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Jim B.
04-02-2014, 12:31 PM
I don't know what the rest of you call them. But I personally call them "Cliché Songs". Songs that invariably get associated with an ethnic group, a place or perhaps an event.

I know there is this Irish jig music that they often play. When I learned to play the recorder as a child, I had the song in my recorder lesson book. It is apparently called "Irish Washerwoman". Makes sense, I suppose. But there is so much more.

There is that melody they often associate with the circus. I can't recreate it here, but I'm sure you all know it. Then there is that snake charmer, Middle Eastern-type, melody. And there is that song that, in the U.S. at least, we always associate with strippers. (I once learned via the Benny Hill show that they apparently use an entirely different melody in the UK. Who knew that?)

Anyways, what are the actual names of these well-known melodies? And please include any I have omitted here.

:)

Roderick Femm
04-02-2014, 12:39 PM
I can provide one of them: the stripper number is called "The Stripper (http://youtube.com/watch?v=rjtrUuyAFjA&feature=kp)" by David Rose.

And another one I'd like to ask about: it's usually heard in cartoons, especially Warner Bros. I think, and it's associated with factories and mechanical movements.

KneadToKnow
04-02-2014, 12:43 PM
And another one I'd like to ask about: it's usually heard in cartoons, especially Warner Bros. I think, and it's associated with factories and mechanical movements.

"Powerhouse," (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powerhouse_%28instrumental%29) I believe. One of the things I learned here.

That piece of music that has a typewriter and its bell used as an instrument is called, hold on to your hat, "The Typewriter." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Typewriter)

Roderick Femm
04-02-2014, 12:47 PM
Answered my own question by using Google: it's called Powerhouse (http://youtube.com/watch?v=N9-7uLg-DZU), and it was apparently written by Raymond Scott for Warner Brothers cartoons.

The familiar part starts at :30.

eta: again, need to type faster.

Suburban Plankton
04-02-2014, 12:54 PM
The "Looney Tunes Theme" is properly titled "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down (https://youtube.com/watch?v=n73lXCzJUZ4)"

Inner Stickler
04-02-2014, 12:58 PM
There is that melody they often associate with the circus. I can't recreate it here, but I'm sure you all know it. Then there is that snake charmer, Middle Eastern-type, melody.Entry of the Gladiators (https://youtube.com/watch?v=m5csNO3oMrQ)

ZipperJJ
04-02-2014, 01:03 PM
The "oriental riff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_riff)" isn't a song with a proper name, but it's been used in a lot of songs with names...and the riff has a name. (man that was a hard sentence to write and I still messed it up)

CalMeacham
04-02-2014, 01:10 PM
Entry of the Gladiators (https://youtube.com/watch?v=m5csNO3oMrQ)

don't think that's the one he's talking about. It isn't at all "Middle Eastern, snake-charmer". But March of the Gladiators does fit well into this thread. It's Circus Music, often used to introduce clowns. I'm sure the gladiators would have been pleased.




Another good fit for the thread is Gaudeamus Igitur, which is the cliché music used when the camera is showing establishing scenes of some Ivy League or British university.

Inner Stickler
04-02-2014, 01:15 PM
don't think that's the one he's talking about. It isn't at all "Middle Eastern, snake-charmer". But March of the Gladiators does fit well into this thread. It's Circus Music, often used to introduce clowns. I'm sure the gladiators would have been pleased.I quoted 3 sentences and you missed 2 of them?

bleach
04-02-2014, 01:38 PM
The classic two "chicken" tunes are

Chicken Reel (https://youtube.com/watch?v=CzwJgGb2pvY)

and

Turkey in the Straw (https://youtube.com/watch?v=5_OOWX6sPzU).

Nars Glinley
04-02-2014, 01:39 PM
The tune that is always hummed to the porn lyrics "Bow chicka bow wow" (or some variant thereof) is from the song "Love Muscle", written by an old high school friend of mine. It's on the album/CD "Sex-O-Rama Vol. 2". Available wherever fine porn music is sold.

bleach
04-02-2014, 01:43 PM
The classic snake charmer song is called "The Streets of Cairo, or the Poor Little Country Maid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Streets_of_Cairo,_or_the_Poor_Little_Country_Maid)". Young boys may know it as "There's a place in France..".

Leaffan
04-02-2014, 01:50 PM
The classic snake charmer song is called "The Streets of Cairo, or the Poor Little Country Maid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Streets_of_Cairo,_or_the_Poor_Little_Country_Maid)". Young boys may know it as "There's a place in France..".
Or "There's a Place on Mars."

Cat Whisperer
04-02-2014, 01:50 PM
The tune that is always hummed to the porn lyrics "Bow chicka bow wow" (or some variant thereof) is from the song "Love Muscle", written by an old high school friend of mine. It's on the album/CD "Sex-O-Rama Vol. 2". Available wherever fine porn music is sold.
Brown Chicken, Brown Cow (https://youtube.com/watch?v=MzQ4qdlhurc) by Trace Adkins. :)

I think another example of a well-known cliché song is that old sixties (fifties?) song that plays every time there's a flashback to some characters childhood. I can't think of the name of it, though - you'd definitely recognize it when you heard it, though. I think they played it in the episode of "Buffy The Vampire Slayer" where the school was haunted by the students from the past.

CalMeacham
04-02-2014, 01:52 PM
I quoted 3 sentences and you missed 2 of them?

Nope. read it fast and missed the "then there's" part.

Marley23
04-02-2014, 02:02 PM
The classic snake charmer song is called "The Streets of Cairo, or the Poor Little Country Maid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Streets_of_Cairo,_or_the_Poor_Little_Country_Maid)". Young boys may know it as "There's a place in France..".
I think we're going to see this situation come up more than once in this thread: that's exactly the original song. That's the title given to it by the first person who thought to write it down and get it copyrighted and published. The Wikipedia entry suggests "Streets of Cairo" is partly derived from two much older songs.
I think another example of a well-known cliché song is that old sixties (fifties?) song that plays every time there's a flashback to some characters childhood. I can't think of the name of it, though - you'd definitely recognize it when you heard it, though. I think they played it in the episode of "Buffy The Vampire Slayer" where the school was haunted by the students from the past.
"Theme from 'A Summer Place.'" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theme_from_A_Summer_Place)

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 03:02 PM
"Waking up to a beautiful, sunny morning," or, "Running through a lovely meadow," music is from Rossini's "William Tell Overture (http://youtube.com/watch?v=xoBE69wdSkQ)." It's called, "The Call to the Cows," and it's at 6:10. The last time I heard it was in a Hershey bar commercial as the ants at a picnic are making off with HBs, and SMILING ABOUT IT! The little bastards. The piece right after this is immediately recognizable (starts at 8:45), and if you don't yell the correct phrase when it starts, you must turn in your Little Orphan Annie Decoder Pin at once.

Ike Witt
04-02-2014, 03:15 PM
It is amazing to me to see the use of player pianos in those youtube videos.

DChord568
04-02-2014, 03:19 PM
Does anyone know the origin of the "stealth" theme (dun…dun…dun…dun… duuuhhhhhhhh, dun-dun-dun-dun)? Certainly one of the most widely used examples of the OP's quest.

Inner Stickler
04-02-2014, 03:26 PM
The Pink Panther theme?

Vinyl Turnip
04-02-2014, 03:36 PM
Nah, that's duh-nuh, duh-nuh, duh-nuh duh-nuh duh-nuh dun-uh dun-uhhhhhhh (etc.) :)

I think he means the one where the first four "dun"s are ascending tones and the last ones descend back down the scale (but more quickly).

ETA: and the first and fourth "dun" are an octave apart, if that helps.

