learn the language and be self-sufficient rather than asking the Hungarians at the table for help, he calls over the waitress and asks her in his limited Hungarian, something like "mi az" (what is this?). He didn't quite understand her explanation, so she began making the sound of the animal in question: röff röff. He turns blankly to the table, and asks, "I'm eating dog?" The Hungarians bust out laughing as, apparently, röff röff is the sound pigs make in Hungarian.

Needless to say, my roommate was relieved.

(Oh, and ketchup on pizza in Hungary was not unusual, either.)

bouv
02-29-2008, 03:09 PM
What is it about Americans and our aversion to eating cooked blood anyway? I've had conversations about how revolting blood pudding and sausages sound yet seen these exact same people drool over a sack of White Castles. Say sparky, you know that gooey bottom bun on the White Castle? You don't think that's just grease and onion juice do ya? And that soft and yummy greyish matter on the side of that meatloaf or home cooked hamburger? Ever wonder where that comes from anyway?

It doesn't come from blood, if that's what you're implying. Commercial meat has almost all the blood removed from it. It's just liquid from the muscle cells.

SmellMyWort
02-29-2008, 03:14 PM
Came upon the ketchup on pizza thing in Romaina. And pickled beats on hamburgers in Australia.

Regarding maple syrup with bacon or breakfast sausage, it's pretty easy for the syrup to run off your pancakes (or waffles or French toast) and contaminate whatever meat you're having. What are you supposed to do, wash it off? I think I've even seen some sausage with maple flavor added.

JR Brown
02-29-2008, 08:02 PM
Mexico and other southern parts: lime, salt and mild hot sauce on fresh fruit of all descriptions. Took a while to get used to the idea but is actually yummy.

JRB

gonzomax
02-29-2008, 09:58 PM
Guy I used to work with declared pizza to be flavored Italian bread. He folded it and then slathered it with butter. Couple calories there.

HazelNutCoffee
02-29-2008, 10:12 PM
In Dave Barry Does Japan he talks about the Japanese putti ng corn of pizza


CORN!!!

OMG - this totally freaked me out when I first moved to Korea. Corn on pizza? Are you kidding me? I kinda got used to it, but Koreans put some weird shit on pizza as a rule. Chestnut paste. Sweet potatoes. Kimchii.

pulykamell
02-29-2008, 10:17 PM
More corn on pizza. (http://chew.hu/desk_test_american_mystificati.html) The Hungarians do it too and call it "American pizza." I'm also fairly sure there was a frozen pizza made by Dr. Oetker (a German company) called "Big American" which also contained corn. Corn seems to be synonymous with "American" in much of the world, with good reason, too, I suppose.

Oh, boy, it gets even better. (http://chew.hu/desk_test_american_pizza_myste.html)


Starting in the foreground is the Szex és New York pizza, named after the Hungarian title of the famous American cable TV show "Sex and the City," and which features a layer of sour cream, chicken "ragú," preserved peach slices, ginger and cheese (tejfölös alap, csirkeragu, barack, gyömbér, sajt). Joining it in the background is the "Los Angeles": dilled yoghurt sauce, salmon, sliced orange, and mozzarella (kapros joghurtos alap, lazac, narancs, mozzarella sajt). Needless to say, you are about as likely to find pizzas like this in Los Angeles or New York as you are to find pizzas in Budapest that are like the ones you get in New York or LA.

Shamozzle
02-29-2008, 11:51 PM
My friend's sister enjoys soya sauce sandwiches.

My boss drinks about 4L of completely flat, warm Pepsi per day and eats Hickory Sticks and butter sandwiches. He is going to die.

NDP
03-01-2008, 01:34 AM
Yeah, but you're from England, where they eat chip sandwiches. Good nutrition, innit?

Nothing better than a chip barm, melted butter oozing down the sides.

That sounds similar to the sandwiches they make at Primanti Brothers (http://primantibrothers.com/) in Pittsburgh.

(Incidentally, I've never eaten a Primanti Brothers sandwich but I'd like to at least once in my life. Pittsburgh/Western PA dopers, are they worth it?)

As for eating "odd" things with french fries, I've noticed dipping them in tartar sauce has gotten more common in the Pacific Northwest.

foolsguinea
03-01-2008, 01:40 AM
A few of the British backpackers I met during that trip could not be convinced that peanut butter and jam go well together in sandwiches. :dubious: :confused: :eek: :rolleyes:

This makes sense if you really hate peanut butter. Maybe if you insist that it's a "savory" flavor not to be mixed with sweet flavors.

I wonder, would they like peanut butter & mustard? I've never heard of anyone but me eating that as a sandwich, but I devised it when without jam years ago.

mobo85
03-01-2008, 01:50 AM
In Hannah, Montana, ketchup is drinken straight from the bottle (http://youtube.com/watch?v=N_4LxxERBHY).

China Guy
03-01-2008, 02:21 AM
Anthropologist Marvin Harris, in his book Good to Eat, says that Chinese and southeast Asians see drinking a glass of milk as roughly equivalent to drinking a glass of cow saliva. The Chinese don't have a tradition of drinking milk or eating dairy products, which is tied up with their general lactose intolerance, so you can understand their lack of enthusiasm.
I'd say Marvin never actually went to China. Yogurt is extremely popular and was 25 years ago when I first visited. Milk is extremely popular and my wife when a child could only get milk via medical perscription and was highly sought after. Marvy was probably going off of 100 year old stereotypes.

Miss Purl McKnittington
03-01-2008, 02:37 AM
My friend's sister enjoys soya sauce sandwiches.

How do you make one these? Wouldn't it just be soy sauce dripped on bread?

Max the Immortal
03-01-2008, 04:41 AM
I'd say Marvin never actually went to China. Yogurt is extremely popular and was 25 years ago when I first visited. Milk is extremely popular and my wife when a child could only get milk via medical perscription and was highly sought after. Marvy was probably going off of 100 year old stereotypes.

Okay, but what about cheese? Is it considered gross in China, or was that little bird lying to me?

11811
03-01-2008, 07:29 AM
In Trinidad, ketchup is a typical dipping sauce for pizza. Never got around to trying it, it just sounds too gross.


Any other wierd eating habits around the world?

When I was much younger, I had a thing for French Dressing on my mashed potatoes.

chowder
03-01-2008, 08:02 AM
:dubious: :confused: :eek: :rolleyes:

This makes sense if you really hate peanut butter. Maybe if you insist that it's a "savory" flavor not to be mixed with sweet flavors.

I wonder, would they like peanut butter & mustard? I've never heard of anyone but me eating that as a sandwich, but I devised it when without jam years ago.

Heh, and I thought it was just me......gotta be English mustard though :D

I also like PB spread really thick and sprinkled with salt and black pepper.

But PB with jam is yuck

chowder
03-01-2008, 08:05 AM
How do you make one these? Wouldn't it just be soy sauce dripped on bread?

Which brings to mind....Dripping Butties :p of old

The fat off the Sunday joint, collected in a pudding basin, allowed to cool and then spread on a thundering great crust of bread, sprinkled with salt.

Oh man, that's what you call a butty, sadly this has fallen by the wayside

An Gadaí
03-01-2008, 08:40 AM
Abrakebabra (Oirish Kebab chain) does a nice chip butty. It's in a baguette with their chips and sauce. It's delish. However chips from a normal chipper + buttered sliced pan is the best.

nd_n8
03-01-2008, 09:21 AM
Which brings to mind....Dripping Butties :p of old

The fat off the Sunday joint, collected in a pudding basin, allowed to cool and then spread on a thundering great crust of bread, sprinkled with salt.

Oh man, that's what you call a butty, sadly this has fallen by the wayside
Say now, that doesn't sound half bad. A well seasoned joint? Loaded with cloves and garlic and brown sugar and such?

I've always liked the skin and fat off of a well roasted ham on a sandwich. Hot, salty, gooey, drippy and quite likely to kill me.

Some of my hispanic employees brought me Tacos Chicharrones. A steamed slab of spicy pork skin, cooked until it was semi-transparent and mushy, with a light sprinkle of lettice, cheese and sour cream on a hot, soft corn tortilla. Yummy.

Colibri
03-01-2008, 09:25 AM
Here in Panama ketchup is a standard condiment for Chinese food, so much so that if you go to the takeout place they put little packets of it along with the soy sauce in your bag along with the chow mein.

Also, it's standard to put both ketchup and mustard on sandwiches they make for you in cafeterias or restaurants. I often forget and am dismayed when my chicken sandwich comes with both.

One of the weirdest breakfast items I have ever encountered is canned mushy spaghetti (like Chef Boy-ar-dee) on toast, which I was served in a guest house in Fiji. I think it originally may be an Australian thing. Also, canned beans on toast.

