PDA

View Full Version : Tell me how to curse in Spanish!


brujaja
04-16-2013, 11:58 PM
I have a very close friend who's six and a half feet tall, and has very big lungs. He has a bit of an anger management problem, and he swears a lot.

After twenty years of "GODDAMNIT!" and "SON OF A WHORE!", I've decided that it would be a lot more fun if he swears in Spanish. We live in California, so that would be specifically Mexican Spanish.

Now, I took Spanish in school for years, but the one thing they never teach you is how to curse.

What is the nearest equivalent to "Goddamn it?" What do you say when you hit your thumb with a hammer? How do you commonly insult an inanimate object? And, what are the next order of magnitude of these?

Thanks!

Ethilrist
04-17-2013, 12:02 AM
DIO!

brujaja
04-17-2013, 12:11 AM
Thank you, Ethilrist; maybe I should have said, "Tell me how to swear like a sailor in Spanish."

And one more thing -- doesn't "puta" mean "whore?" Why do so many sites translate it as "bitch?"

Colibri
04-17-2013, 12:25 AM
And one more thing -- doesn't "puta" mean "whore?" Why do so many sites translate it as "bitch?"

Mainly because modern English rarely uses "whore" as a curse, while "bitch" is very common. Conversely Spanish very commonly uses "puta," while "perra" is relatively less common.

That's the thing with translation: the word that is exactly equivalent in literal meaning may have quite different levels of force or offense in the two languages. For example, "coño" is the equivalent of "cunt" in Spanish, but is much less taboo (at least in Panama). I have heard respectable women swear using this word in circumstances where you would never hear a woman use the equivalent in English. "Cabron" (male goat) literally means "cuckold," which is rarely used as an insult in English these days. But in Spanish it's one of the most offensive things you can say; the equivalent in forcefulness in English would be "motherfucker."

the_diego
04-17-2013, 01:36 AM
Say "tu madre" to anything he calls you. Then prepare to fend off his navaja.

GameHat
04-17-2013, 01:44 AM
delete

chacoguy
04-17-2013, 04:33 AM
Ed Zotti es un coño.

Like that, or what? I'm just making an example.

the_diego
04-17-2013, 04:57 AM
Quien es Ed Zotti?

Busy Scissors
04-17-2013, 05:15 AM
My Spanish BiL swears using variations of shitting on something - Me cago on this, me cago on that. Seems like there is nothing that cannot be shat on in the Spanish profanisaurus.
Me cago en la hostia cracks me up, I think (but could be wrong) that you would say this to indicate surprise.

JohnnyMac
04-17-2013, 05:29 AM
I'm not sure about Mexican Spanish, but I have Spanish friends who regularly use:

Es una mierda - it's shit
Es un coño - it's shit (but stronger)
Joder! - Fuck!
Puta madre - motherfucker

Jim B.
04-17-2013, 05:30 AM
The internet knows. (http://youswear.com/index.asp?language=Spanish)

KarlGrenze
04-17-2013, 05:33 AM
That's the thing with translation: the word that is exactly equivalent in literal meaning may have quite different levels of force or offense in the two languages. For example, "coño" is the equivalent of "cunt" in Spanish, but is much less taboo (at least in Panama). I have heard respectable women swear using this word in circumstances where you would never hear a woman use the equivalent in English. "Cabron" (male goat) literally means "cuckold," which is rarely used as an insult in English these days. But in Spanish it's one of the most offensive things you can say; the equivalent in forcefulness in English would be "motherfucker."

Yea, I made the mistake of telling my coworkers the meaning of coño. They keep thinking I'm saying something so taboo, but it doesn't have the same connotation. One of them gets irritated I say it. :rolleyes: It is not insulting a specific person, it's more of a "Fuck this!". You don't say someone is a a coño, you just say the word.

OTOH, it means nothing to my Chilean coworker, who doesn't use it. For him, it means "pussy". So yea, totally different feeling. But he keeps saying "concha tu madre" all the time.

So also, cursing varies with region.

