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pohjonen
05-19-2013, 09:30 PM
My contribution: In The Color Purple in the scene where Sophia (Oprah Winfrey) confronts Celie over advising Harpo to beat her, Sophia says, "If you want a dead son-in-law, keep on advising him like you doing." Except Harpo was Celie's stepson, not her son-in-law.

Got any more?

Tess
05-19-2013, 10:50 PM
Your example probably is a mistake by the writers, but I think "son-in-law" used to be the term used where we currently use "stepson."
For example, in "Sense and Sensibility" Mrs. Dashwood refers to her late husband's son from an earlier marriage as her son-in-law.

Wendell Wagner
05-20-2013, 01:44 AM
There's the scene in Annie Hall where Marshall McLuhan says, "I heard what you were saying. You - you know nothing of my work. You mean my whole fallacy is wrong. How you ever got to teach a course in anything is totally amazing. ":

http://youtube.com/watch?v=9wWUc8BZgWE

It's not clear what McLuhan was supposed to say, but this is confused. Apparently he blew his line and Allen didn't want to do any more takes. Allen had problems getting a decent performance out of him. I guess he was supposed to say something about how the Columbia professor's view of his work was a fallacy. I can't reconstruct what the line should have been.

Flywheel
05-20-2013, 09:31 AM
When Ewan MacGregor buys his ferry ticket to faux-Martha's Vineyard in The Ghost Writer, the ticket agent asks him "single or return?." Except that's a British idiom - an American would say "one way or round trip?".

xizor
05-20-2013, 10:52 AM
In Boogie Nights, when William H. Macy is complaining about his philandering (actually the female equivalent of that word if on exists) wife and he tells the camera guy friend "She's up there with her dick in his ass!"
Not sure if it was intentional, intentionally left in, or even the editors didn't catch it.

ftg
05-20-2013, 11:04 AM
When Jay and Silent Bob are talking to Dante near the end of Clerks, Jay completely blows his line, swears and tries to start over. It was left in since Kevin Smith basically was barely able to make the film at all, let alone reshoot a bunch of stuff to get it right.

NSFW language. 1:35.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=wHHjsUlRh2w

Watched The Impossible a couple days ago. Pretty good film. One character makes a name goof. Spoiler since it involves what happens late in the film.

Daniel's father calls his (actual) son Johan. The kid's name in real life.

A lot of films contain written in errors. Wrong dates, who did what, order of events, etc. A typical film could easily contain a dozen of those.

Czarcasm
05-20-2013, 11:08 AM
In Boogie Nights, when William H. Macy is complaining about his philandering (actually the female equivalent of that word if on exists) wife and he tells the camera guy friend "She's up there with her dick in his ass!"
Not sure if it was intentional, intentionally left in, or even the editors didn't catch it.Not a mistake-he was referring to a strap-on.

corkboard
05-20-2013, 11:12 AM
Not a mistake-he was referring to a strap-on.

I thought he said it the other way 'round, "She's out there with his ass in her cock!"

Rollo Tomasi
05-20-2013, 11:14 AM
It's been a long time since I've seen it, but I'm pretty sure there's a scene in The Goonies where Sean Astin calls Josh Brolin's character "Josh" instead of the character's name (Brand).

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
05-20-2013, 11:19 AM
In the movie "Porky's", the guys are about to go to the shack, in which Cherry Forever is awaiting. The guys outside give a signal, and the guys inside (with Cherry Forever) return the signal, flashing the inside lights on and off (or was it off and back on?)

Anyway, when they get the signal, one of them says, "The coast is clear," and they all start heading toward the shack.

Right after that line, someone is heard saying, "Can you believe this dialogue?"

Or maybe I misunderstood it, but that's what it sounded like.

===================================
It seems like I read that in one episode of "Land of the Giants," one of the characters accidentally refers to Fitzhugh as "Kurt," the actor playing him being Kurt Kasznar.

JohnT
05-20-2013, 11:21 AM
I'm sure it's been edited out by now, but I recall in the original release of Star Wars that, during one scene, Mark Hamill shouts out "Carrie" instead of "Leia".

Researching this, it's up for debate that this actually happened.

