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View Full Version : Suspicious vehicle in front of my house..What would you do?


pyromyte
02-09-2011, 10:53 AM
I live in a pretty typical suburban neighborhood. Last night when I was begining to fall asleep, about 11:30PM, I heard car doors slamming. At first I think nothing of it, but then I think that those doors sounded awfully close and wondered if someone was getting in my truck that was parked in my driveway.

I got out of bed and looked out my window. There were no footprints in the freshly fallen snow in my driveway, but there was a older (early 2000's) volkswagen sedan with dark tinted windows parked right in front of my house (headlights off, engine off). Then I see the faint glow of an LCD screen illuminating the driver's face. I wait about 45 minutes and the person is still sitting in their car, still parked in front of my house, still playing with their phone or camera or whatever it was.

I finally turn on my porch light and driveway flood lights, and nothing changes. I then turn on my interior light (so he can see me) and I stare out my window at him hoping he'll see that he has aroused curiousity and move on.

There is no reason to pass thru my neighborhood, it is 'landlocked' (if you will) and out of the way for anyone to enter, though it is not gated. So i start wondering what the hell this guy is doing out there (drunk, high, peeping tom, scouting the neighborhood, or innocently finishing a phone/text convo, or argument)

At this point it is about 30 mins past midnight, and I decide I either need to:
A. go to bed and forget about the guy.
B. call the cops to come investigate, or
C. walk out and talk to the dude, figure out his intentions, or encourage him to leave.

If I do (A) I am worried that if he will do something to my or my neighbors family or property.
If I do (B) am I going to have to stay awake til the cops get there, for possibly a guy just trying to sleep off a drunk, or for just trying not to drive and text.
If I do (C) I don't know if the guy is crazy and armed or what.

After much deliberation, I finally put on my jeans and a jacket and walk out to the car. I peck on his window and he rolls it down. I asked if he needed some help or was lost. he just apologized and said he needed to be 'down there'. I told him no problem, that I was just nervous and wondering what he was doing sitting in front of the house. He again apologized and drove off..problem solved.

After the whole ordeal I decide I prolly should not have put myself in danger by walking out there.

Do you think I would be overly sensitive to call the cops in this situation? What would you have done?

shiftless
02-09-2011, 11:08 AM
Apparently you live on a very quiet street. I would have assumed it was either a) kids looking for a quiet place to do ...... what their parents won't let them do or b) the police, either watching my house or doing what their boss won't let them do.

I would double check all the locks and wake up the dog, then go to bed. No way I would go out there unless I could use the excuse that I was walking the dog. Even then I wouldn't knock on the window unless they were on my property. No way I would call the police unless I see an actual crime going on. But that's just me.

Lynn Bodoni
02-09-2011, 11:12 AM
Back when we had dogs, they were always large and generally were either obvious German Shepherd mixes or Chows. Anyway, we had people parking in front of our house or loitering there, and I admit that I walked those large dogs in the front yard. This usually solved the problem.

Nowadays, we have no dogs. So I'd call the cops and ask them to do a slow driveby, and talk to the person in the car if they could.

blondebear
02-09-2011, 11:16 AM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi?

Barkis is Willin'
02-09-2011, 11:21 AM
I said "something else" because the exact same thing happened at my house several months ago and I decided to neither completely ignore them, nor call the cops. I also live in a typical suburban neighborhood. At about 11:00 I saw a big, old, blue Chevy Caprice sitting right in front of my house. I could see a couple kids in the car, they never got out. But I waited downstairs, listening for the car door and checking out the window every few minutes. They sat there for about an hour. I thought about calling the police, and I probably would have if I became too tired to keep watch.

Omar Little
02-09-2011, 11:25 AM
Since when did it become illegal to park on a public street? Buzz off cranky old person.

shiftless
02-09-2011, 11:28 AM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi?

Good call. Or trying to find good reception on his cell phone.

Nadir
02-09-2011, 11:32 AM
Release the hounds!

ducati
02-09-2011, 11:34 AM
This happens weekly to me.

I live in average house in an average neighborhood with average break-ins and burglaries.
Had a drug-related double homicide down the street last year.

Even if I weren't an ex-cop, I still investigate everyone. Most everyone's excuse is they lose cell coverage as they go down the street, so they want to sit and chat on the phone.

Sorry, but no. Parking in the street is illegal, and I don't want your ricer crap parked in front of my house anyway.

I confront everyone so I can see the occupants, write down the tag, and let them know someone's watching. They all leave, which is what I wanted in the first place.

Recently, I heard a door close in the middle of the night, and looked out to see a van parked across the street at 2:30 in the morning. As I put the 3 million CP spotlight on them, they bolted, and I could see their plan: they had broken into my neighbor's truck, unloaded all his tools in the driveway, and were about to fire-brigade them into the side door & go. Luckily I stopped them before they got anything loaded.

If you don't do it, at least let the cops roust them. It's always good to let people know someone has any eye on them, no matter where they are.

jonesj2205
02-09-2011, 11:39 AM
This happens weekly to me.


Parking in the street is illegal, and I don't want your ricer crap parked in front of my house anyway.



Where are you that parking in the street is illegal?

pyromyte
02-09-2011, 11:40 AM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi?
Good thinking, I had not thought of that!

Since when did it become illegal to park on a public street? Buzz off cranky old person.

It's not illegal, but I'm starting to think I should have called the police anyway. The police could have made the decision whether they needed to do anything, instead of me putting myself at risk (by ignoring them, or by investigating further) to determine whether this person was a threat or just innocently checking emails.

Rushgeekgirl
02-09-2011, 11:41 AM
In my neighborhood it's best to call the police because nobody is just sitting there unless they're up to no good. A few weeks ago not far from here they busted a woman selling meth out of the trunk of her car with her kid right there in the back seat.

There are No Parking signs so it IS illegal to park there.

Rushgeekgirl
02-09-2011, 11:43 AM
Is it not common to have "No Parking" signs where you guys live? We have had them on the last three streets where I lived in Memphis. They're also in front of all the school zones that I know of.

control-z
02-09-2011, 11:48 AM
I missed the fact that he was actually in your driveway, so I answered Ignore. I'd change my answer to Go out and talk.

That's a little risky, but I don't think the police need to be involved for something most likely mundane.

lieu
02-09-2011, 11:54 AM
Instead of actually confronting the occupant(s) you could always just take a pic of the plates with your camera phone.

In the situation you describe I think you had every right to be a little suspicious.

Lynn Bodoni
02-09-2011, 11:57 AM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi? I thought that he might be using a cell phone or GPS, but the wifi didn't occur to me.

I still think that it might be a good idea to ask the cops to do a driveby.

pyromyte
02-09-2011, 11:59 AM
Is it not common to have "No Parking" signs where you guys live? We have had them on the last three streets where I lived in Memphis. They're also in front of all the school zones that I know of.

It's not uncommon, but there are none in my neighborhood. a very few of my neighbors do park in the street, but I recognize them and they are generally not occupied while parked.

Jackmannii
02-09-2011, 12:10 PM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi?And possibly hacking into someone's computer via their Wi-Fi.

Recently there was an episode of "Cops" in which officers were called on a report of a suspicious vehicle parked in a residential neighborhood. The guy was using a laptop and had a bunch of worksheets containing personal info from a number of people. He claimed he had the data based on prior product orders, but the cops checked and found that was bogus. He was arrested.

