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View Full Version : Siobhan? Shevaughn? Chevonne?


Tabby_Cat
03-18-2013, 04:41 AM
It's time to play "name the TabbyKitten"! :D

I really, really like the name Siobhan (so it's a girl, you knew that), but unfortunately nobody here (Singapore) is familiar with the original spelling, and there are some unfortunate "false friends (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend)" meaning "roast meat" or similar in Cantonese.

Not wanting to subject my poor daughter to that, my wife and I are thinking of alternatives. What's your favourite alternate spelling of Siobhan? We're thinking of going with Chevonne for now. :)

Sierra Indigo
03-18-2013, 06:49 AM
My favourite "alternate" spelling is please just don't. It's hard enough for those of us saddled with that fucking name without people poisoning the well and giving other assholes an opportunity to go "Oh that's a funny spelling, my cousin's sister's brother's daughter spells it Sheeevaawwwnnn"

kambuckta
03-18-2013, 06:55 AM
Not wanting to subject my poor daughter to that, my wife and I are thinking of alternatives. What's your favourite alternate spelling of Siobhan?

Betty works fine for me.

Or Anne.

Hey, with weird Irish spellings, either could be translated from Siobhan! :p

Whatever you do, don't try to be so clever as to give your child a curse that they will forever hate you for in the future. Listen to Sierra. She's wise. :D

Eliahna
03-18-2013, 06:57 AM
Respellings just look trashy.

PookahMacPhellimey
03-18-2013, 06:58 AM
Thirded. No alternative spellings. If the Irish spelling is too much to handle, go for Yvonne. :)

Beelzebubba
03-18-2013, 07:03 AM
Spell it the proper Irish way or not at all, I say!

Tess (or Tessa) and Chloe are great kitty names....Emily and Allie are also great names for a little girl kitty....

Tabby_Cat
03-18-2013, 07:11 AM
Really? Not a single one? :(

kambuckta
03-18-2013, 07:11 AM
Spell it the proper Irish way or not at all, I say!

Tess (or Tessa) and Chloe are great kitty names....Emily and Allie are also great names for a little girl kitty....

Ummm, I think he's talking about a HUMAN child, not a feline.

kambuckta
03-18-2013, 07:13 AM
Really? Not a single one? :(

Nope.

Now go look back in the Baby Names Almanac for something more appropriate!

You've been told!! :D

stpauler
03-18-2013, 07:16 AM
Get a second cat named "Shove Off".

Ferret Herder
03-18-2013, 07:17 AM
Yeah, I assumed it was actually for a cat as well. For a human? Pick another name if you can't go with the original, IMO.

SciFiSam
03-18-2013, 08:13 AM
Really? Not a single one? :(

No. Some names have acceptable alternates (Shaun's OK), but Siobhan doesn't. Maybe have it as a middle name in its original spelling.

Beelzebubba
03-18-2013, 08:20 AM
Fight the cause of this whole naming debacle-

Name the kid "Roast Meat" and be done with it!

owlfan
03-18-2013, 08:23 AM
I have known Asian kids that were named Kanoe and Fuch, pronounced Canoe( like the thing you paddle down the river) and Foo. They survived with their original spellings so I say go with the traditional Irish version. I agree that alternative spellings look trashy.

Ken001
03-18-2013, 08:27 AM
Friends of mine named their daughters Shayne (meaning Siobhan) and Caeilyn (Caitlin). Odd from my perspective but these girls have held their heads up and thrived.

Kind reminds me of a Boy Named Sue. :D

GuanoLad
03-18-2013, 08:36 AM
If I had a kitten I'd name it something domestic and ordinary, like Dave or Roger.

If you want Irish, I suggest Shona.

SciFiSam
03-18-2013, 08:37 AM
Friends of mine named their daughters Shayne (meaning Siobhan) and Caeilyn (Caitlin). Odd from my perspective but these girls have held their heads up and thrived.

Kind reminds me of a Boy Named Sue. :D

Shayne=Siobhan? How? Caeilyn=Caitlyn kinda makes sense if you turn the t to a glottal stop.

PookahMacPhellimey
03-18-2013, 08:41 AM
If you want Irish, I suggest Shona.

Shona is Scottish.

