PDA

View Full Version : What Animals Have No Natural Enemies


Markxxx
09-11-1999, 04:47 PM
Not counting humans as enemies, AND assuming the animal is full grown and healthy I can only think of a few.

Gorilla
Elephant
Alligator
Bear (Grizzly or Polar)

I was thinking lions have hyena packs that can kill a full grown lion.

Maybe Hippos, Rhinos and Giraffes?

Any other ideas?

Jophiel
09-11-1999, 04:56 PM
Tiger
Snow Leopard (I think the others have enemies, thus them pulling carcasses up into trees)
Camel
Monitor Lizard

I'll agree with you about hippo, giraffe and rhino.

I'm sure there's a lot more, just too lazy to think up the entire food chain.

------------------
"I guess it is possible for one person to make a difference, although most of the time they probably shouldn't."

Bluepony
09-11-1999, 06:00 PM
Hmmm....I'm no natural history major so here's my WAGs.

Great white sharks
Most birds of prey
Killer whales
Crocodiles (technically different from gators)
Anacondas
Wolverines
Wolves
Blue whales
Whale sharks
Large cows with machine guns
Penguins in PT Boats
(okay...now I'm reaching, I'll just end this)

------------------
"...send lawyers, guns, and money..."

Warren Zevon

mangeorge
09-11-1999, 06:46 PM
The mighty flea, enemy to most animals. :)
Prace,
mangeorge

------------------
Work like you don't need the money.....
Love like you've never been hurt.....
Dance like nobody's watching! ....(Paraphrased)

RTA
09-11-1999, 06:57 PM
Many species that have been imported to a place they did not evolve have no natural enemies. Which is why they can devastate ecosystems.
This happens a lot on, say, South Pacific islands where animals like pigs and housecats cause a lot of problems with the native species.

Ken
09-11-1999, 06:57 PM
Don't forget about the sheep that give us steel wool.

RealityChuck
09-11-1999, 07:10 PM
The mighty flea, enemy to most animals.

"So, naturalists observe, a flea
Hath smaller fleas that on him prey;
And these have smaller still to bite 'em;
And so proceed ad infinitim

-- Jonathan Swift

(And, yes, fleas have parasites that prey on them.)

------------------
sff.net/people/rothman (http://sff.net/people/rothman)

BobT
09-11-1999, 07:39 PM
Crows and ravens

09-11-1999, 09:01 PM
Crows And Ravens? No, mink kill them, & I've seen it happen, so give me no shit.


Otters, however; they have no natural enemies.

------------------
We have met the enemy, and He is Us.--Walt Kelly

BenDover
09-11-1999, 10:44 PM
Depends on what you mean by 'natural enemies'. Prey animals have natural enemies in the predators that live off of them. Few predators have natural enemies - their lives are risky enough as it is - but occasionally conflicts over shared food sources arise, as with hyenas and lions. Some predators are prey themselves when young - for example, baby alligators are eaten by fish, birds, turtles, etc. that may, in turn, become the prey of adult alligators.

Actually, all living creatures have 'natural enemies' - disease-causing organisms such as bacteria and viruses.

Big Iron
09-12-1999, 12:55 AM
[[Crows And Ravens? No, mink kill them, & I've seen it happen, so give me no shit.]]Daniel Bostaph


Great Horned Owls will also prey on crows.

Jorge
09-12-1999, 01:31 AM
Most of the ones you all have cited as not having natural enemies do... tiger cubs, alligators (babies & eggs), etc...

Gotta be more specific.

One of the few I can think of: albatrosses have no natural enemies, not even the eggs or hatchlings. (The No.Pacific varieties, anyway, nesting on Midway and Laysan...)

------------------
"Proverbs for Paranoids, 3: If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers."
- T.Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow.

BobT
09-12-1999, 02:57 AM
I'm glad to find out that crows have some predators. Unfortunately, suburban Southern California is low on owls and minks.

I guess a really ornery cat could go after a crow, but I think it would be a tough battle.

Who preys on the pigeon?

Omniscient
09-12-1999, 04:04 AM
Hey Jorge, you may want to reread the OP.Not counting humans as enemies, AND assuming the animal is full grown and healthy I can only think of a few.

As for what animals, well most of the large animals mentioned fit the bill, but I guess its not an exact science. Water Buffalo who are full grown and healthy are pretty safe, but I wouldn't say they have no natural enemies. I guess a better question is what species have no natural predators in their environment. Here, most of the big cats fit becuase AFAIK only the kittens fall prey to hyenas and jackals. Giraffes are safe once they are grown, but thats because they are too big to be killed not because lions won't do it.

Pigeons in cities have not predators, but in the wild they do, do they count? In Australia many introduced animals have no predators, but in their original climes they do. Consideration of these situations is confusing.

Komodo(?) Dragons have no predators.

Do canibalistic animals count? Black Widows have no predators I am aware of except their own.

Humans have no enemies by some accounts. A bear or lion may kill us, but they don't prey on us.

Cattle and Buffalo probably didn't, but what things were like before domestication is beyond me.

Coral isn't eaten I don't believe, but I could be wrong.

