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dougie_monty
05-31-2011, 04:39 AM
When my brother and sister and I were kids, our parents used over-the-counter medications on us, which have since disappeared. We apparently used codeine before it was restricted to prescrfption dispensation. We used asthmador (a brown powder, burned in a cardboard container in a room to open breathing passages in the throat and lungs), and Turpin Hydrate, as a cold medicine. Any of the Teeming Millions remember these or any other discontinued medicines? (Some people still use cod-liver oil--ugh!)

mac_bolan00
05-31-2011, 04:52 AM
sulfanilamide
gentian violet
Q: what's milk of magnesia for?

Shinna Minna Ma
05-31-2011, 05:00 AM
Mercurochrome, the orange stingy-stuff painted on scratches and cuts.

There's a column by Cecil about Mercurochrome here (https://academicpursuits.us/columns/read/2518/what-happened-to-mercurochrome).

My mother-in-law still has an old bottle in her medicine cabinet.

Hbns
05-31-2011, 05:04 AM
Q: what's milk of magnesia for?
In our family mom doled it out for indegestion, heartburn, or constipation.

Shinna Minna Ma
05-31-2011, 05:04 AM
sulfanilamide
Q: what's milk of magnesia for?

It's a laxative (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_hydroxide).

Mean Mr. Mustard
05-31-2011, 09:21 AM
Q: what's milk of magnesia for?

A: What ails ya.


mmm

RealityChuck
05-31-2011, 09:43 AM
The bigger question is how do you milk a magnesia?

I see they still make Boroleum on Fishers Island, NY -- part of my home town, but impossible to drive to without leaving the state and taking two ferries. I don't know the economics, but all raw materials have to shipped in by ferry, and the final result has to be shipped out. Somehow they've been managing for over a century.

There's also Save the Baby, which has been supplanted by Vicks Vap-O-Rub.

Scumpup
05-31-2011, 09:44 AM
Fletcher's Castoria. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%27s_Laxative) My grandmother was firm believer in dosing children with the stuff for any and all ailments. For the record, I don't remember it tasting like root beer or being particularly gentle in its action. The linked page notes that the stuff isn't easy to find any more. Good.

Jake
05-31-2011, 01:39 PM
Then there's Serutan. I think it's a fiber additive. Me mum used to take it all the time. I tried it and it tasted like pelleted cardboard... :)

dauerbach
05-31-2011, 01:49 PM
Turpin hydrate, is still available as a prescription. It was very popular in Viet Nam, or so I hear. Known a GI gin.

RealityChuck
05-31-2011, 02:36 PM
Then there's Serutan. I think it's a fiber additive. Me mum used to take it all the time. I tried it and it tasted like pelleted cardboard... :)And, remember, Serutan spelled backward . . . .

Carter's Little Liver Pills had to drop the "Liver" years ago; they're now Carter's Pills -- a laxative.

robert_columbia
05-31-2011, 02:42 PM
sulfanilamide
gentian violet
Q: what's milk of magnesia for?

Milk of magnesia is an antacid as well as a laxative. It's still sold, as far as I can tell, and I was able to find some the last time I bought some, which was a few years ago.

I saw cod liver oil for sale at a CVS (big pharmacy chain) in Fairfax, Virginia recently. I always thought of it as a dietary supplement, not a drug. What is it used to treat?

robert_columbia
05-31-2011, 02:44 PM
Fletcher's Castoria. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%27s_Laxative) My grandmother was firm believer in dosing children with the stuff for any and all ailments. For the record, I don't remember it tasting like root beer or being particularly gentle in its action. The linked page notes that the stuff isn't easy to find any more. Good.

What she needs is a Balsam Specific.

Spoons
05-31-2011, 02:46 PM
Ayds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ayds), an appetite-suppressant.

Johnny L.A.
05-31-2011, 03:30 PM
Then there's Serutan. I think it's a fiber additive.

I thought Serutan was the Wizard of Isinglass.

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-31-2011, 03:55 PM
Rauwolfia extract for both psychosis and hypertension!

yorick73
05-31-2011, 04:16 PM
Ayds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ayds), an appetite-suppressant.

LOL...I still remember the commercials. "Why take diet pills when you can enjoy AYDS"...Classic.

Here is a link to one...

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7935064058166993925#

Cheez_Whia
05-31-2011, 04:46 PM
Milk of magnesia is an antacid as well as a laxative. It's still sold, as far as I can tell, and I was able to find some the last time I bought some, which was a few years ago.