And I also never got used to the Australian-NZ habit of putting beetroot on hamburgers, as others have mentioned.

chowder
03-01-2008, 11:45 AM
[QUOTE=nd_n8]Say now, that doesn't sound half bad. A well seasoned joint? Loaded with cloves and garlic and brown sugar and such?

Absolutely no garlic/cloves/sugar or anything else.

Just the fat +salt.

____________

Beans on toast is standard British fare Colobri although I prefer the beans not to be on the toast, makes it all soggy and horrid :D

Silence of the clams
03-01-2008, 12:17 PM
When visiting New Zealand I was nonplussed when I discovered that they consider canned beet (aka "beet root") a legitimate hamburger topping. I tried it and did not care for it.

A perfect hamburger is topped with pickled beetrootslices, raw onion, a slice of pineapple, fried bacon and egg, melted cheese, and of course a good squirt of keptchup and a thick layer of mustard. All of this I got in Sydney once a long time ago. Mhhh...

But then again I enjoy toast with Vegemite too :D

Qadgop the Mercotan
03-01-2008, 12:21 PM
A perfect hamburger is topped with pickled beetrootslices, raw onion, a slice of pineapple, fried bacon and egg, melted cheese, and of course a good squirt of keptchup and a thick layer of mustard. All of this I got in Sydney once a long time ago. Mhhh...

But then again I enjoy toast with Vegemite too :D
No vegemite on the burger? WTF??

jjimm
03-01-2008, 12:33 PM
Wait - Papa John's Pizza in the UK supply all their pizzas with dipping sauces - one of which is ketchup. Is this just a British peculiarity?I think they got this from Domino's: nobody ever eats their crusts, so they supply dipping sauces to dip the flavourless pizza crust into. Usually it's garlic and herb, but the last time I ordered from Papa John's they also supplied BBQ sauce. Never seen ketchup from them. (Never ordering from them again, either: the pizzas were burnt.)

nd_n8
03-01-2008, 01:48 PM
Absolutely no garlic/cloves/sugar or anything else.

Just the fat +salt.

____________

Beans on toast is standard British fare Colobri although I prefer the beans not to be on the toast, makes it all soggy and horrid :D
I understand no spices on the samm'ich, but what of the roast itself? If no garlic/cloves/sugar then at least a nice spring onion to sweeten the pot? But a plain old roast joint I don't know. I may have to rethink me positions on the blandness of British cuisine. I bet there's no ketchup, mustard or molasses in them beans either :dubious:

Kneepants Erasmus, the Humanist
03-01-2008, 02:40 PM
A perfect hamburger is topped with pickled beetrootslices, raw onion, a slice of pineapple, fried bacon and egg, melted cheese, and of course a good squirt of keptchup and a thick layer of mustard.

Man. That's.......busy.

Grrr!
03-01-2008, 03:15 PM
In Japan, "American Style" pizza includes corn and mayonnaise.

-FrL-


Now see. I don't want to hear any more of this crap that Americans are self absorbed.

At least if we don't know something about another country we just admit it. We don't make stuff up like some countries do.

:D

Angua
03-01-2008, 04:58 PM
In Trinidad, ketchup is a typical dipping sauce for pizza. Never got around to trying it, it just sounds too gross.



My little brother will attest that this is actually heavenly and won't eat pizza without tomato ketchup. Not even when his sister's been in the kitchen for a good couple of hours making the perfect tomato sauce. ;)

pretend my name is witty
03-01-2008, 05:28 PM
Heh, and I thought it was just me......gotta be English mustard though :D

I also like PB spread really thick and sprinkled with salt and black pepper.

But PB with jam is yuck

I just tried the old PB and English Mustard to see how wrong you were, but I owe you a thank you for giving me my new favourite sandwich filling.

That is awesome. It's more awesome because no-one will steal your sarnies when they know what's in them...

nd_n8
03-01-2008, 07:49 PM
First it was foolsguinea,

Then it was chowder.

Third came pretend my name is witty.

And now nd_n8 joins this ellete group.

After reading three posts about peanut butter and mustard (especially pretend's experiment) I didn't want to be a wuss so I went into the kitchen, slapped some PB on a slice of bread, and squirted some mustard on it. I don't have English Mustard so I used a bottle of Spicy Brown Mustard left over from last summer's bratwurst.
I approached this abomination with an uncomfortable combination of fear and curiosity in the pit of my stomach, and a full glass of water just in case. I actually winced with the first bite then began to chew.
Dammit man, this was not just acceptable, it was dad burned tasty. I returned to the kitchen to add another healthy shot of mustard and made a second one. Now I'm looking forward to the stares I get when I go to work next week with a jar of Jif and a loaf of bread (there is already mustard in my fridge at work) and go to lunch.
Thanks
Nate

nd_n8
03-01-2008, 07:52 PM
I'm still not sure about beets on a burger though, sounds weird to me.

WarmNPrickly
03-01-2008, 07:58 PM
Here's another one my wife likes. Toasted creamed corn sandwiches. She doesn't like beets on her burgers though. (She's a kiwi)

GorillaMan
03-01-2008, 08:03 PM
I'm worried that chowder is gradually disappearing into the 1950s.

Sublight
03-01-2008, 08:05 PM
The big difference between Japanese pizza and American pizza (well, the Domino/Pizza Hut kind) is that you have to order a set of toppings. You can order "a large pizza with A, B and C" but that list gets about two column-inches halfway down the back page.

Looking at the delivery menu for Domino's we have:

The Domino Deluxe, which is the most American pizza on the list: tomato sauce (not a given for J-pizza), pepperoni, onion, mushroom, italian sausage and green and red peppers.
Mayo, Tuna & Corn: tomato sauce, onion, ham, mushroom, tuna, corn, mayonnaise, parsley.
Prime Seafood: white sauce, black pepper, onion, squid, shrimp, scallop, broccoli.
Idaho Curry: white sauce, potato, sausage, mayonnaise, corn and curry.

And their current headliner, the Cheese Ristorante:
1/4 basil sauce, roast chicken, onion
1/4 wasabi sauce, roast beef, onion
1/4 white sauce, scallop, broccoli
1/4 white sauce, smoked salmon, mushroom
all completely covered up in mozzarella cheese, with chunks of camembert, gouda, mozzarella and parmesan semi-melted into the top.

Which honestly doesn't sound half bad, if it were still hot when it arrived.

sjc
03-01-2008, 08:29 PM
That sounds similar to the sandwiches they make at Primanti Brothers (http://primantibrothers.com/) in Pittsburgh.

(Incidentally, I've never eaten a Primanti Brothers sandwich but I'd like to at least once in my life. Pittsburgh/Western PA dopers, are they worth it?)

As for eating "odd" things with french fries, I've noticed dipping them in tartar sauce has gotten more common in the Pacific Northwest.

Huh, I'm from the PNW and I never thought that was particularly odd. I mean if you're at Ivar's and you've just ordered some fish and chips of course they give you tartar sauce. That being the case, why not dip the fries in it as well. I don't do unless I've ordered fish and chips, but if I've ordered them I'll dip a few fries in (most of it goes to the fish though).

sjc
03-01-2008, 08:36 PM
Here in Panama ketchup is a standard condiment for Chinese food, so much so that if you go to the takeout place they put little packets of it along with the soy sauce in your bag along with the chow mein.


Well, ketchup is sorta kinda Chinese. I mean not really but the name comes from the name of a fish sauce made in Malaysia (Indonesia?) by the Chinese living there.

Maui Lion
03-01-2008, 08:45 PM
It kinda freaked me out when I learned that people on the mainland eat SPAM straight from the can without cooking. No wonder many don't like it, it looks so unappetizing raw! Here in Hawaii we fry it golden brown before eating it.
And SPAM musubi is so good. It's the perfect little snack. A block of sticky short-grained rice with a slice of browned spam on top and wrapped with a strip of nori (seaweed). It's nummy. Add some folded scrambled egg on top and you've got breakfast.

Delly
03-01-2008, 09:00 PM
Count me in as another one who loves corn on pizza, my favourite pizza ever is a hamand corn one from Ginos... local chain. Yum.

The Dominoes pizza place here in waterford have started to give out sweet chilli and bbq dips for the pizzas too, dunno how normal that is but its yummy.

Love Mayo on chips... especially if its been mixed with ketchup.

AND now I want a chip butty... thanks people!

bordelond
03-01-2008, 09:37 PM
Some anecdotes:

-- like Pittsburgh, New Orleans has something akin to a chip butty -- the french-fry po-boy.

-- as in Ireland, cole slaw on pulled-pork sandwiches is common in Mississippi barbecue joints. I'm sure it's done elsewhere.

-- I think anyplace where fried seafood is popular will have plenty of folks dipping french fries into tartar sauce. It's done plenty in New Orleans. Also common is ad hoc mixing of ketchup and mayo ... or red "cocktail sauce" with mayo or with tartar sauce.