The cop who was interviewed said this was an increasingly common problem.

madmonk28
02-09-2011, 12:24 PM
Wait, was the car in your driveway? If it is someone sitting in a car on a public street, it wouldn't occur to me to react to it at all.

Voyager
02-09-2011, 12:32 PM
If he was just on the street, I might just ignore it, and I might go out and write down his license so he could see what I was doing. If he were up to no good he'd be gone in a second.

In your driveway, however, I'd call the police, and then try to write the license plate in a a way he can't see you do it (and leave.) Unless you are in a very rural area, no one should be trespassing into your driveway. And I'd check that your wifi is secure.

It doesn't happen to me because there is a park a block away, and lots of people park there. I check them out when walking the dog after dark - she is very slow in this area, so I have lots of time without arousing suspicion. There are some people chatting. There are some people using their phones. There are maie-female pairs, perhaps just getting away from parents, perhaps stepping out on SOs. And there are a few situations which seem like hooker hook-ups. I don't write down licenses but I am clearly paying attention, and very few people have ever left. So it is probably innocent, but still, no one should park in anyone else's driveway.

Really Not All That Bright
02-09-2011, 12:36 PM
Since when did it become illegal to park on a public street? Buzz off cranky old person.
This. Unless he was actually in your driveway, and then I'm not sure.

DrDeth
02-09-2011, 12:37 PM
There's no reason to bother a already overburdened Police dept with someone who is doing ntohing illegal.

Magiver
02-09-2011, 12:44 PM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi? That was my thought. I'd still call it in. The only way for police to investigate suspicious activity is to call it in. I've stopped a number of break-ins in my neighborhood with a phone call.

With that said, it's hard to do at night. The police districts don't answer their phones at night. It all has to go through 911 and they really only want calls involving multiple gun-shot victims (not really but that's their attitude).

MLS
02-09-2011, 12:45 PM
I'd never go out and speak to the person. Never. In the same situation I'd call the local police and ask them to check it out. I also live in a spot that is off the beaten path, near a woods, and I would be concerned about a number of things.

PunditLisa
02-09-2011, 12:46 PM
I'd call the non-emergency police number and ask them to drive by and see what was up when they had a free minute.

Magiver
02-09-2011, 12:48 PM
Wait, was the car in your driveway? If it is someone sitting in a car on a public street, it wouldn't occur to me to react to it at all.suspicious activity is not restricted to private property. I've had people call the police on me and I'm more than happy to answer to my activities. I'm thrilled my neighbors are watching the neighborhood.

cochrane
02-09-2011, 12:55 PM
If I do (A) I am worried that if he will do something to my or my neighbors family or property.
If I do (B) am I going to have to stay awake til the cops get there, for possibly a guy just trying to sleep off a drunk, or for just trying not to drive and text.
If I do (C) I don't know if the guy is crazy and armed or what.

[bolding mine]

I would have called the police, especially on the chance he might be sleeping off a drunk (well, he might be crazy or armed, too). It is illegal to be in control of a motor vehicle while in an impaired condition. You might have done the public a favor if he were actually impaired and the police arrested him for DUI before he had a chance to get back on the road. If he wasn't DUI, no harm, no foul.

Harmonious Discord
02-09-2011, 01:05 PM
I try to take a picture of the vehicle and the people when it's not the people that belong around here at minimum. A month ago I didn't for the first time in years and they stole something worth a few hundred thousand dollars. The cops do have a description of the vehicle used to steal the equipment and the name on it. I wish it hadn't been to cold to go out and snap a few photos at the time.

I've taken pictures of people that were stopping in the area before and just sitting there watching people. Once they saw I had taken pictures of them and their vehicle they never parked and watched the houses again.

pyromyte
02-09-2011, 01:44 PM
I would have called the police, especially on the chance he might be sleeping off a drunk (well, he might be crazy or armed, too). It is illegal to be in control of a motor vehicle while in an impaired condition. You might have done the public a favor if he were actually impaired and the police arrested him for DUI before he had a chance to get back on the road. If he wasn't DUI, no harm, no foul.

Yeah, this is another reason I was thought of (after the fact) that I should have called the police. After he drove off, i thought, great, he's probably drunk, and I just got him to start driving.

For the record it was not in my driveway, it was out on the street. I didn't see him do anything illegal. It just aroused my suspicion, because I don't normally see people do this in my neighborhood. It was a man by himself. Since I went and talked to him, I saw that he was about 35-45 years old. He seemed very nervous or excited, but to be fair I might have startled him by coming out of the house.

Next time I find myself in a similar situation I think i will just call the police. I don't think the police here would have minded to come check out a suspicious vehicle, even if it turned out to be nothing.

Good responses, everyone. Thanks!

mnemosyne
02-09-2011, 01:58 PM
I think I would have called the non-emergency number for the cops, especially since it had been so long that he'd been sitting there. I wouldn't feel safe approaching the person on my own, but I think it's a situation where someone needs to go up to them and ask what's up, and that's part of what the cops do.

I've done something similar before; I saw a man walking along the outside edge of an overpass that goes over a canal in the city I used to live in. There isn't a path/pedestrian bridge there, but I guess some people walk along it rather than go the long route around to get from one side of the canal to the other. I didn't know that, and it looked odd and rather dangerous, so when I got home a couple of minutes later I called the police and asked them to just check on the guy - I was actually worried he'd fall/jump! I had the annoying experience of being passed back and forth between the municipal police and the OPP because no one could quite figure out whose jurisdiction "the side of the overpass on the highway" was, until I finally pointed out that if they guy did fall, he'd probably done it by now and asked whose jurisdiction a body in the canal was? Whichever force I was talking to at the time told me they'd take care of it and hung up. I never heard anything more.

So in the end, I'd probably call the cops, but not expect much to come of it!

Laggard
02-09-2011, 02:19 PM
Too much paranoia here!

Mama Zappa
02-09-2011, 02:21 PM
Good call. Or trying to find good reception on his cell phone.

For 45 minutes?

I'd have called the cops.

Jackmannii
02-09-2011, 02:25 PM
Hmm, a guy spends at least 45 minutes in a car parked late at night in front of somebody else's house, seems "very nervous or excited" when the homeowner approaches him, gives a nonsensical explanation about how he needs to be "down there", and then takes off.

Does seem just a mite suspicious.

From a site dealing with wireless Internet security (http://netsecurity.about.com/od/hackertools/a/aa072004b.htm): "...a hacker searching for insecure wireless connections can get into your systems from a car parked on the street."

It wouldn't have had to be the OP's place being hacked either.

Al Bundy
02-09-2011, 02:27 PM
If a suspicious car was parked in front of your house, I'd most assuredly do nothing.

However, if it were my house, the most I would do is get the license number and go back in the house. I'm secure in my house. I don't need to call the police or go outside. My perimeter is tight. If somebody did attempt to break in, I could respond with "force multipliers" as general Kelly called them during Desert Storm.

Alice The Goon
02-09-2011, 02:38 PM
I would probably call the cops. However, the last time I called the police to come check out suspicious characters loitering around the property, they called me three hours later to tell me that they still hadn't gotten around to coming by and it would be another couple of hours before they could. I wanted to answer, "Never mind, I'm dead by now!"

Storm Girl
02-09-2011, 02:47 PM
My SOP in this situation is a little different to most of the other posters' due to the fact I live in a fairly rural area that is not known for the diligence of its Sheriff's department.

