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aceplace57
01-20-2010, 11:32 PM
My grandmother bought Bundt Cake mixes in the 70's and 80's. My uncle loved them plain without the sugar glazing.

A few years ago I got nostalgic and went to buy a Bundt Cake mix. They weren't in the stores. :smack:

The wikipedia article doesn't mention the mixes either.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bundt_cake

I know I'm not imagining this. There was a Bundt Cake mix that came with a little package of sugar glaze that could be drizzled over the top. There was lemon, strawberry, and a few other flavors. There was even one that made a coconut macaroon filling in the center of the cake.

I always thought the company that made the mixes made the pan too.

Anyone recall these?

**update** I just found this short discussion. I'm not the only one missing these great cakes.
http://inthe70s.com/food/bundtcakemixpillsbury0.shtml

MitzeKatze
01-20-2010, 11:39 PM
Heh...this is funny because I just saw a Bundt cake mix the other day and mentioned that it had been forever since I had seen one. I remember seeing them (and baking them) when I was a kid, and as an adult I make Bundt cakes occasionally without a mix...

I think that regular cake mixes have directions for using a Bundt cake pan, at least sometimes...and the glaze is simple enough to make without a mix. Maybe everyone just started doing that and the mix became redundant? ;)

I saw the Bundt cake mix at a Price Chopper for what it's worth, but I don't remember the brand. If I go there again soon (I rarely do because it is higher than other grocery stores, but it is the closest to my house so I go when I just need one thing, really quickly) I will check on the brand and report back. :)


ETA: I just googled "Bundt Cake Mix" and it looks like they are still readily available at Amazon.com and Target, so maybe we have just been over-looking them for years?

GilaB
01-20-2010, 11:41 PM
There were mixes? I have a Bundt pan, in which I make cakes from scratch all the time. None of the recipes particularly call for Bundt pans, but I like the look, especially if it's an otherwise plain-looking cake. It's my only silicone pan, because while silicone doesn't give the same browning that a metal pan does, I'd only make a Bundt cake if I could peel the pan off the wavy areas.

aceplace57
01-20-2010, 11:59 PM
ETA: I just googled "Bundt Cake Mix" and it looks like they are still readily available at Amazon.com and Target, so maybe we have just been over-looking them for years?

I saw that too. Apparently, a new company has started selling them. I couldn't find a Bundt mix a few years ago. I wonder if the new mixes are as good?

Pillsbury made the Bundt Cake mixes in the 70's & 80's.

Found some more info.
For those who may have used Bundt cake recipes in the past, these are a new presentation. In the 1970s, Nordic Ware licensed Pillsbury to produce the Bundt cake mix line. It was immensely successful, but the popularity of cake mixes began to fade during the 1980s with the rise of the foodie movement and a renewed interest in “scratch” baking. The line was ultimately discontinued (and certain mixes are still lamented on recipe sites and bulletin boards).

http://thenibble.com/zine/archives/bundt-mixes-bundt-pans.asp

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
01-21-2010, 12:04 AM
There was even one that made a coconut macaroon filling in the center of the cake.

Oh yum...I haven't thought of that since the '70s. Now I want one!!!

Runs With Scissors
01-21-2010, 12:15 AM
I just made my first ever Bundt a month ago. Here's the recipe. (It's a heart attack in a pan, but is sooooooo freaking good.)

Eggnog Poundcake

Cream:
1 ½ c. butter (real butter)
3 c. sugar

Add:
5 eggs, beating after each egg!

Mix:
3 c. flour,
¾ tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. nutmeg

Add dry ingredients, alternating with
1 c. eggnog, plus
1 tsp. vanilla

Grease a large bundt pan or 3 loaf pans.
Bake at 350 for 70 minutes.
Be careful not to overbake.
Cool the cake at least 10-15 minutes before you remove it from the pan.