Tigers, Dolphins, Vultures, Condors, and Horses

AuraSeer
09-12-1999, 05:25 AM
Dolphins are occasionally attacked by sharks.

Coral is eaten by the parrotfish, plus lots of other things.

Horses usually lack predators for the same reason that Yorkshire Terriers do; they're domesticated, so we humans keep their enemies away.

funneefarmer
09-12-1999, 06:14 AM
Pigeons, most of our barn cats have brought down full grown, healthy pigeons, don't they have stray cats in the city anymore?

Poto
09-12-1999, 07:27 AM
Deer in North America. Only controlled by the CAR. Hunters are less useful in population control. Other than wiping out each other.

Markxxx
09-12-1999, 09:25 AM
Most of the smaller cats are subject to attacks by lions and hyenas. Hyena packs have attacked lions. Lions attack cheetah's and leopards.

The Great Horned Owl has been known to attack eagles. Lions will attack water buffalos. (usally not a smart move by the lions but I just saw this on nature. It took the lions a long time to overpower the female buffalo).

DSYoungEsq
09-12-1999, 03:55 PM
Actually, the original post is kind of stupid. Nothing exists independent of the food chain. Even 'healthy' animals fall prey to diseases like viruses. Man him/herself has many 'natural' predators. To try and isolate the issue in terms of whether any animal 'preys' on a species is to take a very limited view of the interrelationship of the whole. :)

Diane
09-12-1999, 04:26 PM
Pigeons in cities have not predators, but in the wild they do, do they
count? In Australia many introduced animals have no predators, but in
their original climes they do. Consideration of these situations is
confusing.

Some peregrine falcons make their nests on the ledges of tall buildings. In fact, until recently, a pair would return year after year to nest upon the Joseph Smith Building in downtown Salt Lake City. Their main food was sparrows and pigeons.

------------------
>^,,^<
KITTEN

Coarse and violent nudity. Occasional language.

Jorge
09-12-1999, 04:32 PM
Omniscient, you're correct about the OP. My error, I was caught up in the swirl of the variety of assumptions (other than the ones accounted for in OP) by subsequent posters.

But I still say one needs to limit geography (brown tree snakes in Guam as opposed to native range); and time frame, too: komodo dragons had predators (a larger varanid) - they just happen to be extinct now.

Pigeons are predated upon by falcons and hawks, and as these raptors expand into the cities... So the time frame works both directions. Although:

Pigeons, most of our barn cats have brought down full grown, healthy pigeons,
don't they have stray cats in the city anymore? Apparently the growth of Szechuan restaurants and chicken nuggets has escaped notice.

Sam Stone
09-12-1999, 04:38 PM
Otters are preyed upon by all kinds of animals.

Dolphins are hunted and killed by Orcas. I'm not sure if the Orca has any natural predators.

JillGat
09-12-1999, 05:48 PM
I don't believe Cecil has addressed this topic, but he probably will in the future. So - in anticipation of that - I think Nickrz should move this thread to the "Cecil's Columns" board.
Jill
Just kidding!

Omniscient
09-12-1999, 06:31 PM
Well more of the examples listed contradict the definition as I am applying it. Hyenas have attacked big cats, and big cats attacked one another, but I don't consider it being preyed upon. They are typically just a rivalry for resources or protecting young. This is outside the definition as I chose to use it (if anyone wants to streamline a definition I'd like to hear it.) Same goes for dolphins and sharks (from what I understand dolphins swim circles around a shark and will humble it quite easily), and eagles and owls. None of these animals prey upon one another, but in certain situations (usually not by choice of either species) they will fight, kill, and sometimes eat the other. I am curious what animals killed horses in undomesticated times.

NanoByte
09-12-1999, 06:37 PM
Pigeons are predated upon. . .

Does the existence of 'predation' imply that of a corresponding verb 'predate'? My dictionary doesn't mention the latter, merely equating 'predate' to 'antedate'. I think targeted pigeons should only have "expiration" dates. Whaddaya think?

Ray

Kat
09-12-1999, 09:12 PM
I am curious what animals killed horses in undomesticated times.

I have read that cougars (mountain lions, pumas, whatever you call 'em) had a tendency to prey on horses if they happened upon them.

Omniscient
09-12-1999, 09:34 PM
I thought horses were only found on the Eurasian land mass (maybe Africa to), while the coug/puma/mountain lion was only found in the Americas. I suppose ferral horses imported by settlers may have been preyed upon, but does that make them "natural" predators?

BenDover
09-12-1999, 09:41 PM
Horses are prey to big cats, wolves, and wild dogs. Modern horses are not native to the Americas, so their natural predators would be native to Asia and Europe. However, pumas, jaguars, wolves, etc. had no problem adapting to their presence in the Americas.

Jorge
09-12-1999, 11:18 PM
A brief aside... these "top" animals don't necessarily seem to be top predators.

Markxxx
09-13-1999, 10:42 PM
I guess what I was getting at in the orginal post was what amimals can, say for example, pretty much go about their business without having to worry about getting attacked.