Ken001
03-18-2013, 08:43 AM
Yeah Sam, I agree but I'm not the parents. No harm done and I think the objective was to provide the girls with memorable names.

And yes Pooka, Shona is a fine Scottish name well known and conferred in my part of New Zealand. Och aye the noo. My mother was a Stuart and my brother and my son are named Andrew.

GuanoLad
03-18-2013, 08:44 AM
Shona is Scottish.Damn it.

Well, I decree it can be both.

Baron Greenback
03-18-2013, 08:46 AM
Shona is Scottish.

Is the Irish equivalent Seonaid?

SciFiSam
03-18-2013, 08:54 AM
Yeah Sam, I agree but I'm not the parents. No harm done and I think the objective was to provide the girls with memorable names.

But do they pronounce it like Siobhan? That's really odd. I mean, Shayne is an actual name, one that has its own pronunciation. It'd be like naming your child David and insisting it be pronounced Daniel.

even sven
03-18-2013, 09:04 AM
FWIW, I don't see any problem with Chevonne. I'm not personally a huge fan of the name, but many of us have names that were Anglicized at some point or another.

An Gadaí
03-18-2013, 09:14 AM
If you want to spell it the Irish way don't forget the fada on the a, Siobhán.

Tabby_Cat
03-18-2013, 09:15 AM
FWIW, I don't see any problem with Chevonne. I'm not personally a huge fan of the name, but many of us have names that were Anglicized at some point or another.
At least one! :D

Keep 'em coming, folks. I'm leaning towards yes, but I could be persuaded...

Kevbo
03-18-2013, 09:17 AM
My favourite "alternate" spelling is please just don't. It's hard enough for those of us saddled with that fucking name without people poisoning the well and giving other assholes an opportunity to go "Oh that's a funny spelling, my cousin's sister's brother's daughter spells it Sheeevaawwwnnn"
Yeah, it is annoying to have to ask "spelled traditionally?" when that is the only way anyone but a dumbass would spell it. Anyone that thinks Shawn is OK should stay in Texas, where they think Amarillo rhymes with pillow.

The Siobahns I have met seemed impressed that I knew how to pronounce/spell it. One was less impressed when she worked out that I was about 15 years older than she had guessed. She was a sweet kid, I would have been disappointed if I didn't see it coming...enjoyed the attention while it lasted though.

even sven
03-18-2013, 09:24 AM
Repost

April R
03-18-2013, 09:25 AM
I like Chevonne
No one is going to like your kid's name as much as you do, so do what ever you want. I want to name my new baby girl Celeste Louise, and people either love it or hate it, and I don't care either way what people think about it, it's my name to choose not theirs! Go with whatever spelling/name you want!

Baron Greenback
03-18-2013, 09:32 AM
I want to name my new baby girl Celeste Louise, and people either love it or hate it, and I don't care either way what people think about it, it's my name to choose not theirs!

That's a great name. It's kind of fun to say, too, a bit of a workout for the mouth :)

Ken001
03-18-2013, 09:35 AM
But do they pronounce it like Siobhan? That's really odd. I mean, Shayne is an actual name, one that has its own pronunciation. It'd be like naming your child David and insisting it be pronounced Daniel.

True. Agreed. They pronounce it Schanne which is really Sian but thats what they say.

Aspidistra
03-18-2013, 09:41 AM
If you're a fan of Irish names, any love for Sinead? Unless it means peanut-butter sandwich or something in Cantonese...

April R
03-18-2013, 09:45 AM
If you're a fan of Irish names, any love for Sinead? Unless it means peanut-butter sandwich or something in Cantonese...
LOL.

April R
03-18-2013, 09:46 AM
That's a great name. It's kind of fun to say, too, a bit of a workout for the mouth :)
Thanks! My husband hates the middle name, but it is my great grandma's name so he can suck it!

Also, advice for the OP, everyone and their second cousin is going to give you suggestions for names, just smile and nod and say thanks then do what ever the heck you want.

SciFiSam
03-18-2013, 10:17 AM
Chevonne's OK, it's just that the second vowel sound is not the same as the second vowel sound in Siobhan, at least not in all the pronunciations I've heard. YMMV, of course. And I hate to say it, but it would look like the kind of name that somebody with very little education would choose. That probably won't matter as much where you live now.