1. Observe suspicious vehicle in road. Wait a reasonable amount of time to ensure that it's not just some doofus who didn't realize that the dirt road I live on dead-ends in my yard. This is not at all uncommon at my house.

2. After a reasonable amount of time has passed, it's time to start flipping on lights in the house to make them aware someone is watching. I also make sure there's a gun where I can get to it, but that's strictly a personal preference.

3. If they still haven't left after all that (which I admit has never happened here, so the rest is pure conjecture) I would probably call one of my burly redneck guy friends to come up and check things out. At that point, I'm absolutely sure they would leave! ;)

Magiver
02-09-2011, 02:52 PM
If a suspicious car was parked in front of your house, I'd most assuredly do nothing.

However, if it were my house, the most I would do is get the license number and go back in the house. I'm secure in my house. I don't need to call the police or go outside. My perimeter is tight. If somebody did attempt to break in, I could respond with "force multipliers" as general Kelly called them during Desert Storm.
Putting aside the ability of a person to hijack your computer from a car, do you want people casing your neighborhood for people who are not home? Is your "perimeter" safe from having the phone lines cut when you're not home? Does vandalism not affect you?

We all have the ability to sense when something is amiss. Whether we act on it affects not just our own little patch of land but that of our neighbors. We can react to crime before or after it happens. I would hope that my neighbors watch suspicious activity and parking in front of someone's house for 45 minutes playing with a computer gadget is suspicious.

control-z
02-09-2011, 02:57 PM
The subject of this post is misleading. I would say a car "in front" of a house is parked on the public street. But the OP says the car was parked in his driveway. That to me would be disturbing.

Brandus
02-09-2011, 03:13 PM
he just apologized and said he needed to be 'down there'.

what the H does that mean?

aruvqan
02-09-2011, 03:17 PM
Putting aside the ability of a person to hijack your computer from a car, do you want people casing your neighborhood for people who are not home? Is your "perimeter" safe from having the phone lines cut when you're not home? Does vandalism not affect you?

We all have the ability to sense when something is amiss. Whether we act on it affects not just our own little patch of land but that of our neighbors. We can react to crime before or after it happens. I would hope that my neighbors watch suspicious activity and parking in front of someone's house for 45 minutes playing with a computer gadget is suspicious.

I live out in the sticks on a road that if they wanted to pull off and hang out would be in my driveway ... but at least I am firewalled and have a pretty secure nonsense phrase as the password [I asked my 6 year old goddaughter for a really silly sentence.] Oh, and I have a cell phone, have for years. What I don't have is a landline...only thing they could cut would be electricity, and that would alert me to a home invasion so I could call 911 on headset and get extra magazines for my gun ready.

That being said, even if I was in town, I would call the cops. Sitting for an hour? That would be one hell of a texting/sexting session.

I am a firm believer in neighborhood watch type functions. You keep an eye on my house when I am gone, and Ill do the same for you.

cochrane
02-09-2011, 05:00 PM
The subject of this post is misleading. I would say a car "in front" of a house is parked on the public street. But the OP says the car was parked in his driveway. That to me would be disturbing.
He didn't say the car was in his driveway. He said his own truck was in his driveway and he looked out because he was concerned someone might be trying to get into it. The suspicious vehicle was parked on the street,

control-z
02-09-2011, 05:02 PM
He didn't say the car was in his driveway. He said his own truck was in his driveway and he looked out because he was concerned someone might be trying to get into it. The suspicious vehicle was parked on the street,

:smack: I fail reading comprehension.

LurkerInNJ
02-09-2011, 05:08 PM
Do you think I would be overly sensitive to call the cops in this situation? What would you have done?

He was parked in front of your house, but not in your driveway or on your property, correct?

How is it anyone's business why he is sitting in his car? Aren't roads public?

On your property = your business.

Not on your property = mind your own business unless you see a duct-taped and bound passenger or something else clearly wrong.

Musicat
02-09-2011, 05:10 PM
Where I live, anyone parking anywhere on this street, unless there is a party going on, would attract considerable attention and not be ignored. Neighbors would write down the license number, call their buddies at the sheriff's office, and step up to politely confront the occupants, who would either be arrested or invited in for a drink, depending.

Which is why we have very few break-ins, and nearly 100% of those few are caught.

OTOH, in the summer, it's probably some teenagers rolling around on the nearby beach and that's fine as long as they don't set the beach on fire.

JimboJamesJimmersonIII,Esq.
02-09-2011, 05:14 PM
I would assume he is an al-Qaeda operative trying to get in contact with the other members of his sleeper cell. Obviously, the correct move is to contact the Department of Homeland Security. After all, in this post-9/11-world you can't be too careful.

Ferret Herder
02-09-2011, 05:18 PM
Parking is allowed on my street, there are businesses down the street with people coming and going at various hours, and a school, church, and preschool all with various late-hours activities going on right across the street and around the corner. Unknown car parked in front of my house for extended periods, often with someone in it? That's normal.

Oh, and everyone's wifi is secured. I know, I've walked around with my iPhone checking. :D

PunditLisa
02-09-2011, 05:18 PM
Not on your property = mind your own business unless you see a duct-taped and bound passenger or something else clearly wrong.

Interesting choice of UserName and post.

Contrapuntal
02-09-2011, 05:22 PM
Streets are generally public Many public streets restrict parking, up to and including forbidding it on one or both sides. I am surprised that this is news to anyone.

Sateryn76
02-09-2011, 05:36 PM
This happens weekly to me.

I live in average house in an average neighborhood with average break-ins and burglaries.
Had a drug-related double homicide down the street last year.

Even if I weren't an ex-cop, I still investigate everyone. Most everyone's excuse is they lose cell coverage as they go down the street, so they want to sit and chat on the phone.

Sorry, but no. Parking in the street is illegal, and I don't want your ricer crap parked in front of my house anyway.

I confront everyone so I can see the occupants, write down the tag, and let them know someone's watching. They all leave, which is what I wanted in the first place.

Recently, I heard a door close in the middle of the night, and looked out to see a van parked across the street at 2:30 in the morning. As I put the 3 million CP spotlight on them, they bolted, and I could see their plan: they had broken into my neighbor's truck, unloaded all his tools in the driveway, and were about to fire-brigade them into the side door & go. Luckily I stopped them before they got anything loaded.

If you don't do it, at least let the cops roust them. It's always good to let people know someone has any eye on them, no matter where they are.

I would wager that you don't live in an "average" neighborhood.

dangermom
02-09-2011, 05:47 PM
A few weeks ago a little pickup appeared on the street near our house. I assumed it was someone visiting the neighbors, but it turned out to not be anyone nice, as I learned from a cop friend who had dealt with them. So my vote is, ask the police to do a drive-by.

Omar Little
02-09-2011, 06:12 PM
:smack: I fail reading comprehension.

Even the thread title says "in front of my house", not "in my driveway".

Lynn Bodoni
02-09-2011, 06:40 PM
He was parked in front of your house, but not in your driveway or on your property, correct?

How is it anyone's business why he is sitting in his car? Aren't roads public?

On your property = your business.