Flywheel
05-20-2013, 11:45 AM
Another mistake in the Clerks excerpt posted by ftg: Dante says "unloosen" instead of "loosen."

Renifer
05-20-2013, 01:30 PM
In Black Bodies and Quantum Cats: Tales from the Annals of Physics, Jennifer Ouellette points out that scholars say "Leonardo" to refer to Leonardo da Vinci, not "Da Vinci". Short reason is that Da Vinci is not Leonardo's proper surname, it merely demarcates him by what area or region in Italy he came from.
So even the title is a mistake in The Da Vinci Code.

Morbo
05-20-2013, 01:36 PM
There's a scene in the remake of The Thomas Crown Affair where Pierce Brosnan says that he knows that Rene Russo is from Lima, Ohio. But he pronounces it like the capital of Peru, and she doesn't correct him, which she absolutely would have. It's pronounced LIE-ma. I was actually waiting for her to drop that on him to score a point at the end of that scene. Nope, just a line reading mistake that they didn't bother correcting.

Amateur Barbarian
05-20-2013, 03:21 PM
Not a movie, but Carnivale repeatedly called ten-dollar bills a "fin."

(A five's a fin, a ten's a sawbuck, a twenty is a double sawbuck.)

Amateur Barbarian
05-20-2013, 03:23 PM
There's a scene in the remake of The Thomas Crown Affair where Pierce Brosnan says that he knows that Rene Russo is from Lima, Ohio. But he pronounces it like the capital of Peru, and she doesn't correct him, which she absolutely would have. It's pronounced LIE-ma. I was actually waiting for her to drop that on him to score a point at the end of that scene. Nope, just a line reading mistake that they didn't bother correcting.
Oddly enough, the Lie-ma bean is called that because it was originally shipped to the US in boxes labeled "Lima, Peru."

BurnMeUp
05-20-2013, 03:56 PM
There are also the obvious differences in the robbery dialog by Pumpkin and Honey Bunny in Pulp Fiction?

NSFW language

http://youtube.com/watch?v=_me2G-EToPU
1:56 is the intro

But in the robbery scene we see later from Jules and Vincent's table she flubs the line she's delivering to " execute every one of you moth#$%@ckers"

sco3tt
05-20-2013, 04:13 PM
In Boogie Nights, when William H. Macy is complaining about his philandering (actually the female equivalent of that word if on exists) wife and he tells the camera guy friend "She's up there with her dick in his ass!"
Not sure if it was intentional, intentionally left in, or even the editors didn't catch it.

Not a mistake-he was referring to a strap-on.

I thought he said it the other way 'round, "She's out there with his ass in her cock!"

corkboard got it pretty much correct. The actual line (spoken to Ricky Jay's character, cinematographer Kurt Longjohn) was "My fucking wife has an ass in her cock in the driveway, Kurt. Alright? I'm sorry if my thoughts are not on the photography of the film we're shooting tomorrow."

This was evidently scripted exactly as spoken in order to convey the character's frustration at his wife's behavior, or else Paul Thomas Anderson exhibits a wry sense of humor on the director's commentary track: Immediately prior to this line's appearance in the film, PTA praises Macy's attention to detail: "Macy comes from that Mamet school of acting and dialog... and you know, everything you write, you'd better know what you've written because he is gonna say every single word, exactly as you've written them."

Then he pauses while the line in question is spoken, with no further commentary. So apparently it was entirely intentional.

Push You Down
05-20-2013, 05:26 PM
Not a mistake-he was referring to a strap-on.

....No.

There's no strap-on in that scene.

xizor
05-20-2013, 06:03 PM
corkboard got it pretty much correct. The actual line (spoken to Ricky Jay's character, cinematographer Kurt Longjohn) was "My fucking wife has an ass in her cock in the driveway, Kurt. Alright? I'm sorry if my thoughts are not on the photography of the film we're shooting tomorrow."

This was evidently scripted exactly as spoken in order to convey the character's frustration at his wife's behavior, or else Paul Thomas Anderson exhibits a wry sense of humor on the director's commentary track: Immediately prior to this line's appearance in the film, PTA praises Macy's attention to detail: "Macy comes from that Mamet school of acting and dialog... and you know, everything you write, you'd better know what you've written because he is gonna say every single word, exactly as you've written them."

