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Ice Cream Man
04-29-2008, 01:22 PM
I recently finished reading Reflex by Steven Gould. It's the sequel Jumper (which has a passing resemblance to the movie). Both books are fun reads and I really recommend them if that's your thing.

Anyway, for those that are unaware the books feature someone who has the ability to teleport. I find that I really enjoy reading sci-fi books about people who have powers and deal with them in today's society. It goes along with the day dreaming I often find myself doing.

So does anyone know of other books similar to Reflex and Jumper in that normal people in current society discover they have powers and deal with that realization?

RealityChuck
04-29-2008, 01:35 PM
Robert Silverberg's Dying Inside (telepathy).

Ice Cream Man
04-29-2008, 01:44 PM
Robert Silverberg's Dying Inside (telepathy).

That looks really good. Too bad it's out of print!

ChiefScott
04-29-2008, 01:45 PM
Dianetics -- L. Ron Hubbard

The Bible

NAF1138
04-29-2008, 01:58 PM
It's not exactly what you are looking for, but the first thing that the OP made me think of was the Wild Cards series of mosaic novels edited by George R.R. Martin.

They are short stories about superhero (supervillian) types that pop up after the world in infected with a plague.

IIRC 50% of the world is immune. Of the 50% that is not immune 99% die horrible deaths. Of that remaining 1%, 99 out of a hundred become Jokers (horribly disfigured monsters). The remaining 1% become Aces who resemble classic style superheroes.

My numbers may be wrong, but that's the basic idea. A group of writers take this main idea and build short story collections about the Ace's and Jokers (or norms) in the world post plague.

There are a lot of volumes, and they aren't all great, but the first 5 volumes or so are worth a read. And there is some awesome sci-fi writing in them.

Wiki link that describes the series better (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Cards)

Guinastasia
04-29-2008, 02:09 PM
Would Stephen King's The Dead Zone count?

AuntiePam
04-29-2008, 02:30 PM
Ooooh, Dead Zone's a good choice.

Also, Second Son by Charles Sailor, and The Touch by F. Paul Wilson.

RealityChuck
04-29-2008, 02:36 PM
Older model: Slan by A. E. Van Vogt.

I haven't read it, but you might try Michael Bishop's Count Geiger's Blues.

The fact that Dying Inside is out of print is a condemnation of the US book industry. I'm surprised NESFA Press hasn't picked it up -- it's a classic novel, not just of science fiction, but of literature in general.

Eleanor of Aquitaine
04-29-2008, 02:47 PM
Ken Grimwood's Replay is about a guy who keeps living his life over and over again. It's sort of like having "powers" because he retains the knowledge of all his previous lives.

Horatio Hellpop
04-29-2008, 02:48 PM
Gladiatorr by Philip Wylie

Odd John by Olaf Stapledon

Chances are they're out of print, too.

ianzin
04-29-2008, 02:49 PM
If being invisible counts as a 'power', then you may like to read both the original 'Invisible Man' by H.G.Wells and 'Memoirs of an Invisible Man' by HF Saint which is a very creditable and entertaining modern re-telling of the same plot. The latter was the basis for a 1992 John Carpenter movie that, though neither very good nor very bad, failed to match the quality of the book and shouldn't put you off reading it. Wells also gave us 'The Man Who Could Work Miracles', a short story that was turned into a better than average movie back in 1936.

'The Midwych Cuckoos' by John Wyndham offers a very good twist on the 'people suddenly get special powers' theme, in that the empowered ones are children and the story is told not from their point of view but from the point of view of those whose lives they impact.

'

Annie-Xmas
04-29-2008, 02:51 PM
Would Stephen King's The Dead Zone count?

What about Carrie?

Ice Cream Man
04-29-2008, 02:54 PM
Ken Grimwood's Replay is about a guy who keeps living his life over and over again. It's sort of like having "powers" because he retains the knowledge of all his previous lives.

I love Replay and constantly lend it to my friends.