Glaze
¼ c. butter
2/3 c. sugar
1/3 c. eggnog
½ tsp. nutmeg

*Rum or rum flavoring can be added (I do add rum or rum flavoring depending on where I am taking it)

Heat until sugar is dissolved then add flavorings. Pour over cake while it is warm. Let cake really soak - I let it soak at least four hours or so. I like for the glaze to get sugary again.

salinqmind
01-21-2010, 12:18 AM
I don't know why you would need a bundt cake mix, it's no different from any other cake mix. I have a box of Pillsbury cake mix (to make a cake for 5 year olds) that has baking instructions on the back for cupcakes and different size pans, including bundt cakes. My own bundt pan is older than my marriage, I'm toying with the idea of getting one of those castles or giant flower shaped bundt pans.

Look up nordicware.com, they have a line of bundt cake mixes (including Sticky Toffee, nom nom)

Walloon
01-21-2010, 03:36 AM
For Christmas, I made from scratch a Prune Kumquat Sticky Pudding with Armagnac Toffee Sauce, and baked it in a Bundt pan. Served it with a scoop of rum raisin ice cream. Oh my, that was good. We kept coming back into the kitchen all evening to have another piece.

Harmonious Discord
01-21-2010, 07:46 AM
Bunt is just a shape differentiation and and certain type of frosting for a regular cake. Look at the cooking time section of the box on a cake mix and there is a time given for bunt cake.

Sigmagirl
01-21-2010, 08:26 AM
Making the cake is no problem; it's the "tunnel o'fudge" that's the tricky part. Or "tunnel o'coconut cream," as was the case with the first Bundt cake I ever had, which my aunt baked for my xxth birthday. 12th? I don't remember. Yum.

aceplace57
01-21-2010, 08:55 AM
Bundt cakes represent a slice of my childhood. My grandmother and I were the only night owls in the family. I'd sometimes stay over at her house. She'd often bake at 1AM. She didn't have cable and it gave her something to do. I still remember sitting in the kitchen and talking while she pulled the bundt cake mixes out of her pantry. She made scratch cakes too. I always got a homemade carrot cake for my birthday. Carrot cake is still my favorite.

otternell
01-21-2010, 09:35 AM
I love all the shapes of pans that nordicware has for bundt cakes. Until reading this thread I thought Bundt was all about the pan - I had no idea that there was a specific cake mix.

My favorite thing to make in my bundt pan is pull apart bread or monkey bread. ooohhh with the gooey bits . . . .mmmm!

freekalette
01-21-2010, 09:37 AM
I just made my first ever Bundt a month ago. Here's the recipe. (It's a heart attack in a pan, but is sooooooo freaking good.)

Eggnog Poundcake

<snip>

Thanks for posting this NOM-alicious recipe! I'm off to the store to get ingredients to make this for the weekend.

stargazer
01-21-2010, 10:55 AM
Making the cake is no problem; it's the "tunnel o'fudge" that's the tricky part. Or "tunnel o'coconut cream," as was the case with the first Bundt cake I ever had, which my aunt baked for my xxth birthday. 12th? I don't remember. Yum.

Well, if you can figure out a recipe for the tunnel material, it's pretty easy to create the tunnel effect. You mix your cake batter, pour about half into your bundt pan. Use a spoon to create a little moat in the middle of the batter, all the way around the pan. Pour your filling material into the moat. Pour the rest of the cake batter on top, being careful to cover all the filling, and bake. Voila! Tunnel o' filling!

aceplace57
01-21-2010, 11:07 AM
Here's the coconut macaroon filling.
Make the filling. Beat 1 egg white in a small bowl until peaks form. Gradually beat in 1/4 cup sugar Beat until stiff peaks form. Fold in coconut, 1 tablespoon flour and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Set aside.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/chocolate-macaroon-bundt-cake/detail.aspx

An Arky
01-21-2010, 11:19 AM
You can still make a Bundt cake just fine; I do sometimes. What I want back is Jello 123 (http://rubylane.com/shops/firesidetreasures/item/9411) .

freckafree
01-21-2010, 11:22 AM
Well, if you can figure out a recipe for the tunnel material, it's pretty easy to create the tunnel effect. You mix your cake batter, pour about half into your bundt pan. Use a spoon to create a little moat in the middle of the batter, all the way around the pan. Pour your filling material into the moat. Pour the rest of the cake batter on top, being careful to cover all the filling, and bake. Voila! Tunnel o' filling!