Then he pauses while the line in question is spoken, with no further commentary. So apparently it was entirely intentional.

Thanks, I knew it was worded as it could only be a screw up by the actor, or an intentional screw up in the writing. But with the director's commentary, it sounds like it was intentional to show the character's frustration.

fiddlesticks
05-20-2013, 11:37 PM
Thanks, I knew it was worded as it could only be a screw up by the actor, or an intentional screw up in the writing. But with the director's commentary, it sounds like it was intentional to show the character's frustration.

Ok, yeah, I figured that... I was going to say he was so pissed off he tripped over his words, indicative of how close he was to a breaking point. Also, RE: Macy, the Coen Bros. scripted every hem and haw in Jerry Lundegaard's dialogue as well.

Aw, fuck it, let's take a look at that Ciera.

Peter Morris
05-21-2013, 12:05 AM
Pearl Harbor, when the Japanese attack one character says "I think World War 2 just started"

Actually, at that time, WW2 had been going on for several years.

Bloody Yanks.

Diceman
05-21-2013, 09:40 AM
It's been a long time since I've seen it, but I'm pretty sure there's a scene in The Goonies where Sean Astin calls Josh Brolin's character "Josh" instead of the character's name (Brand).
Even worse, at the very end, one of the girls mentions being frightened by the octopus. Unfortunately, the scene with the octopus was cut out of the finished movie. Somebody in editing wasn't paying attention :smack:

I saw the deleted scene on a TV special once. You can probably find it on YouTube somewhere.

Dendarii Dame
05-21-2013, 01:59 PM
In Brave, Lord MacIntosh introduces his son as his "sire", not son. (Unless in this mythical version of Scotland, "sire" means son.)

This might not count, but in The Little Mermaid, Prince Eric tells Ariel, "No, I won't leave you!" when his lips aren't moving.

Bryan Ekers
05-21-2013, 02:12 PM
"The sum of the squares of any two sides of an isosceles triangle..." or however that goes.

Morbo
05-21-2013, 02:39 PM
In Red Planet the Tom Sizemore character, Genetics Expert, says the four nucleotides of DNA are A, G, T and....P.

In the movie Breach, with Chris Cooper playing Robert Hanssen, Spy / Computer Expert, he at one point mentions "an OC-48 with a data rate of 2-point-4-8-8 megabits per second." Yeah, pretty sure that was a comma in the script, Chris.

MrSquishy
05-21-2013, 02:41 PM
corkboard got it pretty much correct. The actual line (spoken to Ricky Jay's character, cinematographer Kurt Longjohn) was "My fucking wife has an ass in her cock in the driveway, Kurt. Alright? I'm sorry if my thoughts are not on the photography of the film we're shooting tomorrow."

This was evidently scripted exactly as spoken in order to convey the character's frustration at his wife's behavior, or else Paul Thomas Anderson exhibits a wry sense of humor on the director's commentary track: Immediately prior to this line's appearance in the film, PTA praises Macy's attention to detail: "Macy comes from that Mamet school of acting and dialog... and you know, everything you write, you'd better know what you've written because he is gonna say every single word, exactly as you've written them."

Then he pauses while the line in question is spoken, with no further commentary. So apparently it was entirely intentional.Is it possible it was written incorrectly unintentionally? Hence "...you'd better know what you've written..."?

Lemur866
05-21-2013, 04:54 PM
From the commentary the "ass in her cock" line was in the written script, so Macy said the line that way, because that's the kind of actor he is. And it is clear that the line was intentionally left in the movie.

It is unclear if this was an unintentional mistake in the script that afterwards the director intentionally left it in the film, or if it was an intentional part of the script to have the character make this spoken mistake.

It seems more likely that it was a mistake in the script, but left intentionally in the film.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=RTvWZn95mZQ

Superdude
05-21-2013, 05:17 PM
There are also the obvious differences in the robbery dialog by Pumpkin and Honey Bunny in Pulp Fiction?