Glory
04-29-2008, 03:18 PM
Firestarter should definitely count! I love Replay too :)

Also - To Ride Pegasus (http://amazon.com/Ride-Pegasus-Anne-Mccaffrey/dp/0345336038/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209496639&sr=8-1) by Anne McCaffrey. I haven't read it in ages (and some of her books haven't held up with age for me) but I remember really liking it at the time.

CalMeacham
04-29-2008, 03:25 PM
Not today's world, but I highly recommend Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man (which won the first Hugo, and is about committing the Perfect Crime in a world with telepaths) and The Stars my Destination (teleportation).

In both novels the abilities are in the open and widesopread, but not universal.

pinkfreud
04-29-2008, 03:26 PM
Kevin O'Donnell, Jr's The Journeys of McGill Feighan is a series of novels about a "flinger" (a person who can teleport himself, other people, or objects). Good stuff. (If you decide to give this series a try, be sure to read the books in order, starting with Caverns (http://amazon.com/Caverns-Journeys-Mcgill-Feighan-No/dp/0425074692).)

Glory
04-29-2008, 03:32 PM
Oh, I forgot - The Fermata (http://amazon.com/Fermata-Vintage-Blue-Nicholson-Baker/dp/0099466929/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209497472&sr=8-1). I haven't read it since it came out, I remember it being quite teh sexxor - but I was a lot younger!

BrainGlutton
04-29-2008, 03:33 PM
Children of the Atom, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children_of_the_Atom) by Wilmar Shiras. In real life, prenatal exposure to high radiation is as like as not to produce children with parts missing. In some books, especially comic books, children with telepathic and telekinetic powers. In this novel, children with impossibly high IQs.

See also The Boy Who Could Fly, (http://amazon.com/Boy-Who-Could-Robert-Newman/dp/0380007479/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209497654&sr=1-1) by Robert Newman. (He never does fly in the story, but he's superbrilliant and probably a telepath.)

Baldwin
04-29-2008, 03:37 PM
Ken Grimwood's Replay is about a guy who keeps living his life over and over again. It's sort of like having "powers" because he retains the knowledge of all his previous lives.Thanks to you, I just ordered that book.

I'd also recommend The Fermata by Nicholson Baker. Features a protagonist who has the ability to stop time, and uses it -- well, the way a lot of us might. Not for everybody; in a way, the whole book is an extended sexual fantasy.

BrainGlutton
04-29-2008, 03:53 PM
In S.M. Stirling's Draka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draka) novel Drakon, the Draka, always culturally committed to the idea of being superhuman, have become so literally through genetic engineering. No telepathy or telekinesis, but they're super-strong, super-tough, super-smart (but a bit limited in imagination and creativity), super-acute in their senses, super-horny, and capable of dominating unmodified humans through the pheromones they exude.

Der Trihs
04-29-2008, 04:11 PM
The I Inside by Alan Dean Foster. Set in a sci-fi future, the main character starts demonstrating superhuman powers under stress, for reasons totally unknown to him ( but later revealed ). Mostly superhuman strength, speed and durability.

Slipt by Alan Dean Foster features an old man with a power that - to start with - is just a parlor trick where he pops the tops off jars and bottles with his mind; he's never cared about it or really done anything with it. The Bad Guys want to lock him up or worse to study him, and he's forced to figure out how his power works and to stretch it farther and farther until he's gone well beyond parlor tricks.

Coils by Roger Zelazny involves an amnesiac who discovers his true identity, memories and powers ( he's essentially telepathic with machines ), and comes into conflict with other empowered people ( a telekinetic and a telepath, I recall offhand ).

Der Trihs
04-29-2008, 04:20 PM
The Kundalini Equation by Steven Barnes. Basically written by asking the question, "What if that human potential and secret-wisdom-of-the-ages stuff was actually true ?" The main character unlocks ( with help from books written by Savagi, someone who had a little bit of the ancient knowledge that he stole ) long lost techniques that grant him superhuman powers and perceptions. What he doesn't know is that the cult Savagi started is still out there, watching and manipulating him; that what he's discovered isn't some generic make-yourself-superhuman technique, but a make-yourself-a-living-weapon technique; and that he has no idea how to shut it off or control it.

Annie-Xmas
04-29-2008, 04:27 PM
Stephen King seems to have a lot of these--Rose Madder & Insomnia should also be on the list.