Vinyl Turnip
04-02-2014, 03:46 PM
And I'll add Boccherini's String Quintet in E, Op. 11 No. 5, which you'll surely recognize as the snobby violin music from many movies & TV shows.

robert_columbia
04-02-2014, 03:49 PM
"Waking up to a beautiful, sunny morning," or, "Running through a lovely meadow," music is from Rossini's "William Tell Overture (http://youtube.com/watch?v=xoBE69wdSkQ)." It's called, "The Call to the Cows," and it's at 6:10. The last time I heard it was in a Hershey bar commercial as the ants at a picnic are making off with HBs, and SMILING ABOUT IT! The little bastards. The piece right after this is immediately recognizable (starts at 8:45), and if you don't yell the correct phrase when it starts, you must turn in your Little Orphan Annie Decoder Pin at once.

Also, Edvard Grieg's Morning Mood (http://youtube.com/watch?v=wCEzh3MwILY&feature=kp) from his Peer Gynt is a stereotypical "morning song".

Speaking of Peer Gynt, if you were a big gamer in the 1990's you might recognize the Death of Ase (http://youtube.com/watch?v=2aKxf1h5r4g).



Descent, level 8 level music

robert_columbia
04-02-2014, 03:52 PM
Also, another videogame tune that wasn't originally a videogame tune is Nikolay Nekrasov's Korobeiniki (youtube.com/watch?v=W80xBX0jK-c&feature=kp).


Tetris

Inner Stickler
04-02-2014, 03:53 PM
Nah, that's duh-nuh, duh-nuh, duh-nuh duh-nuh duh-nuh dun-uh dun-uhhhhhhh (etc.) :)

I think he means the one where the first four "dun"s are ascending tones and the last ones descend back down the scale (but more quickly).

ETA: and the first and fourth "dun" are an octave apart, if that helps.Ah, it's either Mysterioso Pizzicato or Mysterioso Burglar Music 1. There's conflicting info (http://soundandthefoley.com/2013/04/04/villains-theme/).

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
04-02-2014, 03:59 PM
Does anyone know the origin of the "stealth" theme (dun…dun…dun…dun… duuuhhhhhhhh, dun-dun-dun-dun)? Certainly one of the most widely used examples of the OP's quest.Here's (http://s98.photobucket.com/albums/l269/hosmackah/unknown2/) an example of the "sneaky/villain" music. Spanky is playing the bad guy. Also listen for the familiar tear-inducing "Hearts and Flowers" at the end of this snippet.

Anyway, this tune has come up before, and someone in an earlier thread found it in a directory of 'stock silent movie music.' I don't think the source gave it a title.

astorian
04-02-2014, 03:59 PM
Another tune widely used in cartoons, especially those set in the West or in the country: "The Arkansas Traveller"

http://youtube.com/watch?v=I0aK61MrTyY

Inner Stickler
04-02-2014, 04:04 PM
Stock magic or dreamland music (https://youtube.com/watch?v=I33R3woDeFs)

For all your 50s era PSA needs (https://youtube.com/watch?v=xELDqIyrtNA)

Is it...could it be...? Yes, oh rapture, it's my true love! (https://youtube.com/watch?v=fHvnMi9_9mM)

robert_columbia
04-02-2014, 04:04 PM
One of the most stereotypical Highland bagpipe tunes is, in fact, Amazing Grace - the same tune you might sing in church. Scotty played it on the pipes in one of the Star Trek movies, iirc.

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 04:05 PM
Also, Edvard Grieg's Morning Mood (http://youtube.com/watch?v=wCEzh3MwILY&feature=kp) from his Peer Gynt is a stereotypical "morning song".

Funny, it sounded like an Olive Garden commercial to me. :D Thanks for the name of the tune.

astorian
04-02-2014, 04:08 PM
Whenever there's a conga line in a cartoon, you'll hear "Ahí, Viene La Conga," written by Raúl Valdespí and popularized by Xavier Cugat.


http://youtube.com/watch?v=8Okoh5HN1mo

astorian
04-02-2014, 04:09 PM
One of the most stereotypical Highland bagpipe tunes is, in fact, Amazing Grace - the same tune you might sing in church. Scotty played it on the pipes in one of the Star Trek movies, iirc.

Also used widely: "The Campbells Are Coming"

http://youtube.com/watch?v=HmxQi1RSg_0

astorian
04-02-2014, 04:15 PM
In sea-related cartoons, you often heard "The Song of the Marines."

http://youtube.com/watch?v=cAm-bzk63OI

RivkahChaya
04-02-2014, 04:18 PM
The actual title of "L'amour" from Carmen is "Habanera." (https://youtube.com/watch?v=3rjOrOt6wFw)

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
04-02-2014, 04:19 PM
The actual title of "L'amour" from Carmen is "Habanera." (https://youtube.com/watch?v=3rjOrOt6wFw)You mean it's not "I Ask To Be, Or Not To Be?"

RivkahChaya
04-02-2014, 04:21 PM
Oh, and the one bagpipe piece everyone has heard is called "Scotland the Brave." (https://youtube.com/watch?v=PSH0eRKq1lE)

RivkahChaya
04-02-2014, 04:24 PM
You mean it's not "I Ask To Be, Or Not To Be?"
I was once at a party where practically everyone had an advanced degree, and the youngest people were at least college students, and it turned out that everyone knew all the words to all the songs from the particular production of Hamlet.

Ethilrist
04-02-2014, 04:34 PM
O Fortuna, from Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, is commonly used in trailers for fantasy or period pieces, in big dramatic scenes with people riding horses and fighting in slow motion.

Like, a lot. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Orff%27s_O_Fortuna_in_popular_culture)

Sorry, can't get to YouTube at work.

Kamino Neko
04-02-2014, 04:35 PM
I'm racking my brain trying to remember that stereotypical spooky organ music.

The one that opens with a long held chord, then a series of quick, mostly rising ones.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
04-02-2014, 04:38 PM
Bach, Toccata and Fugue in D minor? (http://youtube.com/watch?v=ipzR9bhei_o)

Inner Stickler
04-02-2014, 04:39 PM
Toccata and fugue in D minor (https://youtube.com/watch?v=ho9rZjlsYYY )?

Marley23
04-02-2014, 04:39 PM
Organ music ninjas! The very worst kind!
I'm racking my brain trying to remember that stereotypical spooky organ music.

The one that opens with a long held chord, then a series of quick, mostly rising ones.
This isn't the one you're thinking of, but Toccata and Fugue in D Minor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toccata_and_Fugue_in_D_minor,_BWV_565) is also a staple of the Famous Creepy Organ Music genre.

Kamino Neko
04-02-2014, 04:56 PM
This isn't the one you're thinking of

It is, actually, I just conflated the bit about 30 seconds in with the opening in my head.

gaffa
04-02-2014, 06:11 PM
The "oriental riff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_riff)" isn't a song with a proper name, but it's been used in a lot of songs with names...and the riff has a name. (man that was a hard sentence to write and I still messed it up)
Didn't part of Devil in the White City deal with the writing of that? It was the person who put together the Midway.

ETA: Opps, my mistake. I meant the "There's a place in France..." melody.

lisiate
04-02-2014, 06:30 PM
Also, Edvard Grieg's Morning Mood (http://youtube.com/watch?v=wCEzh3MwILY&feature=kp) from his Peer Gynt is a stereotypical "morning song".

Speaking of Peer Gynt, if you were a big gamer in the 1990's you might recognize the Death of Ase (http://youtube.com/watch?v=2aKxf1h5r4g).