According to the Pillsbury web site (http://pillsbury.com/recipes/showrecipe.aspx?rid=11510), the tunnel forms "mysteriously," without added ingredients!

In Winnipeg
01-21-2010, 11:23 AM
Jello 1-2-3 was fine, but whatever happened to Whip n'Chill?

aceplace57
01-21-2010, 11:31 AM
Uncle Phaedrus has a clone recipe. I haven't tried it. I will this weekend. ;)

scroll all the way to the end. looks very easy
http://hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m061002.htm

You can still make a Bundt cake just fine; I do sometimes. What I want back is Jello 123 (http://rubylane.com/shops/firesidetreasures/item/9411) .

Sigmagirl
01-21-2010, 11:49 AM
According to the Pillsbury web site (http://pillsbury.com/recipes/showrecipe.aspx?rid=11510), the tunnel forms "mysteriously," without added ingredients!

So do my hips in the winter.

Tanbarkie
01-21-2010, 12:29 PM
We've used a bundt pan to make lasagna a few times - it works surprisingly well. It looks like a giant pasta donut, and every piece is a "side" piece.

Mmm... bundtsagna.

joyfool
01-21-2010, 12:50 PM
Gosh, this is making me hungry. :) I love bundt cakes, but what I'm missing right now is the Tres Leche cake mix that Duncan Hines sells. Of course, after I fell in love with it, my local Wal*Mart has quit carrying it. I now have a recipe, but I wonder if it'll be close to the same....

GilaB
01-21-2010, 12:57 PM
The NYT ran an article (http://nytimes.com/2004/12/28/science/28bake.html?scp=3&sq=tunnel%20of%20fudge%20corriher&st=cse) on the food scientist Shirley Corriher some years back, in which she used the example of the tunnel of fudge cake and figuring out how that worked, without making a separate 'filling' as described by stargazer. The recipe is here (http://nytimes.com/2004/12/28/science/28rbake1.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=tunnel%20of%20fudge%20corriher&st=cse). I didn't have a Bundt pan when the recipe came out, so I made it in an ordinary tube pan, but something went wrong, and my fudge wasn't particularly fudgey. (This may have been because I tried to make it non-dairy - who knows?) Anyway, if it works, voila, a tunnel without added ingredients!

stargazer
01-21-2010, 01:02 PM
According to the Pillsbury web site (http://pillsbury.com/recipes/showrecipe.aspx?rid=11510), the tunnel forms "mysteriously," without added ingredients!

Now, that's just weird. I wonder if it's slightly undercooked? Like the chocolate lava cakes you see at restaurants (or can make at home, I know, but most of us aren't likely to do so).

muldoonthief
01-21-2010, 01:33 PM
What happened to Bundt Cakes?

Spoonerisms.

The NYT ran an article (http://nytimes.com/2004/12/28/science/28bake.html?scp=3&sq=tunnel%20of%20fudge%20corriher&st=cse) on the food scientist Shirley Corriher some years back, in which she used the example of the tunnel of fudge cake and figuring out how that worked, without making a separate 'filling' as described by stargazer. The recipe is here (http://nytimes.com/2004/12/28/science/28rbake1.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=tunnel%20of%20fudge%20corriher&st=cse). I didn't have a Bundt pan when the recipe came out, so I made it in an ordinary tube pan, but something went wrong, and my fudge wasn't particularly fudgey. (This may have been because I tried to make it non-dairy - who knows?) Anyway, if it works, voila, a tunnel without added ingredients!