Elendil's Heir
04-29-2008, 04:35 PM
Joe Haldeman's Tool of the Trade is a terrific Cold War tale of a guy who acquires mind control (through technological means). One of my favorite SF books - I re-read it every few years. A fascinating premise and thrilling in the telling.

Watchmen is a great graphic novel about superheroes with problems. Big problems.

For the movies, you can't go wrong with The Incredibles.

WordMan
04-29-2008, 04:43 PM
I immediately thought of Replay - love it.

I love Bester's books, too CalMeacham

I thought about Stephen King and Dean Koontz...

I would add Fortress of Solitude by Jonathan Lethem - it's about growing up in Brooklyn in the 70's - and some super-power type stuff. Lethem is a wonderful writer and the book was very well received by critics - but in this case, that's actually a good thing!

Did anyone read that book that came out last year written from a super villain's perspective? The cover was a winged helmet or something? Darn - what is the name? Not really what the OP is looking for, but I remember reading reviews that sounded fun and interesting. I think the name is some cliche saying that a super villian might say...

pinkfreud
04-29-2008, 04:51 PM
Did anyone read that book that came out last year written from a super villain's perspective? The cover was a winged helmet or something? Darn - what is the name? Not really what the OP is looking for, but I remember reading reviews that sounded fun and interesting. I think the name is some cliche saying that a super villian might say...Soon I Will Be Invincible (http://amazon.com/Soon-Will-Be-Invincible-Novel/dp/0375424865)? I haven't read it, but a friend is crazy about it.

Dung Beetle
04-29-2008, 04:53 PM
Stephen King's The Shining also.

WordMan
04-29-2008, 05:13 PM
Soon I Will Be Invincible (http://amazon.com/Soon-Will-Be-Invincible-Novel/dp/0375424865)? I haven't read it, but a friend is crazy about it.

Yes! That's it! Thanks. I gotta get that book...so I just followed your link and did!

Motorgirl
04-29-2008, 05:33 PM
That looks really good. Too bad it's out of print!

Not sure if this will help you, but the Montreal public library system has a French edition of the book. (http://nelligan.ville.montreal.qc.ca/search*frc?/Xsilverberg%20dying%20inside&SORT=D/Xsilverberg%20dying%20inside&SORT=D&SUBKEY=silverberg%20dying%20inside/1%2C3%2C3%2CB/frameset&FF=Xsilverberg%20dying%20inside&SORT=D&1%2C1%2C)

BrainGlutton
04-29-2008, 05:35 PM
Gladiatorr by Philip Wylie

Odd John by Olaf Stapledon

Chances are they're out of print, too.

Ah, yes, Odd John. (http://davidszondy.com/future/man/odd_john.htm)

And Slan. (http://davidszondy.com/future/man/Slan.htm)

MadPansy64
04-29-2008, 06:15 PM
Zena Henderson's The People books and stories. They've been out of print for at least 20 years, but used are available on Amazon.

The People were crash-landed aliens with assorted psychic powers, who assimilate reasonably well into earth (mostly, if not entirely US) culture, while trying to hide while maintaining their abilities. Well written, and entertaining, they fall into the fantasy genre, NOT horror.

Going by memory, the titles are The People, No Different Flesh; Holding Wonder; Pilgramage; and The Holding Box, and it seems like there is one more. They stand alone, as they're more interconnected short story collections than a series, IIRC.

I'm not allowing myself to even open Amazon right now, or I'd give you links with prices, and perhaps a coherent review or two. :D

AuntiePam
04-29-2008, 06:51 PM
Zena Henderson's The People books and stories. They've been out of print for at least 20 years, but used are available on Amazon.

I think NEFSA put out a one-volume collection too, for about $40. Well worth the money.

Seconding, thirding etc. Replay -- best time travel story ever.

pinkfreud
04-29-2008, 07:04 PM
I have never read Replay. I don't think I ever even heard of it until today. I just ordered a used copy from Half.com. I love the SDMB! Thanks, y'all. Group hug.

I'd like to echo the comments about Zenna Henderson. Wonderful, haunting, memorable stories.