I saw cod liver oil for sale at a CVS (big pharmacy chain) in Fairfax, Virginia recently. I always thought of it as a dietary supplement, not a drug. What is it used to treat?
It's a dietary supplement for Vitamins A and D that was used before milk was routinely fortified with them, since lack of those vitamins can cause Rickets (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rickets).

california jobcase
05-31-2011, 04:57 PM
Mercurochrome didn't sting. Merthiolate did. Both were made with mercury compounds: merbromin and thimerosal, respectively.

chaoticbear
05-31-2011, 05:28 PM
Gentian Violet is still around, although you have to ask for it at the pharmacy counter. It's still used for thrush, although it's not FDA-approved for it. Fletcher's Laxative is around as well, or was when I worked retail pharmacy about a year ago.

Mercurochrome has been reformulated to Mercuroclear. Old people don't trust it. :p

yabob
05-31-2011, 06:07 PM
Castor oil. Yet another laxative. Fortunately, I was never made to take the stuff, but its horrors are legendary:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil

Curiously, the "Fletcher's Castoria" mentioned above seems not to have anything to do with castor oil. It's active ingredient is senna.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
05-31-2011, 06:33 PM
I wish I could find out more about the old Contac formula. Googling for it or searching for it on Wikipedia just takes me to information about pseudoephedrine, but back in the day Contac also contained a small amount of belladonna1. Additionally, IIRC it contained some other kind of decongestant as well, possibly PPA. Contac used to be one of those things kids took to get high; at least I remember hearing it talked about. This would have been around 1971.

I'd be interested to know (a) what the purpose of the belladonna was, therapeutically, and (b) whether it was that ingredient or something else for which the kids abused it?


1Or it may have been refined atropine sulfate--not sure.

california jobcase
05-31-2011, 07:09 PM
Contac? Tiny time pills? The old formula had phenylpropanolamine, chlorphenaramine maleate, and a bit of atropine and belladonna alkaloids. Phenylpropanolamine is a decongestant that reduces mucosal swelling, chlorphenaramine maleate is an antihistamine for runny nose and sneezing, and the belladonna parts also have a drying effect on the nasal mucosa.

Taking that stuff for hay fever an hour before bed back when I weighed 98 pounds made it very hard to go to sleep, and caused some really creepy sensations.

jayjay
05-31-2011, 07:56 PM
My parents always kept a jar of Brioschi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brioschi_%28company%29) in the fridge. Apparently it's still sold, but I haven't seen it in years.

LouisB
05-31-2011, 09:09 PM
A friend's family believed in a strange, black, tar-like substance dispensed from a tube. As best I remember it was called Ictyol (I know the spelling is butchered). They used if for cuts, burns, rashes, etc. For all I know, it's still available.

longPath
05-31-2011, 09:36 PM
I had an uncle who worked for Burroughs and Wellcome. He was a pharmacist and I assume worked in sales. He would periodically drop off jars of something called "Avamol" (sp?). It was, as I seem to recall, a vitamin supplement in a thick, sweet malt syrup. We got fed spoonfuls of the stuff and quite liked it. I haven't really thought about it until I read the OP.

This was back in the '50s. Google is not helping me with details.

Musicat
05-31-2011, 09:43 PM
Damitall is still around.

BaneSidhe
05-31-2011, 10:12 PM
A friend's family believed in a strange, black, tar-like substance dispensed from a tube. As best I remember it was called Ictyol (I know the spelling is butchered). They used if for cuts, burns, rashes, etc. For all I know, it's still available.

Yup, it still is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ichthammol

It's one of the medicines in our equine medicine chest too, works great.

jasg
05-31-2011, 10:30 PM
Mercurochrome has been reformulated to Mercuroclear. Old people don't trust it. :p For good reason; It has neither of the active ingredients once found in Merthiolate or Mercurochrome as this PDF (http://humco.com/assets/pdf/1637-Mercuroclear.pdf) explains...

Vashbul
05-31-2011, 10:44 PM
Paregoric (tincture of opium) could be got in the US without prescription before 1970. It was magical stuff. When I was a kid, if I had a cramp or other intestinal distress, a dose of this would just melt it away.

Doug Bowe
05-31-2011, 10:45 PM
Tripelennamine. Better known as PBZ.

chaoticbear
05-31-2011, 10:58 PM
Paregoric (tincture of opium) could be got in the US without prescription before 1970. It was magical stuff. When I was a kid, if I had a cramp or other intestinal distress, a dose of this would just melt it away.

