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View Full Version : Baseball metaphors for sex - what do other countries use?


Patch
07-14-2011, 01:07 AM
So American teenagers work hard to get around the bases when they go on dates, but what do teens in, say, France, try to do? Is there something similar centered around football (soccer), or is it more of a US thing?

Obligatory XKCD link. (http://xkcd.com/540/)

Chronos
07-14-2011, 01:49 AM
To hopefully clarify more than that XKCD does: If one kisses a member of the opposite sex, one is said to have made it to first base. If there is fondling of breasts, that's second base. Third base is non-intercourse contact with genitals, and a home run is full-on sex (of course, there is considerable variation in the precise meaning of all of these but the home run, but that's the general idea). The metaphor can of course be extended, but most extensions of the metaphor, you're going to just have to explain your literal meaning anyway (the extended metaphors in the XKCD strip are in no way standard).

Patch
07-14-2011, 01:52 AM
To hopefully clarify more than that XKCD does: If one kisses a member of the opposite sex, one is said to have made it to first base. If there is fondling of breasts, that's second base. Third base is non-intercourse contact with genitals, and a home run is full-on sex (of course, there is considerable variation in the precise meaning of all of these but the home run, but that's the general idea). The metaphor can of course be extended, but most extensions of the metaphor, you're going to just have to explain your literal meaning anyway (the extended metaphors in the XKCD strip are in no way standard).

I knew someone was going to link to it sooner or later, so I figured I'd get it out of the way. :)

MEBuckner
07-14-2011, 01:53 AM
The phrase "sticky wicket" seems ripe with possibilities.

jjimm
07-14-2011, 01:54 AM
When I was a teenager we occasionally used the "bases" analogy, presumably stolen from American teen comedies. We didn't use cricket terms sadly, even though it has a silly mid on, a crease, stumps and a sticky wicket.

Other than that we were just explicit: "I got a handful of tit" or "I got two fingers up".

ETA: you bowled a googly, MEBuckner.

grimpixie
07-14-2011, 02:48 AM
I was certainly aware of the baseball metaphor, and no other sport that I'm aware of has the same sense of progression as baseball does.

bardos
07-14-2011, 04:54 AM
I scored...

[cc]
07-14-2011, 05:11 AM
Japan uses the letters A, B, and C for the various stages of romantic activities.

Novelty Bobble
07-14-2011, 05:42 AM
Well isn't this a strange one? For such a wordy nation, fond of our literary heritage and deeply in love with euphemism sexual slang, we seem to be quite lacking a metaphor for that.

"Tops and Fingers" (and varieties thereof) is about as eloquent as we get for that. Of course when it comes to full act we have an embarrassment of riches (viz.co.uk/profanisaurus.html).

njtt
07-14-2011, 08:12 AM
When I was a teen in the UK, we used a star system (one star, two stars, etc.) but I can't remember what the maximum number of stars was (maybe 5), or the specific meanings of individual numbers.

Stormcrow
07-14-2011, 08:55 AM
GGOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaalllllll!

Hypno-Toad
07-14-2011, 09:12 AM
"Puttin' it in the back of the net" always seemed obvious to me.

bardos
07-14-2011, 09:15 AM
back in the day: "put the wood to her"... kind of baseball-ish

grama
07-14-2011, 09:17 AM
1° grade, 2° grade and 3° grade that's what we use. The 'Goal!!!' metaphor refers to pregnancy, being an unwanted one an 'autogol'

Mangetout
07-14-2011, 10:00 AM
When I was a teenager we occasionally used the "bases" analogy, presumably stolen from American teen comedies. We didn't use cricket terms sadly, even though it has a silly mid on, a crease, stumps and a sticky wicket.

Other than that we were just explicit: "I got a handful of tit" or "I got two fingers up".

ETA: you bowled a googly, MEBuckner.

Concur. No particular system in evidence in the UK. The terms used might be slang (and obscure to those not in the know), but there's no rhyme or reason to them.

