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View Full Version : Is there a symbol for the microsoft Windows Key?


bup
08-04-2011, 11:38 AM
I'm writing documentation, and I want to include that key on a Microsoft box's keyboard, that's usually in the lowest row, with the Windows logo on it.

Is there a symbol for it? Or any easy way to get it in a document?

Bytegeist
08-04-2011, 12:05 PM
There's no Windows logo in Unicode, but there is such a glyph in the Wingdings font, mapped to code 255.

You might be able to insert it by typing a ˙ character in your normal typeface (e.g. Times Roman) and then converting the character to Wingdings. (I'm assuming you're using an ordinary word processor.)

Peter Morris
08-04-2011, 12:06 PM
In MS Word:

1) select from the menu bar Insert > Symbol

2) dialog box opens, with character map of all available symbols

3) change font to Wingdings

4) Windows symbol is the last one on the list.

5) double click on the symbol to insert.

bup
08-04-2011, 12:10 PM
Thanks!

Fear Itself
08-04-2011, 12:48 PM
˙ ..

pulykamell
08-04-2011, 01:06 PM
˙ ..

Apparently, not universal. I see a y with an umlaut. (ETA: Of course, I suspect that being a Mac would be the reason for this. :) I doubt Windows has the Apple logo.)

ETA2: Actually, the Windows logo does exist in my fonts. The browser apparently is just not picking up wingdings for whatever reason.

Fear Itself
08-04-2011, 01:14 PM
Apparently, not universal. I see a y with an umlaut. You could probably install the Wingdings font, and it would show up.

njtt
08-04-2011, 01:33 PM
I have the Wingdings font, and, indeed, was able to get my word processor to display the Windows symbol by using it, but I still see a y with an umlaut in Fear Itself's post.

Presumably, to see the symbol in a browser requires the browser font settings to be configured in a certain (and, I suspect, non-standard) way.

Incidentally, this thread led me to discover that Windows 7, despite appearances, does still have the old Character Map application that actually enables you to find font specific symbols like this. It is hidden away, though. You have to go to Control panel --> Fonts, and then click "Find a character" in the left side menu.

Dewey Finn
08-04-2011, 01:41 PM
Apparently, not universal. I see a y with an umlaut. (ETA: Of course, I suspect that being a Mac would be the reason for this. :) I doubt Windows has the Apple logo.)
FYI, I'm on a Windows XP PC. In Firefox, I get the Y with the umluat, but in IE7, I get the logo.

PaulParkhead
08-04-2011, 01:42 PM
Incidentally, this thread led me to discover that Windows 7, despite appearances, does still have the old Character Map application that actually enables you to find font specific symbols like this. It is hidden away, though. You have to go to Control panel --> Fonts, and then click "Find a character" in the left side menu.

You can also do Start---->Run and type "charmap" (without quotes).

pulykamell
08-04-2011, 02:17 PM
You could probably install the Wingdings font, and it would show up.

I do have Wingdings (and Wingdings 2 & 3), but Chrome apparently doesn't load it up.

Bytegeist
08-06-2011, 10:11 PM
I do have Wingdings (and Wingdings 2 & 3), but Chrome apparently doesn't load it up.

I think it's a mapping policy in the browser or the OS. Wingdings itself is being found, but character 255 (˙) is not a member, so the browser resorts to another font to actually render the glyph.

For example, here are two characters, which I've enclosed in a FONT="Wingdings" block:

☺ ˙

The first character is U+263A (http://fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/263a/index.htm), "WHITE SMILING FACE", which is in Wingdings, and which displays as such, in my browser at least. The second character is our friend "code 255", but that's still going to be interpreted as Unicode — character U+00FF, y-with-diaeresis.

What you'd need to do is somehow say, "here is a 255, but please use the font-specific encoding of the current font to map it to a glyph." I don't know of a way to do that in vBulletin.

Quasimodem
08-06-2011, 10:25 PM
Man, I'm glad you smart folks are here, 'cause I thought "WTF???" when I saw this, and was about to answer "sercond key on far left bottom", before I read the thread through!:):)

Q

BigT
08-06-2011, 11:13 PM
It's actually against web standards to use text to make graphics, as it screws up screen readers (for people with eyesight problems). This is why Firefox does not display Wingdings or Webdings.