Si Amigo
04-17-2013, 09:27 AM
Don't swear in Spanish, it's impolite. Vamos reír o ya sea patearte el culo.

Anaglyph
04-17-2013, 10:01 AM
I have a very close friend who's six and a half feet tall, and has very big lungs. He has a bit of an anger management problem, and he swears a lot.

After twenty years of "GODDAMNIT!" and "SON OF A WHORE!", I've decided that it would be a lot more fun if he swears in Spanish. We live in California, so that would be specifically Mexican Spanish.

Now, I took Spanish in school for years, but the one thing they never teach you is how to curse.

What is the nearest equivalent to "Goddamn it?" What do you say when you hit your thumb with a hammer? How do you commonly insult an inanimate object? And, what are the next order of magnitude of these?

Thanks!

I recommend this book: Mierda!: The Real Spanish You Were Never Taught in School (http://amazon.com/Mierda-Spanish-Never-Taught-School/dp/B002RAR1SK/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1366207087&sr=1-1&keywords=mierda)(Plume)

picker
04-17-2013, 10:04 AM
Vete a la mierda.

gonzoron
04-17-2013, 10:06 AM
Now that some real answers have been posted, I have a friend who enjoys exclaiming: "Sacapuntas!" It just means "pencil-sharpener," but it sounds dirty if you don't know that. (No, my friend is not a native Spanish speaker, and no, I don't know if he's ever encountered someone who knew what it meant when he used it as a curse.)

CorneaGenii
04-17-2013, 10:41 AM
This is one of the longest string of Spanish curse words I've seen in a while. As mentioned before, the level of insult, along with reaction, will vary by region. Still, I think the meaning will be perfectly understood by the recipient.

For the sake of decency...:D
"Hijo de tu puta perra retardada chingada madre pinche puto culero chupa mis pinches huevos cabron!!!"

Si Amigo
04-17-2013, 10:51 AM
Now that some real answers have been posted, I have a friend who enjoys exclaiming: "Sacapuntas!" It just means "pencil-sharpener," but it sounds dirty if you don't know that. (No, my friend is not a native Spanish speaker, and no, I don't know if he's ever encountered someone who knew what it meant when he used it as a curse.)

Perhaps it refers to a girl who sharpens a lot of guys pencils? Not that there is anything wrong with that . . . Or as Rod Steward would say "Hot Legs, keep my pencil sharp, I love ya honey!"

Frodo
04-17-2013, 10:57 AM
"Me recago en la reputisima madre que te pario" usually works.

Learjeff
04-17-2013, 11:54 AM
For the sake of decency...:D
"Hijo de tu puta perra retardada chingada madre pinche puto culero chupa mis pinches huevos cabron!!!"

A friend of mine from Mexico told me that if you wanted to die in Mexico, just call someone "hijo de puta chingase". That would pretty much ensure your rapid demise. To protect that person from incarceration, make sure there are witnesses. A judge would let him off, with this in evidence.

If that's true, then Cornea's phrase would probably cover you, your family, and anyone who's with you at the time, should you all want to leave this world together.

Colibri
04-17-2013, 03:36 PM
But he keeps saying "concha tu madre" all the time.

So also, cursing varies with region.

"Concha" (seashell; in some places = pussy) is OK in Panama. Here one of the most frequent words for pussy is "chucha" (the basis for the common euphemism "Chuleta!"). However in Colombia this means "armpit sweat" or "body odor." Once a female Colombian friend came back from a walk all sweaty, sniffed her armpit, and said "Creo que tengo chucha." I raised my eyebrow and she smacked me when she realized what she had said in Panamanian. :)

KarlGrenze
04-17-2013, 03:46 PM
Yup. Concha to me is nothing, but I do know what it means elsewhere. There was a Peruvian restaurant here named "Las conchitas calientes". I never went, sorry, I'm not going to a restaurant with that name...

Also, everyone else at work doesn't like when I said coño, but they don't realize that the Chilean insult is as bad.

Colibri
04-17-2013, 04:59 PM
Also, everyone else at work doesn't like when I said coño, but they don't realize that the Chilean insult is as bad.