Tom Tildrum
07-14-2011, 10:24 AM
Is there something similar centered around football (soccer)....

Bear in mind how rare the scoring is in that sport....

Bytegeist
07-14-2011, 10:34 AM
... no other sport that I'm aware of has the same sense of progression as baseball does.

Anyone for tennis?

It does have love anyway.

Chronos
07-14-2011, 12:12 PM
Yeah, but Love is when you're not scoring.

Leaffan
07-14-2011, 12:21 PM
Bunt.


Bunt, bunt, bunt.




Bunt.

KneadToKnow
07-14-2011, 12:31 PM
Yeah, but Love is when you're not scoring.

So, it's marriage?

Hypno-Toad
07-14-2011, 12:34 PM
Baseball symbolism is not just about the bases. Pitching and Catching are accepted sexual terms too. And "striking out" is an all too commonly used term, as well.

TriPolar
07-14-2011, 12:50 PM
The game is nothing but sexual innuendo:

backdoor slider, bag, ball, caught looking, chin music, choke up, dish, donut, fair territory, force out, gap, high and tight, moon shot, mound, rubber, squeeze, sweet spot, switch hitter

KneadToKnow
07-14-2011, 12:52 PM
... double header, double play, triple play, rushing the mound ...

silenus
07-14-2011, 01:07 PM
23rd century Russians still reference baseball.

Vir: There were other women, but I never got past one.
Ivanova: You mean first base.
Vir: No, no, I mean one. You see, we have six a ... we have six, you see, and each one is a different level of intimacy and pleasure. So, you know, first you have one, and that's naa-naa. Then there's two ... and by the time you get to five it's ...
Ivanova: Interrupting Vir, I got it, I got it. I got it. I got it. I don't know what to tell you, Vir. I've never really gotten this whole relationship thing down myself so I'm the last person in the world who should be giving advice on … this sort of thing. All I can say is that enthusiasm, sincerity, genuine compassion, and humor can carry you through any ... lack of ... prior experience with ... high numerical value.
Vir: Wow, I'm gonna remember that. Thank you, thank you.
Ivanova [mouths as he leaves]: SIX!

polar bear
07-14-2011, 01:27 PM
I honestly don't think we had any consistent methapors. It was pretty much: Did you fuck her yet, nah just fingered her a bit... we're a direct lot, us Dutch. We do have about a million verbs that mean fucking though.



I'm sure one of the other Dutch dopers will be here with a whole slur of metaphors I'd totally forgotten.

TriPolar
07-14-2011, 01:52 PM
Sticking your finger in the dyke?

bouv
07-14-2011, 02:02 PM
According to Robin Schobosky, a fictional Canadian on How I Met Your Mother, they (ie Canadians) use a hockey analogy (I'm sure Canadians don't, but the writers love to make Canada jokes through her character.)

According to her, the blue line is kissing, the red line is getting naked, and "in the crease" speaks for itself.

She never said explicitly what in the crease means, but I'd like to think that it's third base/genital fondling, and actual sex would be a goal.

07-14-2011, 03:44 PM
To hopefully clarify more than that XKCD does: If one kisses a member of the opposite sex, one is said to have made it to first base. If there is fondling of breasts, that's second base. Third base is non-intercourse contact with genitals, and a home run is full-on sex (of course, there is considerable variation in the precise meaning of all of these but the home run, but that's the general idea). The metaphor can of course be extended, but most extensions of the metaphor, you're going to just have to explain your literal meaning anyway (the extended metaphors in the XKCD strip are in no way standard).Your heterosexism is showing here.

The qualification " a member of the opposite sex" is unneeded, ans wrong. Pretty much the same terms are used by GLBT kids also.

bup
07-14-2011, 04:03 PM
Your heterosexism is showing here.

The qualification " a member of the opposite sex" is unneeded, ans wrong. Pretty much the same terms are used by GLBT kids also.What's second base for gay men?

Also, the baseball innuendo list is noticeably missing the squeeze and the suicide squeeze. I'd like to think a ground-ruled double has some meaning as well - like, your partner agreed to a home run, but then her dad showed up.