Shirley used to be on Good Eats a lot. She was great at explaining the chemical reactions going on in the food. Even better than the silly prop models Alton used.

gang green
01-21-2010, 01:46 PM
As I recall (and I made many of these when I was young), the filling was a separate mix pack, and you just spooned it in a ring over the batter. It would sink into the cake during baking and you'd end up with the distinctive white macaroon filling just beneath the top of the cake.

I hadn't really noticed that they had stopped making the mixes. I'm more of a brownie fiend nowadays.

MitzeKatze
01-21-2010, 02:55 PM
You can still make a Bundt cake just fine; I do sometimes. What I want back is Jello 123 (http://rubylane.com/shops/firesidetreasures/item/9411) .

You don't need that either. I am pretty sure it was pulled because of redundancy, it is easy to do without the special box. Here are the directions from Kraft (http://kraftrecipes.com/kf/recipes/jell-o-1-2-3-dessert-91448.aspx) and here is one from a random recipe site I googled up (http://recipecircus.com/recipes/DollyJ/DESSERTS/Jello_1_2_3.html).

kenobi 65
01-21-2010, 02:59 PM
Prune Kumquat Sticky Pudding with Armagnac Toffee Sauce

Wasn't that a character on an episode of "Monty Python"?

Shoeless
01-21-2010, 04:13 PM
I love all the shapes of pans that nordicware has for bundt cakes. Until reading this thread I thought Bundt was all about the pan - I had no idea that there was a specific cake mix.

My favorite thing to make in my bundt pan is pull apart bread or monkey bread. ooohhh with the gooey bits . . . .mmmm!

In our house it's called "bubble bread", but yeah that's about the only thing we use our bundt pan for anymore. (Mmmm.... bubble bread....)

No wait, I take that back. My wife has a recipe for a blueberry cake that's made from tofu (no milk or eggs) which she sometimes makes for her vegan daughter's birthday. She makes that one in the bundt pan too.

gwendee
01-21-2010, 04:35 PM
We've used a bundt pan to make lasagna a few times - it works surprisingly well. It looks like a giant pasta donut, and every piece is a "side" piece.

Mmm... bundtsagna.

That sounds fantastic...I'm definitely trying it. Thanks!

LunarPlexus
01-21-2010, 05:59 PM
According to the Pillsbury web site (http://pillsbury.com/recipes/showrecipe.aspx?rid=11510), the tunnel forms "mysteriously," without added ingredients!

Oddly, I was just reading about this last week. The original Tunnel of Fudge cake - winner of the 1966 Pillsbury Bake-Off® - turned an obscure pan basically made by one guy in his basement into a staple of kitchens everywhere. The magic ingredient was Pillsbury Double Dutch Fudge Butter Cream Frosting mix. The frosting was mixed into the batter and mysteriously formed a tunnel.

Pillsbury discontinued the frosting in the '80s and has retconned the recipe a couple of times, but, evidently, it just ain't the same.

From Cookoff: Recipe Fever in America (Heartbreak, glory, and big money on the competitive cooking circuit) by Amy Sutherland, a somewhat interesting book I stumbled upon in the cookbook section of my library.

LunarPlexus
01-21-2010, 06:08 PM
Missed edit window: Recipe won the second grand prize, not the grand, grand prize. $5,000, a kitchen full of GE appliances, and a TRACTOR!

Jack Batty
01-21-2010, 06:17 PM
Well, there were already two outs, and besides, Cakes was hitting .350 against left-handers.

Parenchyma
01-21-2010, 06:24 PM
Now, that's just weird. I wonder if it's slightly undercooked? Like the chocolate lava cakes you see at restaurants (or can make at home, I know, but most of us aren't likely to do so).

Trader Joe's has a little frozen twin-pack of chocolate lava cakes for about 3 bucks that take only 60 seconds to nuke into hot magma lusciousness.

