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View Full Version : What goes in barbeque sauce?


Arkcon
05-24-2012, 03:22 PM
Obviously, there are tons of recipes a Google away from me, so I'm not asking for just recipes, especially the secret ones you may have vowed to take to your grave. I'm more interested in what should go in, to bring out the flavor of your grilled food.

I've always made mine pretty simply: it was ketchup, or lately, my mom's tomato sauce reduced a bit, and half as much maple syrup. The maple syrup I use is smoked maple syrup, and that always insures that the sauce goes over well. When I was a kid, the bottled versions were OK, but now, I like the purer flavor of my homemade.

So one day, I was eating at a local burger place, and the barbeque sauce was awesome, much better than any store bought, and a more tangy flavor.

I talked to my neighbor about it, and he mentions his barbeque sauce is:

ketchup -- I'd rather use tomato sauce, a cleaner flavor, I feel.
fried onions -- this may be important, I see that a lot in recipes, and I used to put it in mine, it probably belongs there. I will probably color some minced garlic to add as well.
white sugar, brown sugar and a touch of honey -- he says people really want sweet barbeque sauce, I disagree, they just don't yet know how a moderate sweetness better complements food.
vinegar -- this is something I've left out which is compromising the tangyness the barbeque sauce needs. I will probably add a citrus juice instead, probably lime.

What else have I forgotten?

Athena
05-24-2012, 03:28 PM
I don't put ketchup or tomato sauce in my favorite BBQ sauce recipe; the base is soaked-and-pureed dried ancho chiles.

Other stuff that comes to mind for BBQ Sauce:

- Soy Sauce, to add salt & umami
- I like lime juice for the acidic component
- If I want smoke, I use some chipotles, either dried or canned or powdered
- garlic
- I use shallots instead of onions
- Molasses adds a sugary depth that I like better than sugar/brown sugar
- sometimes mustard and/or mustard powder

I'm pretty much a vinegar-and-heat kinda girl when it comes to my BBQ sauce. In fact, I pretty much despise the overly sugary stuff most people seem to like. Blech.

Alice The Goon
05-24-2012, 03:38 PM
When I make my own barbecue sauce, I will often include cola or Dr. Pepper. It really helps to tenderize the meat.

Motorgirl
05-24-2012, 03:39 PM
I like to add mustard - either ground or prepared - and like Athena I prefer molasses or sometimes maple syrup to white or brown sugar.

silenus
05-24-2012, 03:41 PM
Vinegar, ketchup, red pepper flakes, brown sugar, onion puree, salt, black pepper - in decreasing quantities.

Obviously I am partial to Western North Carolina-style BBQ.

Lord Il Palazzo
05-24-2012, 03:46 PM
The sauce I usually make is definitely on the sweeter end of the spectrum, with plenty of ketchup and sugar plus mustard, lemon juice, salt, minced onion, Worcestershire sauce and maybe red pepper flakes. I've been meaning to vary it up, but I don't make barbeque sauce very often so I haven't had a chance lately. Using soy sauce and molasses for the saltiness and sweetness sounds like it could be a good place to start.

purplehorseshoe
05-24-2012, 03:50 PM
If it's going to be cooked to reduce it down, some folks add beer.

terentii
05-24-2012, 03:54 PM
White sugar---no way! Only natural dark brown Muscovado sugar, or molasses, or real maple syrup (NOT that hideous artificially-flavored sugary crap they market nowadays under famous labels).

shiftless
05-24-2012, 03:54 PM
Vinegar, ketchup, red pepper flakes, brown sugar, onion puree, salt, black pepper - in decreasing quantities.

Obviously I am partial to Western North Carolina-style BBQ.

Western blasphemy! BBQ sauce is vinegar, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes. Maybe some honey or brown sugar. My dad would melt butter into that for basting chicken but he was from the hills of Virginia, so what can you expect.

TruCelt
05-24-2012, 03:56 PM
With a tomato paste base I add lemon juice, browned onion and garlic, a drop or two of dark sesame oil, a splash of worceteshire (SP?!?), molassas, and a splash of basalmic vinegar. I also put a combination of celery salt, black pepper, dried basil, tiny touches of bitter herbs (thyme, marjoram etc) into the mortar and pestle, grind it up and add it in. There is also usually some fresh lemon thyme from the garden. this needs to sit in the fridge for a day at least.