True. Agreed. They pronounce it Schanne which is really Sian but thats what they say.

Ah, so they were mistaken about the pronunciation of Siobhan as well. Oh dear. :D

Dendarii Dame
03-18-2013, 10:33 AM
I used to be a substitute teacher. When I took attendance for one class, I pronounced Siobhan correctly, which astonished her (and the rest of the students) as I was the first teacher who ever pronounced it correctly at first sight.

Perhaps you could use it as a middle name.

Acsenray
03-18-2013, 10:55 AM
Who's going to care about how a cat's name is spelled?

Gary T
03-18-2013, 11:04 AM
I really, really like the name Siobhan (so it's a girl, you knew that), but unfortunately nobody here (Singapore) is familiar with the original spelling, and there are some unfortunate "false friends (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend)" meaning "roast meat" or similar in Cantonese.

Not wanting to subject my poor daughter to that, my wife and I are thinking of alternatives. What's your favourite alternate spelling of Siobhan? We're thinking of going with Chevonne for now. :)I gather that you really like the sound/pronunciation of Siobhan, and that said sound does not present a problem, and that you are not insistent on the spelling "Siobhan," which does present a problem. Given that...

It strikes me as a bit optimistic to suppose that people have a favorite alternate spelling in mind -- I wouldn't think it's something that comes up often.

If you want the second syllable to rhyme with "caught," the "...vaughn" spelling makes sense; if you want it to rhyme with "cot," the "...vonne" spelling makes sense. (I'm in the U.S., which may color the pronunciations I'm referring to.)

While the first syllable can start with "sh" or "ch," and the first vowel could be "a" (after "sh") or "e," I think the two spellings you've proposed are the best choices among the various possibilities. "Shevaughn" seems to have more of an Irish character, while "Chevonne" has more of a French character. If you have no preference between them, I'd lean towards "Chevonne" as being a bit simpler to deal with in terms of spelling and pronunciation.

I understand how alternate spellings of established names can be grating, but so what? Are you likely to run into many -- or any -- people who hear the name and expect it to be spelled "Siobhan?" It seems to me in this case your chosen spelling will be less confusing rather than more confusing, where it would be the other way around if you lived in Ireland. And the way I look at it, if you name her Chevonne, her name will be Chevonne, not Siobhan spelled wrong.

Acsenray
03-18-2013, 11:12 AM
Who's going to care about how a cat's name is spelled?

Oh, for Pete's sake. We're talking about a human, aren't we? I thought we were talking about a kitten for the OP's daughter. <shake my fist at overly cutesy OP> :dubious:

<Emily Littella> Never mind.

Eyebrows 0f Doom
03-18-2013, 11:14 AM
Who's going to care about how a cat's name is spelled?


Not wanting to subject my poor daughter to that, my wife and I are thinking of alternatives. What's your favourite alternate spelling of Siobhan? We're thinking of going with Chevonne for now. :)

Reading is hard.


Chevonne looks trashy and stripper-y. Sorry, but it looks like a name someone less educated would pick. Siobhan is a beautiful name, if you want that name then spell it correctly!

SciFiSam
03-18-2013, 11:19 AM
I just realised that Shevaughn looks exactly like you wanted a son called Vaughn and adapted it when you had a daughter.

missbunny
03-18-2013, 11:29 AM
I think "Chevonne" sounds like you were too dumb to know how to spell Siobhán.

Are you Chinese by heritage? I mean, if you are going to be living there for the rest of your lives, then you might be more concerned about having an Irish name that means something else in Chinese; but if you are not Chinese and will be leaving at some point, then it might not be so important that a baby is, for a relatively short while, named something slightly "strange" to your current neighbors and friends.

If if were me, I would spell it correctly or pick something else.

"Mairéad" is another nice Irish name, if that's what you're going for and really think being teased as "roast meet" will be too hard on the kid.

Merneith
03-18-2013, 11:30 AM
She-Vaughn, He-Man's pre-op cousin?

Learjeff
03-18-2013, 11:31 AM
Contrast:

http://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=siobhan

http://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=chevonne

http://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=shevaughn

Lsura
03-18-2013, 11:36 AM
So, I didn't know until the last few years that it Siobhan = Shevonne/Shavonne. I'd only seen the latter two spellings, so they look normal to me. I have to think a moment when I see Siobhan about how to pronounce it.