Descent, level 8 level music



Grieg's most cliched work has to be "In The Hall of The Mountain King" (http://youtube.com/watch?v=dRpzxKsSEZg)

I count 45 uses in film and television alone on this wikipedia page. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grieg%27s_music_in_popular_culture)

Cat Whisperer
04-02-2014, 07:29 PM
<snip>
"Theme from 'A Summer Place.'" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theme_from_A_Summer_Place)
That's the one! Here's a link to a video so you can all go, "Oh yeah! That song!" (https://youtube.com/watch?v=tSsiS-v6_6M) :)

Another very familiar, clichéd song - Solsbury Hill by Peter Gabriel. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=Os6raCCmAFk) (Music starts at around 0:50.)

BrainGlutton
04-02-2014, 07:39 PM
Does anyone know the name of that theme with kettle drums that plays in old Westerns when the Indians come on the scene? "DUUMMM dum dum DUM dum dum dum"?

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 07:40 PM
Also, Edvard Grieg's Morning Mood (http://youtube.com/watch?v=wCEzh3MwILY&feature=kp) from his Peer Gynt is a stereotypical "morning song".



Grieg's most cliched work has to be "In The Hall of The Mountain King" (http://youtube.com/watch?v=dRpzxKsSEZg)

I count 45 uses in film and television alone on this wikipedia page. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grieg%27s_music_in_popular_culture)

I might have The Ultimate Grieg Cliche: lisiate's list has ELO covering ITHotMK, however, they start that version with a short bit from MM. Jeff Lynne must have been on an EG binge that week.

Slithy Tove
04-02-2014, 07:51 PM
For when the magician or tightrope walker is performing, Over the Waves (http://youtu.be/QzCCQZFDkJk) by Mexican composer Juvenitas Rosas.

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 08:03 PM
Is "Sabre Dance (http://youtube.com/watch?v=gqg3l3r_DRI)" still a cliche, or has it been retired to Cliche Parnassus?

K364
04-02-2014, 08:13 PM
There are many Gypsy themes...

The quintessential sad and poignant one: https://youtube.com/watch?v=xir-5oAWxXE&feature=youtu.be&t=4m45s

TreacherousCretin
04-02-2014, 09:13 PM
Answered my own question by using Google: it's called Powerhouse (http://youtube.com/watch?v=N9-7uLg-DZU), and it was apparently written by Raymond Scott for Warner Brothers cartoons.

I have a couple of Raymond Scott collections, and my impression from liner notes is that he wrote Powerhouse and most (all?) of his other pieces years before his publishing rights were sold to Warner Brothers. I'm too lazy to look any of this up, and agree to be wrong if I'm wrong.

terentii
04-02-2014, 09:23 PM
The "oriental riff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_riff)" isn't a song with a proper name, but it's been used in a lot of songs with names...and the riff has a name. (man that was a hard sentence to write and I still messed it up)

I now think of it as "Gonna Tell Us All about the Rain." :D

terentii
04-02-2014, 09:32 PM
There are many Gypsy themes...

The quintessential sad and poignant one: https://youtube.com/watch?v=xir-5oAWxXE&feature=youtu.be&t=4m45s

Music starts here at about 1:35:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=FcJG1Anqe9k

Ponch8
04-02-2014, 09:53 PM
When there's a party at a country club or some similar high society gathering, and they want to convey just how sophisticated everybody is, you often hear Vivaldi's Spring. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=GRxofEmo3HA)

terentii
04-02-2014, 10:00 PM
Is "Sabre Dance (http://youtube.com/watch?v=gqg3l3r_DRI)" still a cliche, or has it been retired to Cliche Parnassus?

You mean "The Ed Sullivan Show's Plate-Spinner's Theme"?* :D

https://youtube.com/watch?v=AvKgluPJwdg

*Yes, I see it's been dubbed, but it proves I'm not the only guy who thinks this way!

Le Ministre de l'au-delà
04-02-2014, 10:14 PM
The Nokia ring tone, which is played world-wide at least twenty times per second, is actually the Francisco Tarrega "Gran Vals (http://youtube.com/watch?v=uSQzUx3QW2Y)". Listen at 0:11.

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 10:14 PM
You mean "The Ed Sullivan Show's Plate-Spinner's Theme"?* :D

https://youtube.com/watch?v=AvKgluPJwdg

*Yes, I see it's been dubbed, but it proves I'm not the only guy who thinks this way!

Yep, the very one--HEY! I can't be watching this; I'm getting ready for bed. That's worse than coffee. ;)

nevadaexile
04-02-2014, 10:22 PM
Not certain if this has become "cliche" as of yet but this Miserlou from Pulp Fiction:http://youtube.com/watch?v=D5OHrQYwRac

Is actually a variation of this Greek song:http://youtube.com/watch?v=LW6qGy3RtwY

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 10:41 PM
This (http://youtube.com/watch?v=z1088E6E2fY) is certainly cliche at weddings, and I would think heraldry movies (and Masterpiece Theatre), as well.

Toucanna
04-02-2014, 10:45 PM
Shall we dance... the (http://youtube.com/watch?v=kJ-3xGjEKR8) Tango (http://youtube.com/watch?v=P0LosvoEEy8)?

Toucanna
04-02-2014, 10:49 PM
The classic snake charmer song is called "The Streets of Cairo, or the Poor Little Country Maid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Streets_of_Cairo,_or_the_Poor_Little_Country_Maid)". Young boys may know it as "There's a place in France..".

FWIW, reference note #3 for that Wikipedia page is this Straight Dope column (https://academicpursuits.us/columns/read/2695/what-is-the-origin-of-the-song-theres-a-place-in-france-where-the-naked-ladies-dance).

terentii
04-02-2014, 10:55 PM
Not certain if this has become "cliche" as of yet but this Miserlou from Pulp Fiction:http://youtube.com/watch?v=D5OHrQYwRac

Is actually a variation of this Greek song:http://youtube.com/watch?v=LW6qGy3RtwY

My go-to tune for all things Greek:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=zJmnpcotbfc&list=RDzJmnpcotbfc

terentii
04-02-2014, 10:59 PM
This (http://youtube.com/watch?v=z1088E6E2fY) is certainly cliche at weddings, and I would think heraldry movies (and Masterpiece Theatre), as well.

Uhm, you're confusing Clarke with Mouret:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=iZ8QVKOWbPU

Flywheel
04-02-2014, 11:01 PM
It's just not an awkwardly-trying-to-carry-a-big-bulky-object scene without Henry Mancini's Baby Elephant Walk (https://youtube.com/watch?v=b1z4JfxFb6c).

terentii
04-02-2014, 11:05 PM
If I were getting married, I'd insist on this piece (actually, just about anything by Haendel): :o

https://youtube.com/watch?v=-TGKJ9MgCOQ

terentii
04-02-2014, 11:07 PM
My go-to music for all things Russian:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=DM_jGFFhWBU

Toucanna
04-02-2014, 11:13 PM
[Snip] Also listen for the familiar tear-inducing "Hearts and Flowers"...[snip]

Based (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearts_and_Flowers) on Alphons Czibulka's Wintermärchen (http://media.slated.org/displayimage.php?pid=172).

Toucanna
04-02-2014, 11:21 PM
Even though the composers of the music we've referenced are long dead (https://youtube.com/watch?v=ido55uT5U0k), their music lives on (http://books.google.com/books?id=Rz2WJ_-NxsAC&pg=PA109&lpg=PA109&dq=Winterm%C3%A4rchen+Alphons+Czibulka&source=bl&ots=r6ENG16U5C&sig=cuW-bKH_vWOIDZ5V9QQjlmki_jo&hl=en&sa=X&ei=fNI8U9qtLrewsAThr4CQBw&ved=0CHMQ6AEwDg#v=onepage&q=Winterm%C3%A4rchen%20Alphons%20Czibulka&f=false).

burpo the wonder mutt
04-02-2014, 11:30 PM
Uhm, you're confusing Clarke with Mouret:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=iZ8QVKOWbPU

You got me dead to rights on MT, but MAN, those are similar. ;)

terentii
04-02-2014, 11:43 PM
There's one fanfare I remember from kids' TV, and then from a sound effects record in the school AV library:

Dada Da Dada Da Dada Da Dada Da, Dada Da Da Da DAAAAAA! Da Da Da DA Da Da Da, Da Dada Da Da DAAAAA! Da Da Da DA Da Da Da, Da Dada Dada DAAAAA! Da Dada DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!