The Librarian
07-14-2011, 04:06 PM
Isn't the whole baseball thing something 'merican tv/film writers came up with to circumvent quite puritan rules about what you can and cannot say on TV?

I mean, when you are bragging to your friends IRL you can be a bit more descriptive than '3rd base', no?

TriPolar
07-14-2011, 04:24 PM
Isn't the whole baseball thing something 'merican tv/film writers came up with to circumvent quite puritan rules about what you can and cannot say on TV?

I mean, when you are bragging to your friends IRL you can be a bit more descriptive than '3rd base', no?

It's more likely the terms were coined long before game existed. The game of baseball was created to form a context where sexual terminology was accepted as proper language in the Victorian era. Well, not more likely, so much as totally unlikely, but amusing to consider :)

Actually I think it is quite likely that the sexual code language developed along with the game. You can be much more descriptive, and explicit, bragging to your friends in some situations. But in 'mixed company' or within range of 'tender ears', the baseball terms probably replaced existing euphemisms which had grown stale or familiar.

WordMan
07-14-2011, 04:34 PM
According to Robin Schobosky, a fictional Canadian on How I Met Your Mother, they (ie Canadians) use a hockey analogy (I'm sure Canadians don't, but the writers love to make Canada jokes through her character.)

According to her, the blue line is kissing, the red line is getting naked, and "in the crease" speaks for itself.

She never said explicitly what in the crease means, but I'd like to think that it's third base/genital fondling, and actual sex would be a goal.

That's "Robin Scherbatsky" and she's played by Cobie Smulders, who is, in fact, Canadian.

I have no idea if Canadians actually use hockey analogies IRL, though...

TriPolar
07-14-2011, 04:56 PM
I have no idea if Canadians actually use hockey analogies IRL, though...

There is the Two Handed Zamboni.

bup
07-14-2011, 05:32 PM
Hockey penalties seem more fertile ground for metaphor-reaping. Hooking, slashing, boarding, hand pass, cross-checking, high sticking, spearing...

Tibby or Not Tibby
07-14-2011, 05:38 PM
Does this mean I’m mistaken in my long held assumption that Brits mine their venerated English Tiddlywinks Association’s list of winking terminology for their vulgar sexual conquest euphemisms? I just took it for granted.
Winking Terms (from Wikepedia)
Blitz: an attempt to pot all six winks of a player's colour early in the game
Bomb: to send a wink at a pile, usually from distance, in the hope of significantly disturbing it
Boondock: to free a squopped wink by sending it a long way away, leaving the squopping wink free in the battle area
Bristol: a shot which moves a pile of two or more winks as a single unit; the shot is played by holding the squidger at a right angle to its normal plane
Carnovsky (US)/Penhaligon (UK): potting a wink from the baseline (i.e., from 3 feet away)
Cracker: a simultaneous knock-off and squop, i.e. a shot which knocks one wink off the top of another while simultaneously squopping it
Crud: a forceful shot whose purpose is to destroy a pile completely
Good shot: named after John Good. The shot consists of playing a flat wink (one not involved in a pile) through a nearby pile with the intent of destroying the pile
Gromp: an attempt to jump a pile onto another wink (usually with the squidger held in a conventional rather than Bristol fashion)
John Lennon memorial shot: a simultaneous boondock and squop
Lunch: to pot a squopped wink (usually belonging to an opponent)
Scrunge (UK): to bounce out of the pot
Squidger: the disc used to shoot a wink[8] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiddlywinks#cite_note-7)
Squop: to play a wink so that it comes to rest above another wink[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiddlywinks#cite_note-8)
Sub: to play a wink so that it ends up (unintentionally) under another wink

(these make more sense when one remembers that the British are primarily a nation of fetishists and paraphiliacs). :)

Morbo
07-14-2011, 06:36 PM
I have no idea if Canadians actually use hockey analogies IRL, though...

This American uses "pulling the goalie" to describe a certain unreliable method of birth control.