I think Chevonne looks stripperish, but I have no issue with Shevonne or Shavonne. I don't particularly like Shevaughn either, but that's because I don't like the "vaughn" portion of it (it goes back to a kid in elementary school).

Ultimately, it's your kid and you get to name her. Our opinions are just that, and worth exactly what you're paying for them.

ralph124c
03-18-2013, 11:52 AM
Why doesn't Modern English use the "wyth" and "thorne" characters? I always liked "ye olde..whatever!

Virgil Tibbs
03-18-2013, 12:04 PM
To me, Siobhan is the ugliest name possible. That might be because it's a chav name, or because it's repulsive both visually and aurally.

Baron Greenback
03-18-2013, 12:08 PM
To me, Siobhan is the ugliest name possible. That might be because it's a chav name, or because it's repulsive both visually and aurally.

What do you mean by "chav name"?

even sven
03-18-2013, 12:13 PM
I kind of like Shavonne.

Chevonne, with the French allusion and -vonne, sounds not trashy or uneducated, but rather African American.

Eyebrows 0f Doom
03-18-2013, 12:45 PM
What do you mean by "chav name"?

Chav (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chav)

the Lady
03-18-2013, 01:31 PM
Shevawn.

Of course, people STILL won't get it right - but you've got a better chance than with the original spelling...

Acsenray
03-18-2013, 01:34 PM
What do you mean by "chav name"?

I think it's the British equivalent of someone who is uneducated, low class, with bad taste, but can afford expensive clothes.

Acsenray
03-18-2013, 01:36 PM
Reading is hard.

That's kind of obnoxious. It seemed to me he was worried that his daughter would be embarrassed by the family cat's having an unusual name. Hence my query.

PookahMacPhellimey
03-18-2013, 02:54 PM
The Siobahns I have met seemed impressed that I knew how to pronounce/spell it.

You don't know how to spell it.

Count Blucher
03-18-2013, 04:12 PM
Chiffon...?


...when you know your cat won't be named 'butter (http://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=9q6QkUaXx_A#t=21s)'.

An Gadaí
03-18-2013, 04:17 PM
To me, Siobhan is the ugliest name possible. That might be because it's a chav name, or because it's repulsive both visually and aurally.

Don't hold back, tell us how you really feel.

Dangerosa
03-18-2013, 04:55 PM
It's a beautiful name that in the US I'd skip over completely for most of the reasons mentioned here. Few can pronounce Siobhan, few can spell it when it's said, and the alternative spellings don't pass the Senator or Stripper test.

Fear Itself
03-18-2013, 05:12 PM
There is a staff member on TMZ named Shevonne.

silenus
03-18-2013, 05:26 PM
Spell it right or don't do it at all.

epbrown01
03-18-2013, 05:33 PM
Not wanting to subject my poor daughter to that, my wife and I are thinking of alternatives. What's your favourite alternate spelling of Siobhan? We're thinking of going with Chevonne for now. :)

In the words of that great philosopher, Darth Vader: Nooooooooooo!

Go with the tougher spelling and pronunciation - she'll have to find smarter friends as she grows up.

huck
03-18-2013, 06:39 PM
It's time to play "name the TabbyKitten"! :D

I really, really like the name Siobhan (so it's a girl, you knew that), but unfortunately nobody here (Singapore) is familiar with the original spelling, and there are some unfortunate "false friends (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend)" meaning "roast meat" or similar in Cantonese.

Not wanting to subject my poor daughter to that, my wife and I are thinking of alternatives. What's your favourite alternate spelling of Siobhan? We're thinking of going with Chevonne for now. :)

I'd love to know the Cantonese word you refer to, so I can share it with my daughter, Siobhan, now 25 years old.

She likes her name, by the way, but has said that it would have been easier if we spelled it phonetically. When we tried to figure out how to do that, she agreed that all the possibilities made one think of gas stations.

brainstall
03-18-2013, 07:28 PM
If you want to name her Siobhan, then do it. Shevaughn? Really, pretentiously badly spelled alternative. Chevonne makes me think of Chevette. What little girl wouldn't want to be named after a car?