Is this a legitimate piece of music, or what? :dubious:

terentii
04-02-2014, 11:46 PM
Also, is there a name for the piece starting at 1:05 in this clip? I know it was used in at least one action-adventure flick back in the '50s (Prince Valiant):

https://youtube.com/watch?v=pxAvtVhmI7Y

buddha_david
04-03-2014, 12:09 AM
Is "Sabre Dance (http://youtube.com/watch?v=gqg3l3r_DRI)" still a cliche, or has it been retired to Cliche Parnassus?
For some reason I always confuse this one with Flight of the Bumblebee (Rimsky-Korsakov) (https://youtube.com/watch?v=aYAJopwEYv8); probably because it's been done to death in everything from piano arias (https://youtube.com/watch?v=SscLwofQJHo) to heavy metal solos. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=4uzpTyivXMI)

TreacherousCretin
04-03-2014, 12:14 AM
You mean "The Ed Sullivan Show's Plate-Spinner's Theme"?* :D

https://youtube.com/watch?v=AvKgluPJwdg

*Yes, I see it's been dubbed, but it proves I'm not the only guy who thinks this way!

Me too. I'll bet all three of us are about 60.

Ranger Jeff
04-03-2014, 12:36 AM
Me too. I'll bet all three of us are about 60.

:: raising my hand ::

Lordy, I'm enjoying this thread.

Another 50ish song you might have heard in a movie is Sleepwalk (https://youtube.com/watch?v=1st_9KudWB0).

If it was a surf movie, Pipeline (https://youtube.com/watch?v=omG-hZfN6zk) was popular.

Of course, some of us like our opera from more traditional sources. Habanera (https://youtube.com/watch?v=jXKUb5A1auM)

terentii
04-03-2014, 01:43 AM
When I think of "Sleepwalk" and "Pipeline," I automatically think of these two pieces:*

https://youtube.com/watch?v=EzgbcyfJgfQ

https://youtube.com/watch?v=eBYdp84AwuU

*I turned 59 in January.

terentii
04-03-2014, 01:50 AM
My go-to song for all things Jewish:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=BFtv5qe5o3c

rowrrbazzle
04-03-2014, 02:04 AM
The villain has tied the heroine to the train tracks and the train is approaching: Schubert's Der Erlkönig https://youtube.com/watch?v=5XP5RP6OEJI

Jeff Lichtman
04-03-2014, 02:09 AM
The music that recalls images of The Spirit of 76 (http://wpclipart.com/American_History/revolution/soldiers/Spirit_of_76.jpg.html) is The Girl I Left Behind Me (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Vw5ZVhpriK0).

The cliche music used in old cartoons when someone is shown sitting in a jail cell is The Prisoner's Song (http://youtube.com/watch?v=BR9V7pZEY60).

There's one called Please Go 'Way and Let Me Sleep that often accompanies cartoon and movie scenes of someone sleeping or trying to sleep. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a video of it on line.

The Benny Hill theme is Boots Randolph's Yakety Sax (http://youtube.com/watch?v=ZnHmskwqCCQ).

Silver Threads Among the Gold (http://youtube.com/watch?v=twkgyMtA_fo) is cliched "old folks" music.

The Song of the Volga Boatmen (http://youtube.com/watch?v=uNb54rwDQJM) is used to invoke plodding toil.

terentii
04-03-2014, 02:32 AM
There's one called Please Go 'Way and Let Me Sleep that often accompanies cartoon and movie scenes of someone sleeping or trying to sleep. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a video of it on line.


You mean this piece?

https://youtube.com/watch?v=t894eGoymio

terentii
04-03-2014, 02:40 AM
Like "Yakety Sax," this piece was often used as background for pantomime sketches in the late '60s and early '70s. I had a 45 cover of it that was much better than the Muppets' version, but sadly it's long gone. :(

https://youtube.com/watch?v=gsjcb7w1Y-w

Jeff Lichtman
04-03-2014, 03:05 AM
You mean this piece?

https://youtube.com/watch?v=t894eGoymio

No, not that one, although it's another good example of cliche music.

I looked it up in one of my reference books. J. Tim Brymn and Harry Von Tilzer wrote Please Go 'Way and Let Me Sleep in 1902. Arthur Deming introduced it in vaudeville.

I just remembered a record that features a bit of this song. You can hear an excerpt of it in this recording (https://youtube.com/watch?v=8xskUNyBPus) of I Wonder How I Look When I'm Asleep by the Six Jumping Jacks. The excerpt begins at about 0:05 and ends at about 0:12.

chacoguy
04-03-2014, 03:21 AM
I'm sure one of you will be able to decipher this.

What's the climatic score where it goes:

YEEET- YEE YEET-YEET; YEEET- YEE YEET-YEET.

Yee-YEET-Yee yee....

Jeff Lichtman
04-03-2014, 03:24 AM
Here are a couple more.

The music associated with the Can-Can is actually the Infernal Galop (http://youtube.com/watch?v=xLBWx_2y4R4) from the operetta Orpheus in the Underworld by Jacques Offenbach.

A bit of The Billboard March (http://youtube.com/watch?v=cEqYvRUd2vA) by John Klohr is widely known and often used as cliche music in movies and cartoons for raucous parades or marching bands. The famous bit starts at about 0:54.

Derleth
04-03-2014, 04:21 AM
You know, TV Tropes has done this. Oh boy has TV Tropes done this: Standard Snippet (http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/StandardSnippet) is what they call it, and that page has a ton of them, all with apposite YouTube links.

Also, we had a series of threads chasing down the "oriental riff" (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/showthread.php?t=300466) which lead to this wonderful page on it which Wikipedia cites to. (http://chinoiserie.atspace.com/) That page was actually made by a Doper in response to our thread.

Ranchoth
04-03-2014, 04:47 AM
The "Dun Dun Dun DUN Duuuun" sneaking around music is probably "Mysterious Mose, (https://youtube.com/watch?v=PEmYCZu_P4U)" circa 1930 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysterious_Mose).

Barber's Adagio for Strings (https://youtube.com/watch?v=izQsgE0L450) is probably the go-to for stock (now overdramatic) tragedy, especially if it involves choppers in 'Nam. :D

And a little digging awhile back identified the "Generic American Indian riff" as being written for the Florida State Seminoles (https://youtube.com/watch?v=L_vpfblTqng) many years ago, and spreading to similarly themed teams from there, but I don't have any concrete names or dates to back that up.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, there's a trope page (https://allthetropes.orain.org/wiki/Standard_Snippet) on this very subject. One for national riffs (https://allthetropes.orain.org/wiki/Regional_Riff), too.

[Aaaand...Derleth beat me to it. Dangit.]