I mean Elephants pretty much always have the right of way. Hippos will walk into a river full of alligators (or crocs), Sperm Wales don't worry about sharks. (Actually I was reading that the biggest preditor of a shark is a larger shark).

pluto
09-14-1999, 01:58 AM
Since I have already been on a New Zealand thread this morning ...

Prior to the introduction of pigs, rats, cats, dogs, etc. by humans (starting about A.D. 1000) the birds of New Zealand (the dominant fauna) had no natural enemies, at least in the sense of predators. The only mammals on the islands were bats and pinnipeds. None of the birds were carnivorous, so although they competed with each other for ecological niches they didn't eat each other.

Two things resulted from this -- 1) a lot of flightless bird species developed, and 2) the native fauna were easy picking for the introduced predators. IIRC, in the Chatham Islands (near NZ) the lighthouse keeper's cat was personally responsible for the extinction of a number of species of small birds.


------------------
"non sunt multiplicanda entia praeter necessitatem"
-- William of Ockham

Doug Yanega
09-15-1999, 08:40 PM
Well, then, you should realize at least two important ways in which the question isn't a fair one: (1) NO animal is immune from being attacked for its *entire* life, even an elephant. (2) just because an animal has no living predators NOW doesn't mean it's always been that way. I'm sure that Dire Wolves, Saber-toothed cats, and other large Pleistocene predators preyed on a lot of modern animals before they became extinct - and other large modern predators used to occur over much larger areas than they now occupy.

Lovetheoutdoors
04-06-2017, 04:41 PM
Actually, cats don't have natural predators. There are no animals that seek out or prey on cats. Cats are strict carnivores, coyotes are not obligate carnivores. If their paths cross, they will probably fight and kill eachother.

HoneyBadgerDC
04-06-2017, 04:57 PM
Pumas will hunt and kill smaller adult wolves as a food source.
Cats are eaten by owls, hawks, eagles, coyotes, foxes.

nearwildheaven
04-06-2017, 05:00 PM
Do 18-year-old zombies have any natural predators?

:D

TSBG
04-06-2017, 05:01 PM
Actually, cats don't have natural predators. There are no animals that seek out or prey on cats. Cats are strict carnivores, coyotes are not obligate carnivores. If their paths cross, they will probably fight and kill each other.

You would feel a little differently if you lived in Southern California. Coyotes actively seek out and kill cats (and small dogs, and will stalk large dogs).

Also, while I can't say it's never happened, I've never heard of a cat owner waking up in the morning to find her living, triumphant pet with the tattered carcass of a coyote.

Procrustus
04-06-2017, 05:02 PM
Crows And Ravens? No, mink kill them, & I've seen it happen, so give me no shit.


Otters, however; they have no natural enemies.

------------------
We have met the enemy, and He is Us.--Walt Kelly

Unnamed historical poster, I can tell you that otters do have natural enemies. I saw a Bald Eagle try to catch one once. (in your defense, it was probably a few years after you posted this)

aldiboronti
04-06-2017, 07:43 PM
I agree with Omniscient above, humans have no natural enemies at all if we are discounting viruses and bacteria, as we must because no animal would qualify if we didn't. I'm sure humans had natural enemies in the past but now we sit at the top of the food chain as do lions, tigers, etc.

markn+
04-06-2017, 08:08 PM
It really depends on how you define "prey on". Polar bears certainly prey on humans by any definition. Nile crocodiles attack hundreds of people every year and kill and eat most of those they attack. Tigers kill many hundreds of people each year, although one might argue about how many of these attacks are really predation.

Ambivalid
04-06-2017, 08:25 PM
What about blue whales? I mean, what the fuck could possibly pose a physical threat to such a monster?

purplehearingaid
04-06-2017, 08:28 PM
Deer in North America. Only controlled by the CAR. Hunters are less useful in population control. Other than wiping out each other.

I saw a half eaten deer at the beach once, coyotes killed the deer and left part of it the water. We still have some coyotes left in Ma, my state.

Cockroaches don't seem to have any natural enemies, I sure wish they did !

enipla
04-06-2017, 09:07 PM
What about blue whales? I mean, what the fuck could possibly pose a physical threat to such a monster?That was going to be my first thought. Unless giant squid.

And as someone mentioned above, cougars/mountain lions. A healthy one in it's natural environment has nothing that could take it. I discount that wolves could take it because they aren't really in the same environment. And no bear could catch one, not that it would want to.

Guinastasia
04-06-2017, 10:05 PM
What about blue whales? I mean, what the fuck could possibly pose a physical threat to such a monster?

Killer whales. Orcas are the apex predators of the ocean -- they'll even eat great whites. (Seriously, if I had to be one animal on the planet, I'd be a killer whale. They're total bad asses)

Tibby or Not Tibby
04-06-2017, 10:21 PM
Killer whales. Orcas are the apex predators of the ocean -- they'll even eat great whites. (Seriously, if I had to be one animal on the planet, I'd be a killer whale. They're total bad asses)

I agree. I once messed with an orca. I won't make that mistake again.

Jophiel
04-06-2017, 10:41 PM
Actually, cats don't have natural predators. There are no animals that seek out or prey on cats. Cats are strict carnivores, coyotes are not obligate carnivores. If their paths cross, they will probably fight and kill each other.
If by "kill each other" you mean "the coyote will eat the cat on go on its happy way with a fully belly and wagging tail..."