Meurglys
04-29-2008, 07:05 PM
There's a UK edition of Dying Inside by Silverberg available, if anybody wants it - I expect Amazon UK will have it...

And somebody mentioned Count Geiger's Blues by Michael Bishop; it's pretty good, but not great - another book kind-of like it is Flyboy Action Figure Comes with Gasmask (http://amazon.com/Flyboy-Action-Figure-Comes-Gasmask/dp/0380810433/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209509963&sr=8-1) by Jim Munroe where 2 students realise they have special powers and decide to do the right thing, and fight crime (more or less!)

wonderlust
04-29-2008, 07:15 PM
I've been thinking about this topic recently, as well. I've noticed all the tv shows about super-powered people, and have been wondering whether this is due to people feeling powerless in the real world.

I loved Replay as well, and have been looking for books such as the OP asks for. Thanks for all the good recommendations.

Recently I greatly enjoyed Natasha Mostert's Season of the Witch (http://amazon.com/Season-Witch-Natasha-Mostert/dp/B000VPKFA4/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209510484&sr=8-1), in which the main character has "remote viewing" ability.

MadPansy64
04-29-2008, 08:02 PM
I think NEFSA put out a one-volume collection too, for about $40. Well worth the money.
So much for my resistance to the temptation known as Amazon. :p

Zena Henderson Complete People Stories (http://amazon.com/Ingathering-Complete-People-Stories-Henderson/dp/0915368587/ref=wl_itt_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=I3FWNWR88UNDAG&colid=3AZ3IOGVAQ8QE) $20!

The Them
04-30-2008, 12:28 AM
Bacchus by Eddie Cambell (comic book). Greek mythology for real, in the 1990s.

:smack: myself 'cause I can NOT remember...a childrens' book, with this kid who meets a sorcerer who gives him the ability to grow wings, and the kid does stuff like rescue a littler kid stranded on a rowboat in Long Island Sound...dang...set in the 1940s...dang me! This is just escaping me!

wonderlust
04-30-2008, 12:56 AM
So much for my resistance to the temptation known as Amazon. :p

Zena Henderson Complete People Stories (http://amazon.com/Ingathering-Complete-People-Stories-Henderson/dp/0915368587/ref=wl_itt_dp?ie=UTF8&coliid=I3FWNWR88UNDAG&colid=3AZ3IOGVAQ8QE) $20!I ordered it too!

Decades ago, I remember looking everywhere for the Anything Box, but without the internet in those days, finding a book was really difficult. In fact I may have some of these packed in the garage, but some of my books were water-damaged.

Risha
04-30-2008, 01:08 AM
:smack: myself 'cause I can NOT remember...a childrens' book, with this kid who meets a sorcerer who gives him the ability to grow wings, and the kid does stuff like rescue a littler kid stranded on a rowboat in Long Island Sound...dang...set in the 1940s...dang me! This is just escaping me!I think that you're thinking of Zilpha Keatley Snyder's Black and Blue Magic (http://amazon.com/Black-Magic-Zilpha-Keatley-Snyder/dp/0595321828/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209531269&sr=1-9). If not, you should be. I loved her stuff as a kid.

There's a lot of possibilities if we start digging into children's books and YA. For instance, Margaret Mahy's Changeover (http://amazon.com/Changeover-Supernatural-Romance-Margaret-Mahy/dp/0140365990/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209531499&sr=1-5), Willo Davis Robert's The Girl With the Silver Eyes (http://amazon.com/Girl-Silver-Eyes-Apple-Paperbacks/dp/0590442481/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209531610&sr=1-1), and a good sized chunk of Diana Wynne Jones' oeuvre (http://amazon.com/Deep-Secret-Diana-Wynne-Jones/dp/0765342472/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209531903&sr=1-13).

Risha
04-30-2008, 01:15 AM
And I just thought of a more recent example: Scott Westerfeld's Midnighters (http://amazon.com/Midnighters-1-Secret-Hour/dp/0060519533/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209532342&sr=1-1) series. I'm not always thrilled by his endings, but the series overall was OK and definitely fits the theme the OP is looking for.