Slithy Tove
04-03-2014, 05:21 AM
Like "Yakety Sax," this piece was often used as background for pantomime sketches in the late '60s and early '70s. I had a 45 cover of it that was much better than the Muppets' version, but sadly it's long gone. :(

https://youtube.com/watch?v=gsjcb7w1Y-w

It originated in one of those "Mondo" movies, soft-core porn travelogues that showed Japanese women walking on clients' backs, etc.

astorian
04-03-2014, 07:11 AM
Whenever people are working, slaving and toiling away, you're likely to hear "The Song of the Volga Boatmen."

https://youtube.com/watch?v=uNb54rwDQJM

astorian
04-03-2014, 07:13 AM
I may have missed it, but Chopin's "Funeral March" has certainly become a cliche.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Hgw_RD_1_5I

terentii
04-03-2014, 09:06 AM
I looked it up in one of my reference books. J. Tim Brymn and Harry Von Tilzer wrote Please Go 'Way and Let Me Sleep in 1902. Arthur Deming introduced it in vaudeville.

Oliver Hardy sang it to the children in Brats:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=SweobMBvpUM

terentii
04-03-2014, 09:17 AM
I'm sure one of you will be able to decipher this.

What's the climatic score where it goes:

YEEET- YEE YEET-YEET; YEEET- YEE YEET-YEET.

Yee-YEET-Yee yee....

This piece? :dubious:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=GHAOkDamRzU

terentii
04-03-2014, 09:21 AM
Another song that's become a "generic Indian riff":

https://youtube.com/watch?v=gUHefKQkAYA

Nava
04-03-2014, 09:26 AM
Told before:

When my all-Basque-Spaniards team got to Scotland, we kept being told about this guy that of course we knew, (uh, no), the greatest of Scottish poets (pleasedtomeethim and all that, so how's your Becquer? Machado? Lorca? Espronceda? Don't complain, we're not even listing any bersolaris**...), oh c´mon, he wrote the lyrics to this song they always play in New Year's Eve! (Do they? I thought they always played adiós con el corazón (https://youtube.com/watch?v=2h7mwtIWr2E)...)

Eventually wikipedia and Youtube kindly told us that Auld Lang Syne (https://youtube.com/watch?v=2deQgkciOB4)*, a tune whose name we'd never known and that we associated with "banquets in American movies", does indeed have lyrics by Robert Burns and is indeed played not just in movie banquets but in NYE movie banquets. And apparently, also in NYE celebrations which are not being filmed.


* Hey, it IS a New Year's celebration.
** Basque-language poets

terentii
04-03-2014, 09:29 AM
More generic "old folks" music:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=Cnnzw88bqtc

https://youtube.com/watch?v=_3xMQdu_k2k

https://youtube.com/watch?v=AEe-4aygujI

Sparky812
04-03-2014, 09:34 AM
Barber's Adagio for Strings (https://youtube.com/watch?v=izQsgE0L450) is probably the go-to for stock (now overdramatic) tragedy, especially if it involves choppers in 'Nam. :D

Choppers in Nam (https://youtube.com/watch?v=Gz3Cc7wlfkI) otherwise known as Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries

Colonel Bogey March (https://youtube.com/watch?v=xvWLMkxSwIo)/ Hitler has only got one Ball/The River Kwai March (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/youtube.com/watch?v=83bmsluWHZc)

Forgive me if I missed it but aren't the most cliche wedding songs
Wagner's Lohengrin (Here Comes the Bride) (https://youtube.com/watch?v=5C5FOW2ekHo)
Pachelbel's canon in D (https://youtube.com/watch?v=8Af372EQLck)

JKellyMap
04-03-2014, 09:38 AM
"Theme from 'A Summer Place.'" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theme_from_A_Summer_Place)

Folks who lived in the New York area in the 1970s will recognize this as the interlude music from one of the regional TV stations there -- WPIX (channel 11) maybe? Or WOR (channel 9)? Played, if I recall correctly, when a film ended before the top of the hour.

astorian
04-03-2014, 11:33 AM
I know I've asked this in other threads, but what's the title of that cliche Russian dance music?

"Da da da da da daaaaa,
Da da da da da da.
HEY!

"Da da da da da daaaaa,
Da da da da da da.
HEY!"

You'll hear it in this old Popeye cartoon around 6:45

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ly8jsu_i0JU

burpo the wonder mutt
04-03-2014, 12:11 PM
Barber's Adagio for Strings (https://youtube.com/watch?v=izQsgE0L450) is probably the go-to for stock (now overdramatic) tragedy, especially if it involves choppers in 'Nam. :D
Choppers in Nam (https://youtube.com/watch?v=Gz3Cc7wlfkI) otherwise known as Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries

Colonel Bogey March (https://youtube.com/watch?v=xvWLMkxSwIo)/ Hitler has only got one Ball/The River Kwai March (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/youtube.com/watch?v=83bmsluWHZc)

Forgive me if I missed it but aren't the most cliche wedding songs
Wagner's Lohengrin (Here Comes the Bride) (https://youtube.com/watch?v=5C5FOW2ekHo)
Pachelbel's canon in D (https://youtube.com/watch?v=8Af372EQLck)

One more cliche wedding song (http://youtube.com/watch?v=z0wmzoHd6yo):

TreacherousCretin
04-03-2014, 12:45 PM
The "Dun Dun Dun DUN Duuuun" sneaking around music is probably "Mysterious Mose, (https://youtube.com/watch?v=PEmYCZu_P4U)" circa 1930 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysterious_Mose).

Good one. I always assumed "Mysterious Mose" used the motif because it was appropriate to the context of the song. Never occurred to me that it might be the point of origin.

robert_columbia
04-03-2014, 01:10 PM
The stereotypical "graduation" music in the US is Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance, Op. 39, March 1 (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Kw-_Ew5bVxs)

robert_columbia
04-03-2014, 01:21 PM
There is also the famous Hoedown (http://youtube.com/watch?v=LsReWx9XdNs) from Aaron Copland's Appalachian Spring that evokes stereotypical American farmers.

terentii
04-03-2014, 01:35 PM
I know I've asked this in other threads, but what's the title of that cliche Russian dance music?

"Da da da da da daaaaa,
Da da da da da da.
HEY!

"Da da da da da daaaaa,
Da da da da da da.
HEY!"

You'll hear it in this old Popeye cartoon around 6:45

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ly8jsu_i0JU

It's called the Hopak (or Gopak), and is actually Ukrainian.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=ALzZ69HLXuY

K364
04-03-2014, 01:37 PM
The stereotypical "graduation" music in the US is Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance, Op. 39, March 1 (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Kw-_Ew5bVxs)
March 4 is also used: http://youtu.be/sAU5vD7LC9w?t=1m18s (http://youtu.be/sAU5vD7LC9w?t=4m2s)

Inner Stickler
04-03-2014, 01:38 PM
Good one. I always assumed "Mysterious Mose" used the motif because it was appropriate to the context of the song. Never occurred to me that it might be the point of origin.Your first instinct is correct. The tune itself was published back in 1914 as part of a piece called Mysterioso Pizzicato which itself may have been borrowed from an earlier work called Mysterioso Burglar Music 1. Mysterious Mose was not made until 1930.

RivkahChaya
04-03-2014, 01:51 PM
Grieg's most cliched work has to be "In The Hall of The Mountain King" (http://youtube.com/watch?v=dRpzxKsSEZg)

I count 45 uses in film and television alone on this wikipedia page. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grieg%27s_music_in_popular_culture)As a huge Grieg fan, I have to say, for as well known as all these clips are, it's a shame that his name isn't better known.

Or that you don't hear the Holberg Suite more often.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
04-03-2014, 02:00 PM
Does anyone know the origin of the "stealth" theme (dun…dun…dun…dun… duuuhhhhhhhh, dun-dun-dun-dun)? Certainly one of the most widely used examples of the OP's quest.Mysterioso Pizzicato (1914) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysterioso_Pizzicato)

RivkahChaya
04-03-2014, 02:02 PM
My go-to song for all things Jewish:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=BFtv5qe5o3cI think everyone knows "Hava Nagila." If anyone is curious, the title means "Let's Be Happy." Anyone who is Jewish can actually sing the whole song.