Similarly "Carajo!" (prick) is a common and comparatively mild swear word compared to the English equivalent (although like chucha it has a euphemism: "Ajo!" (green pepper)).

Frodo
04-17-2013, 05:07 PM
Does "Carajo" mean prick?, I was told (but I'm not sure I believe it) that the Carajo was a ship's lookout.
Never heard the "prick" meaning.

Ranger Jeff
04-17-2013, 05:13 PM
I've heard that "Chinga tu madre" is offensive. It might be more Cuban than Mexican in origin though.

Colibri
04-17-2013, 05:53 PM
Does "Carajo" mean prick?, I was told (but I'm not sure I believe it) that the Carajo was a ship's lookout.
Never heard the "prick" meaning.

You either misunderstood the word, or it was along the lines of Cheech telling Chong that "pendejo" means "friend.":D The only meanings any of my dictionaries give for it is "prick, dick (vulgar)" or expletives (damn, shit, bloody, etc.)

Unless maybe you were on The Good Ship Venus. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Ship_Venus)

'Twas on the good ship Venus,
By Christ you should have seen us,
The figurehead
Was a whore in bed,
And the mast a rampant penis.

I've heard that "Chinga tu madre" is offensive. It might be more Cuban than Mexican in origin though.

"Chinga tu madre" (fuck your mother) may get you killed almost anywhere. However, "chingar" for "to fuck" is especially characteristic of Mexico and Central America. Elsewhere it is often "joder." "Coger" (literally, "to catch") varies; some places it means "to fuck," elsewhere it's OK.

KarlGrenze
04-17-2013, 09:36 PM
Colibrí, you just made me look at the entry for carajo in the dictionary. :D

It definitely have most of the uses, all various forms of insults. And at the beginning it says "of uncertain origins"... :)

brujaja
04-17-2013, 10:08 PM
Oh, this is awesome!! I got him to say, "Joder!" just now, and it was just way more suave. (you must understand that he is a six-and-a-half-foot Irish-American biker type.)

Thank you all!!

chacoguy
04-17-2013, 11:22 PM
I can't find a cite, but apparently calling someone "Butthurt" in Panama will get you a knife in the ribs.

CorneaGenii
04-18-2013, 02:33 AM
However, "chingar" for "to fuck" is especially characteristic of Mexico and Central America.

"Chingar", with its different conjugations, is one of the most versatile words in the lexicon of Mexican Spanish. ;)

El Verbo Chingar (http://taringa.net/posts/info/2184969/El-verbo-Chingar.html)



Yup. Concha to me is nothing, but I do know what it means elsewhere.

This is off on a tangent, but it just dawned on me. There is a pastry called a concha (http://mexicanfood.about.com/b/a/Pandulcetacos.jpg) in Mexico. There is also a children's variety show in Monterrey which features a popular character dancing around dressed as this pastry and singing "Soy una concha! Soy una concha!" (http://youtube.com/watch?v=L_Nc0pZGnyM) I can't help but wonder at the reaction of people from a region where "concha" has a vulgar meaning. :D

pool
04-18-2013, 02:40 AM
Mamon = cocksucker

My Wife calls me comen mierda, which is eater of shit or shit eater.

KarlGrenze
04-18-2013, 05:15 AM
This is off on a tangent, but it just dawned on me. There is a pastry called a concha (http://mexicanfood.about.com/b/a/Pandulcetacos.jpg) in Mexico. There is also a children's variety show in Monterrey which features a popular character dancing around dressed as this pastry and singing "Soy una concha! Soy una concha!" (http://youtube.com/watch?v=L_Nc0pZGnyM) I can't help but wonder at the reaction of people from a region where "concha" has a vulgar meaning. :D

Hey, it's not even my dialect, but I laughed at the idea of a restaurant (from a region where it DOES mean something) using that word as their name. And it was supposed to be a family restaurant!

Comemierda is used to call snobby superficial people.

A better idiom is "comen mierda y no llegan a peo", they eat too much shit and don't amount to a fart.