Not on your property = mind your own business unless you see a duct-taped and bound passenger or something else clearly wrong. It's my business because he's probably up to no good. If someone is parked on a residential street, but not getting out of the car, he MIGHT be a cop or PI on a stakeout, or he might be waiting to meet someone. Otherwise, I'd be very hard pressed to think of any legitimate reason why someone is parked in front of a house, instead of a c store parking lot, say. Especially if this goes on for the better part of an hour. If he's using his GPS or making a phone call (I'm lost, where do you live again?). On the other hand, I can think of a whole bunch of reasons why he'd be out there. He could be using someone's unsecured wifi, he could be casing the neighborhood, or he could be a stalker who is watching someone. Or he could be doing something I couldn't dream of.

Speaking as someone whose house was broken into, I'm GLAD that my neighbor called the cops, even though it was really none of her business. Let the parker explain himself to the cops.

To me, the warning sign isn't that he parked in front of someone's house, but the fact that he's staying in the car for so long at night. I really can't think of any legitimate reason that an ordinary citizen (that is, someone who's not a cop or PI) would need to be doing that, especially at night.

impatien
02-09-2011, 07:24 PM
We live in a small subdivision a few miles out in the country. A couple years ago one hot summer day (Georgia) there was a minivan parked out in front of our house. I noticed it and didn't pay too much attention, but the neighbor across the street called and asked me if I would have my husband go out and see who it was just sitting there in the van. My husband said no, and said to call the cops. The person had been there a couple hours by this point and it had to have been really hot inside the van.

Two cop cars arrived very shortly after. After they confronted the person in the van, one of the cops came knocking on our door to let us know that the guy was actually stalking someone who lived down the street. Apparently the guy was high on something and acting very suspicious, so they did some checking. He had actually spray-painted the van himself to disguise it from the stalkee (??)

I would most definitely call the cops again in the same situation. A strange vehicle definitely arouses suspicion in our neighborhood, even in broad daylight, let alone at night. If the person isn't doing anything wrong, no harm done anyway.

elfkin477
02-09-2011, 07:59 PM
People would really call the cops, after less than an hour? Geez. Man, you'd keep the cops busy where I live because idiots think that our private road makes a good place to leave their car for hours at a time while they wander off fishing. No one gets too mad, as long as they make an effort not to literally park in the middle of the road which makes going around them hard.

We did actually call the cops last winter, though. It's not unusual for one of my two neighbors to buy cars and small boats to sell and park them off the end of our road to be seen from the adjoining highway, so no one found it odd at first that a small truck appeared at the end of the road. After a couple of days it got broken into, and we finally noticed that there was no "for sale" sign. We checked with both neighbors to see if the vehicle was theirs before reporting it to the police, who came by to see it (they ran the plates to see if it had been reported stolen, but it hadn't been). It stayed there for two more days before someone claimed it, so apparently the owner wasn't in a hurry to see what had happened to it...

Balthisar
02-09-2011, 08:36 PM
I almost feel like trolling people's neighborhoods just to park in front of their houses to see what happens. But not certain neighborhoods where I feel they might approach me with illegally obtained firearms.

LurkerInNJ
02-09-2011, 08:37 PM
It's my business because he's probably up to no good. If someone is parked on a residential street, but not getting out of the car, he MIGHT be a cop or PI on a stakeout, or he might be waiting to meet someone. Otherwise, I'd be very hard pressed to think of any legitimate reason why someone is parked in front of a house, instead of a c store parking lot, say. Especially if this goes on for the better part of an hour. If he's using his GPS or making a phone call (I'm lost, where do you live again?). On the other hand, I can think of a whole bunch of reasons why he'd be out there. He could be using someone's unsecured wifi, he could be casing the neighborhood, or he could be a stalker who is watching someone. Or he could be doing something I couldn't dream of.

Speaking as someone whose house was broken into, I'm GLAD that my neighbor called the cops, even though it was really none of her business. Let the parker explain himself to the cops.

To me, the warning sign isn't that he parked in front of someone's house, but the fact that he's staying in the car for so long at night. I really can't think of any legitimate reason that an ordinary citizen (that is, someone who's not a cop or PI) would need to be doing that, especially at night.

Except this guy was in his car, not breaking into anyones house. Roads are a public place. Unless there is an ordinance that says people can't be in public at night, what is your point? That all citizens must either be a cop or a PI if they want to be out at night?

Legitimate reason? He doesn't need a reason. How about because he felt like it? Maybe his mother in law was visiting and he didn't want to go home until she was asleep. Maybe he needed a quiet place to think. Maybe he had a migraine and needed silence for it to go away. Maybe he likes to drive at night to clear his head. Maybe he just wanted to sit in his freaking car and play Farmville.

LouisB
02-09-2011, 09:29 PM
The police exist to protect and serve.

The policeman is your friend.

If the guy in question isn't doing anything wrong, then he has nothing to worry about.

If you are concerned, call the police.

Kozmik
02-09-2011, 10:02 PM
The police exist to protect and serve.

The policeman is your friend.

If the guy in question isn't doing anything wrong, then he has nothing to worry about.

If you are concerned, call the police.If the police aren't concerned, then whoever is in the vehicle in front of your house is not your friend.

If you don't know whether the guy in question is doing anything wrong, then you have someting to worry about.

madmonk28
02-09-2011, 10:22 PM
suspicious activity is not restricted to private property. I've had people call the police on me and I'm more than happy to answer to my activities. I'm thrilled my neighbors are watching the neighborhood. I guess I don't see sitting in a car as suspicious activity, I see it as someone minding his own business. I've noticed that people from the suburbs seemed scared of a lot more with a lot less reason than people in the city.

gladtobeblazed
02-09-2011, 11:44 PM
I call the cops. Sure the streets are public, but who cares. If it's in my neighborhood then it is my business.

Jackmannii
02-10-2011, 12:05 AM
I guess I don't see sitting in a car as suspicious activity, I see it as someone minding his own business. I've noticed that people from the suburbs seemed scared of a lot more with a lot less reason than people in the city.Preach it, brother!

I used to be a carefree city dweller myself. I was busy enjoying the vibrant life of the city, a new restaurant every night, concerts, gallery openings. Nothing fazed me - burglary, arson, rape, murder, double-parking - I took it all in stride.

Then I moved to the suburbs, and all that space and quiet made me real nervous. I started packing heat just to walk the dog. Strangers? Hell, I've blown away more than one person for just asking directions.

You'd best not park in front of my house for more than a few seconds, even if you're posing as the mailman or UPS guy. I'm onto you people. :mad:

Magiver
02-10-2011, 01:14 AM
I guess I don't see sitting in a car as suspicious activity, I see it as someone minding his own business. I've noticed that people from the suburbs seemed scared of a lot more with a lot less reason than people in the city. The person was waiting in the car for 45 minutes and was seen with some type of electronic device. There is no obvious explanation for the behavior which makes it suspicious. This is how crime is stopped before it happens.

Nametag
02-10-2011, 01:37 AM
"Don't let the sun set on your ass in this town, n*gg*r."

Unbelievable.

Magiver
02-10-2011, 02:42 AM
"Don't let the sun set on your ass in this town, n*gg*r."

Unbelievable. Is there a point to your racist rant?

EvilTOJ
02-10-2011, 03:45 AM
The guy could have had a fight with his wife, and needed to cool down, or continue fighting via text messages. I fondly barely remember the late night fights me and the kids' mom would have, and I'd get in the car and drive to a random part of the neighborhood to get away from her bitch ass for awhile.

Lots of paranoid people in this thread, for sure. And what does 'down there' mean? Did he mean like a house down the street?

madmonk28
02-10-2011, 05:03 AM
The person was waiting in the car for 45 minutes and was seen with some type of electronic device. There is no obvious explanation for the behavior which makes it suspicious. This is how crime is stopped before it happens. Oh my God, an electronic device? .....you mean like an iphone? Why are people so scared?