Wild African cats (as in the little ones, not lions & leopards) are preyed upon by jackals and wild dogs.

Tibby or Not Tibby
04-06-2017, 10:57 PM
My vote for “animal” with no natural enemy is antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Pit orca against MRSA (https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007261.htm), in a cage match? I predict orca will be spanked hard...unless Chuck Norris is orca's tag team member.

Darren Garrison
04-07-2017, 06:23 AM
]My vote for “animal” with no natural enemy is antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

([URL="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacteriophage"]Throat-clearing noise (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/member.php?u=55317).)

constanze
04-07-2017, 06:30 AM
Not counting humans as enemies, AND assuming the animal is full grown and healthy

It sounds as if you are thinking of animals being attacked by other species for Food. But every adult animal is competing with the adults of its own species for Food, Habitat and mating. Two deer, or mutton sheep, will run headfirst at each other to win females.

Hippos don't eat meat, yet they cause many deaths in Africa attacking humans on the water as intruders into their space, or trampling anything underfoot when they leave the water.

Tibby or Not Tibby
04-07-2017, 06:53 AM
(Throat-clearing noise (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacteriophage).)

Yes, but prokaryotic bacteria are at least in the general neighborhood of “animal/plant” lifeforms. Viruses are more like tiny non-living rotten robots.

Darren Garrison
04-07-2017, 07:41 AM
Hippos don't eat meat

Actually, they do (http://mentalfloss.com/article/72550/hippos-eat-way-more-meat-we-thought-and-it-can-make-them-sick).

(So do cows (https://youtube.com/watch?v=EPa-NetXeUk). And deer (https://youtube.com/watch?v=sQOQdBLHrLk).)

astorian
04-07-2017, 08:06 AM
Lots of large predators are prey themselves when young. A baby python or anaconda can easily get snapped up by other larger animals.

And many large whale species have to watch out for packs of orca that can rip them to shreds.

astorian
04-07-2017, 08:08 AM
As noted, surprisingly few mammals are PURE vegetarians. Most herbivores will eat carrion if it's available, and many will pounce on a small bird or lizard for an occasional high protein snack.

DudeManBro
04-07-2017, 12:27 PM
Certain gorilla populations are at risk from leopards.

DrDeth
04-07-2017, 12:35 PM
Giant tortoise.

Mola Mola.

watchwolf49
04-07-2017, 01:46 PM
I found the recent video of lions hunting elephants ... unfortunately the lions were hunting calves so this doesn't really fit the OP ... although the elephant that was taken down isn't a calf, nor is it a full grown adult ...

Enjoy -- "Lions attack elephant - Planet Earth - BBC" (https://youtube.com/watch?v=q2ZW0EvMzSM) -- 2006 -- {YouTube 7'35"}

<Snark> Wolverine hunting Godzilla (https://youtube.com/watch?v=uKcZf_V4QYI) -- {YouTube 4'55"} </Snark>

md2000
04-07-2017, 02:06 PM
"So, naturalists observe, a flea
Hath smaller fleas that on him prey;
And these have smaller still to bite 'em;
And so proceed ad infinitim

-- Jonathan Swift

(And, yes, fleas have parasites that prey on them.)

------------------
sff.net/people/rothman (http://sff.net/people/rothman)

The version I heard once...

"Bigger fleas have smaller fleas,
Upon their backs to bite'em,
and smaller fleas have lesser fleas,
and so on, ad inifinitum..."

Weisshund
04-07-2017, 02:47 PM
I saw a half eaten deer at the beach once, coyotes killed the deer and left part of it the water. We still have some coyotes left in Ma, my state.

Cockroaches don't seem to have any natural enemies, I sure wish they did !

Sure they do
Inside your house? maybe not on a non microscopic level, outside?
Lots of things like to eat them.

Weisshund
04-07-2017, 02:57 PM
Adult great blue whale?

Silver lining
04-07-2017, 03:19 PM
Not counting humans as enemies, AND assuming the animal is full grown and healthy I can only think of a few.

Gorilla
Elephant
Alligator
Bear (Grizzly or Polar)

I was thinking lions have hyena packs that can kill a full grown lion.

Maybe Hippos, Rhinos and Giraffes?

Any other ideas?

Some Whales. Killer Whale or Sperm are examples.

The Alligator has natural enemies, such as large snakes, and hippos.

Really Not All That Bright
04-07-2017, 03:42 PM
Saltwater crocodiles and goliath tigerfish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tigerfish) appear to have no nonhuman predators.
Adult great blue whale?
Orcas will attack even mature blue whales (https://sites.google.com/a/pvlearners.net/the-blue-whale/defenses-and-predators). I don't think a successful attack has been documented, but presumably they wouldn't be trying if they couldn't pull it off once in a while.

ETA: Orcas will attack and kill sperm whales on occasion, too.

astorian
04-07-2017, 04:29 PM
Saltwater crocodiles and goliath tigerfish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tigerfish) appear to have no nonhuman predators.