I had an old friend who used grape jelly in his! It was actually quite good. . .

DMark
05-24-2012, 09:28 PM
Ketchup, Worchester, brown sugar and most importantly, hot sauce.

If it ain't got that kick, it ain't worth a lick.

Sudden Kestrel
05-24-2012, 09:52 PM
Brown sugar, molasses, tomato paste, W'shire sauce, coffee, shallots, garlic, pepper sauce, and vinegar.

Musicat
05-24-2012, 09:59 PM
I am so fucking hungry right now.

BrainGlutton
05-24-2012, 10:42 PM
Western blasphemy! BBQ sauce is vinegar, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes. Maybe some honey or brown sugar. My dad would melt butter into that for basting chicken but he was from the hills of Virginia, so what can you expect.

Hmm. And here I thought Carolina BBQ was based on something unthinkable, like mustard.

silenus
05-24-2012, 11:08 PM
Hmm. And here I thought Carolina BBQ was based on something unthinkable, like mustard.

That's South Carolina. They's weird down there.

pulykamell
05-24-2012, 11:18 PM
I have three basics, all based on the Carolinas:

Eastern style - just cider vinegar, pepper flakes, salt, pepper, and a bit of sugar.
Western - above with ketchup, and I add a few spices, usually at least cloves, and maybe some celery salt or cumin. For pork, I tend to go more for cloves, and maybe nutmeg or mace, possibly fennel; for beef, I go more in the cumin, Mexican oregano, and thyme direction.
Southern - Like Eastern style, cut with a lot of yellow mustard and balanced with a good deal of sugar.

ETA: Oh, and I should add, when I'm feeling a little bit different, I'll add various fruits to my sauces. I like pureed apples for pork; tamarind for beef; perhaps a hit of citrus (especially for chicken). It's all over the map, but it all comes down to one of those three bases for me.

Oredigger77
05-25-2012, 12:35 AM
I typically cook down 2 parts Coke to 1 part Siracha and then top it of with a bunch of red pepper flake. I've been meaning to work on a vinager based sause and I think I'll steal some ideas from this thread. I'm definitly going to steal the soy sause idea for salt to flesh out my current sause.

Ethilrist
05-25-2012, 12:45 AM
Ketchup, mustard, worchestershestershire sauce, liquid smoke, soy sauce, lemon juice, onions, tabasco sauce, salsa, salt, pepper, cumin, brown sugar, salt, pepper, garlic, and probably a few things I'm not remembering.

Jeff Lichtman
05-25-2012, 02:47 AM
My own recipe:

1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup dark molasses
2/3 cup Dijon mustard
5 Tbsp. tomato paste
2 Tbsp. Tabasco (or other hot sauce)
2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 Tbsp. liquid smoke

Just mix the ingredients - no cooking necessary. This sauce is on the tart side - not too sweet.

TriPolar
05-25-2012, 03:06 AM
That's South Carolina. They's weird down there.

If knowing how to make barbecue sauce right is weird, then fine. But without mustard you've just got a weak facsimile of barbecue sauce.

And I seriously hope all of you have meat drippings in your sauce, because you don't make it until the meat is done, because it doesn't go on the meat while you're cooking it! That's what dry rubs are for!

carnivorousplant
05-25-2012, 09:16 AM
That's South Carolina. They's weird down there.

Heretic!
Burn him!

pulykamell
05-25-2012, 09:36 AM
If knowing how to make barbecue sauce right is weird, then fine. But without mustard you've just got a weak facsimile of barbecue sauce.

And I seriously hope all of you have meat drippings in your sauce, because you don't make it until the meat is done, because it doesn't go on the meat while you're cooking it! That's what dry rubs are for!

Meat drippings are fine in a barbecue sauce, but hardly necessary. Your standard Carolina sauces, for example, don't have drippings. I almost never put drippings in my sauce. I'm making barbecue sauce, not gravy.

While my style of barbecue generally does not apply sauce during cooking time, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using a "mop" during the cooking, and finishing off with a layer of barbecue sauce at the end if ciijubg. When you do that, and have a sauce with some type of sugar, you get a nice caramelization to it that is different from applying sauce at the end. I'm a sauce-on-the-side kind of guy, but I can appreciate those who like a glaze of barbecue sauce to finish.