PunditLisa
02-10-2011, 06:07 AM
If the person is doing something innocuous -- cooling down after a fight with his wife, for instance -- then he can explain that to the cop. No harm, no foul.

mittu
02-10-2011, 06:29 AM
he just apologized and said he needed to be 'down there'.

So many people seem to be ignoring this that i'm starting to think it is a regular turn of phrase i'm unfamiliar with. Can anybody clue me in on what he meant by this?

Personally I wouldn't be too concerned at all, perhaps I would be if I lived in a remote area but even when I used to live in a quiet suburb on a road that was on the route to nowhere it wouldn't concern me. From the sounds of it the guy wasn't acting suspiciously or watching anything or anyone intently, he was just a guy dicking about on his phone. It's something I have done more than once, sometimes I work in the evenings and might have a booking at 9pm (when the person gets home from work) and if I get finished at my previous job early I will just park on a street somewhere until 9pm rolls around. During this time I tend to play games on my phone to keep myself occupied.

madmonk28
02-10-2011, 06:34 AM
If the person is doing something innocuous -- cooling down after a fight with his wife, for instance -- then he can explain that to the cop. No harm, no foul. Except that we have to live in a world where we explain our behavior to police officers for no reason other than we created a vague sense of unease in the community. Seriously, where does this fear come from? I have friends from all over the world and I only get this fear of the other vibe from a certain strain of Americans. In general, crime is down in the US, there really isn't as much to be afraid of as some people seem to think.

LouisB
02-10-2011, 06:47 AM
If the police aren't concerned, then whoever is in the vehicle in front of your house is not your friend.

If you don't know whether the guy in question is doing anything wrong, then you have someting to worry about. I had thought my sarcasm was evident but I guess not.

j666
02-10-2011, 07:21 AM
Another vote for asking the police to send the car down your street on the next loop.

I guess I don't see sitting in a car as suspicious activity, I see it as someone minding his own business. I've noticed that people from the suburbs seemed scared of a lot more with a lot less reason than people in the city.
I can shed some light on this. I live on a quiet little cul de sac in a city (as does the OP, I believe).
My street goes nowhere, and I am familiar with the cars of my neighbors, their families, their friends ... so, a strange car parked on the street stands out.

Although the neighborhood is quiet, the city is not. We've had mini-crime waves three, four times. So I am concerned about those strange cars (even though the problems are probably caused by foot-bound teens.)

However, when I do see a strange car, I usually assume it's a visitor and leave them alone.

I did call the police once on a strange van, but only because it was the wrong color - a green van with the logo of a company that uses WHITE vans, and the logo was magnetic, not a painted. The van drove off before the police arrived.

Looking back, I'm pretty sure that was some kind of stake-out on one of my neighbors.

Lynn Bodoni
02-10-2011, 07:32 AM
I can see and accept a vehicle parked in front of a house if the driver goes fishing or whatever. However, why would someone who is fighting with his wife park in front of a house, instead of in front of a gas station or something?

I like my privacy, and I've done my share of running around after midnight. But this behavior still sounds pretty suspicious to me.

LouisB
02-10-2011, 07:33 AM
What I would really do is to take careful aim and await developments.

Eats_Crayons
02-10-2011, 08:15 AM
This happens weekly to me.

I live in average house in an average neighborhood with average break-ins and burglaries.
Had a drug-related double homicide down the street last year.That's supposed to be an "average" neighbourhood? Where do you live?

pyromyte
02-10-2011, 08:27 AM
So many people seem to be ignoring this that i'm starting to think it is a regular turn of phrase i'm unfamiliar with. Can anybody clue me in on what he meant by this?

I should have mentioned that he gestured toward the front of the car with his hand. I took it to mean down the road. I'm not really sure, but I think he didn't really know how to respond and just kind of blurted something out.

I have also lived in the city before, and this sort of thing happening in the city would not have attracted my attention. It was definately unusual behavior in my current neighborhood. I did not assume he was up to no good, but I also didn't assume he wasn't.

I appreciate everyone's responses and different perspectives you've given me. I would most likely call the police next time. So, if you come park at my house late at night without leaving your vehicle, you'll just have to explain to the police officer that you're just playing pacman on your i-phone and this paranoid jackass (me) called the police, and he'll be on his way.

Dogzilla
02-10-2011, 10:46 AM
I would have turned off my Wi-Fi with the assumption he found my signal and was surfing off it to use my interwebs. I would suspect that the signal would drop and he'd wander off to find some other Wi-Fi connection.

Nametag
02-10-2011, 12:00 PM
Is there a point to your racist rant?

My point is that the "this is how crime gets stopped before it happens" paranoid BS I'm reading here reminds me of those shitty little towns where the local sheriff would make sure that "suspicious characters" (like Blacks, Indians, and strangers) were warned to leave town before it got dark. I used to think it was a thing of the past; my mistake.

Labrador Deceiver
02-10-2011, 12:12 PM
My point is that the "this is how crime gets stopped before it happens" paranoid BS I'm reading here reminds me of those shitty little towns where the local sheriff would make sure that "suspicious characters" (like Blacks, Indians, and strangers) were warned to leave town before it got dark. I used to think it was a thing of the past; my mistake.

Wow, what a stupid thing to say.

aruvqan
02-10-2011, 12:25 PM
My point is that the "this is how crime gets stopped before it happens" paranoid BS I'm reading here reminds me of those shitty little towns where the local sheriff would make sure that "suspicious characters" (like Blacks, Indians, and strangers) were warned to leave town before it got dark. I used to think it was a thing of the past; my mistake.

Fine, you can do that. I on the other hand welcome a bit of paranoia. Home invasions are a reality, and I am a gimp female that has few options. I live in the countryside, and a quick offense beats being robbed and possibly killed or hospitalized.

ducati
02-10-2011, 01:12 PM
I would wager that you don't live in an "average" neighborhood.

That's supposed to be an "average" neighbourhood? Where do you live?

You're right. I live in what some would consider an above-average neighborhood, the average home being about 6,000 sf and costing about $650,000.

According the the homicide detectives who came to visit after finding out I have cameras facing the street, mexican drug gangs rent houses in middle to upper-middle class neighborhoods all over the Atlanta area. Two or three people will live there with no furniture, and avoid contact with everyone. This is called a stash house.

They bring in a ton or 2 of pot, and after dark they'll back a car into the garage, sell some dope, and repeat as necessary.

Something went wrong one night, and 1 buyer and 1 seller were killed.
The others involved jumped in their vehicles and fled. The police were hoping they went by my house so they could at least have a lead on vehicles to look for.
One did.

They told me they have 15 more such houses "in the area" that they're looking for.

I live in a nice place with nice things and nice neighbors. Strangers walking around are unusual. Parking in front of someone's house is unusual. Cars driving and parking after about 10pm are unusual. Parking in the street is illegal.