RivkahChaya
04-03-2014, 02:06 PM
Allan Sherman's "Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah" is actually titled "A Letter from Camp," and the tune is borrowed from "Dance of the Hours," from the opera La Gioconda by Amilcare Ponchielli.

buddha_david
04-03-2014, 02:20 PM
Pachelbel's canon in D (https://youtube.com/watch?v=8Af372EQLck)

Where are you now, Pachalbel? (https://youtube.com/watch?v=JdxkVQy7QLM) :)

Little Nemo
04-03-2014, 02:34 PM
That piece of music that has a typewriter and its bell used as an instrument is called, hold on to your hat, "The Typewriter." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Typewriter)Another "cliche" song written by Leroy Anderson is Sleigh Ride (https://youtube.com/watch?v=vwHEqx_3BYE).

terentii
04-03-2014, 03:00 PM
I think everyone knows "Hava Nagila." If anyone is curious, the title means "Let's Be Happy." Anyone who is Jewish can actually sing the whole song.

I learned it as "Come, Brethren, Let Us Rejoice!" I can sing the whole song too, and I'm not even Jewish. :cool:

Toucanna
04-03-2014, 03:04 PM
Another song used to convey the "old folks" motif: https://youtube.com/watch?v=4I5GOPPL-z0.
I may have missed it, but Chopin's "Funeral March"...[snip]
Psst... Post #69. ;)

burpo the wonder mutt
04-03-2014, 03:43 PM
ANOTHER "cliche" song written by Leroy Anderson is The Syncopated Clock (http://youtube.com/watch?v=CrpdQngwk2g).

Jeff Lichtman
04-03-2014, 05:39 PM
It's called the Hopak (or Gopak), and is actually Ukrainian.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=ALzZ69HLXuY

What I think astorian is looking for is not in this clip. What he's looking for starts at about 7:04 of the Popeye cartoon (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ly8jsu_i0JU).

Toucanna
04-03-2014, 05:43 PM
At a "Cinco de Mayo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinco_de_Mayo)" party in the USA, you're like to hear "The Mexican (http://youtube.com/watch?v=zE6qVVffM1Q) Hat Dance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarabe_Tapat%C3%ADo)".

RivkahChaya
04-03-2014, 06:33 PM
I learned it as "Come, Brethren, Let Us Rejoice!" I can sing the whole song too, and I'm not even Jewish. :cool:"Hava" is an interjection, not a true verb form, although it comes from a form of "to give." "Nagila" could be translated as "rejoice," but it could also be translated as "be in a good mood."

Later in the song, it does say "Brothers, in your hearts, let there be celebration"; all the lines of the song are pretty much along that theme.

You probably had an old translation out of a pre-WWII Reform "hymnal," where everything was translated to sound like Christian hymns that were mostly written in the 17th, 18th & 19th centuries. "Hava Nagila" was actually written only about 100 years ago, and is not quite as old as "Happy Birthday."

Toucanna
04-03-2014, 06:34 PM
I know I've asked this in other threads, but what's the title of that cliche Russian dance music? [snip]
It's called the Hopak (or Gopak), and is actually Ukrainian. [snip]
What I think astorian is looking for is not in this clip. What he's looking for starts at about 7:04 of the Popeye cartoon (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ly8jsu_i0JU).
@astorian: I have a bunch of CDs with Russian folk music on them and will have to dig them out and see if I can find the song you're trying to ID. FWIW, I can rule out two biggies, Kalinka (http://youtube.com/watch?v=VJ9q7N5e25c) and Marusya (http://youtube.com/watch?v=rEfvQB2gG2Y).

Slightly off-topic, the Popeye theme song is based on an old folk song called, The Sailor's Hornpipe (http://youtube.com/watch?v=9YxKeuURayU&quot;).

RivkahChaya
04-03-2014, 06:42 PM
Original lyrics to the ditty known as "The Star-Spangled Banner":

"Anacreon in Heaven"

Lyrics: Ralph Tomlinson Music: John Stafford Smith

To Anacreon in Heav'n, where he sat in full glee,
A few Sons of Harmony sent a petition;
That he their Inspirer and Patron wou'd be;
When this answer arrived from the Jolly Old Grecian;
"Voice, Fiddle, and Flute,
No longer be mute,
I'll lend you my name and inspire you to boot,
And besides I'll instruct you like me, to intwine,
The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's Vine."

The news through Olympus immediately flew;
When Old Thunder pretended to give himself airs.
If these Mortals are suffered their scheme to pursue,
The Devil, a Goddess, will stay above stairs.
"Hark", Already they cry,
"In transports of joy,
Away to the Sons of Anacreon we'll fly.
And besides I'll instruct you like me, to intwine,
The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's Vine."

"The Yellow-Haired God and his nine lusty Maids,
From Helion's banks will incontinent flee,
Idalia will boast but of tenantless Shades,
And the bi-forked hill a mere desert will be.
My Thunder no fear on't,
Shall soon do it's errand,
And damme I'll swing the Ringleaders I warrant,
I'll trim the young dogs, for thus daring to twine,
The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's Vine."

Apollo rose up and said, "Pry'thee ne'er quarrel,
Good sing of the Gods with my Vot'ries below:
Your Thunder is useless"--then showing his laurel,
Cry'd "Sic evitable fulmen' you know!
Then over each head
My laurels I'll spread
So my sons from your Crackers no mischief shall dread,
While snug in their clubroom, they jovially twine,
The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's Vine."

Next Momus got up with his risible Phiz
And swore with Apollo he'd cheerfully join-
"The full tide of Harmony still shall be his,
But the Song, and the Catch, and the Laugh, shall be mine.
Then Jove be not jealous
Of these honest fellows,"
Cry'd Jove, "We relent since the truth you now tell us;
And swear by Old Styx, that they long shall intwine,
The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's Vine."

Ye Sons of Anacreon then join hand in hand;
Preserve Unanimity, Friendship, and Love!
'Tis yours to support what's so happily plann'd;
You've the sanction of Gods, and the Fiat of Jove.
While thus we agree,
Our toast let it be:
"May our Club flourish Happy, United, and Free!
And long may the Sons of Anacreon intwine,
The Myrtle of Venus with Bacchus's Vine."

RivkahChaya
04-03-2014, 06:50 PM
Oh, the real name of what everyone calls "The Pina Colada Song" is "Escape," and apparently Rupert Holmes has a thing about calling it by its right name.

buddha_david
04-03-2014, 06:54 PM
At a "Cinco de Mayo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinco_de_Mayo)" party in the USA, you're like to hear "The Mexican (http://youtube.com/watch?v=zE6qVVffM1Q) Hat Dance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarabe_Tapat%C3%ADo)".

Which, according to George Carlin, took three people to write. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=L9kGA_HyRLY) ;)

terentii
04-03-2014, 07:00 PM
@astorian: I have a bunch of CDs with Russian folk music on them and will have to dig them out and see if I can find the song you're trying to ID.

Repeat: The tune in the Popeye cartoon is the Hopak (or Gopak, depending on which region you're from).

https://youtube.com/watch?v=ALzZ69HLXuY

Boulter's Canary
04-03-2014, 07:07 PM
One of the most stereotypical Highland bagpipe tunes is, in fact, Amazing Grace - the same tune you might sing in church. Scotty played it on the pipes in one of the Star Trek movies, iirc.

And it isn't even Scottish.

How about Verdi's Dies Irae (https://youtube.com/watch?v=ZDFFHaz9GsY&feature=kp)? That one has seen service for the forces of good and evil.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
04-03-2014, 07:21 PM
Repeat: The tune in the Popeye cartoon is the Hopak (or Gopak, depending on which region you're from).

https://youtube.com/watch?v=ALzZ69HLXuY

That tune appears before and after the tune that Jeff Lichtman referred to, but your video does not contain the specific part in question, which is heard only briefly (when Popeye and Bluto dance up into the air, and when Popeye kicks Bluto's butt).