Harmonious Discord
01-21-2010, 06:26 PM
You don't need that either. I am pretty sure it was pulled because of redundancy, it is easy to do without the special box. Here are the directions from Kraft (http://kraftrecipes.com/kf/recipes/jell-o-1-2-3-dessert-91448.aspx) and here is one from a random recipe site I googled up (http://recipecircus.com/recipes/DollyJ/DESSERTS/Jello_1_2_3.html).

I don't see the magical third layer. There were 3 layers were there not?

MitzeKatze
01-21-2010, 06:33 PM
I don't see the magical third layer. There were 3 layers were there not?

You are right but the first (bottom) layer was just plain Jell-O wasn't it? So you could make some Jello and then let it set for a few minutes then do it that way and pour it on top if you wanted three layers. More steps I know, but still not too bad.

I haven't thought about Jell-O 1-2-3 in so long I am not sure if I remember the original. ;)

RainGrowsBrite
01-21-2010, 06:35 PM
Best Bundt Cakes EVER!:

http://nothingbundtcakes.com/

Especially the White Chocolate Raspberry. I know the locations are few, but I have seen people just flip over these cakes!

Harmonious Discord
01-21-2010, 06:46 PM
You are right but the first (bottom) layer was just plain Jell-O wasn't it? So you could make some Jello and then let it set for a few minutes then do it that way and pour it on top if you wanted three layers. More steps I know, but still not too bad.

I haven't thought about Jell-O 1-2-3 in so long I am not sure if I remember the original. ;)

There was also something by jello that had a layer of chocolate on the top. Do you remember what that was?

MitzeKatze
01-21-2010, 06:52 PM
There was also something by jello that had a layer of chocolate on the top. Do you remember what that was?

I don't remember it, but I found this googling...could it be Spoon Candy (http://inthe70s.com/food/spooncandy5.shtml)?

Oh also I found Dr. Oetker makes a Jell-O 1-2-3 dessert mix. They call it Trio Treat (http://oetker.us/en/product/dessert-mixes/gelatin) and it comes in Grape, Strawberry, Lime or Orange. :)

kath94
01-21-2010, 06:59 PM
Oh yum...I haven't thought of that since the '70s. Now I want one!!!

What I want back is Jello 123 (http://rubylane.com/shops/firesidetreasures/item/9411) .

Aw, man, you guys are making me wish I was 10 again!

As I recall (and I made many of these when I was young), the filling was a separate mix pack, and you just spooned it in a ring over the batter. It would sink into the cake during baking and you'd end up with the distinctive white macaroon filling just beneath the top of the cake.

I missed the tunnel of fudge. That was the BEST tasting part of the cake.

kath94
01-21-2010, 07:02 PM
Oh also I found Dr. Oetker makes a Jell-O 1-2-3 dessert mix. They call it Trio Treat (http://oetker.us/en/product/dessert-mixes/gelatin) and it comes in Grape, Strawberry, Lime or Orange. :)

I was just thinking about Jell-o 1-2-3 last week. I tried some of the refrigerated Jell-o sugar-free mousse puddings in chocolate, and the first thing that came to my mind was, "This is the consistency of one of the Jell-o 1-2-3 layers."

Harmonious Discord
01-21-2010, 07:48 PM
I don't remember it, but I found this googling...could it be Spoon Candy (http://inthe70s.com/food/spooncandy5.shtml)?

Oh also I found Dr. Oetker makes a Jell-O 1-2-3 dessert mix. They call it Trio Treat (http://oetker.us/en/product/dessert-mixes/gelatin) and it comes in Grape, Strawberry, Lime or Orange. :)

It could very well be Spoon Candy. I really can't be positive any more.

ahoffman
12-08-2010, 12:30 AM
ive missed them too and i figured out how to make the black forest one u just make a choclate one and get cherry pie filling and pour over top its great

Lightray
12-08-2010, 10:01 AM
Oddly, I was just reading about this last week. The original Tunnel of Fudge cake - winner of the 1966 Pillsbury Bake-Off® - turned an obscure pan basically made by one guy in his basement into a staple of kitchens everywhere. The magic ingredient was Pillsbury Double Dutch Fudge Butter Cream Frosting mix. The frosting was mixed into the batter and mysteriously formed a tunnel.