ToeJam
04-30-2008, 01:22 AM
Bacchus by Eddie Cambell (comic book). Greek mythology for real, in the 1990s.

I should check that one out, esp. if it's written for adults.
The Lightning Thief is a similar thing with the protagonist being a "Greek Demi-God" sorta superpowers, except that it's written for like... 12 year olds or so.
But it's really entertaining if you KNOW your Greek mythology, then you get all the inside jokes.

Mojo Pin
04-30-2008, 01:28 AM
The Chrysalids, by John Wyndham
Not superpowers in everyday life, but superpowers in a post apocalyptic future, with generous undertones of social commentary on the dangers of dogma.
(don't be put off by the really really bad cover)

devilsknew
04-30-2008, 02:27 AM
Zena Henderson's The People books and stories. They've been out of print for at least 20 years, but used are available on Amazon.

The People were crash-landed aliens with assorted psychic powers, who assimilate reasonably well into earth (mostly, if not entirely US) culture, while trying to hide while maintaining their abilities. Well written, and entertaining, they fall into the fantasy genre, NOT horror.

Going by memory, the titles are The People, No Different Flesh; Holding Wonder; Pilgramage; and The Holding Box, and it seems like there is one more. They stand alone, as they're more interconnected short story collections than a series, IIRC.

I'm not allowing myself to even open Amazon right now, or I'd give you links with prices, and perhaps a coherent review or two. :D

Sounds like Stranger in a Strange Land by Heinlein. Another book I would add to this list. However, it falls into Dianetics territory for me, as I have encountered groups who take this book as a religous tome.

Risha
04-30-2008, 07:21 AM
One more - a SciFi classic, Theodore Sturgeon's More Than Human (http://amazon.com/More-Than-Human-Theodore-Sturgeon/dp/0375703713/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209554307&sr=8-3). Several people who are somewhat outcast in our normal society (disabled, the wrong color, etc) find by accident that when they're together, they're greater than the sum of their parts.

MarcusF
04-30-2008, 08:04 AM
Thinking of Stranger in a Strange Land there are a good number of Heinlein short stories about people with special powers. The one I can remember off hand is Lost Legacy in Assignment in Eternity. A group of students discover they can develop latent telepathic and telekinetic powers ....

detop
04-30-2008, 08:28 AM
Frank Robinson's The Power, but it is probably out of print.

BrainGlutton
04-30-2008, 09:22 AM
Thinking of Stranger in a Strange Land there are a good number of Heinlein short stories about people with special powers. The one I can remember off hand is Lost Legacy in Assignment in Eternity. A group of students discover they can develop latent telepathic and telekinetic powers ....

Then there's Andy Libby -- from Methusaleh's Children, though he first appears in a short story of which I forget the title. Not a telepath or anything, just a mathematical genius, one with "an intutitive knowledge of mathematical relationship." Despite a near-complete lack of formal education, he can, all subconsciously and instantly, estimate the diameter of the planetoid he's standing on by eyeballing the level of the horizon -- "That's the only way it could be."

jayjay
04-30-2008, 10:13 AM
To piggyback off of Glory's recommendation of To Ride Pegasus, I'd go on to recommend that entire series, from that volume all the way through Lyon's Pride, at least.

To Ride Pegasus
Pegasus In Flight
Pegasus In Space
(Interval of at least 100 years)
The Rowan
Damia
Damia's Children
Lyon's Pride
The Tower And The Hive

I say the interval is at least 100 years because there is a Peter Reidinger IV in The Rowan. The original Peter Reidinger is a child in the Pegasus books. So it's at LEAST four generations between those and the later books, but it could be more, since a designation of IV doesn't necessarily mean that all four of them were consecutive with each other.

The powers in those books, by the way, span the gamut of psychic talents, from telepathy to the ability to teleport multi-ton spaceships hundreds of light-years.

Glory
04-30-2008, 11:33 AM
Dean Koontz has several books featuring people with powers. He's pretty hit or miss with me, but I definitely liked and would recommend Lightning and Strangers. Powers are also featured in The Bad Place, Cold Fire, Odd Thomas and Twilight Eyes, but they are weaker books, in my opinion.

well he's back
04-30-2008, 11:48 AM
People with special powers – this is a big part of the story in the “Obernewtyn” novel and its sequels by Isobelle Carmody, I enjoyed those a lot, and recommend them.