NSFW language

http://youtube.com/watch?v=_me2G-EToPU
1:56 is the intro

But in the robbery scene we see later from Jules and Vincent's table she flubs the line she's delivering to " execute every one of you moth#$%@ckers"

I've read an interview (no cite, sorry) with Tarantino that stated that this was intentional.

panache45
05-21-2013, 09:47 PM
"The sum of the squares of any two sides of an isosceles triangle..." or however that goes.

This is the answer I immediately thought of.

Peter Morris
05-21-2013, 10:23 PM
Do you mean the Scarecrow's line from Wizard Of Oz?

That's not a (script) error. That's a mistake by the character. The character isn't all that bright, despite being awarded a degree. He tries tio say something clever, but gets it wrong. It's a deliberate joke, not a mistake.


If we are allowed TV as well as movies, the first Doctor Who was notorious for it.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=WFFvNcgS45g

Siam Sam
05-21-2013, 10:57 PM
When Ewan MacGregor buys his ferry ticket to faux-Martha's Vineyard in The Ghost Writer, the ticket agent asks him "single or return?." Except that's a British idiom - an American would say "one way or round trip?".

Not necessarily. I'm pretty sure I've heard both in the US. although maybe I've just been over here so long I'm used to "single" and "return." It's what I usually say.

I'm not sure if this counts since it was obviously written into the dialogue and not a blooper on the part of the actor, but there's this exchange regarding Rick Blaine:

Major Strasser: You give him credit for too much cleverness. My impression was that he's just another blundering American.
Captain Renault: We musn't underestimate "American blundering." I was with them when they "blundered" into Berlin in 1918.

Actually, the Allies did not march into Berlin at the end of the war.

Ibn Warraq
05-21-2013, 11:02 PM
Pearl Harbor, when the Japanese attack one character says "I think World War 2 just started"

Actually, at that time, WW2 had been going on for several years.

Bloody Yanks.

True, but when WWII started depends on your perspective. Obviously, the British think it started in 1939, but to the Chinese it started years earlier.

On a different note, was it even referred to as WWII in 1941 or was that not till later?

Siam Sam
05-21-2013, 11:09 PM
On a different note, was it even referred to as WWII in 1941 or was that not till later?

From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_war):

"The term 'World War I' was invented by Time magazine in its issue of June 12, 1939. In that same issue, the term 'World War II' was first used speculatively to describe the upcoming war. The first use for the actual war came in its issue of September 11, 1939. Speculative fiction authors were noting the concept of a Second World War at least as early as 1919 and 1920, when Milo Hastings wrote his dystopian novel City of Endless Night."

Flywheel
05-21-2013, 11:33 PM
Not necessarily. I'm pretty sure I've heard both in the US. although maybe I've just been over here so long I'm used to "single" and "return." It's what I usually say.

True - I've heard "single ticket" and "return trip" in American usage, so "single or return?" isn't too much of a stretch. (I'd assumed it was an error since the screenplay was co-written by - and based on a novel by - a Brit.)

Peter Morris
05-22-2013, 12:01 AM
Obviously, the British think it started in 1939 ...

I'm British, and I don't think so. I know that there had been military action by Hitler long before his invasion of Poland.

However, I think I can say that it wasn't a World war until Canada and Australia joined the fight. And that happened in September 1939.

Sampiro
05-22-2013, 12:03 AM
In the movie CARRIE (the original) Sue Snell and her mother were played by real life daughter/mother Amy Irving and Priscilla Pointer. In the final scene where Sue is screaming and her mother is trying to calm her you can see Priscilla Pointer mouth "Amy!" a couple of times.

One I've wondered about: in The Godfather summit scene, Don Corleone tells the other dons that he will forgive the death of his son Sonny and everything else from the Five Family war so long as his son Michael is able to return safely. But,

"But I'm a superstitious man, and if some unlucky accident should befall him, if he should get shot in the head by a police officer, or if he should hang himself in his jail cell, or if he's struck by a bolt of lightning, then I'm going to blame some of the people in this room. And that, I do not forgive."

I've wondered if the line is supposed to be "I'm a suspicious man", which would work a bit better.

Ibn Warraq
05-22-2013, 12:18 AM
I'm British, and I don't think so. I know that there had been military action by Hitler long before his invasion of Poland.