Orcas will attack even mature blue whales (https://sites.google.com/a/pvlearners.net/the-blue-whale/defenses-and-predators). I don't think a successful attack has been documented, but presumably they wouldn't be trying if they couldn't pull it off once in a while.

ETA: Orcas will attack and kill sperm whales on occasion, too.

Orcas hunt in large packs, and they tend to go for baleen whales, not toothed whales.

Their target is... the tongue. If a pack of orcas keeps at a humpback whale or any other baleen whales, they may eventually be able to get its mouth open and rip out its big, tasty tongue.

If they get that, they may then swim off and leave the mortally wounded whale to die slowly.

cher3
04-07-2017, 04:49 PM
I'm glad to find out that crows have some predators. Unfortunately, suburban Southern California is low on owls and minks.

I guess a really ornery cat could go after a crow, but I think it would be a tough battle.

Who preys on the pigeon?

A barn owl near where we used to live would take a pigeon every couple of weeks or so.

DrDeth
04-07-2017, 05:08 PM
e.

Who preys on the pigeon?

Cats. Hawks. Coyotes.

Darren Garrison
04-07-2017, 05:09 PM
A barn owl near where we used to live would take a pigeon every couple of weeks or so.

Other natural enemies of the pigeon include the pelican (https://youtube.com/watch?v=0b4TU_R7J3c) and the catfish (https://youtube.com/watch?v=pwlJO789k-A).

Really Not All That Bright
04-07-2017, 05:14 PM
Orcas hunt in large packs, and they tend to go for baleen whales, not toothed whales.
Sure, but the OP didn't exclude pack hunters. Orcas do also go for toothed whales.

Irishman
04-07-2017, 05:44 PM
Great white sharks - preyed upon by killer whales
Most birds of prey - preyed upon by other birds of prey
Killer whales - I'll accept that one
Crocodiles (technically different from gators) - anacondas and crocs fight it out for dinner rights
Anacondas - crocs (and in Florida, gators)
Wolverines - maybe
Wolves - maybe
Blue whales - packs of orca
Whale sharks - I suspect orca

Crows and ravens

Birds of prey. Many birds will attack smaller birds. Crows go after blue jays. Hawks go after crows. I suspect eagles take hawks if they can. Also, cats will go after crows.


I guess a really ornery cat could go after a crow, but I think it would be a tough battle.

Naw, cats are pretty vicious predators. A house can might have a challenge with a raven, but a bobcat/lynx probably wouldn't.


Cattle and Buffalo probably didn't, but what things were like before domestication is beyond me.

North America had several large predators that would take Bison. Cattle were imported, and they are still preyed upon by wolves and pumas.


Horses

Horses were imports to North America, and even then they are susceptible to pumas and wolves. There were numerous predators in the Middle East and Europe where they originated.

Deer in North America. Only controlled by the CAR. Hunters are less useful in population control. Other than wiping out each other.

Wolves and pumas hunt deer, we just keep their populations low, too.

Same goes for dolphins and sharks (from what I understand dolphins swim circles around a shark and will humble it quite easily),

Solitary dolphins are at risk from sharks, but they tend to group up, and a pod of dolphins will chase/kill a shark. Not necessarily to eat, just for protection.


Predators= True carnivores, Prey= Herbivores, Omnivorous animals

Your definition is faulty. Carnivores eat meat. Omnivores eat meat and plants. Many omnivores hunt prey. Predator just means they hunt for food. Predator =/= carnivore.

Actually, cats don't have natural predators. There are no animals that seek out or prey on cats. Cats are strict carnivores, coyotes are not obligate carnivores. If their paths cross, they will probably fight and kill eachother.

Just because coyotes can eat plants doesn't mean they don't prey on cats. Also, big birds of prey will kill a cat if they can. I personally met a golden eagle that was in lockup because it habitually preyed on small pets.

Shalmanese
04-07-2017, 06:05 PM
An animal that is not preyed on as a healthy adult in the wild is known as an apex predator. Wikipedia has a list of them (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_apex_predators).

HoneyBadgerDC
04-07-2017, 08:03 PM
An animal that is not preyed on as a healthy adult in the wild is known as an apex predator. Wikipedia has a list of them (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_apex_predators).

This list has many animals listed that are routinely preyed upon by larger predators as a food source. I counted at least 10 just at a glance.

RivkahChaya
04-07-2017, 08:16 PM
Do 18-year-old zombies have any natural predators?

:DNot as long as you buy brains for it.

The Dodo bird had no natural predators on its island it was confined to, which is how it ended up not being very bright about them, and easy pickings for humans when discovered. And soon made extinct. If not for humans, the Dodo would likely still be there, on its island.

astro
04-07-2017, 08:26 PM
Orca tearing apart a great white shark (https://youtube.com/watch?v=K9I_DcSbZjI)

Tamerlane
04-07-2017, 08:35 PM
This list has many animals listed that are routinely preyed upon by larger predators as a food source. I counted at least 10 just at a glance.