My only personal rule about barbecue sauce is no liquid smoke. I don't like the bitter creosote-y taste of it, and, besides, I generally use barbecue sauce on actual barbecue, which has plenty of smoke flavor. Liquid smoke would kind of defeat the point of me doing all that work.

silenus
05-25-2012, 10:05 AM
The BBQ Song (youtube.com/watch?v=6ubTQfr_tyY)

People who use a mustard or mayonnaise based sauce are the same sort of people who put random vegetation in chili and ketchup on hot dogs. Meat drippings? Nonsense.

As puly said, there are mop sauces that are essential to certain styles of BBQ. But tomato or sauces with sugar should never be put on meat until the end of the cooking process.

pulykamell
05-25-2012, 10:05 AM
if ciijubg.

Whoa. Somehow my fingers got shifted. That should be "of cooking."

And don't knock the mayonnaise sauce until you've tried it. It has a very specific purpose -- on chicken (which some may disqualify as barbecue off the bat). It's surprisingly nice. I prefer to go the Cornell chicken (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/cornell-chicken-marinade/) route when it comes to grilled chicken (and it's basically just a homemade mayonnaise), but they're both good.

shiftless
05-25-2012, 10:20 AM
If knowing how to make barbecue sauce right is weird, then fine. But without mustard you've just got a weak facsimile of barbecue sauce.

And I seriously hope all of you have meat drippings in your sauce, because you don't make it until the meat is done, because it doesn't go on the meat while you're cooking it! That's what dry rubs are for!

A smoked, pulled pork butt doesn't need any kind of sauce to make it the best BBQ I've ever had. There is rub involved of course (another religious debate) and the butt is basically smoking in its own lard, so there's your drippings. The sauce (Eastern Carolina in my case) just adds some tang and heat.

I think the sauce really depends on the type of meat and the type of cooking. All of the sauces here make me hungry but I wouldn't put some of them on smoked pork.

silenus
05-25-2012, 10:23 AM
I've had Cornell chicken. I've had chicken in Arkansas with that <shudder> sauce. No thank you. Not to my tastes at all.

As my grandfather always noted "If everybody's tastes were the same, they'd all be hot for your grandmother!"

RealityChuck
05-25-2012, 10:23 AM
"One half gallon of vanilla ice cream." ;)

[spoiler]Detective Bill Gannon, Dragnet.[/quote]

pulykamell
05-25-2012, 10:27 AM
I've had Cornell chicken. I've had chicken in Arkansas with that <shudder> sauce. No thank you. Not to my tastes at all.


Ah. As long as you've given it a fair shake. And I know we disagree on mustard sauce (which I think is just perfect for pork. I mean, how can you not like it? You seem to be a sensible guy. You don't put ketchup on your hot dogs, so you must like mustard. And mustard and pork is one of the classic combinations!)

pulykamell
05-25-2012, 10:35 AM
A smoked, pulled pork butt doesn't need any kind of sauce to make it the best BBQ I've ever had.

I agree with this philosophy. It's not about the sauce. Barbecue should taste great without anything on it, but if you desire that accent, go for it with the sauce.


There is rub involved of course (another religious debate)

When it comes to pulled pork, I've gone from the simplest rubs--salt and pepper--to more complicated ones and, honestly, as long as it's smoked well, it doesn't seem to make all that much of a difference, unless you add the spice mix to the meat after you've chopped or pulled it. I mean, you have a giant hunk of pork that has a relatively thin layer of spices so, unless you get a reasonable amount of bark in your sandwich (or plate), you're not tasting much of it. And then there's those crazy people who don't like bark in their sandwich.

This doesn't keep me from continuing to do different rubs, but on pork shoulder, it's really hard for me to note the difference unless I season the meat additionally after cooking.


I think the sauce really depends on the type of meat and the type of cooking. All of the sauces here make me hungry but I wouldn't put some of them on smoked pork.

I tend to agree, although I think pork marries well with a wide variety of sauces. I tend to like pork sauce towards the tarter and more "fragrant" spice end (cloves, nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, fennel, anise, etc.), while beef does a little better with a big of sweetness and earthiness, but I've enjoyed pork with sauces meant for beef, too. The only one I wouldn't use on pork is the mayonnaise sauce.

silenus
05-25-2012, 10:39 AM
Ah. As long as you've given it a fair shake. And I know we disagree on mustard sauce (which I think is just perfect for pork. I mean, how can you not like it? You seem to be a sensible guy. You don't put ketchup on your hot dogs, so you must like mustard. And mustard and pork is one of the classic combinations!)