We still had a bottle of that at work as late as last year, but a cursory google search says that they're pulling it off the market like so many of the older drugs that haven't hurt anyone for decades but don't meet their current regulatory standards. :rolleyes:

Colibri
05-31-2011, 11:45 PM
This is not really a GQ; moving to IMHO.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator

hellpaso
06-01-2011, 01:04 AM
Paregoric (tincture of opium) could be got in the US without prescription before 1970. It was magical stuff. When I was a kid, if I had a cramp or other intestinal distress, a dose of this would just melt it away.
Oh yes--that was what we got for stomach cramps in the sixties. My Mama always mixed it in coke--perhaps that explains my propensity for drinking lots of vodka and cokes for the past 25 years. ;)

Guinastasia
06-01-2011, 01:24 AM
The only thing I really remember taking is Dimetapp when I was a kid. It tasted like grape pop.

Alice The Goon
06-01-2011, 01:33 AM
My parents always had a styptic pencil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antihemorrhagic), to stop the bleeding of small cuts.

They went through a castor oil stage, which isn't as bad as it sounds, because a dose is only a spoonful, not half a bottle or anything. Although, I have drank half a bottle of it, to bring on labor- worked.

Linament (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linament). The southern part of my family always had this in the cabinet, and it smells really odd.

horsetech
06-01-2011, 01:33 AM
Rauwolfia extract for both psychosis and hypertension!

I'm not sure about the other Rauwolfia compounds, but reserpine is still around. A low dose can help an injured horse who's on stall rest decide to keep all 4 feet on the ground. There are a couple pharmacists on another board who claim to have seen/dispensed it once.

panache45
06-01-2011, 02:18 AM
My parents always had a styptic pencil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antihemorrhagic), to stop the bleeding of small cuts.

That's not outdated at all. I still use it occasionally.

When I was a kid, our cough medicine was cherry-flavored Cheracol. If we needed something stronger, it was Turpin Hydrate and Codeine.

I also remember mercurochrome and merthialate . . . and even iodine.

And we got vitamins in a blue bottle with an eye dropper; a few drops were added to our orange juice.

Spoons
06-01-2011, 02:31 AM
Linament (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linament). The southern part of my family always had this in the cabinet, and it smells really odd.Linament is still available, though not always labelled as such. Nowadays, you may know it as Absorbine Jr. (http://absorbinejr.com/), which (in a stronger version) was known as "Absorbine Veterinary Linament."

elfkin477
06-01-2011, 03:42 AM
Castor oil. Yet another laxative. Fortunately, I was never made to take the stuff, but its horrors are legendary:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castor_oil. Which begs the question: why were Baby Boomer kids so full of crap? :D Seriously, though, why did people dose their kids with laxitives so often back in the day?


Spectre of Pithecanthropus, in the 80s my mom used to take these weird little pills for migraines that looked like someone barfed up a rainbow, and they contained belladonna too. She said that whatever they replaced it with didn't work nearly as well.

Lacunae Matata
06-01-2011, 03:54 AM
Hmmm, looks like they still make it, but it's been years since I've seen a bottle: Formula 666 Cold Medicine. (http://drugstore.com/666-maximum-strength-cold-preparation/qxp88946) My mother used to give that stuff to me and my brother when we were kids, for several reasons, I guess. First off, it tasted vile, so Mom knew we were really sick and not faking it if we agreed to take that crap. Second, it worked (sort of. IIRC, one of the ingredients of the old formulation was castor oil or something similar. You might have wanted to cough, but you were afraid to!) And finally, because my mother was a sadist.

Yeah, of course we referred to that stuff as The Cough Medicine of the Beast.

Ronald C. Semone
06-01-2011, 08:24 AM
I remember the headache powder Stanback from when I was a kid in the 40s. All the drugstores had advertising signs reading "Snapback With Stanback". I haven't seen it in years. Do they still make it?

Do they still make cough drops? Vicks, Ludens, and the Smith Brothers were the big three when I was a kid. They were sold at the candy counter.

Lorski
06-01-2011, 08:42 AM
I remember the headache powder Stanback from when I was a kid in the 40s. All the drugstores had advertising signs reading "Snapback With Stanback". I haven't seen it in years. Do they still make it?

Do they still make cough drops? Vicks, Ludens, and the Smith Brothers were the big three when I was a kid. They were sold at the candy counter.