Yeah, that is actually a very bad list relative to the OP. All kinds of critters prey on rattlesnakes for instance. Great Horned Owls alone rule out quite a few predators. They're the king of generalists in North America, with over 500 identified prey species. They'll hunt and eat anything that flies, walks, runs, crawls, hops, glides or swims in the right size range, which is very wide. Including most raptors, ravens, and many small to mid-sized mammalian predators like virtually all the mustelids - i.e. that list mentions the Striped Skunk as an apex predator, the remains of 57 of which were found in one owl's nest ;).

Qwakkeddup
04-08-2017, 12:05 AM
I have seen mention of Cows with guns, anybody for the Chickens in Choppers??

https://youtube.com/watch?v=FQMbXvn2RNI

astorian
04-08-2017, 12:47 AM
Most predators are opportunists, and hardly any will rule out attacking all members of any species.

Even if (random example), say, a cheetah is highly unlikely to attack a baboon, well, you never say never. If a cheetah is REALLY hungry, is much bigger than the baboon, and thinks it has surprise on its side... MAYBE it will take a shot.

coremelt
04-08-2017, 02:07 AM
Komodo Dragons. They're the biggest thing in their eco system. Nothing preys on them.

In Australia Quoll and Tasmanian Devil's used to have nothing that preyed on them, now introduced feral cats and foxes will sometimes attack them. Edit: Scratch that, Wedge Tail Eagles have been known to attack Quoll and Tassie devils, they are really the Apex Predator in Australia so I guess I'd add Wedge Tail Eagles to the list.

cochrane
04-08-2017, 02:49 AM
Some Whales. Killer Whale or Sperm are examples.

The Alligator has natural enemies, such as large snakes, and hippos.

Nitpick: Alligators don't share a habitat with hippos. They only live in the USA and in China. In fact, once an alligator reaches four feet in length, it is relatively safe from being preyed on by other species, although it may be eaten by a larger alligator.

And the only large snake an alligator might encounter in the wild would be a Burmese python, an invasive species in the Everglades.

Kobal2
04-08-2017, 07:49 AM
Ironically enough, sloths have very few predators despite having precious few natural defenses and no inclination to use them (nevermind the energy to). They don't move and fade into the background, so they rarely get noticed. They're covered in moss and garbage and their meat tastes awful, so predators who *do* notice learn to stop real quick.
The only time they really get attacked with any frequency is when they try and get off their lazy arse and forage around on the ground, at which time leopards and humans take notice.
Which just goes to show : don't make the effort. It's bad for you.

Darren Garrison
04-08-2017, 08:47 AM
Orca tearing apart a great white shark (https://youtube.com/watch?v=K9I_DcSbZjI)

But I'm guessing that some times the fight goes the other way.

Darren Garrison
04-08-2017, 08:54 AM
Ironically enough, sloths have very few predators despite having precious few natural defenses and no inclination to use them

{Schwarzenegger voice]It's not a puma!{/Schwarzenegger voice]

Oh, wait, it is a puma (https://youtube.com/watch?v=90M7kH5wCtA).

HoneyBadgerDC
04-08-2017, 09:52 AM
Most predators are opportunists, and hardly any will rule out attacking all members of any species.

Even if (random example), say, a cheetah is highly unlikely to attack a baboon, well, you never say never. If a cheetah is REALLY hungry, is much bigger than the baboon, and thinks it has surprise on its side... MAYBE it will take a shot.

A leopard will kill a baboon but I doubt a cheetah would take on anything but a baby. Baboons have bigger teeth than cheetah and can fight.

astorian
04-08-2017, 10:12 AM
A leopard will kill a baboon but I doubt a cheetah would take on anything but a baby. Baboons have bigger teeth than cheetah and can fight.

You're absolutely right- 999 times out of 1000, a cheetah isn't going to mess with a baboon. Certainly not if there are easier pickings (a nice Thomson's gazelle maybe) around. Baboons are tough and they travel in big groups, which means Most predators (even lions or hyenas) generally steer clear of them- rightly!

I'm just saying we should hardly ever state categorically "Animal X is safe from all predators." It really depends- how hungry is the predator? How desperate? How close in size are predator and prey? Even if a predator would prefer easier pickings, might he try to eat me if he was famished and I happened to stumble into him?

StarvingButStrong
04-08-2017, 10:52 AM
I don't know about humans being "apex predators." I get viciously preyed upon about eight months of the year in my own yard if I'm stupid enough to go out at dusk or dawn. :(

GusNSpot
04-08-2017, 11:29 AM
One on one & without mechanical help, we are a long way from the top.

40below
04-08-2017, 11:41 AM
Not a biologist, but I am a gardener so I wasn't thinking large fauna, I was thinking about everything in nature that makes itself either taste bad or smell bad so entire classes of animals not only don't eat it but actively avoid it and whose only natural enemy is me.

Thaliana
04-12-2017, 05:53 PM
Giraffes (yes, even adults) can be prey to lions and hyenas. They are definitely exempt from the no natural enemies statement.

http://giraffeworlds.com/giraffe-predators/

Not to say it's EASY for a lion or hyena to take down a giraffe, it does happen, the lions just prefer easier, slower food first.

Irishman
04-14-2017, 12:03 AM
But I'm guessing that some times the fight goes the other way.