My understanding was that British textbooks usually date the start of WWII at 1939 which is the same with American textbooks, which understandably have an anglophile bias.

Certainly the quote from the movie makes little sense since the term WWII was two years old at that time.

JohnT
05-22-2013, 08:28 AM
One I've wondered about: in The Godfather summit scene, Don Corleone tells the other dons that he will forgive the death of his son Sonny and everything else from the Five Family war so long as his son Michael is able to return safely. But,

"But I'm a superstitious man, and if some unlucky accident should befall him, if he should get shot in the head by a police officer, or if he should hang himself in his jail cell, or if he's struck by a bolt of lightning, then I'm going to blame some of the people in this room. And that, I do not forgive."

I've wondered if the line is supposed to be "I'm a suspicious man", which would work a bit better.

In the novel, it's "superstitious."

Enginerd
05-22-2013, 12:11 PM
One from TV: in an episode of Bones, Brennan wants a chunk of concrete delivered to her lab. She says, "a 2 x 3 x 4 m section. It shouldn't weight more than a ton."

That much concrete weighs almost 70 tons.

mr. jp
05-22-2013, 12:19 PM
"But I'm a superstitious man, and if some unlucky accident should befall him, if he should get shot in the head by a police officer, or if he should hang himself in his jail cell, or if he's struck by a bolt of lightning, then I'm going to blame some of the people in this room. And that, I do not forgive."

I've wondered if the line is supposed to be "I'm a suspicious man", which would work a bit better.

Superstitious has stronger implications than suspicious. Even if something happens that fully looks like the other mafia guys are innocent, like the lightning, he will still blame them (and not just be suspicious.) To me, this is fully in line with something Don Corleone would say.

Dancer_Flight
05-23-2013, 12:14 AM
One from TV: in an episode of Bones, Brennan wants a chunk of concrete delivered to her lab. She says, "a 2 x 3 x 4 m section. It shouldn't weight more than a ton."

That much concrete weighs almost 70 tons.

Hell, that much water masses 24 tonnes, and I'm assuming this wasn't special low-density air-entrained concrete either.

A quick googling shows that expanded polystyrene (suitably painted and textured to match the appearance of concrete) at ~42g/L (range 10 - 50g/L) would mass just over 1 tonne.

-DF

AK84
05-23-2013, 06:54 AM
One from TV: in an episode of Bones, Brennan wants a chunk of concrete delivered to her lab. She says, "a 2 x 3 x 4 m section. It shouldn't weight more than a ton."

That much concrete weighs almost 70 tons.
In Bones Booth routinely has to ask the scientists for conversion when they use metric terms. Thing is, Booth was in the Army ( it's a major part of his character) and he should be familiar with the system, possibly moreso than the scientists.

Slow Moving Vehicle
05-23-2013, 07:17 AM
Pearl Harbor, when the Japanese attack one character says "I think World War 2 just started"

Actually, at that time, WW2 had been going on for several years.

Bloody Yanks.

Yes, but does this really count as an error? I presume the line is spoken by a American character at Pearl Harbor. So perhaps the subtext was "...for us!".

Acsenray
05-23-2013, 07:27 AM
There's the scene in Annie Hall where Marshall McLuhan says, "I heard what you were saying. You - you know nothing of my work. You mean my whole fallacy is wrong. How you ever got to teach a course in anything is totally amazing. "

In Woody Allen's Love and Death, early in the film there was a throwaway joke about "Old Gregor" being younger than "Young Gregor." And then there was a scene in which a family servant called "Old Nahamkin" was struck by lightning.

At the end of the film, when Woody Allen's character is recounting some of the mysteries of life, he says that no one knew how "Old Nahamkin" could be younger than "Young Nahamkin."

Isamu
05-23-2013, 07:46 AM
I've wondered if the line is supposed to be "I'm a suspicious man", which would work a bit better.

In the same vein, in True Romance when Vincenzo Coccotti is giving his speech about Sicilian liars and how he is a worl-class expert at spotting lies, he says "You don't wanna show me nothin', but you're tellin me everything."

I wonder if it wasn't a mistake and it should have been reversed to

"You don't wanna tell me nothin', but you're showin' me everything."

which would make more sense.

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