I hate phonetic spellings of names. Unique spellings are equally irritating. I can't help thinking when I see an unusual variation on a name, that the parents who did this were too stupid to spell their child's name as it is traditionally spelled and just made something up.

Dr. Drake
03-18-2013, 07:58 PM
Just call her "Joan" and then say "but we pronounce it the Irish way, which is pronounced (shove-ahn) and spelled Siobhán in Irish."

huck
03-18-2013, 08:18 PM
Just call her "Joan" and then say "but we pronounce it the Irish way, which is pronounced (shove-ahn) and spelled Siobhán in Irish."

Joan is a famly name which I wished to carry on when I named my daughter, but I could not bring myself to give such an old-biddy name to my lovely new little daughter.

So I named her Siobhan. It actually worked out just fine.

Tabby_Cat
03-18-2013, 08:55 PM
I'd love to know the Cantonese word you refer to, so I can share it with my daughter, Siobhan, now 25 years old.

She likes her name, by the way, but has said that it would have been easier if we spelled it phonetically. When we tried to figure out how to do that, she agreed that all the possibilities made one think of gas stations.
"Sio", pronounced "see-oh", means "roasted" in Cantonese, and the word most commonly used after that is "Bak", or "Bakh", meaning meat. Sio Bak (http://ieatishootipost.sg/2011/02/how-to-make-sio-bak-chinese-style.html). You've probably seen a slab of roasted pork belly hanging in Chinatown before, that's what it is.

Anyway. thanks for the comments all, and I especially appreciate that some of your daughters named Siobhan love their name! No Chevonnes or Shevaughns in this thread yet, I see...

Eliahna
03-18-2013, 09:38 PM
I like Chevonne
No one is going to like your kid's name as much as you do, so do what ever you want. I want to name my new baby girl Celeste Louise, and people either love it or hate it, and I don't care either way what people think about it, it's my name to choose not theirs! Go with whatever spelling/name you want!

That's quite beautiful. Celeste Louise would suit anyone of any age, and is both a name you can take seriously and a rather sweet sounding name. I'm a fan :)

April R
03-18-2013, 09:59 PM
Thanks!

Tabby_Cat
03-18-2013, 09:59 PM
"Sio", pronounced "see-oh", means "roasted" in Cantonese, and the word most commonly used after that is "Bak", or "Bakh", meaning meat. Sio Bak (http://ieatishootipost.sg/2011/02/how-to-make-sio-bak-chinese-style.html). You've probably seen a slab of roasted pork belly hanging in Chinatown before, that's what it is.

Anyway. thanks for the comments all, and I especially appreciate that some of your daughters named Siobhan love their name! No Chevonnes or Shevaughns in this thread yet, I see...
My wife has alerted me to the fact that Sio Bak is Hokkien, not Cantonese. I have been duly chastised.

Rhiannon8404
03-18-2013, 11:03 PM
Chevonne looks trashy and stripper-y. Sorry, but it looks like a name someone less educated would pick. Siobhan is a beautiful name, if you want that name then spell it correctly!

100% this.

April R
03-18-2013, 11:10 PM
y'all are so judgmental :dubious:

Weedy
03-18-2013, 11:22 PM
I used to work with a woman called Chevoy. I thought it was a very pretty name.

Renifer
03-18-2013, 11:24 PM
Siobhan is a derivation of Jane or Joan.
Most straightforward spelling is Shavonne. In Singapore I would avoid any versions with silent g's. But I vote strongly for keeping it Siobhan. People will learn.

Gary T
03-19-2013, 12:22 AM
As I understand it, the "Siobhan" spelling would set the child up for teasing by other kids, which can sometimes be quite cruel. This seems to be overlooked by those of you who are rather stridently (and sanctimoniously, in my view) insisting on the traditional spelling. Why the hell it bothers you so much how someone else's kid a half world away spells her name is beyond me. How about some consideration for the person who will be living with the name.

shijinn
03-19-2013, 12:41 AM
My wife has alerted me to the fact that Sio Bak is Hokkien, not Cantonese. I have been duly chastised. yup, and in Cantonese it could conceivably sound like "roast plank", or maybe "hot plate". (Siu Ban)

your daughter's apparent race would matter here i think.