Nava
04-18-2013, 08:04 AM
Ed Zotti es un coño.

Like that, or what? I'm just making an example.

No, in Spanish it's both an impolite name for a woman's bits and a curseword, but you don't use it to insult someone. I have a coño and I've been known to exclaim ¡COOooooooOOOOOooooOOOO ÑO! la ostia, puta, caBRÓN after a close encounter with a hammer, but I'd never call someone a coño. Profane yes, my grandma-who-was-a-lady would never have used such a word. An insult, no. Oh, and in Spain coña is unbelievably good luck, something which can get extremely confusing.

Sending someone al coño tu madre is extremely impolite, but I don't think they do it in Mexico - their version is the already-mentioned chinga tu madre.

Frodo
04-18-2013, 09:49 AM
Sending someone al coño tu madre is extremely impolite, but I don't think they do it in Mexico - their version is the already-mentioned chinga tu madre.

Or as mentioned above, in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay (at least), you send them to the "concha" of their mothers

Politzania
04-18-2013, 10:02 AM
Now that some real answers have been posted, I have a friend who enjoys exclaiming: "Sacapuntas!" It just means "pencil-sharpener," but it sounds dirty if you don't know that. (No, my friend is not a native Spanish speaker, and no, I don't know if he's ever encountered someone who knew what it meant when he used it as a curse.)

My high school Spanish teacher (in an informal session) taught us the minced oath "Chinelas!" which, according to her, meant "fuzzy bathroom slippers"

Frodo
04-18-2013, 10:28 AM
"Pantuflas!, Chinelas!, Chancletas!"!
Watch your mouth young man!

Cheshire Human
04-18-2013, 12:40 PM
Does "Carajo" mean prick?, I was told (but I'm not sure I believe it) that the Carajo was a ship's lookout.
Never heard the "prick" meaning.

I learned my spanish cursing from Puerto Ricans, mostly*, and they told me it meant "hell". Every time I use it with that intended meaning (as in "go to hell"), it seems to be understood as I intended.

*to the immense shock of my Puerto Rican sister-in-law. :D

Colibri
04-18-2013, 10:01 PM
"Pantuflas!, Chinelas!, Chancletas!"!
Watch your mouth young man!

I always thought Pitufos (http://azrael.es/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/los-pitufos.jpg) sounded like it might be obscene.

slowlearner
04-18-2013, 11:07 PM
I'm a generation out of date, I'm sure, but Mexicans are more apt to use insults than curses. Pelon is a common one, they love to pick a physical characteristic and make fun of it, pelon being baldy, orejon big ears, narizon nose, when I had a big black beard my Mexican friends called me chongo, ape, which is also their equivalent of the n word. Then a lot of potent Mexican curses are agricultural in origin, gue or guevon being the most potent and most common. Gue is ox, so a guevon is a nutless man, very bad. Cabron, of course, is goat, and is the old european form of cuckold, having another man put the horns on you. Joto is a fascinating word, in my generation it referred to effeminate men rather than gay men generally. Back in the old days on farms and ranches the young men lived in barracks in the country far away from women and it was not considered a terrible thing if you helped a buddy out by having sex with him, so long as you remained manly. Start acting like a girl though and you lost all respect and became el joto. Working class guys say hijo de la puta at the drop of a hat, or hijole, or puta madre. Mamon is cocksucker, mamona is the good kind of cocksucker. Verga is slang for cock, as in mama la verga, or the ultimate sigh of exasperation, a la verga... Fundillo (fundido) is a good word for asshole, it refers to funnel and fundament both, less creative is culo. Rendija is crack and you can just imagine the utility of that word. Panocha is candy corn and very commonly used for vagina. Nalgas are cheeks and a woman with a nice ass is a nalgona, and often has the nickname Nacha. Bruja and ruca are both witch with a strong connotation of bitch. Bezamela is suck my dick. Hemingway used to go on about Spanish being a great language for cursing, but American English is the best, and Irish English a close second. Man, I love to drink and cuss...