I haven't seen Stanback in years, (my Pawpaw used to take them) but you can get BC Powder, which is basically the same thing. And yup I have a bag of Vick's cough drops at home.

jayjay
06-01-2011, 08:45 AM
I've seen Smith Brothers recently. Good ol' Trade and Mark.

Ronald C. Semone
06-01-2011, 08:52 AM
I've seen Smith Brothers recently. Good ol' Trade and Mark.

And speakling of Smith Brothers cough drops, they used to come in three flavors: the original licorice, cherry, and honey. We used to buy the licorice under the theory that anything that tasted this bad must be good for you. Smith Brothers and Ludens were 5 cents a box, Vicks was ten cents. We thought only rich people bought Vicks.

GreedySmurf
06-01-2011, 10:07 AM
Don't know if this was used in the US, but when I was a kid if you had rashes, got a lot of mozzie bites, etc in a bath of Condy's Crystals you would go. Don't stay in too long unless you want purple skin :D

Went looking for some a year or so ago, and not only could I not find any, but the younger pharmacy attendents just looked at me strange when I asked for Condy's Crystals. :(

Jake
06-01-2011, 11:11 AM
Umm... Mozzies?

Poysyn
06-01-2011, 11:44 AM
Umm... Mozzies?

I am guessing mosquito bites?

Azeotrope
06-01-2011, 12:24 PM
Damitall is still around.

:D

There's times I can't get through work without my Damitall

ThelmaLou
06-01-2011, 12:36 PM
We still had a bottle of that at work as late as last year, but a cursory google search says that they're pulling it off the market like so many of the older drugs that haven't hurt anyone for decades but don't meet their current regulatory standards. :rolleyes:

Yeah, by all means, let's remove these time-tested harmless remedies and substitute things that will be discovered to cause all kinds of catastrophic side effects after they've been on the market for a couple of years.


I believe in the Old Days, constipation was thought to be the root cause of all the evils and woes of the world. Hell, maybe it is.

WhyNot
06-01-2011, 12:40 PM
Well, the American diet of the 50's wasn't exactly known for copious amounts of fiber...

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
06-01-2011, 03:16 PM
Damitall is still around.

And what about Goddammitol?

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
06-01-2011, 03:18 PM
Which begs the question: why were Baby Boomer kids so full of crap? :D Seriously, though, why did people dose their kids with laxitives so often back in the day?


Spectre of Pithecanthropus, in the 80s my mom used to take these weird little pills for migraines that looked like someone barfed up a rainbow, and they contained belladonna too. She said that whatever they replaced it with didn't work nearly as well.
Belladonna is still sold in homeopathic remedies, or was as of a few years ago when I last noticed it in a Whole Foods market.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
06-01-2011, 03:31 PM
We still had a bottle of that at work as late as last year, but a cursory google search says that they're pulling it off the market like so many of the older drugs that haven't hurt anyone for decades but don't meet their current regulatory standards. :rolleyes:

You mean there was a bottle of opium tincture in the first-aid cabinet at your job? Wow. IIRC in my state (California), everything except band-aids and adhesive tape was removed from workplace "medicine cabinets", even aspirin and those chalky-tasting "Eez" throat lozenges; this all happened some time around 1990. I always imagined it was for insurance reasons.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
06-01-2011, 03:34 PM
Do they still make cough drops? Vicks, Ludens, and the Smith Brothers were the big three when I was a kid. They were sold at the candy counter.

Sure they do, but it's hard to find ones that contain any actual medication, other than menthol or eucalyptus to coat the throat. But there are DXM ones if you look hard enough.

Rhiannon8404
06-01-2011, 04:05 PM
You mean there was a bottle of opium tincture in the first-aid cabinet at your job? Wow. IIRC in my state (California), everything except band-aids and adhesive tape was removed from workplace "medicine cabinets", even aspirin and those chalky-tasting "Eez" throat lozenges; this all happened some time around 1990. I always imagined it was for insurance reasons.

I'm in CA, and the last job I worked at (left in 2008) we had tons of stuff in the medicine cabinet: Aspirin, Tylenol, Advil, Tums, cough drops, Midol, etc. in addition to bandages and Neosporin.

ThelmaLou
06-01-2011, 05:36 PM
When I was in high school in the 60's (a Catholic girls' school), the principal's secretary had a big bottle of aspirin in her desk and you could pretty much go up there any time and get a couple if you needed to.

horsetech
06-01-2011, 05:47 PM
And what about Goddammitol?

If you really want something fixed, go for Fukitol. I use it recreationally myself.