NAF1138
04-30-2008, 11:51 AM
I should check that one out, esp. if it's written for adults.
The Lightning Thief is a similar thing with the protagonist being a "Greek Demi-God" sorta superpowers, except that it's written for like... 12 year olds or so.
But it's really entertaining if you KNOW your Greek mythology, then you get all the inside jokes.

Bacchus is awesome. In fact everything that Eddie Campbell does is awesome.

Most of what Eddie does has nothing to do with superpowers, but I heartilly recommend everything he has written. He and Sam Kieth were my heroes when I was starting to explore non traditional comics.

The Alec stories are semi autobiographicall, Alex has no superpowers, but they are awesome stories and worth a read.

Speaking of Sam Kieth, the Maxx is a fantastic comic series that holds up surprisingly well. It's kind of sort of about a person who discovers she has powers.

Kind of.

Also see Zero Girl by Sam Kieth.

Helena
04-30-2008, 12:56 PM
Crawford Killian's Lifter is about a high-school nerd who figures out how to fly. The ending is rather lame but it's a good fun read. One of my favorite books, in fact.

I quite enjoyed Children of the Atom. I have to wonder if it was the inspiration for Willo Davis Roberts' The Girl with the Silver Eyes.

Elendil's Heir
04-30-2008, 01:08 PM
The first Dune has a lot about mental powers. A great book, a well-deserved classic. But all of the rest of the books in the series are, IMHO, not worth anyone's time.

Shodan
04-30-2008, 02:59 PM
E.E. "Doc" Smith wrote tons of this kind of thing. His Lensman series in particular, Galaxy Prime - even in the Skylark series they wound up telepathic eventually.

And John W. Campbell wrote a series beginning with The Black Star Passes, also featuring telepathy. It speeds up the plot considerably to bypass having to learn the language. And sooner or later they build headsets that tap the ambient energy of the universe and become more or less omnipotent.

Regards,
Shodan

Max Torque
04-30-2008, 05:09 PM
Here's one I recall from way back when, that I quite enjoyed as a young reader: Christopher (http://amazon.com/Christopher-Magic-Powers-Richard-Koff/dp/0595179665/) (they may call it Christopher and his Magic Powers today, but I remember the earlier, more enigmatic title). The book is basically about a boy who bravely knocks on the door of a supposedly haunted house, wherein he meets "The Headmaster", a mysterious person who knows an awful lot about Christopher. Over the course of the book, he helps Christopher develop his mental abilities, with the aid of some little gold cubes with binary numbers on them (I still think of this book when I use binary).

Anyway, it's aimed at younger readers, but I remember liking the book a lot.

Der Trihs
04-30-2008, 07:42 PM
In Galatea in 2-D, the hero, an artist, discovers that he has the power to make his paintings come to life. And that he's not alone, and that the other guy who can do this is a very bad man indeed. The details of how the power works are nicely thought out.

Achren
04-30-2008, 08:14 PM
People with special powers – this is a big part of the story in the “Obernewtyn” novel and its sequels by Isobelle Carmody, I enjoyed those a lot, and recommend them.
Except that AFAIK, books 4 and 5 aren't being published in the US. And it costs about $30 to buy the used paperback for book 4. I'm all kinds of bitter about this.

Septima
04-30-2008, 09:19 PM
"Assasins Aprentice" and its sequels, by Robin Hobb, features two "powers": The Skill, which is more or less telepathy with some other stuff added to it; and The Wit, which is some odd variant off psychic empathy, with the ability to talk to animals thrown in.

The Skill is uncommon, but not unheard of (like being a super athlete or having a perfect ear for music), and gives a certain amount of status. Almost all members of the royal family have it.

The Skill is a lot more uncommon, and people who don't have it (and some of those who do) view it as a perversion; anyone who openly has it will be treated with a mixture of fear and disgust.