Leo Bloom
04-19-2013, 02:52 AM
I would like to point out--perhaps not even snarkily for some non-American readers--that "the n-word" is "nigger." Using the euphemism in the current thread is particularly hypocritical.

Nava
04-19-2013, 05:28 AM
I always thought Pitufos (http://azrael.es/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/los-pitufos.jpg) sounded like it might be obscene.

Well, you can pitufar a alguien al pitufo, but if you add a few more complements it gets really confusingpitufoso. ¡Me pitufo en el pitufo de la pitufa que lo pitufó, en la pitufa que le pitufaron al pitufo que lo pitufó, y en los pitufos de todos ellos!... blep?


Oh, and nalgas are buttcheeks. The other kind are mejillas.

the_diego
04-19-2013, 05:30 AM
In Colombia, 'publico' with a long 'u' is a whore. That's what our spanish teacher from Bogota told us.

Nava
04-19-2013, 05:34 AM
I know (mujer) pública for whore (it's the expression used in older versions of the Bible, for starters), but it's the first time I hear mention of a "long u"...

the_diego
04-19-2013, 06:20 AM
Probably a local trait? Similar to the differences in:

Papa [father]
Papa [the Pope]
papa [potato]

Frodo
04-19-2013, 09:03 AM
I always thought Pitufos (http://azrael.es/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/los-pitufos.jpg) sounded like it might be obscene.

Especially in this (https://google.com.ar/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CC8QtwIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fyoutube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DDHbhyYcW2I8&ei=ZUBxUaLUKIbY9QSdooHAAg&usg=AFQjCNE5HtnDHXjsxecKCgOlxrs6JQ6H2w&sig2=I5YaFN9zdHjj6TLWAal-3w&bvm=bv.45373924,d.eWU) alternate spelling :)

Ají de Gallina
04-19-2013, 09:43 AM
"chinga" and its derivatives sounds Mexican for other Latin Americans
"coño" sounds Spanish, it is the word you use when you want to pretend you're speaking like a Spaniard.
"cabrón" always sounds foreign. In Perú "cabro" (and "chivo), both meaning goat, mean sissy. In Chile, "cabro" means "young man" or "boy".

In Peru
"Vete a la reconcha de tu madre" (lit. go back to your mother's big cunt)
"Ándate a la puta que te parió" (lit. go to the whore who gave birth to you)
"Ándate a la mierda"

Genreral expletive
"(re) Conchatumadre"
"Huevón de mierda"

"Me llega a la punta del pincho" (I don't give a fucking damn)

My mother in law uses as a, very minor insult to one's intelligence "Anda a bañarte y tómate el agua" (go take a bath and drink the water). "Anda a bañarte" is a minor version of "go to heck" but my MIL's version is nicer.

"Miércoles" replaces "Mierda" is nicer settings.

"Imbécil" or "Estúpido" ("estúpido" is a very strong word, nothing like stupid in English)

"Manicero" (lit. peanut person, it means "you have a tiny dick")

Nava
04-19-2013, 10:38 AM
Probably a local trait? Similar to the differences in:

Papa [father]
Papa [the Pope]
papa [potato]

Only, those are either phonetically identical (all llanas) or the only difference is in stress (in some locations, the first one would be the aguda papá): Spanish doesn't differentiate vowel lengths, there's no "short u" and "long u". I think it may have been more a matter of trying to put things in terms of "English phonics" (and yes, I do remember you're from the Philippines - but I don't imagine the teacher would have been very familiar with Tagalog or Pilipino before moving there, so (s)he wouldn't have been aiming for those phonics).

KarlGrenze
04-19-2013, 11:20 AM
"chinga" and its derivatives sounds Mexican for other Latin Americans
"coño" sounds Spanish, it is the word you use when you want to pretend you're speaking like a Spaniard.
"cabrón" always sounds foreign. In Perú "cabro" (and "chivo), both meaning goat, mean sissy. In Chile, "cabro" means "young man" or "boy".

Yea, except that the Caribbean speakers sound nothing like Spaniards, and happily say that word in their day to day lives.