Belladonna atropa - aka deadly nightshade - contains the anticholinergics atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine, among other things. They can cause hallucinations and delirium. In higher doses, Belladonna can put you in a coma and flog your heart into v-fib, thereby doing you in unless someone is standing over you with a defibrillator. They also increase heart rate, dilate pupils, bronchodilate, dry secretions, and slow GI motility (and decrease nausea), things that are useful in certain circumstances but can be bad in others. Of course, with an herbal product, you don't know exactly what dose you are getting, and it may vary from batch to batch unless there is constant testing performed.

I think Donnatal - which is those three anticholinergics with a barbiturate - is still available by prescription, but don't quote me on that. It was at one point commonly used for GI problems as an anti-spasmodic and such, but for the most part it has been supplanted by individual drug preparations, synthetic anticholinergics (e.g., ipratropium and glycopyrrolate), and even other classes of drugs entirely.

irishgirl
06-01-2011, 06:29 PM
Spectre of Pithecanthropus- I'm pretty sure the homeopathic Belladonna, being homeopathic, doesn't contain any actual Belladonna.

My grandmother believes in:
Cod Liver Oil and Malt (http://hollandandbarrett.com/pages/product_detail.asp?pid=3098): as a general tonic- it actually tastes ok.
Kaolin and morphine (http://medicines.org.uk/EMC/medicine/13915/SPC/Kaolin+and+Morphine+Mixture+BP/): for diarrhoea
Milk of Magnesia: for being too boisterous, looking "peaky" and any other bloody excuse she could think of.

My father believes in Andrews liver salts (http://medicines.ie/medicine/2083/SPC/Andrews+Liver+Salts/): for hangovers, heartburn and general intestinal unhappiness.

I took Aulin (Nimesulide) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimesulide) for pain in my foot I developed after walking around on a fractured metatarsal for at least a week.* I went from agony to a deep and peaceful sleep in about 15 minutes- that stuff is magic, but has been subsequently banned in Ireland and the UK.

*In my defence, I didn't know it was broken because it wasn't that bad. Then I woke up with a swollen foot, unable to weight bear and the only trauma had been twisting my foot 10 days beforehand while dancing at my wedding. I was told at first it was plantar fasciitis-then a repeat xray showed new callous formation around a small break. Apparently my body finally decided that enough was enough, but only after a week walking around Venice on honeymoon. My husband thinks that I was too happy and in love to notice the pain until we got home. I disagree.

Zyada
06-01-2011, 06:52 PM
Yeah, by all means, let's remove these time-tested harmless remedies and substitute things that will be discovered to cause all kinds of catastrophic side effects after they've been on the market for a couple of years.


Yes, mercury is just so harmless (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_poisoning). Gosh darn it, next thing you know, they'll be getting rid of homeopathic medicine.

Harmless is one thing - false advertising is another, especially when people choose a treatment that is not going to do anything over one that will.




I believe in the Old Days, constipation was thought to be the root cause of all the evils and woes of the world. Hell, maybe it is.

As I get older, I find this conjecture more and more believable.

Ace309
06-01-2011, 08:12 PM
What she needs is a Balsam Specific.

Balsam specific?! Oof! While we're burning money, why don't we give her a curative galvanic belt too.

Lynn Bodoni
06-02-2011, 03:05 AM
that stuff is magic, but has been subsequently banned in Ireland and the UK.
Yeah, magic stuff always gets banned. I fondly remember paregoric too.

congodwarf
06-02-2011, 01:45 PM
Does anyone still torture small children with chewable charcoal pills? They were my grandfather's favorite heartburn cure (bastard has never HAD heartburn). They were the only thing he'd give me when I was visiting him and suffering. He also thought I was lying though.

Not only did they NOT help with the heartburn, they also caused a lifelong aversion to any food with an even slightly squeaky texture (fish) and the sound of walking on snow (which sounds remarkably like chewing charcoal). I have finally learned to deal with chewing Tums but it still makes me gag.

My grandfather still thinks I'm lying about the heartburn, even with a proven GERD diagnosis. :rolleyes:

Dogzilla
06-02-2011, 04:07 PM
I was given Tetracycline (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetracycline) when I was a young kid. Turns out, when you give Tetracycline to little kids before their dentin has hardened, it causes permanent staining of the teeth. I have gray bands on my teeth that no amount of professional (in the dentist's office) bleaching will fix. I have spent ridiculous amounts of money to try to mitigate the Tetracycline damage; nothing has worked. Pretty much my only option at this point is to have all my perfectly healthy but not pretty white teeth ground down to nubs and capped. Which, of course, is insanely expensive and insurance won't cover it because it's cosmetic.