Chronos
07-14-2011, 06:46 PM
Your heterosexism is showing here.Probably true, and I apologize for that. But to be honest, I'm not sure the terminology is actually used by anyone but straight males. Do gay men, or women of any orientation, ever brag (or commiserate) about what base they've gotten to?

As to the origin of the metaphor, I imagine it started with "scoring" for having sex. "Did you score with that chick last night?" "No, but I did make it to third base, if you know what I mean.".

Leo Bloom
07-14-2011, 09:47 PM
Wiki provides a page on baseball metaphors for sex. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baseball_metaphors_for_sex)

Leo Bloom
07-14-2011, 09:56 PM
I've heard from a (precocious?) 15-year old that the baseball thing was passé, and what to say is what f: French, finger, fellate, fuck. It is less iconic, more abstract, but does make up for it in building a child's vocabulary (assuming that the etymology of the terms is not lost).

panache45
07-14-2011, 10:09 PM
Your heterosexism is showing here.

The qualification " a member of the opposite sex" is unneeded, ans wrong. Pretty much the same terms are used by GLBT kids also.

I'm so glad the new GLBT generation is more into sports terminology than when I was younger. We didn't have pitchers and catchers; we had "active" or "passive" "french" or "greek" . . . which is actually more descriptive, when you think about it.

Leo Bloom
07-14-2011, 10:32 PM
Does this mean I’m mistaken in my long held assumption that Brits mine their venerated English Tiddlywinks Association’s list of winking terminology for their vulgar sexual conquest euphemisms? I just took it for granted....

Hah! Just found it. From Finnegans Wake, p. 583, as Finnegan and the Mrs. (so-called) go at it.

From here on cricket terms also begin and continue another page till they climax (not posted).

Here she reaches under her legs to tickle the wicked/wicket batter's balls:

... her duffed coverpoint of a wickedy batter, whenever she 34
druv behind her stumps for a tyddlesly wink through his tunnil- 35
clefft bagslops as she ....

It must be mentioned that Joyce furiously considered himself an Irish, not English, writer.

07-14-2011, 11:04 PM
What's second base for gay men?Same as for straight men: touching bare skin on the chest area. Feeling up a guy's pecs.

Indistinguishable
07-15-2011, 02:14 AM
I'm so glad the new GLBT generation is more into sports terminology than when I was younger. We didn't have pitchers and catchers; we had "active" or "passive" "french" or "greek" . . . which is actually more descriptive, when you think about it.
Which is French and which is Greek? (And, uh... why? Didn't the actual French couplings still use one of each, and same for the old Greeks?)

11811
07-16-2011, 07:29 PM
There was a thread on the SDMB (perhaps lost) detailing variations, including "selling the team to Minneapolis."

panache45
07-17-2011, 04:51 AM
Which is French and which is Greek? (And, uh... why? Didn't the actual French couplings still use one of each, and same for the old Greeks?)

French = oral, Greek = anal. And each can be either "active" or "passive."

naita
07-17-2011, 01:30 PM
I know of no commonly used metaphors in Norwegian. The conversation would instead go something like this:

"Did you do her?"
"No, we just fooled around"

and if further detail is desired it'll be metaphorless.

appleciders
07-17-2011, 02:42 PM
I've heard from a (precocious?) 15-year old that the baseball thing was passé, and what to say is what f: French, finger, fellate, fuck. It is less iconic, more abstract, but does make up for it in building a child's vocabulary (assuming that the etymology of the terms is not lost).

See, if we're using only "F" words, I know it as "french, fondle, finger, fuck." I suspect that third base as manual stimulation (and by implication, the whole metaphor) dates to a time before oral sex was as commonplace or socially acceptable as it is today.

BleizDu
07-18-2011, 03:23 AM
There is no equivalent system/gradual scale in French that I know of, and I was confused for years about what exactly their meanings were when I read about it in passing in novels.

Equivalent words exist, but not a whole coherent system based around one metaphor.