You're presuming there's a fight. The orcas have a hunting technique for sharks. You grab them and then flip them on their backs. Many sharks and rays, when flipped over, go into a catatonic state. White sharks are not exempt.

Plus, full-grown orcas are larger than the largest Whites. Like 2 to 3 times the mass. Smart fighters that are bigger than you make poor prey.

It should also be telling, as they stated in that video, that when that orca ate that white shark, all the other white sharks for miles left the area and abandoned the seals - a season's worth of eating and they skipped out. None hung around to fight off the orcas - they all headed for the hills.

Given that bottlenose dolphins will attack and drive off white sharks, I'm thinking an orca/shark battle is pretty one-sided.

Colibri
04-14-2017, 12:31 AM
Ironically enough, sloths have very few predators despite having precious few natural defenses and no inclination to use them (nevermind the energy to).

Harpy Eagles take a lot of sloths. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=i0zrah5JEBM) Along with monkeys and opossums they are their principle prey

The only time they really get attacked with any frequency is when they try and get off their lazy arse and forage around on the ground, at which time leopards and humans take notice.

Sloths and leopards don't occur together. Ocelots and sometimes jaguars take a lot of sloths when they come to the ground once a week to defecate (they don't forage on the ground).

astorian
04-14-2017, 06:10 AM
Giraffes (yes, even adults) can be prey to lions and hyenas. They are definitely exempt from the no natural enemies statement.

http://giraffeworlds.com/giraffe-predators/

Not to say it's EASY for a lion or hyena to take down a giraffe, it does happen, the lions just prefer easier, slower food first.

Again, a lion pride would RATHER go after a zebra or a gnu.

But if they're REALLY hungry, and they spot an oblivious giraffe munching on acacia leaves? Of COURSE they'll give it a go. Can't be too choosy.

Very few predators ever think, "Gee, maybe I could kill and eat that unfamiliar animal, but... nah, he's not in my list of natural prey." To most predators, a meal is a meal.

Filbert
04-14-2017, 06:54 AM
Since I have already been on a New Zealand thread this morning ...

Prior to the introduction of pigs, rats, cats, dogs, etc. by humans (starting about A.D. 1000) the birds of New Zealand (the dominant fauna) had no natural enemies, at least in the sense of predators. The only mammals on the islands were bats and pinnipeds. None of the birds were carnivorous, so although they competed with each other for ecological niches they didn't eat each other.

Two things resulted from this -- 1) a lot of flightless bird species developed, and 2) the native fauna were easy picking for the introduced predators. IIRC, in the Chatham Islands (near NZ) the lighthouse keeper's cat was personally responsible for the extinction of a number of species of small birds.


------------------
"non sunt multiplicanda entia praeter necessitatem"
-- William of Ockham


I realise this is post is almost old enough to drink alcohol in my country, but I can't help pointing out it's not true: New Zealand does not have any native mammals bar bats and aquatics, but it has a native falcon, the unimaginatively named New Zealand Falcon, and it used to be home to the largest eagle ever known to exist, the Haast's Eagle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haast%27s_eagle), which could take down even the biggest of the moas, judging by skeleton records.

Oh, and I think the post has mixed up the (not extinct, but it got damn close) Chatham Island Black Robin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_robin), and the flightless, and supposedly wiped out by the lighthouse keeper's cat Stephen Island Wren (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyall%27s_wren), which was probably actually wiped out from it's last refuge on Stephen Island by feral cats and specimen collectors, after previously being eradicated from the mainland due to having no defence against mammalian predators.

MrDibble
04-16-2017, 02:34 AM
Cockroaches don't seem to have any natural enemies
Sure they do. Terrifying mind-controlling ones (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald_cockroach_wasp).

Guest-starring: Id!
04-16-2017, 02:58 PM
AFAIK there isn't anything out to kill the great wild Gary Busey.
Except maybe paparazzi.

Can't remember the poster's name.........I was hoping he was still around to let him know that I'm pretty sure a tiger can eat a lion.
Whole.

I don't know about humans being "apex predators." I get viciously preyed upon about eight months of the year in my own yard if I'm stupid enough to go out at dusk or dawn. :(

This applies to me if you're talking about flibbertyjibbin mosquitoes.

Irishman
04-16-2017, 10:30 PM
Feeding from you isn't quite the same as eating you. Something about how dead you are at the end of the process.

I realize certain ants might blur the distinction.

Guest-starring: Id!
04-16-2017, 11:22 PM
Feeding from you isn't quite the same as eating you.

What if I croak from dengue? I might not be getting maowed down on, but the natural enemy is still taking me down.

Not to mention - that world famous Aussie mosquito hunter's maxim: "There's nothing more dangerous than a wounded mosquito".

Also - good "G.I." band.

Kobal2
04-17-2017, 07:34 AM
{Schwarzenegger voice]It's not a puma!{/Schwarzenegger voice]

Oh, wait, it is a puma (https://youtube.com/watch?v=90M7kH5wCtA).