Oh, I was so happy to see my Cuban friend, and hear that word, and all conjugations of the word joder. :)

Ají de Gallina
04-19-2013, 01:22 PM
Yea, except that the Caribbean speakers sound nothing like Spaniards, and happily say that word in their day to day lives.

Oh, I was so happy to see my Cuban friend, and hear that word, and all conjugations of the word joder. :)

I know coño is used elsewhere, but it's the go-to word. If you want to sound Cuban you finish every sentece with "chico".

Sister Vigilante
04-19-2013, 05:29 PM
Chupa mi verga.*

Suck my dick.

*my husband was uncertain of the spelling

Mapache
04-19-2013, 06:09 PM
When people pissed me off in traffic, I usually yelled "Vete a la chingada, pendejo(a)" - go to the fucked one, asshole, more or less. Don't do it much anymore.

slowlearner
04-19-2013, 09:52 PM
actually, the n word isn't a curse word, it's a racial slur, and an unforgivable one. My dad was one of the few egalitarians of his generation of Texans, which is pretty much my main inheritance. By the way I forgot punyeta (or punyada), chaqueta and pelarse, which all refer to jerking off. Pelarse means to peel or strip, and is used as the word for milking a farm animal, just as an American farmer calls it stripping milk. This usually refers to having the glorious act performed upon you by another. Punyeta I think refers to the adjective for handful, and chaqueta is just picking up on vulgar english. Obviously I haven't spent enough time around Mexican women to know how they curse, but have been assured they do. Mapache is raccoon in Spanish, and is also used as a milder form of the n word, so watch out.

Nava
04-20-2013, 12:20 AM
Chupa mi verga.*

Suck my dick.

*my husband was uncertain of the spelling

Your husband's spelling is fine. Verga can also mean a cane/rod, as in "whipping".

...punyeta (or punyada)..

Ei, we're cussing in Catalan now! :D

Puñeta's clean meaning is "the cuff embroidery on the robes of lawyers". Sending someone "a hacer puñetas" (to make puñetas) is telling them to get off your face (you're giving them a task that would take a long time).

Nava
04-20-2013, 12:30 AM
Lace, sorry, not embroidery. Usually it's the kind you make with a thin hooked needle.

KarlGrenze
04-20-2013, 04:49 AM
The cufflinks too. The fancy ones that needed the lace.

But hacer la puñeta is also to masturbate.

Nava
04-20-2013, 06:09 AM
Not reflexive? Here I've always heard it reflexive.

KarlGrenze
04-20-2013, 09:28 PM
My bad, I do usually hear it a bit reflexive when talking about someone. But I've heard it without it when just mentioning it as a meaning.

Best Topics: flowchart microsoft creepy boohbah horned creatures define sor dragonscale body armor internal phone system lidocaine versus benzocaine fiennes pronunciation pieces and parts urban dictionary snorkeling furuya minoru minigun overheat batshit crazy origin motor kote dial operator rastagar viking condoms with cum prohibition amendments denmark strait wenger of victorinox elc bumper sticker two level basement dead bluebird entropy opposite thumbing his nose dryer vent tape latin learning book homologous protein flomax dizziness girls horses cartoon factory music hot rear end has ny ever voted republican how to say white boy in spanish is beef tartare safe to eat fleas on nursing cats and kittens big bang theory characters ages costco dell xps 8700 do nhl teams have their own planes can a man take midol for back pain d&d 3.5 extra spell feat ask a glass of water what to do with moldy cheese calories in pure alcohol does 7 11 sell beer the irs sent me a letter dr pepper ingredients prune juice wwii scrap metal drives dog has poop stuck in anus alfred hitchcock doesn have a belly button how to remove wax from hands radio controlled clock wrong time buy boric acid powder when did they stop using asbestos in flooring male version of camel toe do vending machines take dimes if police officer messes up ticket taping mouth shut to stop snoring imperial star destroyer vs enterprise what are the shock paddles called how was the play mrs lincoln declaration of independence paraphrase how to remove concrete from metal