In my experience, the unusual always warrants a second look, and perhaps a question or two. It's one way to prevent crimes before they happen.
People with nothing to hide typically understand; they're homeowners too, somewhere.
Punks with a problem? Fuck 'em. Cops are on the way, meathead.

cochrane
02-10-2011, 01:18 PM
My point is that the "this is how crime gets stopped before it happens" paranoid BS I'm reading here reminds me of those shitty little towns where the local sheriff would make sure that "suspicious characters" (like Blacks, Indians, and strangers) were warned to leave town before it got dark. I used to think it was a thing of the past; my mistake.
In which part of the O.P. did pyromyte happen to mention the man's skin color. :confused:

Magiver
02-10-2011, 01:50 PM
My point is that the "this is how crime gets stopped before it happens" paranoid BS I'm reading here reminds me of those shitty little towns where the local sheriff would make sure that "suspicious characters" (like Blacks, Indians, and strangers) were warned to leave town before it got dark. I used to think it was a thing of the past; my mistake. You made 2 mistakes. The first was the racist rant. The second was not addressing the thread with a cogent line of reasoning. As has already been discussed, computers can be hacked through router wi-fi signals. It's done by parking in a neighborhood with a computer which is what the op witnessed.

There is no logical explanation for parking in front of someone's house and sitting in the car for 45 minutes. That by itself is suspicious. The person could be acting as lookout for someone else. This is how I stopped a car theft. I observed someone behaving in a manner that had no rationale behind it. He was acting as a lookout for other people.

On a similar note I stopped a break-in by noting someone walking back and forth around my neighborhood looking at houses. He broke into a neighbor's house when they weren't home. All that was done through the power of observation. It's based on the same mental process that allows us to pick up on the tiniest nuance in a conversation or body movement. Unless a person has Asperger's Syndrome this is an ability that everybody has.

Labrador Deceiver
02-10-2011, 02:24 PM
You're right. I live in what some would consider an above-average neighborhood, the average home being about 6,000 sf and costing about $650,000.



I've been building houses in Atlanta for years, and you must live in one crappy-ass neighborhood if you can find a house of that size for just over $100 per square foot.

ducati
02-10-2011, 03:44 PM
I've been building houses in Atlanta for years, and you must live in one crappy-ass neighborhood if you can find a house of that size for just over $100 per square foot.

Yes. This is the only possible reason there could be.:rolleyes:

Labrador Deceiver
02-10-2011, 03:53 PM
Yes. This is the only possible reason there could be.:rolleyes:

Of course there are other reasons, such as the possibility that you're exaggerating just a tad.

Magiver
02-10-2011, 03:58 PM
I've been building houses in Atlanta for years, and you must live in one crappy-ass neighborhood if you can find a house of that size for just over $100 per square foot. That seems a bit cold.
Are all the houses in ATL occupied or did the housing bubble collapse take a bite out of prices?

Hal Briston
02-10-2011, 04:01 PM
Maybe he was using somebody's unsecured wi-fi?That's a tip -- want a safe neighborhood? Leave your wi-fi unsecured. You'll have bored cops parking nearby hooking their smartphone to your wi-fi so they can surf the web for a bit.


By the by, someone else may have already mentioned this, but my first thought when I read the thread title was "Nothing...why should I care if someone is parted in front of your house?"

aBouncer
02-10-2011, 04:04 PM
You call the police and tell them there is a suspicious vehicle and give them the address. Provide the make, model and color of the car. Then tell them you don't want the officer to contact you because you're going to bed.

The way this works on the other end, is that the call will be given a low priority and put into the queue. If the police in that area or sector are busy, they won't pick up the call. Units in other areas will often grab a call from another area, just to help out if the police in that area are swamped, but they would probably just take a pass on a call like this.

If the units in your area are not busy, that call is still going to be sitting there, and they'll grab it and roll by, just to clear it up. It'll have all the info you provided and will also say "Caller does not want to be contacted." The officer or deputy will come by, and if he recognizes the car (since it's his area) he will likely close out the call and move on. You may not even notice him do this and think they didn't respond. If it's not someone he recognizes, he'll likely just ask the guy what's going on, and if he doesn't have a good reason, he'll tell him to take a hike and go someplace else.

Police will often talk about neighborhoods that don't tolerate crime versus those that do. You can have someone standing on the street corner selling drugs, and no one will report it. Or, you can have some neighborhoods where lots of people will call the police if someone is in the area looking shady, and eventually the police have no choice but to respond and roust the guy. When this happens over a period of time, shady characters quickly learn where they can hang out without worrying about being hassled and where they can't, and it's all up to the residents in that area to make it happen by making the call.

-aB

Sailboat
02-10-2011, 04:11 PM
Years ago I lived in a rental house across a short residential street from a public swimming pool and playground. One day as I left my house, I noticed a white pickup truck parked in front of the playground. A man sat in it, staring intently at the young children playing.

As soon as I came out, he turned and glared at me with hostility, the entire time I was walking to my car, getting in, and driving off. It seemed like a deliberate attempt to warn me off.

So, after driving off, I circled the block and came back. He was again mesmerized by the children, but as my car came down the street, his head snapped around and he followed me until I was out of sight.

So I called the cops. Maybe he was totally innocent, I don't know. But he didn't look much like he could be the father of any of those kids (they were black and he was Hispanic) and anyway he wasn't interacting with them, just staring from his vehicle.

The police thanked me for the call and agreed they should send someone around to observe. I don't know what happened ultimately.

Labrador Deceiver
02-10-2011, 04:20 PM
That seems a bit cold.
Are all the houses in ATL occupied or did the housing bubble collapse take a bite out of prices?

Sure it hit Atlanta, though it depends on how you define Atlanta. However, the neighborhoods hit hardest were typically the ones that contain houses smaller than 6000 sf. I'm sure there are a few out there.

BigT
02-12-2011, 11:47 AM
Ugh. What's all this crap about a public street? A street is public for driving on. Not for random parking.

And honestly, the idea that, if something is legal, it's inherently 100% okay is ludicrous. If you do something out of the ordinary, people are going to notice. And if it's something like sitting out in a car in front of a house that is often a prelude to illegal activity, the cops are going to care about it to.

It doesn't have to be illegal to be stupid.

janinpam
02-26-2013, 09:50 PM
I have had a pickup truck come into our neighborhood every day at 5:30 a.m.. pull over to the opposite side of the street...sit for exactly 4 minutes headlights still on, then go to the end of our street where there is a turnaround...sit for another 2 minutes, then speed out of the neighborhood. The street he sits on t's into mine, and points directly at my house. I am up smoking a cigarette with my door to my garage open, and he has seen me numerous times. Then...after 6 months of this, he doesn't show. Well, I got up with a sick child yesterday, and stood in my garage at exactly 4:30 a.m....and guess who shows up?? He had still been coming, just at an earlier hour. I reported this to the police, who basically patted me on the shoulder (I wanted to knee him) and told me it wasn't against the law to "sit in a parked car" and that there had been no break ins in the neighborhood, so "not to worry."
I am a single mother, and it is freaking me out!!! I can never get his plate, just the make and color of his truck. So when he saw me yesterday...he immediately sped out of the neighborhood. Something is definitely wrong about this!! What can I do?

Really Not All That Bright
02-26-2013, 10:05 PM
Was it this guy? (http://sptimes.com/2005/07/04/State/Wi_Fi_cloaks_a_new_br.shtml)

Kaio
02-27-2013, 04:15 AM
Yeah, it's cold enough for fresh snow, but he opts to stay outside in the car with the engine off for close to an hour? If he needs to cool off after fighting with his wife, a diner would be warmer. I'd be dialing the phone after 10 minutes.