Gotta love that dangling bite move. I know he's trying to tire the sloth out, but it's like "OK, that's enough effort for today, you lost so just...become dinner now, fucker, OK ?"

wombattver
04-17-2017, 01:39 PM
Kangaroos?
(I don't think they've been mentioned yet)

gytalf2000
04-17-2017, 06:15 PM
Kangaroos?
(I don't think they've been mentioned yet)

I'm pretty sure that dingoes prey on kangaroos.

StarvingButStrong
04-17-2017, 06:49 PM
I know that *something* does because of those Nature shows that always mention how the mama Kangaroo will dump the baby out of the pouch if she has to when being pursued.

gytalf2000
04-18-2017, 08:39 AM
I know that *something* does because of those Nature shows that always mention how the mama Kangaroo will dump the baby out of the pouch if she has to when being pursued.

Oh, and I figure that if the kangaroos linger at the water's edge, they risk gettin' chomped by crocs, as well. Also, in days past, they had to worry about thylacines.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thylacine

astorian
04-18-2017, 01:02 PM
Dingoes have been in Australia so long, people forget they aren't "natural" predators of the kangaroo, because they aren't native to Australia.

DrDeth
04-18-2017, 01:07 PM
Dingoes have been in Australia so long, people forget they aren't "natural" predators of the kangaroo, because they aren't native to Australia.

Well, at a certain point in time, you have to accept them as "native". I mean, many species have arrived by colonization. Dingos may have arrived 12000 years ago.

astorian
04-18-2017, 03:50 PM
Well, at a certain point in time, you have to accept them as "native". I mean, many species have arrived by colonization. Dingos may have arrived 12000 years ago.

Oh sure, at SOME point, you accept animals as native even if they were introduced later than their neighbors.

Point is, the dingoes' prey DIDN'T have any natural enemies 13,000 years ago. But by now, no one remembers when that was true.

DrDeth
04-18-2017, 04:12 PM
Oh sure, at SOME point, you accept animals as native even if they were introduced later than their neighbors.

Point is, the dingoes' prey DIDN'T have any natural enemies 13,000 years ago. But by now, no one remembers when that was true.

Oh but they did:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megalania

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsupial_lion

(Ok, both likely all gone by 13K years ago, but still a large carnivore that preyed on kangaroos)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thylacine


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcophilus (maybe)

Darren Garrison
05-06-2017, 08:41 AM
As noted, surprisingly few mammals are PURE vegetarians. Most herbivores will eat carrion if it's available, and many will pounce on a small bird or lizard for an occasional high protein snack.

To add one more example, apparently deer aren't averse (http://rawstory.com/2017/05/forensic-scientists-caught-a-deer-munching-on-a-human-carcass-for-the-first-time-ever/) to partaking in the occasional yummy human.

Gymnopithys
05-06-2017, 03:58 PM
Pumas will hunt and kill smaller adult wolves as a food source.
Cats are eaten by owls, hawks, eagles, coyotes, foxes.

Just wondering: Which could be honey badgers' predators ?

HoneyBadgerDC
05-06-2017, 11:49 PM
Just wondering: Which could be honey badgers' predators ?

If you are talking healthy adults I would suspect leopards and to a lesser extent lions.

If you made a list of animals with absolutely no natural enemies it would be very short. If you extended that description to include animals with less than a 4% mortality from natural enemies it would be a very long list.

DrDeth
05-07-2017, 01:04 AM
If you are talking healthy adults I would suspect leopards and to a lesser extent lions.

If you made a list of animals with absolutely no natural enemies it would be very short. If you extended that description to include animals with less than a 4% mortality from natural enemies it would be a very long list.

Yes, there's a lot of animals with "no natural enemies" if you dont include odd acts of killing or unusual predation.

orcas. Great whites. Polar bears. Tigers. That doesnt mean that once in a a while a odd tiger might not be killed.

KidCharlemagne
05-07-2017, 07:32 AM
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_apex_predators

Best Topics: check payees 13 digit vin robitussin dm high printer cleaning paper nj duplicate license reddit lactating market can bear wrist pain doctor games thread gigantism height chemlawn prices deutschland pronounce bouncer salary walmart engine flush brick holes chicago city block dago tee cash mail snowed in sex jedi batman price of hay bowling hooking krista allen hardcore luc havan ups shipment delayed quitting drinking insomnia french cafe cd hobo stick bag spyder spider poodle balling powerlisting random sexually active definition 5lb sugar ct scan weight limit where to recycle encyclopedias why is halibut so expensive olives in a jar does fedex fly or drive b&h hours sunday longest you can go without pooping can bacon grease go bad how much are lakers courtside tickets blue toilet seat stain soma for opiate withdrawal tin man song meaning what is quid vs pounds can you use armorall on leather if a chicken and a half floor dimmer switch car what if i ate poop where to buy crt televisions how much does hastings pay for used dvds long distance phone sex numbers the godfather vhs collection price how do you retract a bid on ebay? turn signal dont work what liquor goes good with coffee how long is an average movie do bulls have udders home depot at&t wifi frank sinatra type music can i bum a cigarette les schwab brake service ways to pass out george bush flips the bird how often do men get haircuts how much chili powder per pound of meat 5th and 20th pay period how to get institutionalized mother was a nigger father was a faggot