Pork with a little hot mustard on the side is nice. But BBQ pork demands (nay, requires!) a vinegar-based North Carolina-style sauce. Rub that pork butt well, cook it low and slow, chop it up good (slices are ok as well, but I like the bark mixed in) and slather it with sauce. Lexington (http://urbanspoon.com/r/156/945875/restaurant/Piedmont-Triad/Lexington-Barbecue-Lexington) #1 (http://kevinsbbqjoints.com/joint/553/) is my idea of wonderful.

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-25-2012, 12:50 PM
Make sure you add vegemite to your recipe.

pulykamell
05-25-2012, 12:51 PM
Make sure you add vegemite to your recipe.

You're just trying to start a fight, aren't you? ;)

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-25-2012, 12:56 PM
You're just trying to start a fight, aren't you? ;)
Okay, okay.

Marmite is acceptable also.

Happy now?

:cool:

silenus
05-25-2012, 12:59 PM
You are very ecumenical in your weirdness, I'll grant you that. And your tastes in cheese are beyond reproach. But still...a general rule is items that end in "...mite" might not really be food.

billfish678
05-25-2012, 01:12 PM
Its all good. Whatever you like or wanna try. I recall my childhood days where my moms idea of BBQ was to slather cheap BBQ sauce on some meat on the grill (yeah, thats not real BBQ but I do like that style as well). The real problem was her idea included turning that basted on sauce into a fully carbonized coating. I imagine Hans Solo tasted better.

I haven't seen anyone mention paprika yet. And sometime I use a bit of curry. Hell, I get crazy and throw all kinds of random spices/stuff into my sauces. One of my favorite sauces is one I can't make regularly. It was a basic sauce but it had a special ingredient. It was the left over pepper pulp from the Tabassco Hot Sauce company. Most of the heat was gone but there was still plenty of flavor.

Turble
05-25-2012, 01:14 PM
I don't care much for lemon and never have limes around so when I used to make tomato based BBQ sauce I always added a splash of orange juice.

Lately I have been taking the real easy route and using Alton Brown's bastardized Carolina(s) sauce on pulled pork; just mix mustard and sweet pickle juice. Couldn't be any easier and very tasty.

gazpacho
05-25-2012, 01:20 PM
Make sure you add vegemite to your recipe.I have a theory about things like this. They are only suggested by old men who have killed off their taste buds with years of drinking and smoking. The old men crave extremely strong tasting things like blue cheese stuffed olives and vegemite because otherwise the food is tasteless.

I am old man who like blue cheese stuffed olives but do not quite yet need to resort to vegemite to feel alive.

pravnik
05-25-2012, 01:34 PM
You are very ecumenical in your weirdness, I'll grant you that. And your tastes in cheese are beyond reproach. But still...a general rule is items that end in "...mite" might not really be food.Oh, come on, have you ever even tried dynamite?

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-25-2012, 01:39 PM
Oh, come on, have you ever even tried dynamite?
I have, it tastes like burning. And causes one hell of a headache.

Really.

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-25-2012, 01:44 PM
You are very ecumenical in your weirdness, I'll grant you that. And your tastes in cheese are beyond reproach. But still...a general rule is items that end in "...mite" might not really be food.
New flavor opportunities are dancing lessons from God.

Some seek the Lost Chord, I seek the 6th Taste.

carnivorousplant
05-25-2012, 01:46 PM
Some seek the Lost Chord, I seek the 6th Taste.

That's umami, isn't it?

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-25-2012, 01:50 PM
That's umami, isn't it?
No, umami was the 5th.

billfish678
05-25-2012, 02:09 PM
Unami is Japanese for the right to not incriminate oneself? Who knew?

Kimballkid
05-25-2012, 03:08 PM
My own recipe:

1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup dark molasses
2/3 cup Dijon mustard
5 Tbsp. tomato paste
2 Tbsp. Tabasco (or other hot sauce)
2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 Tbsp. liquid smoke

Just mix the ingredients - no cooking necessary. This sauce is on the tart side - not too sweet.