CalMeacham
03-01-2008, 09:47 PM
I'd say Marvin never actually went to China. Yogurt is extremely popular and was 25 years ago when I first visited. Milk is extremely popular and my wife when a child could only get milk via medical perscription and was highly sought after. Marvy was probably going off of 100 year old stereotypes.

Might be, but Harris points out that there are no Chinese dishes with cheeses, and dairy plays virtually no part in the cuisine of Chinese restaurants. The Chinese I knew (in grad school) were lactose intolerant, and insisted that I serve no dairy when they came over to eat.

WarmNPrickly
03-01-2008, 10:25 PM
I agree with Cal, the chinese students I knew in grad school didn't touch dairy. I don't think they were lactose intolerant, but one time when I had milk or beer in the fridge, my girlfriend that never drank grabbed a beer at 10 in the morning. :confused:

Lisa-go-Blind
03-01-2008, 11:10 PM
Idaho Curry

Well, there's two words I never thought I'd see together.

mobo85
03-01-2008, 11:22 PM
Idaho Curry

Didn't she just win an Oscar for writing Juno?

Lucky 13
03-01-2008, 11:57 PM
And SPAM musubi is so good. It's the perfect little snack. A block of sticky short-grained rice with a slice of browned spam on top and wrapped with a strip of nori (seaweed). It's nummy. Add some folded scrambled egg on top and you've got breakfast.
I've had Spam musubi before at one of the many Hawaiian BBQ places that have sprouted up around here lately. That stuff is great.

Someone mentioned fresh fruit with lemon, salt and hot sauce. I've seen street vendors in downtown LA sell cups of sliced mango, watermelon or cucumber with lemon, salt, and optional chili powder. One of these vendors was selling this outside my workplace, and I tried the mango slices with lemon and just a touch of chili powder - yum.

Tuckerfan
03-02-2008, 01:57 AM
Might be, but Harris points out that there are no Chinese dishes with cheeses, and dairy plays virtually no part in the cuisine of Chinese restaurants. The Chinese I knew (in grad school) were lactose intolerant, and insisted that I serve no dairy when they came over to eat.
That's starting to change. Apparently, as the Chinese become more affluent, they've begun to adopt a more Western diet, this is supposed to be the reason for the spike in dairy prices.

I dated a Vietnamese gal who'd drink green milk. She never would tell me what was in it or let me taste it. I do know that she had to be careful about how much dairy she consumed during the day. Too much and she was sick as a dog.

Bites When Provoked
03-02-2008, 03:00 AM
A perfect hamburger is topped with pickled beetroot slices, raw onion, a slice of pineapple, fried bacon and egg, melted cheese, and of course a good squirt of keptchup and a thick layer of mustard.Lose the mustard and I think you've just about got it right. I'd remove the word 'pickled' too. Pickled beetroot is probably fine as far as it goes, but the tinned sort you use on hamburgers isn't vinegary-tart - in fact, I've always found it ever so slightly sweetish.

My ideal Aussie/NZ style burger is:

A thick, juicy, pure meat patty
BBQ sauce
Sliced cheese (not cheese singles) put right on the meat so it melts
Fried bacon
Fried onion
Freshly sliced tomato
Sliced, tinned beetroot
Fried egg
Thick slice of lightly fried pineapple

And of course you should always skip lettuce entirely; rabbit food has no place on a burger. :D


ETA: Pizza dipping sauce? What the...? I'd expect the toppings to fall off if you tried to dip your pizza. Why not just have the right sauce put on the pizza when it's created?

chowder
03-02-2008, 03:00 AM
I understand no spices on the samm'ich, but what of the roast itself? If no garlic/cloves/sugar then at least a nice spring onion to sweeten the pot? But a plain old roast joint I don't know. I may have to rethink me positions on the blandness of British cuisine. I bet there's no ketchup, mustard or molasses in them beans either :dubious:

Nossir, the meat is roasted just as it comes and golly gosh it dont half taste scrummy :p

Think on this: Roast Beef, roast spuds,Yorkshire pud,carrots,peas,broccoli,horseradish sauce and all topped off with delish gravy.

Scoff the lot then mop up what's left on the plate with a slice or 2 of bread.

THAT'S what you call an English Sunday lunch my friend

Nope again, no additions to the beans

Caractacus Pott
03-02-2008, 06:23 AM
<snip>As for eating "odd" things with french fries, I've noticed dipping them in tartar sauce has gotten more common in the Pacific Northwest.
Take the pickle relish bits out of the American tartar sauce and you're pretty close to the "mayonnaise" that non-Americans put on their french fries. I was so relieved to find out they're not just glopping Hellman's onto their potatoes. That is disgusting.

Has anyone yet broached the taste of ketchup outside America? Suh-weet. In Germany you have to buy the "spicy" ketchup to get the default Heinz US ketchup flavor.

An American food that almost no one outside the US gets right is chips and salsa. Even American brands that are made overseas. Typically the salsa is sweet enough to be a dessert topping. Often the tortilla chips are too thick and/or crumbly to pick up the salsa. I didn't understand how those Old El Paso chips from Australia were double the thickness of American-made chips yet broke apart at the slightest push into their extra-sweet salsa.

How about an omission? I don't recall seeing gelatin desserts outside America. Thank goodness. I don't want to think about what I'd find in suspended animation in green Jello in other countries. It creepy enough seeing canned fruit cocktail in it on Sunday dinner tables across America!

chowder
03-02-2008, 06:35 AM
[QUOTE=Delly]

Love Mayo on chips... especially if its been mixed with ketchup.


Ewwww, I mean, Ewwwww :eek:

The Them
03-02-2008, 06:41 AM
On the Pacific Coast of Mexico, they serve Squid Fried in its Own Ink. Yes, the black goop that squid use to confound their predators. They cut out the ink sacs, chop up the squid, and fry away. The results look like cheap special effects from a zombie movie.

They're DELICIOUS.

Sublight
03-02-2008, 06:51 AM
Well, there's two words I never thought I'd see together.
If that sounds appetizing, there's also a brand of stew base here called Vermont Curry (http://house-foods.com/our_products/imported_products.html) made with apples.

Martini Enfield
03-02-2008, 07:04 AM
ETA: Pizza dipping sauce? What the...? I'd expect the toppings to fall off if you tried to dip your pizza. Why not just have the right sauce put on the pizza when it's created?

This was my reaction too. But apparently I don't eat "Real" Pizza because I'd rather call up the Eagle Boys or summon the minions of Pizza The Hut for my "Shit, it's two days before payday and I've only got $15 on me" dinner needs than go to somewhere that has mood lighting and a wine list. ;)

Dipping Sauce for a Pizza? Madness, I say. Dipping Sauce is for Spring Rolls, Wontons, and Potato Wedges or Chunky Fries.

Moving onto burgers:

The true Hamburger should have:

*Meat patty (min. 1/4 lb)
*Cheese, melted over the patty
*Onion
*Lettuce
*Beetroot
*Bacon
*Egg
*Pineapple
*One or more of the following sauces: Tomato, Mustard, BBQ.
*A white bun. Not a Wholemeal bun, not a Sourdough bun. A White bun.

Any hamburger that doesn't have Beetroot on it is a Poofter Hamburger, and anyone who doubts the righteousness of Pineapple on hamburgers is a Communist. And remember: If you don't need both hands to hold it, it's not a Real Hamburger either. :D

Apparently the Steak & Cheese Pie is also completely unknown in America, which is a shame. The only thing that even comes close to a Great Aussie Hamburger is a Great Aussie Pie, with Steak & Onion and Cheese in it, topped with Tomato Sauce or Gravy. You can eat them with one hand and drive at the same time, so you'd think the Yanks would be all over them, but apparently not. ;)

Marienee
03-02-2008, 07:35 AM
In Holland they put an egg, sunny-side-up, on their hamburgers. And they fry them with some kind of weird onion. It's not a normal onion, that would be good (mmmm, sliders), but some bastard relative thereof.

I like Holland (except in the winter, when nobody likes Holland). But what they think is a hamburger is an affront to all that is holy.

A hamburger is meant to be made from beef. You would think they could work this out, what with all the cows wandering about. A Dutch guy's very notion of Truth is bound up in a cow, witness the expression zo waar als een koe -- "as true as a cow".

But they make their burgers from half beef, half pork, bleah. Then they put some horrible kind of curry in them, fry them with vegetables of uncertain origin, slap them on the nastiest cotton like bread in the world (which also makes no sense as Dutch bread is on the whole very good) and cover them in assorted slimy goos. Like curry ketchup or peanut sauce. Top it all off with an egg and it's disgusting. It's enough to make you long for a Wendy's franchise.