Instead, I just have to suck it up whenever I post a pic on the interwebs and some jackass feels compelled to point out that I do not have straight white pretty teeth. As if I hadn't noticed. I tend to cover my mouth when I laugh or smile, if I can.

I don't think people give that stuff to kids anymore. It's still in use, but not for children.

congodwarf
06-02-2011, 04:15 PM
They still do. It's the only antibiotic that my nephew can take (so far) without a trip to the ER. He also had stains on his teeth but I don't remember if it was from that or from something else. I do know that it cost my sister over $400 to get it fixed.

Vinyl Turnip
06-02-2011, 04:37 PM
Belladonna is still sold in homeopathic remedies, or was as of a few years ago when I last noticed it in a Whole Foods market.

Hmm. Why would they adulterate a homeopathic remedy with an ingredient that actually has an effect?

chaoticbear
06-02-2011, 04:57 PM
I think Donnatal - which is those three anticholinergics with a barbiturate - is still available by prescription, but don't quote me on that. It was at one point commonly used for GI problems as an anti-spasmodic and such, but for the most part it has been supplanted by individual drug preparations, synthetic anticholinergics (e.g., ipratropium and glycopyrrolate), and even other classes of drugs entirely.

It is, or at least is for the moment. Who knows about its fate?

Hmm. Why would they adulterate a homeopathic remedy with an ingredient that actually has an effect?

Because the more dilute you make it, the more potent it is! :p

Chanteuse
06-02-2011, 05:54 PM
I remember the headache powder Stanback from when I was a kid in the 40s. All the drugstores had advertising signs reading "Snapback With Stanback". I haven't seen it in years. Do they still make it?

Yes (http://walmart.com/search/search-ng.do?search_query=stanback&ic=48_0&Find=Find&search_constraint=976760).

elfkin477
06-03-2011, 07:07 AM
Well, the American diet of the 50's wasn't exactly known for copious amounts of fiber...Compared to now was it worse? People don't go for daily laxitives for kids any more, and you often hear laments about the lack of fiber in kids' diets.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
06-03-2011, 03:37 PM
Hmm. Why would they adulterate a homeopathic remedy with an ingredient that actually has an effect?IIRC one of the principles of homeopathic medicine, in addition to "like cures like", is that only extremely small amounts of any active ingredient are used. There may be a bare smidgen of actual belladonna in there--but such an infinitesimal amount that the manufacturer could just as well have glanced obliquely at the belladonna jar from across the room and left it at that, for all the effect it has in the finished product.

WhyNot
06-03-2011, 05:46 PM
Compared to now was it worse? People don't go for daily laxitives for kids any more, and you often hear laments about the lack of fiber in kids' diets.

Yes, it was worse. I had a nice post with cites and everything, but my computer hates me, and I'm too lazy to recreate it. So I'm just going to say yes, and IIRC, dietary fiber was at an average of 11g per day in the 50's (down from somewhere in the 20's at the turn of the century) and didn't begin to increase until the late '60s.

'Sides that, we now think that not everyone needs to poop everyday, and increasing fiber and bowel retraining are better first lines of intervention for constipated kids, anyway.

C. Montgomery Burns
06-04-2011, 11:51 AM
Balsam specific?! Oof! While we're burning money, why don't we give her a curative galvanic belt too.
Don't forget about Smeckler's Powder!

Ace309
06-09-2011, 01:29 PM
Don't make fun.

Orionizer
06-10-2011, 01:27 PM
Do they still make St. Joseph's children's aspirin? I thought I heard they took it off the market a few years ago b/c of Rye Syndrome or something. Used to take that all the time when I was young.

I also remember Stanback from when I was young, though I never had to take it.

WhyNot
06-10-2011, 01:42 PM
Do they still make St. Joseph's children's aspirin? I thought I heard they took it off the market a few years ago b/c of Rye Syndrome or something. Used to take that all the time when I was young.

I also remember Stanback from when I was young, though I never had to take it.
They've taken the word "children's" off the label, and are now marketing it as low dose aspirin for cardiac patients on daily aspirin therapy.

http://stjosephaspirin.com/products/

Orionizer
06-10-2011, 01:50 PM
They've taken the word "children's" off the label, and are now marketing it as low dose aspirin for cardiac patients on daily aspirin therapy.

http://stjosephaspirin.com/products/

Thanks for the info!

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