Vanilla extract?! Sounds a bit unusual. And so much of it too. Might have to try this sometime.

TruCelt
05-25-2012, 03:23 PM
Unami is Japanese for the right to not incriminate oneself? Who knew?

No, no no. Unami is the state of perpetual awareness achieved by those who took ka-ra-tey for several months in the third grade.

Qadgop the Mercotan
05-25-2012, 03:28 PM
No, no no. Unami is the state of perpetual awareness achieved by those who took ka-ra-tey for several months in the third grade.
I don't think I'd like perpetual awareness. I like occasional sweet oblivion.....

carnivorousplant
05-25-2012, 03:55 PM
Vanilla extract?! Sounds a bit unusual. And so much of it too. Might have to try this sometime.

A replacement for bourbon?

I think the smoke flavoring is cheating. :)

TriPolar
05-25-2012, 04:20 PM
Meat drippings are fine in a barbecue sauce, but hardly necessary. Your standard Carolina sauces, for example, don't have drippings. I almost never put drippings in my sauce. I'm making barbecue sauce, not gravy.


That's ok. I was going for the point about not cooking with sauces.


While my style of barbecue generally does not apply sauce during cooking time, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using a "mop" during the cooking, and finishing off with a layer of barbecue sauce at the end if ciijubg. When you do that, and have a sauce with some type of sugar, you get a nice caramelization to it that is different from applying sauce at the end. I'm a sauce-on-the-side kind of guy, but I can appreciate those who like a glaze of barbecue sauce to finish.


I usually don't need to mop, I make sure there's plenty of fat covering the meat. I have a seperate rub with lots of brown sugar to put on at the end if ciijubg. I'll remove excess fat before the final rub, leaving just a little to form a glaze with the rub.


My only personal rule about barbecue sauce is no liquid smoke. I don't like the bitter creosote-y taste of it, and, besides, I generally use barbecue sauce on actual barbecue, which has plenty of smoke flavor. Liquid smoke would kind of defeat the point of me doing all that work.

Definely no liquid smoke. And definetly not 1 Tbsp. That stuff was meant to be used by the drop! Smoke salt is not too bad for cijubg some things, if you're not actually barbecuing.

Plumpudding
05-25-2012, 04:33 PM
Just a tip for people who don't like liquid smoke, smoke essences, nor have the capability to actually smoke the meat:

Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier

http://tapasgaeta.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/aecht-schlenkerla-rauchbier1.jpg

It's perfect for marinades and in sauces, or if you just want to drink beer.

carnivorousplant
05-25-2012, 04:46 PM
if you just want to drink beer.

Nothing wrong with that!


:)

silenus
05-25-2012, 05:06 PM
Have you ever had rauchbier? Vile stuff to drink, but a superb addition to all sorts of dishes, including BBQ sauce.

Plumpudding
05-25-2012, 05:28 PM
Vile?! It's wonderful! Liquid smoked ham! I usually have a couple an evening, though. More may get a bit too much.

Grrr!
05-26-2012, 09:55 AM
Heh, I learned to make BBQ sauce out of pure lazyness.

I was at home about to fire up the grill in the back yard. I suddenly realized I didn't have any BBQ sauce. Too lazy to go to the store, I just threw some ingredients together I had at home:

Tomato paste
Red wine vinegar
Pineapple juice
mustard
Minced garlic
minced onion
various spices from the spice rack

[simmer]

I kept my fingers crossed hoping it would work.

Turns out it did. Because my guests kept asking me what brand of sauce it was. They really liked it. As did I.

VOW
05-26-2012, 10:21 AM
"One half gallon of vanilla ice cream." ;)

[spoiler]Detective Bill Gannon, Dragnet.[/QUOTE]

Thank you, Chuck! I wondered if somebody would remember that one!


~VOW

VOW
05-26-2012, 10:28 AM
I have, it tastes like burning. And causes one hell of a headache.

Really.

That's because the nitrates are notorious vasodilators!

Try an Imitrex chaser.


~VOW

Biggirl
05-26-2012, 10:41 AM
Just yesterday I slow cooked some ribs on my kettle drum bbq. It had a rub and I thought I'd do like the Chinese and leave it at that but in the end it just didn't look right so I slapped together a quick sauce of molasses, beer, vinegar and ketchup.