2nd base would be "peloter" IMO. It comes from the pelote/jeu de paume game, some kind of tennis ancestor, played by hand at first.

Candyman74
07-18-2011, 09:37 AM
To hopefully clarify more than that XKCD does: If one kisses a member of the opposite sex, one is said to have made it to first base. If there is fondling of breasts, that's second base. Third base is non-intercourse contact with genitals, and a home run is full-on sex (of course, there is considerable variation in the precise meaning of all of these but the home run, but that's the general idea). The metaphor can of course be extended, but most extensions of the metaphor, you're going to just have to explain your literal meaning anyway (the extended metaphors in the XKCD strip are in no way standard).

Thank you! I was never clear on what the bases meant when they were mentioned in US movies and such. Now I know (yeah, I guess I could have looked it up).

Hypno-Toad
07-21-2011, 09:58 AM
This American uses "pulling the goalie" to describe a certain unreliable method of birth control.

I always called that, "Leaving during the fourth quarter." And that's the only American football term I've ever heard for sex. Never heard anyone talking about getting a touchdown, for example.

Nava
07-21-2011, 11:08 AM
To hopefully clarify more than that XKCD does: If one kisses a member of the opposite sex, one is said to have made it to first base. If there is fondling of breasts, that's second base. Third base is non-intercourse contact with genitals, and a home run is full-on sex (of course, there is considerable variation in the precise meaning of all of these but the home run, but that's the general idea).

Thank you, I'd actually been thinking of asking someone to explain that for months but never got around to it.




The only soccer-related metaphor I can recall right now re. sex is "una boda de penalty", "a penalty wedding" being one where the "goal" of marriage has been achieved barring unusual circumtances - i.e., the bride is pregnant (again: penalty not in the sense of punishment, which most people don't even know to be the English-language meaning of "penalty", but in the sense that scoring from a penalty shot is easiest yet not sure, and so is getting a baby once a woman is already pregnant). I know other metaphors related to other sports but can only recall one: the space between anus and vagina/balls is called "el frontón" (the jai-alai wall) as "it is what the penetrator's balls bang against".

Where I come from and 30 years ago, we called kissing kissing, I never knew any specific descriptor to differentiate a "groping session with breasts or genitals being fondled" from one where hands stayed away from them (it was "un lote"; if it lasted a long time/was particularly good it got upgraded to "un lotazo"), fucking was fucking (follar, for anybody who's interested; we normally used follar rather than joder, perhaps because this one is used as a curseword and follar isn't), oral sex was seen as "advanced materials" (a fifth base if you wish; several friends of mine had and/or gave it for the first time after being married) and anal between heterosexuals wasn't even in our vocabulary. Current teens have moved oral to be more or less on pair with vaginal and know about heterosexual anal (no idea how likely they're to actually practice it), but fucking is still fucking, no need for euphemisms.



Oh, and since they came up: in Spanish a French is a BJ. What's called a French kiss in English is a "beso de tornillo"; "screw kiss" (as in the noun meaning "twirly nail", not as in the verb meaning "to have sex"). This can make misstranslations quite strange, I remember some fragment from a movie or TV series where a girl's parents were all outraged because "you were giving that guy a French!" when all they'd been doing was kiss - if they were that irate over a mere kiss, imagine if she'd been giving him a blowjob in their front porch for real...

Chronos
07-21-2011, 12:06 PM
Point of order: American English never uses "a French" as a noun. The noun is always "French kiss". "French" can be used by itself as a verb, though ("I saw John and Mary Frenching", or whatever).

SmithCommaJohn
07-21-2011, 12:18 PM
This American uses "pulling the goalie" to describe a certain unreliable method of birth control.

I've never heard that one.

I've only ever heard "pull and pray"

Hypno-Toad
07-21-2011, 01:11 PM
I've only ever heard "pull and pray"

Leading to "Pray and Spray."

Ponch8
07-21-2011, 01:19 PM
The OP's very question was addressed on an episode of King of the Hill, when Hank asked Kahn what the terms are in Laos. Unfortunately I don't remember the answer.

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