Bites When Provoked
03-02-2008, 08:12 AM
Apparently the Steak & Cheese Pie is also completely unknown in America, which is a shame. The only thing that even comes close to a Great Aussie Hamburger is a Great Aussie Pie, with Steak & Onion and Cheese in it, topped with Tomato Sauce or Gravy. You can eat them with one hand and drive at the same time, so you'd think the Yanks would be all over them, but apparently not. ;)I do love a good steak & cheese pie, though I can never eat them without burning myself on molten cheese.

I couldn't find any sort of meat pie anywhere when I was over there - how about you? It was kind of weird, walking into a bakery and seeing not a single pie, pasty or sausage roll...just rows upon rows of (admittedly, delicious!) sweet pastries and many variations on yeasty doughnuts.

One day I shall win the lottery, move to America*, open an Aussie-style bakery and ... probably fail miserably. Though you never know; I might just be the one to introduce Cheesymite Scrolls (http://bakersdelight.com.au/cms/document.php?objectID=277) to the US**...



* Americans, consider yourselves warned.
** Americans, consider yourselves warned...again.

SmackFu
03-02-2008, 08:42 PM
A few of the British backpackers I met during that trip could not be convinced that peanut butter and jam go well together in sandwiches.My theory is that this is because it's usually called "peanut butter and jelly", and "jelly" means "jello" in other places.

Peanut butter and jello? Gross.

River Hippie
03-02-2008, 09:06 PM
As I read this I'm eating frozen pizza (California Pizza Kitchens-Margerita) slathered in chili garlic sauce. Yum.

DesertDog
03-02-2008, 09:31 PM
I do love a good steak & cheese pie, though I can never eat them without burning myself on molten cheese.

I couldn't find any sort of meat pie anywhere when I was over there - how about you? It was kind of weird, walking into a bakery and seeing not a single pie, pasty or sausage roll...just rows upon rows of (admittedly, delicious!) sweet pastries and many variations on yeasty doughnuts.You won't find them in bakeries. What you want to look for -- and it's not too common -- is someone selling Cornish pasties. When I was living in Carson City, right next to Virginia City and the Comstock Lode, two old guys there had a pasty shop. They had two varieties, chicken and beef, and both were delicious. Unfortunately they retired and no one picked up the place.

Then a couple years ago, not far from where I work, opened The Cornish Pasty Co. (http://cornishpastyco.com/) Run by an immigrant Cornishman, it has a wide variety but the traditional beef, potato, and rutabega is his best seller. He doesn't have steak and cheese but rather, 'meat and cheese' -- the meat being pork sausage.

Spoke
03-02-2008, 10:06 PM
Pasties are common in the upper peninsula of Michigan.

If you don't want to go that far, Jamaican patties are somewhat similar, and you can find those in most big cities. No cheese in 'em, though.

Cerowyn
03-02-2008, 11:21 PM
Pizza as we think of it was invented and perfected in the U.S. The Italian versions can be reverse engineered as a foreign food just like everywhere else.No, pizza evolved in Italy.

amarone
03-02-2008, 11:42 PM
My theory is that this is because it's usually called "peanut butter and jelly", and "jelly" means "jello" in other places.

Peanut butter and jello? Gross. But I'm a Brit and understand that "peanut butter and jelly" to you means "peanut butter and jam" to me. And it still sounds gross. As I've posted in other food threads, we Brits do not mix savoury and sweet like the Merkins do.

Getting back to the OP: iced tea. Full of the spirit of "when in Rome" after emigrating to the US, I tried it, and discovered that it tastes as disgusting as it sounds.

Bites When Provoked
03-03-2008, 12:54 AM
But I'm a Brit and understand that "peanut butter and jelly" to you means "peanut butter and jam" to me. And it still sounds gross. As I've posted in other food threads, we Brits do not mix savoury and sweet like the Merkins do.Having tried it, I agree that peanut butter and jam is as disgusting as you'd expect.

Peanut butter and sliced banana, on the other hand, is bloody good. I like it on rice cakes. Not sure about sandwiches, but it's probably good that way.

TheLoadedDog
03-03-2008, 07:37 AM
My ideal Aussie/NZ style burger is:

A thick, juicy, pure meat patty
BBQ sauce
Sliced cheese (not cheese singles) put right on the meat so it melts
Fried bacon
Fried onion
Freshly sliced tomato
Sliced, tinned beetroot
Fried egg
Thick slice of lightly fried pineapple

And of course you should always skip lettuce entirely; rabbit food has no place on a burger. :D


That truly is the perfect burger. It's called a "hamburger with the lot", or a "hambrdalot" when you come out of the pub. The only thing I'd change is that I'd keep the lettuce - a burger with lettuce on it, and there's yer healthy eatin' for the week.


And nobody has mentioned the South Australian "pie floater"? Take one bowl of pea soup, and one meat pie. Drop the meat pie into the soup. Eat (somehow).

Sophistry and Illusion
03-03-2008, 02:21 PM
And nobody has mentioned the South Australian "pie floater"? Take one bowl of pea soup, and one meat pie. Drop the meat pie into the soup. Eat (somehow).
The word 'floater' has a number of denotations for me. None of them lend themselves well to culinary contexts.

Max the Immortal
03-03-2008, 03:04 PM
But I'm a Brit and understand that "peanut butter and jelly" to you means "peanut butter and jam" to me. And it still sounds gross. As I've posted in other food threads, we Brits do not mix savoury and sweet like the Merkins do.

I've never considered peanut butter to be in the savory category. In my mind it's eaten primarily in sandwiches either alone or with jam or honey. Otherwise it's used to make sweets like peanut butter cookies or peanut butter cups.

What do Brits do with peanut butter?

pulykamell
03-03-2008, 03:19 PM
I've never considered peanut butter to be in the savory category. In my mind it's eaten primarily in sandwiches either alone or with jam or honey. Otherwise it's used to make sweets like peanut butter cookies or peanut butter cups.

What do Brits do with peanut butter?

Yeah, I've never quite understood the head scratching PB&J gets overseas. Fruits and nuts are a perfectly normal combination pretty much anywhere in the world. Why would turning both into a paste-like consistency and combining them be suddenly gross?

But I've also used peanut butter for savory applications like soup (there's a great Szechuan-style carrot soup that uses peanut butter), stews, dipping sauces for meats--it's mostly Asian and African stuff. Plus I enjoy peanut butter and hot pepper sandwiches.

Anne Neville
03-03-2008, 03:34 PM
It doesn't come from blood, if that's what you're implying. Commercial meat has almost all the blood removed from it. It's just liquid from the muscle cells.

I can say personally that it doesn't. I have eaten both kosher and non-kosher meat. The kosher meat has had all the blood drained from it by a process of soaking and salting. After cooking, they're quite similar in texture. (The salt gets washed off, so kosher meat isn't saltier than non-kosher, either, just to head that myth off at the pass)

I've never considered peanut butter to be in the savory category. In my mind it's eaten primarily in sandwiches either alone or with jam or honey. Otherwise it's used to make sweets like peanut butter cookies or peanut butter cups.

Americans generally do think of peanut butter in the "sweet" category- it's usually used in cookies, sandwiches, or candy. Dishes that use it as a savory flavoring tend to be Asian or African, and relatively new to most of us in the last 20 years. Dave Barry made a joke once years ago about men's cooking, talking about a husband who "had made 10 dinners over the last 20 years, 8 of which involved peanut butter". Tom Lehrer also joked about "peanut butter stew". It's not funny if you know about things like satay or groundnut stew.

Maybe what we think of as peanut butter is slightly different from what you'd get if you asked for peanut butter in a British supermarket?

Peanut butter and jello? Gross.

Anything and jello- gross, in the same way that "anything and a big steaming dog turd" would be gross.

Ximenean
03-03-2008, 04:26 PM
Peanut butter here is used almost exclusively as a sandwich filling, and very rarely with anything else in the sandwich - just bread, butter or margarine, and peanut butter. British peanut butter does seem to be less creamy and slightly less sugary than American. The no. 1 brand by some distance is Sun-Pat, and the supermarket brands are suspiciously similar, like they're made in the same factory. They do sell US brands like Skippy too.

Hogwash
03-03-2008, 05:04 PM
FWIW, I'm a Brit that regularly has peanut butter and jam together, although I almost always have it on toast instead of in a sandwich.

It truly is a match made in Heaven. The saltiness of the peanut butter helps temper the sweetness of the jam. It's a great snack for winter nights when you need the extra calories that buttered toast alone won't provide.

Ponster
03-03-2008, 05:56 PM
Abrakebabra (Oirish Kebab chain) does a nice chip butty.

Abrakebabra?

nice?

Sorry, you lose the Internet game !