if she has no Irish roots, giving her the name Siobhan would be seen as stubbornly pretentious since it is obvious that you'll be saddling her with a name not many know the pronunciation or spelling of. if she is Irish, or maybe if she simply looks caucasian, you should definitely go with Siobhan. teasing would not be a problem, the name is easy to pronounce and it's really a stretch to associate it with Hokkien or Cantonese roasts imho.

if she has no Irish roots, giving her the name Chevonne would not be remarkable, though you'll be saddling her with a non-standard name that needs to be clarified for spelling. the name would also fit in well i should think, strippers simply aren't a thing in Singapore. western names are all adopted anyway, so making up new ones aren't really remarkable unless you are trying to make up badly spelt variants of common names.

will her Chinese name be a transcription or will she have her own?

Ms. Pumpkin
03-19-2013, 12:51 AM
I say use the original spelling. If you must phoneticize it: Shavonne.

aruvqan
03-19-2013, 02:42 AM
If I had a kitten I'd name it something domestic and ordinary, like Dave or Roger.

If you want Irish, I suggest Shona.
Just named our new cat Five.

And I hate 'alternate spellings' unless it is a real one, not some stupid revisioning. Siobhan or something different.

PookahMacPhellimey
03-19-2013, 05:03 AM
As I understand it, the "Siobhan" spelling would set the child up for teasing by other kids, which can sometimes be quite cruel. This seems to be overlooked by those of you who are rather stridently (and sanctimoniously, in my view) insisting on the traditional spelling. Why the hell it bothers you so much how someone else's kid a half world away spells her name is beyond me. How about some consideration for the person who will be living with the name.

Sure, if you call someone Cretinia Stupida or something you set them up for teasing, but I think it is a bit exaggerated to say that any name that isn't 100% absolutely common and idiot proof will make the kid a walking target. From what I get from the OP's explanation, it is even a bit of stretch to get to the "funny" interpretation. If she is going to teased for that, she would have been teased for something else if her name was spelled phonetically.

Honestly, I don't buy that naming a kid Siobhan is going to somehow going to traumatise her for life.

PookahMacPhellimey
03-19-2013, 05:04 AM
Also, since Chinese doesn't use western letters, how is spelling it phonetically going to change anything?

even sven
03-19-2013, 07:51 AM
So at what point can we Anglicize a difficult to pronounce foreign name? I'd assume you guys aren't running around naming your kids Guinhyfhar, here. Without Anglicization, we wouldn't have 90% of the names we use today, and it has to start somewhere.

Also, since Chinese doesn't use western letters, how is spelling it phonetically going to change anything?

While characters are used for most applications, people learn Western characters in elementary school alongside with characters, and they are used in certain situations (signage, for example, if often romanized.) Everyone knows and recognizes them.

Names can be a little complex. There is no real way to "translate" a Western name into characters. There are some somewhat standard transcriptions of very common Western names, and sometimes people cobble together sets of characters that kind of sound like the Western name. But this isn't very satisfying, as each character has it's own independent meaning, and it's tough to find something that sounds right and isn't just a string of random meaningless (or even worse, negative) words.

Anyway, the only way around this is to pick a completely separate Chinese name, or to just keep using your Western name as it is written. Lots of people do the former.

An Gadaí
03-19-2013, 08:05 AM
So at what point can we Anglicize a difficult to pronounce foreign name? I'd assume you guys aren't running around naming your kids Guinhyfhar, here. Without Anglicization, we wouldn't have 90% of the names we use today, and it has to start somewhere.

Anglicise away, but Chevonne, Shevanne, etc. will have a different set of cultural notions attached to them than Siobhán has. It might not matter, maybe just the sound suffices. Ultimately call your kid anything you want short of Fuckface or Shittyknickers and I'm sure they'll be fine, but if you like a name so much you want to name your kid it, why the hell would you change it?

Steophan
03-19-2013, 09:09 AM
Maybe have it as a middle name in its original spelling.