In places where ^ is Control, @ is Alt, and $ is shift, I see the windows key represented by #. Otherwise, I'd replace it with a small image, with the alt text "Windows key" for screen readers.

EDIT: ☺ works because it's not actually a Wingding, but a standard character. And since the name of that character is "white smiling face," it doesn't mess up screen readers.

chorpler
08-07-2011, 03:01 AM
Incidentally, this thread led me to discover that Windows 7, despite appearances, does still have the old Character Map application that actually enables you to find font specific symbols like this. It is hidden away, though. You have to go to Control panel --> Fonts, and then click "Find a character" in the left side menu.

Wha...? All of my Windows 7 machines have the Character Map application listed in the Start Menu, under Accessories --> System Tools. I use it all the time.

Hail Ants
08-07-2011, 03:08 AM
I think it's a mapping policy in the browser or the OS. Wingdings itself is being found, but character 255 (˙) is not a member, so the browser resorts to another font to actually render the glyph.

For example, here are two characters, which I've enclosed in a FONT="Wingdings" block:

☺ ˙

The first character is U+263A (http://fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/263a/index.htm), "WHITE SMILING FACE", which is in Wingdings, and which displays as such, in my browser at least. The second character is our friend "code 255", but that's still going to be interpreted as Unicode — character U+00FF, y-with-diaeresis.

What you'd need to do is somehow say, "here is a 255, but please use the font-specific encoding of the current font to map it to a glyph." I don't know of a way to do that in vBulletin.

Ok, when I view this post in Firefox I see the white smiley face and the y umlaut, but in IE8 I see a hand holding a pen and not the white smiley face (I do however see the Windows key symbol instead of the umlauted (sic) y).

LSLGuy
08-07-2011, 10:04 AM
Ok, when I view this post in Firefox I see the white smiley face and the y umlaut, but in IE8 I see a hand holding a pen and not the white smiley face (I do however see the Windows key symbol instead of the umlauted (sic) y).Yep, multiple browser support are fun for the devs.

Under Win7 I see this:
IE8: hand with pen & Windows logo
FF3.6.12: white smiley face & Y-umlaut
Chrome 13.0.782.107: white smiley face & windows logo

Three browsers, three diferent renderings.

kab1
02-28-2013, 05:42 PM
Use Marlett font and type capital 'W'.

j_sum1
02-28-2013, 07:01 PM
Use Marlett font and type capital 'W'.

I have never used Marlett. But that is actually quite cool. Might even be useful occasionally.

dstarfire
02-28-2013, 09:43 PM
Back to the OP, if you're writing key combinations, the standard is simply "win", like "ctrl" for (what used to be labeled the control key but is labelled simply as CTRL on every keyboard I've owned in the last decade), and "alt" for whatever the heck it's supposed to stand for (possibly alternate, though I've only ever said or thought of it as alt).

njtt
03-01-2013, 08:16 AM
Wha...? All of my Windows 7 machines have the Character Map application listed in the Start Menu, under Accessories --> System Tools. I use it all the time.

Well, it isn't there on mine. Mind you, even if it were I would still regard it as fairly effectively hidden away. I would not know to go there looking for it.

the O
03-01-2013, 11:23 AM
I don't know if you're aware of it, but there are keyboard fonts (such as http://fontspace.com/byte-sized-computing/keyboard/3896.charmap,) but I don't know if any of them has a Windows key.

ThomasThePro
09-11-2017, 11:52 PM
Hmmm....This could help you... ⊞❖

DPRK
09-12-2017, 12:18 PM
In case anyone still cares about this thread, that would not help anyone in the OP's position. He or she needed a specific glyph, not an abstract character (even if there were a ‘Microsoft’ character defined in, say, Unicode), and the correct solution given was to pull it out of an existing font or official logo.

In general-purpose documentation (such as for Emacs), I have seen various modifier keys referred to generically as ‘Shift,’ ‘Control,’ ‘Alt,’ ‘Super,’ ‘Meta,’ ‘Escape,’ ‘Hyper’, and similar, even though their existence and labelling (except classics like ‘Shift’) varies between different brands of keyboard, and are also completely remappable. (Ie, it usually makes little sense to refer to the ‘Windows’ key, when on a different keyboard it may just be a little rhombus, or not be available at all.)

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