Thudlow Boink
03-03-2008, 07:35 PM
But I'm a Brit and understand that "peanut butter and jelly" to you means "peanut butter and jam" to me. And it still sounds gross. As I've posted in other food threads, we Brits do not mix savoury and sweet like the Merkins do.Which one are you calling "savoury"? To me, they're both sweet. And is peanut butter & chocolate (as in Reese's Peanut Butter Cups) eaten over there?
I couldn't find any sort of meat pie anywhere when I was over there - how about you? It was kind of weird, walking into a bakery and seeing not a single pie, pasty or sausage rollThe closest thing to a meat pie in the parts of America I'm familiar with is pot pie (e.g. chicken pot pie, which has chicken and vegetables in gravy baked in a pie crust), which is not uncommon in restaurants and readily available in the frozen food section of most grocery stores.

That, or pizza "pies," calzones, and such.

pulykamell
03-03-2008, 07:43 PM
Which one are you calling "savoury"? To me, they're both sweet.

To me, peanut butter is savory. I'm American, but I don't think of peanut butter as sweet--it's salty and nutty. The commercial brands like Skippy and such have enough sweetness to keep the kids eating it, and the more "natural" blends have very little, if any, sugar at all.

Martini Enfield
03-03-2008, 07:46 PM
The closest thing to a meat pie in the parts of America I'm familiar with is pot pie (e.g. chicken pot pie, which has chicken and vegetables in gravy baked in a pie crust), which is not uncommon in restaurants and readily available in the frozen food section of most grocery stores.

Ironically, Australian pies do not typically contain chicken. You can get them, but when you say "Pie" here, most people immediately think of the steak kind with tomato sauce on it.

Max the Immortal
03-03-2008, 08:12 PM
The more I think about it, the more I get the sneaking suspicion that you Brits are just playing a trick on us. You really think that peanut butter doesn't go well with jam? You tried it and didn't like it? Yeah, right. We've all heard the jokes about your food, but you can't be so culinarily inept as to miss such an obvious combination. I bet you eat peanut butter and jam sandwiches all the time.

Lutefisk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk) probably isn't real, either.

devilsknew
03-03-2008, 08:29 PM
I think it is stupid. Why was Smith's statement of understanding worse than a perpetuation of hate?

I'll bet if he would have badmouthed Hitler in a hateful way he'd be applauded. Why must we hang on to hate?

Better to call an apple an apple.

whiterabbit
03-03-2008, 09:45 PM
I'm afraid lutefisk is all too real. I have relatives from Minnesota. I haven't eaten it, but I have heard alllll about it.

My Czech roommate recently made spaghetti with a pile of grated cheese (yum) and then instead of actual sauce used ketchup. And from the size of the bottles of ketchup he buys he must do this a lot, I just don't often see it since we tend to have very different schedules. I found this utterly disgusting.

I don't like ketchup anyway, but as pasta sauce?? Is this a Central Europe thing, or just a weird roommate thing?

whiterabbit
03-03-2008, 09:46 PM
I'm afraid lutefisk is all too real. I have relatives from Minnesota. I haven't eaten it, but I have heard alllll about it.

My Czech roommate recently made spaghetti with a pile of grated cheese (yum) and then instead of actual sauce used ketchup (WTF????). And from the size of the bottles of ketchup he buys he must do this a lot, I just haven't seen it since we tend to have very different schedules. I found this utterly disgusting.

I don't like ketchup anyway, but as pasta sauce?? Is this a Central Europe thing, or just a weird roommate thing?

Peanut sauce for dipping Vietnamese spring rolls is like crack for me.

threnodyangelfire
03-03-2008, 09:48 PM
When visiting New Zealand I was nonplussed when I discovered that they consider canned beet (aka "beet root") a legitimate hamburger topping. I tried it and did not care for it. On the other hand, I wish that potato wedges with sour cream were more common here in Canada. Those are sheer brilliance.

It's not a real hamburger to me without beetroot and pineapple on it!

whiterabbit
03-03-2008, 09:53 PM
Well, there's two words I never thought I'd see together.

I should have read farther back in the thread before I posted a minute ago.

Idaho Curry????

StinkyBurrito
03-03-2008, 09:54 PM
First it was foolsguinea,

Then it was chowder.

Third came pretend my name is witty.

And now nd_n8 joins this ellete group.

After reading three posts about peanut butter and mustard (especially pretend's experiment) I didn't want to be a wuss so I went into the kitchen, slapped some PB on a slice of bread, and squirted some mustard on it. I don't have English Mustard so I used a bottle of Spicy Brown Mustard left over from last summer's bratwurst.
I approached this abomination with an uncomfortable combination of fear and curiosity in the pit of my stomach, and a full glass of water just in case. I actually winced with the first bite then began to chew.
Dammit man, this was not just acceptable, it was dad burned tasty. I returned to the kitchen to add another healthy shot of mustard and made a second one. Now I'm looking forward to the stares I get when I go to work next week with a jar of Jif and a loaf of bread (there is already mustard in my fridge at work) and go to lunch.
Thanks
Nate
Lord help me, I just ate a peanutbutter and mustard sandwich. Then I made a cashew butter and mustard sandwich and ate that too. Of course I already had this (http://pbloco.com/Expand.asp?ProductCode=PB-ACS) in my cabinet.

devilsknew
03-03-2008, 10:08 PM
Lord help me, I just ate a peanutbutter and mustard sandwich. Then I made a cashew butter and mustard sandwich and ate that too. Of course I already had this (http://pbloco.com/Expand.asp?ProductCode=PB-ACS) in my cabinet.
You know what would be good? Cashew Mustard with Schnitzel... or cashew crusted schnitzel with Löwe Mustard

(Umm... that Will Smith Hitler thing was posted in the wrong thread. My bad.)

devilsknew
03-03-2008, 10:12 PM
No, it's not Schnitzel with Love Mustard, you perverts.

"Ler-va Mustard..."

Tuckerfan
03-04-2008, 05:19 AM
No, it's not Schnitzel with Love Mustard, you perverts.

"Ler-va Mustard..."
Larva with mustard??? (Actually, with anything.) Eeeewwww!















;)

Bites When Provoked
03-04-2008, 05:34 AM
And nobody has mentioned the South Australian "pie floater"? Take one bowl of pea soup, and one meat pie. Drop the meat pie into the soup. Eat (somehow).Tomato sauce is essential, too. Meat pie, tomato sauce, green pea soup. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts, honest. :)

TheLoadedDog
03-04-2008, 06:53 AM
Tomato sauce is essential, too. Meat pie, tomato sauce, green pea soup. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts, honest. :)

Yeah, yer right. Forgot the sauce. Dunno why, being a New South Welshman through and through, but I do loves me a good pie floater. Great winter fare, and as my dad would say, it'll "stick with you".


Pie'n'peas is also good.

chowder
03-04-2008, 07:16 AM
What do Brits do with peanut butter?

Well in the absence of KY................ :p

No seriously..........spread yer PB on bread and sprinkle salt on.

That jam thing is disgusting and a waste of PB

WILLASS
03-04-2008, 07:29 AM
But I'm a Brit and understand that "peanut butter and jelly" to you means "peanut butter and jam" to me. And it still sounds gross. As I've posted in other food threads, we Brits do not mix savoury and sweet like the Merkins do.

Getting back to the OP: iced tea. Full of the spirit of "when in Rome" after emigrating to the US, I tried it, and discovered that it tastes as disgusting as it sounds.

I, and loads of people I know do. I love PB&J and also love bacon or sausages with maple syrup. You should try it, it's no weirder than pork and apple sauce or turkey and cranberryreally is it?

WILLASS
03-04-2008, 07:39 AM
Peanut butter, mayonaise and cucumber sandwiches.

I'm sure this will ick most people but mainly Americans as they seem far less keen on mayo than Europeans but I can assure you it's awesome, an old flatmate of mine made them.

I have dipped pizza crusts in ketchup but this was because the sour cream and herb dip had run out and I needed something moist to dip the crusts into. It was alright, pretty much exactley what you'd expect seeing as ketchup is so acceptable a flavour.

amarone
03-04-2008, 07:42 AM
I, and loads of people I know do. I love PB&J and also love bacon or sausages with maple syrup. You should try it, it's no weirder than pork and apple sauce or turkey and cranberryreally is it? I don't like maple syrup. Or apple sauce with pork (it's OK with custard). Cranberry jelly with turkey is ok - I can take it or leave it. I admit that I am at the extreme - I rarely like sweet with savory, but in my experience it is also generally true that Brits have fewer savory/sweet combinations than Americans.

As for other comments about PB not being savory - maybe not - I don't eat it so can't claim to be an expert. From when I was a kid, I don't recall it being terribly sweet (British brands). I do remember it sticking to the roof of my mouth - yuck.

Capt. Ridley's Shooting Party
03-04-2008, 07:48 AM
Say now, that doesn't sound half bad. A well seasoned joint? Loaded with cloves and garlic and brown sugar and such?