A friend of mine has that, it's a nice way to note the Irish roots without causing too much trouble. That said, her sister's called Niamh, so I don't think her parents were that bothered about people having to learn to pronounce it!

ralph124c
03-19-2013, 12:07 PM
Forget women's names..how did people decide how to spell the names of Scotch distilleries?
-Bruichladdich
-Bunnahabhain
-Laphroigh
-Rhosdhu
A few of the stranger examples.

Dr. Drake
03-19-2013, 12:08 PM
Forget women's names..how did people decide how to spell the names of Scotch distilleries?
-Bruichladdich
-Bunnahabhain
-Laphroigh
-Rhosdhu
A few of the stranger examples.Yes, how dare another language have its own internally consistent spelling rules which are not immediately apparent to an English speaker?

Dr. Drake
03-19-2013, 12:10 PM
I'd assume you guys aren't running around naming your kids Guinhyfhar, here.Guinhumar (medieval spelling, Latinized as Guinhumara) > (Welsh) Gwenhwyfar. Neatly anglicized (from the closely related Cornish) as Jennifer.

Yllaria
03-19-2013, 01:46 PM
When my middle boy called his buds from back in high school and told them that he was dating someone named Siobhan, they asked if she was black. They later said that it sounded like it was spelled: ShaVon, so that's another variation.

I learned a new word today that made me think of this thread, because it sounded like a pretty name but would be a bad idea to use as one. Sharrow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_lane_marking).

Colophon
03-19-2013, 02:56 PM
I don't understand how Siobhan could be spelt phonetically as Chevonne or Shevonne. The second syllable isn't an "on" sound, it's an "awn" sound.

But then a lot of Irish names get mangled - see Caitlin pronounced, or even spelt, as "Kate-Lynn".

Maggie the Ocelot
03-19-2013, 03:05 PM
"On" and "awn" are homophones to many Americans.

An Gadaí
03-19-2013, 03:06 PM
I don't understand how Siobhan could be spelt phonetically as Chevonne or Shevonne. The second syllable isn't an "on" sound, it's an "awn" sound.

But then a lot of Irish names get mangled - see Caitlin pronounced, or even spelt, as "Kate-Lynn".

Closest I can think of to how I've heard people here say it is Shuvaun.

Colophon
03-19-2013, 03:32 PM
"On" and "awn" are homophones to many Americans.
Really? I know "on" and "ahn" would be homophones to some, but that hadn't occurred to me.

You Americans really need to get some more vowel sounds. :)

Gymnopithys
03-19-2013, 05:40 PM
Chie-au-vent ?



Bons baisers de Paree.

Colophon
03-19-2013, 06:23 PM
Chie-au-vent ?



Bons baisers de Paree.

Yeah, cos "shitting in the wind" is much better than "roast pork" :p

Kamino Neko
03-19-2013, 06:59 PM
Sure, if you call someone Cretinia Stupida or something you set them up for teasing, but I think it is a bit exaggerated to say that any name that isn't 100% absolutely common and idiot proof will make the kid a walking target.

In fact, it's a huge exaggeration, to say that the actual name has anything whatsoever to do with whether the kid gets teased for it.

I didn't take the name Siubhan (a Scottish variant) until I was an adult (noted simply because it's why this thread caught my eye). My birth name is pretty much bog standard. I went to school with 3 other people with my first name, and my last name is common enough that nobody would ever blink an eye. The amount of teasing I got based around my name was fucking ridiculous.

Kids don't tease other kids because of something that's different about them, they tease them because they seem like they'll be reactive targets, and they latch onto the easiest thing to tease them about. (The most ridiculous example I can think of from my personal history was somebody who was heavier than me making fun of my weight.)

If I were to anglicize the name Si(u/o)bhan to make it easier to pronounce, I'd go with Shvaughn, since that was the name of the character who inspired me to take the name. On the other hand, I'm not sure if Chinese speakers would really have an easier time with the 'vaughn' string than with the Gaelic spelling, so I don't know if that really helps the OP.

stui magpie
03-19-2013, 07:02 PM
I have never been able to get me head around how to pronounce Siobhan. Whenever I see the word written my brain always pronounces it See-Oh-Barn.

Gary Robson
03-19-2013, 11:18 PM
I'll add another vote for spelling it Siobhán.

Why use a name from another culture if you're not going to spell it in that culture's traditional way?