It came out really good! (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v19/Biggirl/memorialdayribsalldone.jpg)

carnivorousplant
05-26-2012, 01:24 PM
It came out really good! (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v19/Biggirl/memorialdayribsalldone.jpg)

Mrs. Plant says, "You aren't supposed to post pictures of really good shit unless you explain how you did it."

For how long?
What is a kettle drum bbq?

Biggirl
05-26-2012, 02:17 PM
A Webber charcoal grill and not gas.

The rub was brown sugar, paprika, my own homemade smokey chili powder, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper. (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v19/Biggirl/Fridaylabordayweekend.jpg)

Get the charcoal going and then make two piles on either side of the grill leaving the middle empty. That's where you put the rib rack bone down. I put a small handful of soaked mesquite wood chips on the coals. Put more every hour or so. If you don't have wood chips, you can put a drop or two of liquid smoke in the sauce. (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v19/Biggirl/labordayFridayribsalmostdone.jpg)

Cooking takes four or five hours. If the top starts looking a little dried out, spray it with vinegar water. The last half hour or so, flip it and put on the sauce. Cook for ten/12 minutes or so, flip, put sauce, cook for another ten/12 minutes or so.

RetroVertigo
05-26-2012, 04:16 PM
I love making my own sauce, and will try a few of the ones posted.

Just wanted to point out that by bringing a sauce to a light simmer then allowing to cool allows all the flavors to meld. I know sometimes you don't have time, but if you do heating makes for a better sauce.

When I'm in the mood for a tartier non-vinegar sauce I use OJ. Adds a bit of sweet, and a bite to the tongue.

carnivorousplant
05-26-2012, 05:12 PM
A Webber charcoal grill and not gas.


Cooking takes four or five hours. If the top starts looking a little dried out, spray it with vinegar water. The last half hour or so, flip it and put on the sauce. Cook for ten/12 minutes or so, flip, put sauce, cook for another ten/12 minutes or so.

Thanbks, Biggirl!

carnivorousplant
05-26-2012, 05:19 PM
A brief hijack: wrapping ribs in aluminum foil.
It prevents the fire that always starts when I look away and it keeps them from drying out. TNAI Mrs. Plant likes them because they are literally falling off the bone, but I like to unwrap them for awhile and get them brown, tender yet still attached to the bone.

Do any of y'all wrap ribs?

Labrador Deceiver
05-26-2012, 06:13 PM
A brief hijack: wrapping ribs in aluminum foil.
It prevents the fire that always starts when I look away and it keeps them from drying out. TNAI Mrs. Plant likes them because they are literally falling off the bone, but I like to unwrap them for awhile and get them brown, tender yet still attached to the bone.

Do any of y'all wrap ribs?

Holy hijack!

Go ask this on a barbecue forum and watch the board explode.

Biggirl
05-26-2012, 06:30 PM
Holy hijack!

Go ask this on a barbecue forum and watch the board explode.

Totally agree. You should see me and hubby fight over this. He also boils his ribs before putting them on the grill. Sacrilege!

pulykamell
05-27-2012, 01:21 AM
Do any of y'all wrap ribs?

First vegemite in barbecue sauce, and now this?

On the other hand, at least it's not boiling them.

billfish678
05-27-2012, 10:26 AM
I hear if you put the ribs in cold water and slowly bring it to a boil the ribs never know they were boiled and its all okay.

carnivorousplant
05-27-2012, 11:57 AM
I hear if you put the ribs in cold water and slowly bring it to a boil the ribs never know they were boiled and its all okay.

Does this mean one may wrap them in foil very, very slowly?

billfish678
05-27-2012, 12:04 PM
As long as you don't make any "crinkling" sounds and wake them up.

Athena
05-27-2012, 12:48 PM
I was just rummaging around in the fridge and found the last batch of BBQ sauce I made. It had blueberries in it, and turned out great. When I was making it, I found a couple packages of wild blueberries left over from last summer in the freezer in danger of getting freezer burnt, so figured if people can put peaches in BBQ sauce, I can put blueberries in.

It's kinda purple, but other than that, they add a nice sweet/sour taste. I'd do it again.

pulykamell
05-27-2012, 01:07 PM
Pretty much any fruit can successfully find its way into a barbecue sauce. I'm particularly partial to a bit of tamarind, myself.

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