FWIW, in similar circumstances where I thought to save the 911 operators some trouble by calling 311 for what I figured was a not-emergency police matter, I was directed to call 911 anyway. This is Chicago, YMMV.

And for all the MYOBs, it is possible that the car's occupant might be having a medical emergency, too, and might appreciate some help. I remember a TED talk where a woman described her experience of having a stroke in her left hemisphere. She was alone at the time and it took her hours to dial the phone for help, because her ability to read the numbers kept coming and going.

I don't think it's out of line to be concerned about something that unusual. The minor safety checks are part of the police's job too. If everything is fine, then cool.

Kaio
02-27-2013, 04:50 AM
Oh, God DAMN it. Another zombie thread?

Stoppit, people! Make your own threads!

Enkel
02-27-2013, 06:35 AM
I have had a pickup truck come into our neighborhood every day at 5:30 a.m.. pull over to the opposite side of the street...sit for exactly 4 minutes headlights still on, then go to the end of our street where there is a turnaround...sit for another 2 minutes, then speed out of the neighborhood. The street he sits on t's into mine, and points directly at my house. I am up smoking a cigarette with my door to my garage open, and he has seen me numerous times. Then...after 6 months of this, he doesn't show. Well, I got up with a sick child yesterday, and stood in my garage at exactly 4:30 a.m....and guess who shows up?? He had still been coming, just at an earlier hour. I reported this to the police, who basically patted me on the shoulder (I wanted to knee him) and told me it wasn't against the law to "sit in a parked car" and that there had been no break ins in the neighborhood, so "not to worry."
I am a single mother, and it is freaking me out!!! I can never get his plate, just the make and color of his truck. So when he saw me yesterday...he immediately sped out of the neighborhood. Something is definitely wrong about this!! What can I do?

Despite the zombie thread and the one and only post by the poster...

This guy sounds like he's probably delivering newspapers. The same time, 7 days a week, frequent short stops... that sounds like newspaper delivery.


And now I'll go look for a nice breakfast of brains or something :-)

FrankJBN
02-27-2013, 10:01 AM
So in this story, the parked car and occupant were apparently innocent of any wrong doing. A poster says 'the occupant gave a nonsensical answer' when asked why he was there. What?

The guy in the car said he had to be there. How is that nonsense and what more information would a stranger asking what you were doing on a public street deserve?

Sure the guy drove off after being interrogated, but i wouldn't be surprised if he figured the police would be around to roust him soon thereafter, and innocent as the driven snow, who needs the armed and nervous with the power to arrest the innocent confronting them?

It is described as a "suspicious vehicle". What made suspicious other than its presence parked on a public street? Unfamiliarity?

It's what the gun owners and the media and the government want - they want you to be frightened - and apparently it's working.

ladyfoxfyre
02-27-2013, 10:09 AM
Ugh. What's all this crap about a public street? A street is public for driving on. Not for random parking.



I know this is a zombie, but I LOL'd at this. "A public street is not for parking!"


Uh, yes it is, dude. Streets are for driving and parking unless there is a sign that says "no parking".

Pixel_Dent
02-27-2013, 11:11 AM
Oh my God, an electronic device? .....you mean like an iphone? Why are people so scared?

Oops, zombie

Kaio
02-27-2013, 05:40 PM
It is described as a "suspicious vehicle". What made suspicious other than its presence parked on a public street? Unfamiliarity?

Am I really the only one who noticed that this happened in the winter, at night, when it was cold enough for snow, with the engine (and therefore the heat, and for that matter the radio) OFF? Do YOU regularly sit outside in a freezing cold car for an hour doing nothing? Do you do it preferentially over finding a warm building to do nothing in?

I don't, and so if I saw such a thing I'd be thinking either the driver is in trouble, or one of the neighborhood residents are about to be. What made it suspicious is the abnormal behavior of the car's occupant.

Suspicious does not equal fear, either. It's just as possible that the driver is having a medical emergency, or got lost, pulled over to check directions, and now can't get his car started again. In that case, he may welcome a little help.

SCAdian
02-27-2013, 09:18 PM
But the OP says the car was parked in his driveway.

Where does he say that?

Ostrya
02-27-2013, 10:01 PM
Read post #42, also take note this is a zombie thread.

Tollhouse
02-27-2013, 11:07 PM
He was parked in front of your house, but not in your driveway or on your property, correct?

How is it anyone's business why he is sitting in his car? Aren't roads public?

On your property = your business.

Not on your property = mind your own business unless you see a duct-taped and bound passenger or something else clearly wrong.


This.

FrankJBN
02-28-2013, 01:53 PM
Kaio asks: "Do YOU regularly sit outside in a freezing cold car for an hour doing nothing? Do you do it preferentially over finding a warm building to do nothing in?"

I sure do. 5 days a week I leave a warm building to go sit in my car. I often lunch parked on the various streets near the river. In the winter, I'm wearing a coat (and longies) - I don't need the heater. I also will just sit in the car in the parking lot at lunch.

solosam
02-28-2013, 04:39 PM
On your property = your business.

Not on your property = mind your own business unless you see a duct-taped and bound passenger or something else clearly wrong.

Yeah, right. Anything in the vicinity of my house becomes my business by virtue of its proximity to my family.

My first thought is that this might be some PI on his first stakeout. One of the neighbors might be cheating on their spouse or something.

I, personally would shout at him from my window and, if he doesn't move, call the cops. I would not go outside. In every state that I am familiar with, "Castle Doctrine" no longer applies if you exit your home to confront the intruder. Various courts have held that the correct response is to remain in your home until the police arrive.

RaftPeople
02-28-2013, 05:58 PM
Based on the movies, the guy in the car was not interested in the OP's house because he was right in front of it. But if he was across the street and 2 houses up then it's time to worry.

Tollhouse
02-28-2013, 10:19 PM
Yeah, right. Anything in the vicinity of my house becomes my business by virtue of its proximity to my family.

My first thought is that this might be some PI on his first stakeout. One of the neighbors might be cheating on their spouse or something.

I, personally would shout at him from my window and, if he doesn't move, call the cops. I would not go outside. In every state that I am familiar with, "Castle Doctrine" no longer applies if you exit your home to confront the intruder. Various courts have held that the correct response is to remain in your home until the police arrive.


not this answer.

While one has a right to control over their own residence, a person does not have the right to dictate that another person cant sit in their own car...i have a friend who went out at 11 pm to buy a cucumber, she was having a late night pregnancy craving. she parked in her car greedily eating the cucumber, when she coudnt wait to get home to eat it. Some nosy neighbor asked what she was doing and she smiled and said "what does it look like? im eating a cucumber, lady...." who then noticed her stomach and left her the h alone to eat her cucumber in peace

Magiver
03-01-2013, 01:32 AM
Based on the movies, the guy in the car was not interested in the OP's house because he was right in front of it. But if he was across the street and 2 houses up then it's time to worry.
This is very true with drug dealing houses. Cars pull up down the street and people walk to the house. Like THAT isn't suspicious all day long.:rolleyes:

solosam
03-01-2013, 01:06 PM
not this answer.

While one has a right to control over their own residence, a person does not have the right to dictate that another person cant sit in their own car...i have a friend who went out at 11 pm to buy a cucumber, she was having a late night pregnancy craving. she parked in her car greedily eating the cucumber, when she coudnt wait to get home to eat it. Some nosy neighbor asked what she was doing and she smiled and said "what does it look like? im eating a cucumber, lady...." who then noticed her stomach and left her the h alone to eat her cucumber in peace

This sounds like two children playing a game. One child waves his hands in the other child's face. The other child complains, while the first one chants, "I'm not touching you! You can't get mad!"