BigT
03-23-2013, 07:08 AM
Spelling a name in a way that doesn't fit in with the phonetics of the surrounding culture is rather pretentious, in my opinion. I don't get why you guys think spelling a name so that it will never be spelled correctly is better than a respelling that will be. I get that a lot of common respellings are kinda annoying these days, but that's because you won't know how to spell them.

In other words, using Siobhan (esp. with diacritics) is the equivalent of names like Kaytee, Mykayla, etc.

An Gadaí
03-23-2013, 07:16 AM
In other words, using Siobhan (esp. with diacritics) is the equivalent of names like Kaytee, Mykayla, etc.

No it is not. Plenty of people in Britain, America and elsewhere know that "Shuvaun" = Siobhán (ok maybe without the fada but still). Also, how will the respelling actually make it any more likely the kid's name would be spelled right?

Wiki lists: Siobhan, Siobhain, Siobhann, Siobhin, Siobhon, Siobahn, Shivon, Siavon, Siovhan, Shivaune, Shivaun, Shavon, Sioban, Siobain, Shivonne, Shvaugn, Shivaughn, Shivaughne, Shievonne, Shavaughn, Shavaughne, Shavaughan, Shavaugn, Shavaugne, Shavaun, Shavaune, Sheavaughn, Shevaun, Shevawn, Shavone, Shavonne, Chevonne, Chivonne, Chevon and Shivan as variants.

If you at least use the most common spelling you've upped the odds surely. Also, I could be wrong but I imagine out in the Far East a lot of people would have trouble with plenty of European names. Furthermore, being someone who gets his named spelled wrong (both first and surname) all the time it's hardly the worst thing in the world to have to deal with.

Acsenray
03-23-2013, 08:10 AM
Furthermore, being someone who gets his named spelled wrong (both first and surname) all the time it's hardly the worst thing in the world to have to deal with.

I'll attest yo this too. Having an unusual name in the context of my society is pretty cool, especially because it is one with s real cultural history.

An Gadaí
03-23-2013, 08:14 AM
I'll attest yo this too. Having an unusual name in the context of my society is pretty cool, especially because it is one with s real cultural history.

My only problem is I'm a tad too easy to google.

Unauthorized Cinnamon
03-23-2013, 08:37 AM
When my middle boy called his buds from back in high school and told them that he was dating someone named Siobhan, they asked if she was black. They later said that it sounded like it was spelled: ShaVon, so that's another variation. Sharrow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_lane_marking).Yeah, I think in America, if people read "Chevonne," they might well assume the person is African American. Not that that's a terrible thing, but I did once meet a white girl with a "black-sounding" name, and it caused enough awkwardness she just gave up and used her middle name. YMMV in Singapore of course.

I would say if you want to make your child's life a bit less annoying, use something easier to spell and pronounce for the first name and use Siobhan as a middle. Don't get me wrong, it's lovely, and I considered it for my daughter too. But it must be a drag to have no one be able to spell or pronounce your name your whole life.

(NB: I'm extremely conservative about that issue, to the degree that I thought "Chloe" and "Claire" might be too "out there," and gave my kids ultra-traditional white-bread middle names in case they feel more comfortable using that in their bid for a Supreme Court seat or something. So feel free to ignore me!)

Gary Robson
03-26-2013, 11:02 PM
In other words, using Siobhan (esp. with diacritics) is the equivalent of names like Kaytee, Mykayla, etc.
In what way is using the original ethnic spelling of an ethnic name the equivalent of taking a traditional name and coming up with a non-obvious (and in the second case, non-phonetic) spelling?

Eyebrows 0f Doom
03-27-2013, 01:51 AM
In what way is using the original ethnic spelling of an ethnic name the equivalent of taking a traditional name and coming up with a non-obvious (and in the second case, non-phonetic) spelling?

You're looking for logic in a BigT post?

drastic_quench
03-27-2013, 12:18 PM
/ʃivaːn/

and be done with it.

Acsenray
03-27-2013, 12:22 PM
Actually, I believe it might be more /ʃivɑːn/ or /ʃivɒːn/

drastic_quench
03-27-2013, 12:35 PM
Actually, I believe it might be more /ʃivɑːn/ or /ʃivɒːn/

Googling Siobhan IPA, you'll find at least three versions.

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