Dripping sandwiches are what miners used to take down the pits with them, because they couldn't afford anything else. So no, there won't have been any seasoning on the dripping.

I'm not entirely sure whether chowder is pulling your leg at still enjoying dripping sandwiches, but, on the off chance he isn't, for full disclosure, I heard he's nearly 90 :p

Silence of the clams
03-04-2008, 07:58 AM
The more I think about it, the more I get the sneaking suspicion that you Brits are just playing a trick on us. You really think that peanut butter doesn't go well with jam? You tried it and didn't like it? Yeah, right. We've all heard the jokes about your food, but you can't be so culinarily inept as to miss such an obvious combination. I bet you eat peanut butter and jam sandwiches all the time.

Lutefisk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk) probably isn't real, either.

Whats wrong with lutefisk, its only fish-jello. You should try it with peanutbutter ;)

WILLASS
03-04-2008, 08:10 AM
Or apple sauce with pork (it's OK with custard)

You like pork with custard and you are calling PB&J disgusting?!?!?

Only joking but I do agree that the sweet/savoury thing is not so common in Britain as it is in America but I do find that most Brits like it when they get over their intial 'eww' factor - those salted pretzels covered in chocolate? Everyone I knew thought they sounded gross until they tried them.

phungi
03-04-2008, 08:30 AM
I spent a year in Toronto, and was shocked when someone ordered a "Beer and Clamato", thus desecrating a fine lager.

There is even a "how-to video (http://clamato.com/bar_ing09.htm)" on the Clamato web site, and recipes (http://drinksmixer.com/drink11204.html) scattered across the web.

I'm a strong man, but this makes my knees buckle.

nd_n8
03-04-2008, 09:42 AM
Dripping sandwiches are what miners used to take down the pits with them, because they couldn't afford anything else. So no, there won't have been any seasoning on the dripping.

I'm not entirely sure whether chowder is pulling your leg at still enjoying dripping sandwiches, but, on the off chance he isn't, for full disclosure, I heard he's nearly 90 :p
That's ok, I'm aware of chowder's umm... let's say superior level of experience. This is precisely what makes his input so valuable. If I should be so lucky to make it to his level of expertize I'll eat any thing I damn well please (or at least tell people I do). Tell 'em to bugger off chowder, and for the love of God put some ketchup and sugar in them beans, maybe some extra bacon as well. Might as well cowboy up and slap 'em directly on the toast as well, just like the creamed corn or the mushy peas (all three of which were staples when I was growing up).

And the Sunday lunch sounds like a great recipe for a long Sunday after lunch nap. Although from an American POV, an awesome Sunday lunch is:

1/2 southern fried chicken
Fresh coleslaw
Mashed potatos with a ton of gravy (gotta have the gravy)
Fresh corn on the cob slathered with butter and salt
Hot, flaky, buttery biscuits (probably glazed with honey)
A huge pitcher of ice cold sweet tea, maybe with a drop of lemon or a nice piece of mint.

Please note, none of the above should come from KFC, Churches, Popeye's or any place but my momma's kitchen.

YMMV though.

(I am also grossed out by the ketchup / mayonaisse thing, my ex used to mix ketchup, mayonaisse and mustard and eat it with chips (the crispy kind) or with fries (the chippy kind). UUUUCK.)

Anne Neville
03-04-2008, 09:44 AM
Whats wrong with lutefisk, its only fish-jello. You should try it with peanutbutter ;)

*heave*

All right you, get over here with a mop and a bucket now.

pulykamell
03-04-2008, 10:33 AM
I spent a year in Toronto, and was shocked when someone ordered a "Beer and Clamato", thus desecrating a fine lager.


You don't even have to cross the border to see that. There's a bit of a marketing campaign for that here in Chicago--the highway near my house has a huge billboard in Spanish implying that Budweiser + Clamato = yummers! To be honest, I could actually see it being not that bad.

nd_n8
03-04-2008, 10:55 AM
I spent a year in Toronto, and was shocked when someone ordered a "Beer and Clamato", thus desecrating a fine lager.

There is even a "how-to video (http://clamato.com/bar_ing09.htm)" on the Clamato web site, and recipes (http://drinksmixer.com/drink11204.html) scattered across the web.

I'm a strong man, but this makes my knees buckle.
Saturday I stopped at a gas station and noticed they had Budweiser and Clamato already pre-mixed in a can. I had to look twice to make sure I was seeing correctly.

nd_n8
03-04-2008, 11:05 AM
Whats wrong with lutefisk, its only fish-jello. You should try it with peanutbutter ;)
No, aspic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspic) is fish-jello. Lutefisk sounds like a high protien shampoo product.

nd_n8
03-04-2008, 11:21 AM
(didn't edit in time)

And now that I mention aspic, I have to wonder if the beef variety is not much different from chowder's pan dripping butties only without the fat? Beef drippings (and pork or chicken drippings as well) certainly have enough protein to congeal after the fat rises to the top. Put a pan of good drippings in the fridge and there will be a nice white fatty crust and a soft layer of beefy jelly underneith. Probably be good on some bread hot or cold (although if the fat is retained it would be better hot IMHO).

CalMeacham
03-04-2008, 11:32 AM
:
Originally Posted by Kotick
Whats wrong with lutefisk, its only fish-jello. You should try it with peanutbutter


No, aspic is fish-jello. Lutefisk sounds like a high protien shampoo product.



Aspic is jelloed anything.


My understanding (based on what I've read on this Board) is that Lutefisk is Highly Processed and Jelly-like Fish Now! with Lots of Added Lye!


I can't imagine eating this. I can't imagine doing anything with this. I wouldn't want to inflict it on my cats. It sounds as if a cruel work prank would be to put a serving of this in the microwave, nuke it on high, and deny everything.

An Gadaí
03-04-2008, 11:46 AM
I just looked up clamato there. That's sick sounding. Yeah and Reese's Pieces taste like crap too.

WILLASS
03-04-2008, 11:54 AM
Clamato and beer? WTF?!?!?! I like Clamato and I like beer but would be hard pushed to drink them together. I'd have to be really drunk.......

phungi
03-04-2008, 02:36 PM
Saturday I stopped at a gas station and noticed they had Budweiser and Clamato already pre-mixed in a can. I had to look twice to make sure I was seeing correctly.

I was in Toronto in 1991-1992, so this appears to have been a more recent and unfortunate export from our otherwise generous beer-loving neighbors...

nd_n8
03-04-2008, 03:15 PM
I was in Toronto in 1991-1992, so this appears to have been a more recent and unfortunate export from our otherwise generous beer-loving neighbors...
I don't know about dem fellers up nort sometimes. William Shatner, Celiene Deon, Clamato and Beer, it almost seems like a conspiracy.

But then I remember Geddy Lee and Back Bacon and all is forgiven.



As far as weird foods go, I remember as a kid my dad liked head cheese and cottage cheese, often with a little sliced tomato. I admit that I enjoyed it very much too. How would a nice slice of boiled and jellied pig head parts (eyes, ears, snout, tongue, cheeks) on a bed of curds and whey sound internationally? Sounds yummy over here.

Caractacus Pott
03-04-2008, 03:50 PM
Heh, and I thought it was just me......gotta be English mustard though :D <snip>
Uh, chowder, I tried a PB&Mustard sandwich tonight. The fridge broke, so I hotfooted it to the Co-op for some Hovis "Classic White" bread, Sun-Pat smooth peanut butter, and the only mustard they had, Colman's. It's not a bad sandwich, what little I could taste before my tongue burst into flames. Damn, that's some hot stuff! Is this how you Brits can live in these drafty flats in the winter?

What is in that Colman's? The ingredients list is simple: water, mustard flour, sugar (hah!), salt, wheat flour, spice, citric acid. I'm guessing the enigmatic "spice" is devil's farts. Maybe denatured napalm. At least the Walkers smoky bacon crisps are quelling the fire in my mouth.

Frylock
03-04-2008, 04:22 PM
What is in that Colman's? The ingredients list is simple: water, mustard flour, sugar (hah!), salt, wheat flour, spice, citric acid. I'm guessing the enigmatic "spice" is devil's farts. Maybe denatured napalm. At least the Walkers smoky bacon crisps are quelling the fire in my mouth.

Colman's is awesome. Awesome. But a very thin layer of Colman's suffices for awesomeness.

-FrL-

Caractacus Pott
03-04-2008, 04:31 PM
Frylock,

Yeah, I'll have to practice. I got the idea of the goodness of the concept, though. It's not nearly as heavy as PB+J.

Adding something to the OP. Has anyone mentioned baked beans (beanz) on bread?