Toucanna
04-03-2014, 07:26 PM
Repeat: The tune in the Popeye cartoon is the Hopak (or Gopak, depending on which region you're from).

https://youtube.com/watch?v=ALzZ69HLXuY
Yes, you're right, the Hopak is heard in the Popeye cartoon, starting at 6:50. What I was trying to say (and mangled badly because I'm following a game in another thread ;) ) is that there are three stereotypically "Russian" songs heard, starting at 6:50 and ending at 7:45: the (Ukranian) Hopak, an as-yet unidentified song, and then The Song of the Volga Boatmen. The Hopak and the A-YUS alternate twice, and then the SotVB is heard. It's that second song snippet I'm trying to ID.

Toucanna
04-03-2014, 07:38 PM
That tune appears before and after the tune that Jeff Lichtman referred to, but your video does not contain the specific part in question, which is heard only briefly (when Popeye and Bluto dance up into the air, and when Popeye kicks Bluto's butt).
FWIW...
Time stamps are approximate:
6:50 Hopak
7:05 A-YUS
7:15 Hopak
7:25 A-YUS
7:37 SotVB
7:45 Closing Popeye theme music.

(Please, please, please, don't make me watch that cartoon again! I don't even like Popeye. :D )

terentii
04-03-2014, 09:20 PM
The Hopak and the A-YUS alternate twice, and then the SotVB is heard. It's that second song snippet I'm trying to ID.

Aha! My fault for not watching to the end. I don't know the name of the unknown piece right offhand, but I recognize it from Bullwinkle's Corner ("Little Tommy Tucker"):

RUSSIAN DRESSING?!?
Tomatoes, beets, and turnips, we use to make it red! HEY!
Put it on your salad and you'll wish that you were dead! HEY!

SirRay
04-03-2014, 10:11 PM
Folks who lived in the New York area in the 1970s will recognize this as the interlude music from one of the regional TV stations there -- WPIX (channel 11) maybe? Or WOR (channel 9)? Played, if I recall correctly, when a film ended before the top of the hour.

As a little kid, when I was still young enough to find most of the jokes in the WPIX Sunday Morning Abbot & Costello movies funny, the theme music in the early 1970s was Hot Butter - Popcorn (https://youtube.com/watch?v=DBYjZTdrJlA).

On the subject of the '70s, no question that I associated John Philip Sousa "Liberty Bell March (https://youtube.com/watch?v=ov1kjVvYpWk)" first and foremost (actually, only) with Monty Python's Flying Circus (Hard not to imagine the cartoon foot going splat around the 0:56 mark)

On pre-Fox NY Channel 5 10:00PM local news - the song "Music Box Dancer (https://youtube.com/watch?v=2N_tmH6y7ng)" was often used to end the newscast.

And does the song Heavy Action (https://youtube.com/watch?v=p41_M_mehG0) have any other connotations in America than the obvious?

Toucanna
04-03-2014, 10:47 PM
Interesting article about cartoons with classical music in them: http://listverse.com/2009/06/30/10-best-uses-of-classical-music-in-classic-cartoons/

rowrrbazzle
04-04-2014, 01:34 AM
The Apache dance: https://youtube.com/watch?v=s48wDOalMLw

The music is actually by Offenbach: "Valse des rayons" (waltz of the sunbeams) from "Le Papillon". According to this video (https://youtube.com/watch?v=iF7dniksnHY) it was adapted for "le revue des femmes" at the Moulin Rouge, and called "la valse chaloupée" (swaying waltz).

Like "Yakety Sax," this piece was often used as background for pantomime sketches in the late '60s and early '70s. I had a 45 cover of it that was much better than the Muppets' version, but sadly it's long gone. :(

https://youtube.com/watch?v=gsjcb7w1Y-w

Is "Mais non, mais non (https://youtube.com/watch?v=HudhA28bk6U)" that cover?

rowrrbazzle
04-04-2014, 01:38 AM
BTW, here are the lyrics for "la valse chaloupée":
Tout en dansant la valse chaloupée
Son cavalier a les mains occupées
Il la balance
Lance avec violence
Puis, avec force, il la prend aux cheveux
La fait plier entre ses bras nerveux
Elle chavire, vire
Et tombe en disant "Je te veux"

Google translation:While dancing the waltz swaying
Rider's hands are occupied
He balance
Lance violent
Then, forcefully, he takes the hair
The bends in his sinewy arms
It capsizes, turns
And falls by saying "I want you"

Inner Stickler
04-04-2014, 01:47 AM
It's just not an awkwardly-trying-to-carry-a-big-bulky-object scene without Henry Mancini's Baby Elephant Walk (https://youtube.com/watch?v=b1z4JfxFb6c).Well, son of a bitch. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=R6kizqah-Po)

Rick Kitchen
04-04-2014, 02:59 AM
Mules slowly plodding along comes from https://youtube.com/watch?v=bVKVB0MImOg starting at 1:30 (The Grand Canyon Suite)

The typical circus music is https://youtube.com/watch?v=LR5ntF9XjhA (The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze)

terentii
04-04-2014, 07:40 AM
The Hopak and the A-YUS alternate twice, and then the SotVB is heard. It's that second song snippet I'm trying to ID.

My ex, who is Russian, was able to identify it. It's call Vo sadu li, v ogorode, which I would translate as "In My Backyard Garden, Eh?"*

https://youtube.com/watch?v=coqNGhtXWdU

*A little Canadian flavor, there! :D

terentii
04-04-2014, 07:47 AM
If you're curious, the stress in sadu is on the second syllable, li is with a long e, and ogorode is pronounced a-ga-ROD-yeh.

The part in parentheses indicates it's a children's song (detskaya [pesenka]).

Sparky812
04-04-2014, 08:31 AM
One of the most stereotypical Highland bagpipe tunes is, in fact, Amazing Grace - the same tune you might sing in church. Scotty played it on the pipes in one of the Star Trek movies, iirc.


Actually, the text to "Amazing Grace" was originally titled "Faith's Review and Expectation" while the most familiar accompanying melody is called "New Britain" which itself is an amalgamation of 2 older hymns.

And it isn't even Scottish.

Not really true, the melody's origin are unknown. There is some evidence that it's quite possible the tune has a Scottish origin anyway.

DChord568
04-04-2014, 09:18 AM
Slightly off-topic, the Popeye theme song is based on an old folk song called, The Sailor's Hornpipe (http://youtube.com/watch?v=9YxKeuURayU&quot;).

This statement is somewhat misleading.

Some early Fleischer Popeye cartoons used "The Sailor's Hornpipe" as an introduction to the Popeye theme song, and later entries in the series did sometimes use an uptempo version of it over the opening and closing credits.

But the Popeye theme song itself ("I'm Popeye the Sailor Man [toot]") was purpose-written for the cartoon series by Sammy Lerner, and has nothing in common with "The Sailor's Hornpipe."

Toucanna
04-04-2014, 01:25 PM
This statement is somewhat misleading...
[shrugs in confusion]I guess it kind of depend on how one uses, and interprets the use of, italics when naming creative works. [/shrugs in confusion]

I was saying that the series of animated short films titled Popeye--note the italicized title--used an (uptempo) arrangement of "The Sailor's Hornpipe" during its opening and closing credits. As you point out, the character of "Popeye the Sailor" had his own theme song, "I'm Popeye the Sailor Man".