Pillsbury discontinued the frosting in the '80s and has retconned the recipe a couple of times, but, evidently, it just ain't the same.
That sounds familiar... didn't Cook's Illustrated recreate that, a while back? Off to google...

Cook's Country (http://cookscountry.com/pwlogin.asp?did=4576&area=recipe&iseason=), but yeah. I remember thinking that was one to try. And now y'all have made me nostalgic-curious about it.

Mallory
12-08-2010, 11:01 PM
Gosh, this is making me hungry. :) I love bundt cakes, but what I'm missing right now is the Tres Leche cake mix that Duncan Hines sells. Of course, after I fell in love with it, my local Wal*Mart has quit carrying it. I now have a recipe, but I wonder if it'll be close to the same....

Found it here: http://crossroads-market.com/hard-to-find-grocer/Duncan-Hines-Tres-Leche-3-Milk-Cake-Mix-1825oz/productinfo/HFDE455/

Little Nemo
12-09-2010, 12:38 AM
I was at a flea market a few months back and picked up an old Bundt cookbook put out by Nordicware. I haven't used any of the recipes yet because I don't have a bundt cakepan at the moment but here's a couple of their recipes.

Tunnel of Fudge cake

1 3/4 cups butter or margarine, softened
1 3/4 cups granulated sugar
6 eggs
2 cups powdered sugar
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
3/4 cup cocoa
2 cups chopped walnuts (the nuts are necessary for this recipe and should not be omitted)

Glaze:
3/4 cup powdered sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons milk

Beat butter and granulated sugar together until fluffy.
Add the eggs one at a time and beat the mixture after each one.
Gradually blend in the powdered sugar.
Blend in the flour, cocoa, and walnuts.
Spoon into a 10 or 12 cup bundt pan.
Bake at 350 degrees for sixty minutes. You can't test the cake for being done because it's supposed to have a gooey center.
Let the cake cool in the pan for an hour then invert it onto a plate. Let if cool the rest of the way.
Mix the glaze ingredients and spoon over the top of the cake. Let it drip down the sides.


Chocolate Macaroon cake

2 cups shifted flour
1 3/4 cups sugar
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons vanilla
3/4 cup cold water
1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup sour cream
4 eggs (reserve one egg white for the filling)

Filling:
1 egg white
1/4 cup sugar
1 cup coconut
1 tablespoon flour
1 teaspoon vanilla

Make the filling first. Beat the egg white at high speed until peaks form. Gradually add in the sugar and keep beating. Blend in coconut, flour and vanilla by hand. Set the filling aside.

Make the cake. Combine all the ingredients. Beat them together at low speed and then mix them at medium speed for three minutes.

Pour cake batter into a floured and greased 10 or 12 cup bundt pan. Drop spoonfuls of filling into the batter.

Bake at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes. Let it cool in the pan for about 15 mins and then invert on to a plate. Let it cool the rest of the way. Top with chcocolate or orange glaze.

Fenris
12-09-2010, 10:18 AM
We've used a bundt pan to make lasagna a few times - it works surprisingly well. It looks like a giant pasta donut, and every piece is a "side" piece.

Mmm... bundtsagna.

Holy crap! :eek:

That's a GREAT idea.

Thanks!

Little Nemo
12-09-2010, 12:49 PM
We've used a bundt pan to make lasagna a few times - it works surprisingly well. It looks like a giant pasta donut, and every piece is a "side" piece.

Mmm... bundtsagna.Can you have a top layer of melted cheese? Because that's the best part of the lasagna in my opinion.

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