Frylock
03-04-2008, 05:08 PM
Frylock,

Yeah, I'll have to practice. I got the idea of the goodness of the concept, though. It's not nearly as heavy as PB+J.

Adding something to the OP. Has anyone mentioned baked beans (beanz) on bread?

Oops. don't get me wrong. PB and mustard would be disgusting. This is a priori true and those who say otherwise are clearly deceiving themselves.

I was just saying that Colemans is awesome.

-FrL-

BMax
03-04-2008, 06:34 PM
in Bandung, a city of 2 1/2 million people on the Indonesian island of Java, they eat chicken head soup. And worry about the cleanliness of food in Bali because Balinese eat pork.

TheLoadedDog
03-04-2008, 07:13 PM
in Bandung, a city of 2 1/2 million people on the Indonesian island of Java, they eat chicken head soup. And worry about the cleanliness of food in Bali because Balinese eat pork.

In Vietnam and Hong Kong (and Australia in the migrant communities), I've eaten a whole range of arguably disgusting things from unhatched duckling to snake to pigs' intestines to pigeon. Yet, show those guys a lamb cutlet or a piece of cheese, and they will recoil in horror.


All part of the fun, I guess.

devilsknew
03-04-2008, 10:36 PM
Adding something to the OP. Has anyone mentioned baked beans (beanz) on bread?

I've eaten proper cold American baked bean sandwiches on Pumpernickel and Rye (ya know, pork and beans truly baked up long and slow, till thick and rich, with brown sugar, mollasses, ketchup, bacon and onions.). The beans aren't runny, but a sweet ambrosiac paste.

It's something of an after Easter sandwich that I picked up from my Grandma and Grandpa. I've eaten them with and without thick slices of Easter Ham (Baked Beans and Ham are Easter staples in my family.)

Harmonious Discord
03-04-2008, 11:49 PM
I figure that lutefiske contains soap, when the fat in the meat reacts with the lye. Ummm. Soapy stinky halibut slicker than snot sliding to the stomach made the traditional Scandinavian way. :p

chowder
03-05-2008, 02:40 AM
Dripping sandwiches are what miners used to take down the pits with them, because they couldn't afford anything else. So no, there won't have been any seasoning on the dripping.

I'm not entirely sure whether chowder is pulling your leg at still enjoying dripping sandwiches, but, on the off chance he isn't, for full disclosure, I heard he's nearly 90 :p

Cheeky sod, I'm 66 years young.

Unfortunately I no longer enjoy drippin' butties 'cos the fat from the meat these days just doesn't taste the same somehow.

Shirley Ujest
03-05-2008, 06:46 AM
I thought this until I tried it, It's bloody good I tells ya.

The maple syrup/bacon thing that Americans indulge in, is, I feel quite disgusting


From the land of Mushy Peas, you find Maple Syrup gross?


My mind boggles.

chowder
03-05-2008, 09:22 AM
From the land of Mushy Peas, you find Maple Syrup gross?


My mind boggles.
Not at all, I love it but not drizzled over bacon or sausage.

................just what is wrong with mushy peas?

devilsknew
03-05-2008, 09:41 AM
I'm an American that's not huge on the maple flavor either. I don't mind it on my pancakes and french toast, but I don't really like it flavoring my bacon or sausage. Maple is just such a huge flavor, and very cloying. I also can't stand smelling it on my hands an hour after I eat a stack. I hate that artificial maple flavored sausage as well. However, I do like Maple Nut Goodies (http://groovycandies.com/V2ProdDetail1.asp?Product_ID=482).

Solfy
03-05-2008, 10:25 AM
That sounds similar to the sandwiches they make at Primanti Brothers (http://primantibrothers.com/) in Pittsburgh.

(Incidentally, I've never eaten a Primanti Brothers sandwich but I'd like to at least once in my life. Pittsburgh/Western PA dopers, are they worth it?)

As for eating "odd" things with french fries, I've noticed dipping them in tartar sauce has gotten more common in the Pacific Northwest.

I've been to Primanti's. They're good, but I can honestly (but quietly - don't want to rile people!) say I don't know what the fuss is about. I'm not a big coleslaw fan, though. They're certainly worth it if you happen to be in the area, and they've expanded their locations in the past few years and are easier to come by.

WotNot
03-05-2008, 11:24 AM
What is in that Colman's? The ingredients list is simple: water, mustard flour, sugar (hah!), salt, wheat flour, spice, citric acid. I'm guessing the enigmatic "spice" is devil's farts. Maybe denatured napalm. At least the Walkers smoky bacon crisps are quelling the fire in my mouth.
To the best of my knowledge, the only spice used in Colman's mustard is a touch of turmeric – and that's primarily to enhance the colour. All the heat comes from the mustard flour. The heat of mustard depends on which seed you use, which part of it you include in the flour, and what liquid you use – I believe water tends to give you a fierier taste than the wine vinegar these pansy foreign mustards have in them.

SmackFu
03-05-2008, 11:45 AM
Peanut butter here is used almost exclusively as a sandwich filling, and very rarely with anything else in the sandwich - just bread, butter or margarine, and peanut butter. It's funny how this works. Peanut Butter and butter? That's weird.

In Costa Rica, they had rum & coke in a can. Well, Cuba Libre was what they called it. Weird but awesome. Ever seen this anywhere else?

chowder
03-05-2008, 11:45 AM
If you want a really hot mustard may I point you in the direction of:

English Mustard with Horseradish.

Once tried never forgotten

chowder
03-05-2008, 11:49 AM
To the best of my knowledge, the only spice used in Colman's mustard is a touch of turmeric – and that's primarily to enhance the colour. All the heat comes from the mustard flour. The heat of mustard depends on which seed you use, which part of it you include in the flour, and what liquid you use – I believe water tends to give you a fierier taste than the wine vinegar these pansy foreign mustards have in them.
wrong forum :smack:

Caractacus Pott
03-05-2008, 12:04 PM
I've eaten proper cold American baked bean sandwiches on Pumpernickel and Rye (ya know, pork and beans truly baked up long and slow, till thick and rich, with brown sugar, mollasses, ketchup, bacon and onions.). The beans aren't runny, but a sweet ambrosiac paste.

It's something of an after Easter sandwich that I picked up from my Grandma and Grandpa. I've eaten them with and without thick slices of Easter Ham (Baked Beans and Ham are Easter staples in my family.)
Are you British? I ask because Heinz Beanz are different than American baked beans (sauce is thinner). Should I spread some Colman's on that, too? Or peanut butter? Or peanut butter and mustard?

phungi
03-05-2008, 01:25 PM
That sounds similar to the sandwiches they make at Primanti Brothers in Pittsburgh. (Incidentally, I've never eaten a Primanti Brothers sandwich but I'd like to at least once in my life. Pittsburgh/Western PA dopers, are they worth it?)

I've had "Pittsburgh-style" sandwiches on two occasions, both times in Pittsburgh. I'm not a fan of cole slaw or fries on sandwiches, but this was one formidable and tasty sandwich. The crisp hot fries against the cold crunch of the cole slaw, along with the salty corned beef was one-of-a-kind. Mind you, the sandwich contained the caloric equivalent of 3 full meals, and, combined with 2 beers, nearly placed me in a carbohydrate-overload coma!

devilsknew
03-05-2008, 01:55 PM
Are you British? I ask because Heinz Beanz are different than American baked beans (sauce is thinner). Should I spread some Colman's on that, too? Or peanut butter? Or peanut butter and mustard?
I'm American.

When we speak of baked beans in America, nine times out of ten we mean homemade baked beans. Or at least semi-homemade baked beans that involve cans of Pork and Beans (similar to Heinz Baked Beanz). Here's my easy baked bean recipe for you.

Best Merkin Baked Beans

4 or 5 cans of Heinz Baked Beanz (415 g cans)
1 medium chopped onion
1/4 cup of dark brown sugar
1/4 cup of dark mollases
3 tblsp. ketchup
5 slices of bacon

Chuck the beans, onions, brown sugar, and liquid ingredients into a large shallow baking dish (a 9x13 pan works well) and stir to combine. Float the slices of bacon across the top. Bake at 160C for around two to two and a half hours.

devilsknew
03-05-2008, 02:09 PM
I'm estimating on the measurements for the ketchup, mollasses, and brown sugar. I never measure... but basically, you want it fairly sweet and dark but not too liquid. Try to keep some viscosity.

Prepared mustard or dry mustard powder is also a good addition to this basic baked bean recipe. So yes, you can work the colman's in there before or after the fact. Hearty NO on the peanut butter.

Bites When Provoked
03-07-2008, 07:26 AM
How would a nice slice of boiled and jellied pig head parts (eyes, ears, snout, tongue, cheeks) on a bed of curds and whey sound internationally? Sounds yummy over here.I may never find the courage to travel overseas again... :eek:

WILLASS
03-07-2008, 08:08 AM
In Costa Rica, they had rum & coke in a can. Well, Cuba Libre was what they called it. Weird but awesome. Ever seen this anywhere else?