The main character, a royal bastard, has both, which is a bit of a problem.

wonderlust
05-01-2008, 01:03 PM
While probably not of interest to you, but significant enough to deserve a mention, is the immense surge of books about shapeshifters such as vampires, werewolves, etc.

Septima
05-02-2008, 05:24 AM
"The Wit is a lot more uncommon..."

I'm tired.

Kat
05-02-2008, 10:41 PM
Wen Spencer's Ukiah Oregon novels (Alien Taste, Tainted Trail, Bitter Waters and Dog Warrier) are about a feral child turned private detective who has enhanced senses and other abilities.

Gerome
05-03-2008, 02:27 AM
Well, there's a few Philip K Dick novels about people with some degree of psychic ability. For instance, a few of the characters in The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch are precognitive, and have made careers out of it. It's not usually the most important part of the story, though, kind of an secondary aspect.

XaMcQ
05-03-2008, 12:29 PM
Wen Spencer's Ukiah Oregon novels (Alien Taste, Tainted Trail, Bitter Waters and Dog Warrier) are about a feral child turned private detective who has enhanced senses and other abilities.

You beat me to it, Kat. I love those books. There some great recommendations here. You might also like E.E. Knight's Vampire Earth series.

For some darker but thought-provoking material, you could try John Ridley's Those Who Walk in Darkness (http://amazon.com/Those-Walk-Darkness-John-Ridley/dp/0446612022/ref=pd_bbs_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209831308&sr=8-5) and What Fire Cannot Burn (http://amazon.com/What-Fire-Cannot-Burn-Ridley/dp/0446612030/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209831308&sr=8-1), about cops who hunt people with superpowers, or Thirsty (http://amazon.com/Thirsty-M-T-Anderson/dp/076362750X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209831883&sr=1-1) by M.T. Anderson, about a boy who is becoming a vampire in a world where that is a very bad fate indeed.

Yumblie
05-03-2008, 01:26 PM
It's less a power and more of a disability, but The Time Traveler's Wife features a man who's born with a genetic disorder that causes him to randomly pop into different times. He often ends up meeting himself and his wife as children, but surprisingly the whole thing holds together as a consistent timeline.

Harmonious Discord
05-03-2008, 01:47 PM
The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin
The power to dream reality.

mbh
05-03-2008, 02:22 PM
Larry Niven's stories about Gil Hamilton. A collection of short stories, published under the title The Long A.R.M. of Gil Hamilton, and a novel titled The Patchwork Girll. I believe they have recently been re-published, all in one volume, under the title Flatlander.

When one of his arms is amputated, Hamilton develops an "imaginary arm". Psychokinesis allows the "arm" to pick up objects, and ESP gives the "arm" a sense of touch. He can only reach the distance of his natural arm, but he can reach through solid objects. He returns to Earth, and becomes a cop, working for an agency called the A.R.M. (Thus, the triple pun in the title of the short story collection.)

squeegee
05-03-2008, 03:26 PM
Then there's Andy Libby -- from Methusaleh's Children, though he first appears in a short story of which I forget the title.Misfit

The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin
The power to dream reality.Yeah, Lathe of Heaven was awesome. Really short, though.

Eleanor of Aquitaine
05-03-2008, 04:41 PM
While probably not of interest to you, but significant enough to deserve a mention, is the immense surge of books about shapeshifters such as vampires, werewolves, etc.Yes, I was thinking that the OP might like some of the ones that involve magical people in modern-day, mundane settings, like Jim Butcher's Dresden Files books, Charlaine Harris's Southern Vampire series (HBO is making a show based on these) or Tanya Huff's Blood series.

Lynn Bodoni
05-04-2008, 05:23 AM
Andre Norton (may she rest in peace) wrote a great many books about people (not necessarily humans) with assorted powers.

I just got into reading the Preacher series of graphic novels. While the main character DOES have a power, generally he relies on more physical means.

Sunshine by Robin McKinley is very good.

I'm very fond of Dianna Wynne Jones's books.

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
05-04-2008, 06:22 AM
Ishmael is about a telepathic gorilla, but the meat of the book is a compelling (imho) look at human history, the religions of the world, and the global food supply.

And another nod for The Fermata.

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