(I had typed out a longer and more philosophical answer, but then my computer ate it, and I don't feel like retyping it, so this will have to stand. But to sum up, I have spent far more time than I ought, on discussing a cartoon I do not like and have never liked. It was only my love of Russian folk music [and the current difficulty in accessing my CD collection] that has led me down this Popeye-tainted rabbit hole. Do svidanya to the squinty-eyed mariner.)

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
04-04-2014, 01:40 PM
I was saying that the series of animated short films titled Popeye--note the italicized title--used an (uptempo) arrangement of "The Sailor's Hornpipe" during its opening and closing credits. As you point out, the character of "Popeye the Sailor" had his own theme song, "I'm Popeye the Sailor Man".

The most familiar versions of the Popeye opening titles begin with a quick snatch of "Sailor's Hornpipe," but this leads into an instrumental version of "I'm Popeye the Sailor Man," which is the main theme.

The earliest Popeye cartoons had a different theme song, "Strike Up the Band," but both the "Sailor's Hornpipe" and Popeye's own theme were in place from the very first episode. (https://youtube.com/watch?v=9UjM9UI40jk)

astorian
04-04-2014, 03:30 PM
My ex, who is Russian, was able to identify it. It's call Vo sadu li, v ogorode, which I would translate as "In My Backyard Garden, Eh?"*

https://youtube.com/watch?v=coqNGhtXWdU

*A little Canadian flavor, there! :D

Well, I'll be! Thanks! And thank your wife for me!

burpo the wonder mutt
04-04-2014, 03:50 PM
Just because I heard this (http://youtube.com/watch?v=jfKbuOGdcuU) 22,000,000 times on The Flintstones and other Hanna-Barbera cartoons may not earn it "cliche" status. You decide.

TreacherousCretin
04-04-2014, 04:03 PM
As a huge Grieg fan, I have to say, for as well known as all these clips are, it's a shame that ... you don't hear the Holberg Suite more often.

Amen. It's beautiful.
I knew a Piano Teacher who had it played at her wedding.

TreacherousCretin
04-04-2014, 04:13 PM
On the subject of the '70s, no question that I associated John Philip Sousa "Liberty Bell March (https://youtube.com/watch?v=ov1kjVvYpWk)" first and foremost (actually, only) with Monty Python's Flying Circus (Hard not to imagine the cartoon foot going splat around the 0:56 mark)

Liberty Bell was my favorite Sousa March before I'd ever heard of Monty Python, whose good taste impressed me when I discovered them.

DChord568
04-04-2014, 04:16 PM
[shrugs in confusion]I guess it kind of depend on how one uses, and interprets the use of, italics when naming creative works. [/shrugs in confusion]

I was saying that the series of animated short films titled Popeye--note the italicized title--used an (uptempo) arrangement of "The Sailor's Hornpipe" during its opening and closing credits.

This is also not strictly true. I can't give you a percentage breakdown, but in many entries in the series, "Sailor's Hornpipe" was not heard at all, in any context. It was gone after the first few episodes of the Fleischer run (1933-1942), and returned for an indeterminate number of episodes during the Famous Studios era (1942-1957).

P.S. To each is own tastes, but I'm sorry that you're immune to the charms of the Fleischer-era Popeyes, many of which are wonderful. If your judgment is based on those from roughly 1944 forward, that's a different story.

terentii
04-04-2014, 04:58 PM
To each is own tastes, but I'm sorry that you're immune to the charms of the Fleischer-era Popeyes, many of which are wonderful. If your judgment is based on those from roughly 1944 forward, that's a different story.

Agreed. I love the background scenery---it's almost always a seedy Depression town, on the wrong side of the tracks---and the snippets of dialogue, which you usually have to strain to hear, are hilarious!

All that, plus the fawning over Olive Oyl as though she were a great beauty, never fails to crack me up!

cjepson
04-04-2014, 11:34 PM
At a "Cinco de Mayo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinco_de_Mayo)" party in the USA, you're like to hear "The Mexican (http://youtube.com/watch?v=zE6qVVffM1Q) Hat Dance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jarabe_Tapat%C3%ADo)".

Another cliche Mexican song is "Cielito Lindo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cielito_Lindo)", which people of my generation may think of as "the Frito Bandito jingle".

TreacherousCretin
04-05-2014, 01:28 AM
Agreed. I love the background scenery---it's almost always a seedy Depression town, on the wrong side of the tracks---and the snippets of dialogue, which you usually have to strain to hear, are hilarious!
The (terrific) DVD sets have excellent subtitles that include nearly all of those little verbal asides. My favorite has always been (since about 1960) Popeye reacting with "Izzat so?"

All that, plus the fawning over Olive Oyl as though she were a great beauty, never fails to crack me up!
Trying on roller skates, she comments "I wear a size 3 but a 12 is so comfortable."

DChord568
04-05-2014, 05:59 PM
The (terrific) DVD sets have excellent subtitles that include nearly all of those little verbal asides.

I promise I'll end the thread hijack after this, but I have to point out my all-time favorite Jack Mercer aside.

In "I Never Changes Me Altitude," Popeye is flying an open-cockpit small plane when he's knocked out of his seat by a swipe from Bluto's plane.

To save himself from plummeting into space, he grabs onto the skin of the now vertical wing of the aircraft — which gradually rips down the side, exposing the framework. As he's desperately trying to slow his fall, Popeye exclaims "This is terrible, this is terrible (i.e., tearable)!"

He manages to stop, quickly patches up the damage as he climbs back toward the cabin, while muttering, "Hmmm, need a little mucilage on the fuselage!"

terentii
04-05-2014, 07:26 PM
My favorite was when Swee'Pea crawled off and got into a variety of life-treatening situations:

OLIVE: Oh, help, Popeye! Stop him! He'll be killed to death!

POPEYE: Oh! I'll save ya for him, Olive!

TreacherousCretin
04-06-2014, 01:12 AM
Your first instinct is correct. The tune itself was published back in 1914 as part of a piece called Mysterioso Pizzicato which itself may have been borrowed from an earlier work called Mysterioso Burglar Music 1. Mysterious Mose was not made until 1930.

Mysterioso Pizzicato (1914) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mysterioso_Pizzicato)

Thank you.

burpo the wonder mutt
04-27-2014, 12:39 PM
150 posts and no one (including me) mentioned the Ultimate Cliche Tune (http://youtube.com/watch?v=SLuW-GBaJ8k). We should all hang our heads in shame.

terentii
04-29-2014, 06:22 PM
I'm sure one of you will be able to decipher this.

What's the climatic score where it goes:

YEEET- YEE YEET-YEET; YEEET- YEE YEET-YEET.

Yee-YEET-Yee yee....

Maybe this one? :dubious:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=8VP5jEAP3K4

terentii
11-27-2014, 09:34 AM
And does the song Heavy Action (https://youtube.com/watch?v=p41_M_mehG0) have any other connotations in America than the obvious?

Only when I watch British TV series from the '70s and '80s. I was introduced to Bulman on-line just the other day. :D

terentii
11-27-2014, 09:43 AM
In rereading this now-zombie thread, I think we missed one of my favorites:

Duh-duh-duh-duh-duh-duh-DUH-duh,
Duh-duh-duh-duh-duh-duh-DUH-duh,
DA DA! Da DAH, Da DAH!
Da-da-DA-DA-DA-DA, DA DA-DA-DA, DA DA DA-DA-DA-DA, DA DA-DA-DA-DA!
Duh-duh-duh-duh-duh! Duh-duh-duh-duh-duh!
DA DA-DA-DA-DA!
DUM!
Duh-duh-DUH-duh-duh ... duh-duh-duh ... duh-duh-duh-duh-duh ... duh-duh-DUH-duh-duh.... :(

Clearly, I have too much free time on my hands right now.... :smack:

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