I don't understand why this is weird? It's a classic drink, just in a can - like pre-mixed Pimms or something. Is it the being in a can that's weird?

I tried the PB and mustard sandwich last night, it's actually pretty good! I reckon it would be nice with some cucumber in it as well though......

Walpurgis
03-07-2008, 08:58 AM
My understanding (based on what I've read on this Board) is that Lutefisk is Highly Processed and Jelly-like Fish Now! with Lots of Added Lye!


I can't imagine eating this. I can't imagine doing anything with this. I wouldn't want to inflict it on my cats. It sounds as if a cruel work prank would be to put a serving of this in the microwave, nuke it on high, and deny everything.

It's not that horrific, doesn't really taste much. At home people drown it in sauce and green peas which accounts for most of the tatse. If anything, lutfisk tastes vaguely like, well... baked semen.

Harmonious Discord
03-07-2008, 09:13 AM
I'm American.

When we speak of baked beans in America, nine times out of ten we mean homemade baked beans. Or at least semi-homemade baked beans that involve cans of Pork and Beans (similar to Heinz Baked Beanz). Here's my easy baked bean recipe for you.

Best Merkin Baked Beans

4 or 5 cans of Heinz Baked Beanz (415 g cans)
1 medium chopped onion
1/4 cup of dark brown sugar
1/4 cup of dark mollases
3 tblsp. ketchup
5 slices of bacon

Chuck the beans, onions, brown sugar, and liquid ingredients into a large shallow baking dish (a 9x13 pan works well) and stir to combine. Float the slices of bacon across the top. Bake at 160C for around two to two and a half hours.


Mother would throw wieners one top with a spiral cut on the outside. Weiners baked in the baked beans are really good. I guess the term should be franks though. Frank n Beans. Ring Baloney works too.

Anne Neville
03-07-2008, 09:32 AM
It's funny how this works. Peanut Butter and butter? That's weird.

That sounded disgusting to me.

How would a nice slice of boiled and jellied pig head parts (eyes, ears, snout, tongue, cheeks) on a bed of curds and whey sound internationally? Sounds yummy over here.

I'm sorry- if there's anywhere in the world where that sounds yummy, the rest of us are going to have to nuke it from orbit.

chowder
03-07-2008, 09:36 AM
It's not that horrific, doesn't really taste much. At home people drown it in sauce and green peas which accounts for most of the tatse. If anything, lutfisk tastes vaguely like, well... baked semen.

So you're a fan of baked semen then.

Each to their own I guess

Walpurgis
03-07-2008, 09:40 AM
So you're a fan of baked semen then.

Each to their own I guess

Not really - I avoid the dish. What I meant was that it's more slightly icky than horrific. Pretty mild compared to other monstrosities like fermented herring (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming).

Sitnam
03-07-2008, 09:42 AM
Birmingham England, the land of sprouts and pineapple on pizza and boiled chicken served cold <shudder>.

Just about every bowl of soup I ordered in Southern China and Vietnam had chicken feet in it.

even sven
03-07-2008, 12:06 PM
Cameroon doesn't quite get the whole "sandwich" thing.

My usual breakfast sandwich is a bean sandwich. Just red beans on baguette with the unholy hot habenero based local hot sauce. My usual night-on-the-town sandwich is the amazing speghetti-omelette sandwich. It sounds gross, but it is actually quite good and amazingly filling.

Beer-soda combinations are big here. Guiness and Coke is the classic, but grenadine (a horrible red soda that tastes like Swedish Fish) is mixed with lighter beers. We can also get whiskey-coke and gin-tonic premixed, though they taste horrific.

SmackFu
03-07-2008, 01:22 PM
I don't understand why this is weird? It's a classic drink, just in a can - like pre-mixed Pimms or something. Is it the being in a can that's weird?Well, I agree. Yet it completely doesn't exist in the US, unless I'm missing it somehow. Probably due to the alcohol regulations. We don't really have hard alcohol in a can.

amarinth
03-07-2008, 03:28 PM
I had a lot of great meals and great snacks in NZ. It's the first place I've ever eaten lamb and liked it. And though there were some weird things, most nearly everything was lovely.

But for the love of all that is holy, bacon should be cooked. It should not be waved in the general direction of an oven (or maybe just placed in a warmish room for a while) and then served to unsuspecting tourists. The first time I thought that the chef was just having an off day. But then it kept happening over and over (I'm a slow learner), as toppings, ingredients, side dishes...raw bacon. It does not taste good. Plus trichinosis. Just saying.

MissGypsy
03-07-2008, 08:13 PM
Well, I agree. Yet it completely doesn't exist in the US, unless I'm missing it somehow. Probably due to the alcohol regulations. We don't really have hard alcohol in a can.

I don't know if it's still around, but Jack Daniels used to market Jack & cola in a can, and I think Bacardi did the rum & cola. This was back in my college days, 15 years ago, and it was pretty nasty even then. Don't know if it was the canning process, or some weird cola that they used, but it was barely drinkable.

Stillwell Angel
03-08-2008, 08:48 AM
It's funny how this works. Peanut Butter and butter? That's weird.

Actually I love this. The butter really doesn't add any flavor to the sandwich but it keeps the peanut butter from sticking in your mouth. Makes it much easier to chew and swallow.

Jennyrosity
03-08-2008, 09:37 AM
When I was a student, a Texan room-mate made us all Thanksgiving dinner, which included mashed sweet potatoes with marshmallows melted onto them as a side dish. It was bizarre.... and faintly reminiscent of the pink mouthwash you get at the dentist.

I've never had a dripping sandwich as such, but when I was little my grandma used to dip a slice of bread in the hot essence of the roast beef for me, and I remember it being one of the most delicious tastes ever. You can't do that anymore - as chowder says, the fat on beef these days just isn't right for it.

That makes me sound really old, doesn't it?

pulykamell
03-08-2008, 11:50 AM
Pretty mild compared to other monstrosities like fermented herring (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming).

Surströmming is the most disgusting stuff I've ever eaten. And I like strongly flavored food.

Caractacus Pott
03-08-2008, 12:57 PM
I'm American.

When we speak of baked beans in America, nine times out of ten we mean homemade baked beans. Or at least semi-homemade baked beans that involve cans of Pork and Beans (similar to Heinz Baked Beanz). <snip>.I'm an American too, but newly transplanted to England. Beanz don't seem to do well in sandwiches, in my mind. Too runny. American style, other than the basic "tomato" kind, seems like it'd do better on bread. I learned the hard way that Heinz's provactively named Big Saucy Bangers (http://wilkinsonplus.com/invt/0264417) is definitely NOT beans and franks.

ForumBot
03-08-2008, 01:01 PM
Egg on burger is delicious. I'm really, really craving this gourmet burger I picked up in Madrid now that was loaded up with all sorts of things. Mmmmmmm.

Walpurgis
03-08-2008, 01:03 PM
Surströmming is the most disgusting stuff I've ever eaten. And I like strongly flavored food.

You actually got close enough to eat it? You have my deepest respect.

As for other combinations, during a trip to Wales this weekend me and my S.O. taught mystified Welshmen to put jam on their cheese sandwiches. They liked it, but had no idea such a thing could be done. :D In exchange, my S.O. has now learned to eat everything with malt vinegar on top. I've picked that up earlier and absolutely love it - doesn't seem to be practiced outside the UK though. Malt vinegar on french fries, any kind of fish, anything fried really - yum!

pulykamell
03-08-2008, 04:29 PM
You actually got close enough to eat it? You have my deepest respect.

I got it mail-order. From time to time, I buy snus, and I was really fascinated by the description of surströmming on the Scandinavian goods mail order site I use, so I decided to put in an order for it. I'm usually very disappointed by what people deem "disgusting" (I mean, really, head cheese, cold boiled chicken, chicken feet in soup? Pfft...not that weird.) Surströmming did not disappoint. I love pickled herring. I love fermented stuff. I love fish sauce, anchovies, all that sort of thing. I thought to myself, how bad can this stuff really be?

Really bad. I opened it on my front steps (taking heed of warnings I read online about not eating it indoors), and instantly a swarm of flies spontaneously appeared. It was the oddest thing. The scent was something of a cross between a dog's ass and rotting meat. I am not exaggerating. I ate a little filet with some flatbread. "It tastes better than it smells," my ass. It tastes exactly as bad as it smells. I don't understand what would possess anyone to voluntarily eat this stuff.

Unfortunately, I chugged some beer to wash the flavor down, which meant for the next few hours, I burping that flavor back up. The spot on the steps where some of the brine dripped became a solid black carpet of flies.

Would I try it again? Well, when in Stockholm....

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