I'm not going to pull out my property map and say, "Well, he's two inches over the property line. That might as well be in another country. He can just do whatever he wants."

If I see someone suspicious anywhere near my family, I'm going to take action. Just because they are in the "public" street does not put them above suspicion.

Kaio
03-01-2013, 01:19 PM
Kaio asks: "Do YOU regularly sit outside in a freezing cold car for an hour doing nothing? Do you do it preferentially over finding a warm building to do nothing in?"

I sure do. 5 days a week I leave a warm building to go sit in my car. I often lunch parked on the various streets near the river. In the winter, I'm wearing a coat (and longies) - I don't need the heater. I also will just sit in the car in the parking lot at lunch.

:rolleyes: I'm sure you do. I'm sure it's completely lost on you that pretty much no one else does this. And I'm sure you don't realize it's even more unusual on a residential street, far from businesses or parking lots, in someone else's neighborhood, late at night.

Because that couldn't possibly be the least bit unusual, right?

Magiver
03-01-2013, 01:39 PM
not this answer.

While one has a right to control over their own residence, a person does not have the right to dictate that another person cant sit in their own car...i have a friend who went out at 11 pm to buy a cucumber, she was having a late night pregnancy craving. she parked in her car greedily eating the cucumber, when she coudnt wait to get home to eat it. Some nosy neighbor asked what she was doing and she smiled and said "what does it look like? im eating a cucumber, lady...." who then noticed her stomach and left her the h alone to eat her cucumber in peace
And a person has the right to call police on a suspicious car parked in front of their house. I realize it's now a foreign concept of neighbors looking after each other but that's how it use to be in a small town. If you like to take walks at 3am you would expect a friendly chat with the local policeman.

I've had the police called on me for parking in a strange location. I was clearing debris away from an area that eventually became a city park. The person didn't believe me and eventually I had a very pleasant conversation with an officer who was interested in historical places.

I've also had the police called on me for playing frisbee at night. It was an older woman and she heard voices near her house. It resulted in a pleasant conversation with an officer plus we were able to introduce ourselves to her and give her our phone number if she ever needed help.

If you feel indignant that your activities look suspicious that's your prerogative but it's also shortsighted. I've caught one set of burglars in my neighborhood and stopped 2 other robberies by calling the police. This is how a civilized society works.

jonathan1173
04-20-2013, 11:03 PM
Has happened to me in the past. I'd turn on the porchlight and step outside to smoke. Meanwhile I'd be staring at the car and taking notes and perhaps calling the cops. By the way, I usually go out to smoke with my casual jeans on. They seem to fit much better with a Colt 45 tucked into them:D

madmonk28
04-21-2013, 06:39 AM
Do you live in such a high crime area that sight of a person on a public street minding his own buisiness requires you to arm yourself? If not, what do you think is the source of your fear, have you been the victim of violence in the past?

Magiver
04-21-2013, 08:56 AM
Do you live in such a high crime area that sight of a person on a public street minding his own buisiness requires you to arm yourself? If not, what do you think is the source of your fear, have you been the victim of violence in the past?The people at the Boston Marathon were minding their own business. So were the terrorists. Was that a high crime area? What it comes down to is suspicious activity. If someone pulls up to your house and parks there without getting out then that is suspicious.

Ulfreida
04-21-2013, 03:37 PM
Unless you are in a very rural area, no one should be trespassing into your driveway.


Very rural area here, checking in: if a stranger is in your driveway in a very rural area, they are either lost, are looking for their dog (or horse, or cows), or up to no good. Daytime, I go out and ask if they need help. Nighttime, I take my large bite-first-ask-questions-later dog (on a leash) and a big flashlight and do the same.

Except for one time a pack of kids looking to for a place to party, in the past 30 years they've always been lost. One of the big differences between rural and urban/suburban life is that you really don't ignore anything or anyone. Strangers are noted and talked about. Odd noises, anything different, ditto.

madmonk28
04-21-2013, 06:17 PM
The people at the Boston Marathon were minding their own business. So were the terrorists. Was that a high crime area? What it comes down to is suspicious activity. If someone pulls up to your house and parks there without getting out then that is suspicious.Im not sure I understand the link between Boston and some guy parked on the street. Also, if he's really concerned about his safety, he should stop smoking, that's probably going to kill him before the Chechens.

cougar58
04-21-2013, 10:30 PM
a friend of mine work for a firm that investigated workers comp fraudulent claims. He would park within line of sight of the suspects home and use a zoom lens to record them doing strenuous work. He even followed them on trips.
He said one neighbor - not the person staked out - but the neighbor, whose house he was closest to, walked up and asked him what he was doing. So he asked me if he could use my car on the next stake out, and parked near a different neighbor.

Magiver
04-22-2013, 12:14 AM
Im not sure I understand the link between Boston and some guy parked on the street.don't feel bad. There are a bunch of people in Boston missing limbs who don't understand it either.

Warlordofcars
12-24-2016, 03:54 AM
Last week I got home and my laptop was gone. A neighbor told me that an AT&T van had been parked in front of my place that day. The day before, I saw an AT&T van parked in front of my next door neighbor's place. I have been in Florida all week. My friend that's feeding my cat said the laptop is back. There were no signs of forced entry and the doors were locked.

Annie-Xmas
12-24-2016, 09:38 AM
That car has been parked outside the house for almost six years!

Call the cops why don't you?

Count Blucher
12-24-2016, 10:24 AM
Inside the house? Pick up a Nanny-Cam. You can find them used at garage sales too. ( My kid's GF got one from someone in her family. He won't use it & brought it home, so I stuck it in some nic-nac.)

Nobody on the tape? You're imagining things.
Somebody on the tape? Police Report & change the locks.
You're always imagining things until you pull out proof and say, "Did I Imagine That, Fucker?"

jtur88
12-24-2016, 10:37 AM
Read post #42, also take note this is a zombie thread.

Meanwhile, four years later . . .

Maybe it was me. Sometimes when I can't sleep, I drive around and park on public streets and play Yahtzee on my phone. As far as I know, it is not illgeal, immoral nor unethical. And it wasn't way back then, either.

ZonexandScout
12-24-2016, 11:14 AM
There's no law in my state that prevents me from placing a lawn chair on my front lawn near the car and sitting in it with a shotgun across my lap, staring at the car the whole time. As long as I don't brandish it or threaten the driver of the car, I'm fine.

Would I do this? Nope.

My biggest concern would actually be my neighbor from across the street. She is 70 years old and she will come trotting over to my place if she sees a strange car or person anywhere near it. I have to let her know if a friend is going to feed my dogs because otherwise she'll be up in their face before they can open their car door.

Patx2
12-24-2016, 11:32 AM
I actually had a situation like this recently but it was during the day. I live in a small development in a small town. One day, a few weeks ago, I noticed a car parked and running near the corner. It was there for hours. It finally left, but then came back, same scenario. I finally called the local police. A short time later they called me back and assured me it legit. The officer also told me, never feel bad about reporting something if it makes me feel uncomfortable or makes me suspicious, it's their job, better safe.

kopek
12-24-2016, 11:36 AM
That car has been parked outside the house for almost six years!

Call the cops why don't you?


I planned on calling the local zombie patrol but ----------- :D

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