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JcWoman
02-02-2015, 03:42 PM
Okay, ATM's are notorious for being horribly programmed, and this one has probably come up a time or two. But hang on, let me check my calendar.... yeah, it's now 2015. Surely some improvements have been made, but there is one bit of stupidity that my bank still has programmed into it's ATM's:

Pressing each digit one by one to specify how much cash you want. When the machine only dispenses ten or twenty dollar bills, there's no reason on this green earth that I should be able to type in amounts like these:

0.01
0.10
1.00

Anybody here work for a bank's IT department can explain this stupidity? I used to be a system engineer, so I understand how features sometimes have to be de-scoped from a project. But something as completely brain-dead as this never being fixed in, what, three decades now? Hello?

wolfman
02-02-2015, 03:52 PM
I hate that inconsistency shit. My normal machine is one of those so I get used to typing 2--0--0--0--0--Enter when I want 200 bucks.

But then I get a panic attack when I go to another machine to get 200 bucks, and it tells me insufficient funds, not realizing for a bit that I had asked for $20000.

Bryan Ekers
02-02-2015, 03:53 PM
There might come a time when ATMs dispense money orders or similar instruments that could have penny-accurate amounts, so better to have the capability now then try to add it later.

Speculating, of course.

cmosdes
02-02-2015, 03:58 PM
Okay, ATM's are notorious for being horribly programmed, and this one has probably come up a time or two. But hang on, let me check my calendar.... yeah, it's now 2015. Surely some improvements have been made, but there is one bit of stupidity that my bank still has programmed into it's ATM's:

Pressing each digit one by one to specify how much cash you want. When the machine only dispenses ten or twenty dollar bills, there's no reason on this green earth that I should be able to type in amounts like these:

0.01
0.10
1.00

Anybody here work for a bank's IT department can explain this stupidity? I used to be a system engineer, so I understand how features sometimes have to be de-scoped from a project. But something as completely brain-dead as this never being fixed in, what, three decades now? Hello?
How would you have the ATM input wanting $120?

While your bank (and perhaps that particular ATM) dispenses only ten and twenty dollar bills, there could be other ATMs that do otherwise.

If someone is entering how much they are depositing, it could include cents. The subroutine or function that is being used to ask the user for input is generic and needs to accept all increments.

JcWoman
02-02-2015, 04:53 PM
Oh, you're probably right about that. Still, it's a horrible user experience, as Wolfman above describes. I'm always tempted to try to withdraw ten cents just to be snarky.

SmellMyWort
02-02-2015, 04:57 PM
Horrible in a first world problems sort of way. I really can't say I've ever gotten pissed off about having to type in a couple extra digits at the ATM, many of which offer a fast cash type option anyway.

Ravenman
02-02-2015, 05:22 PM
I think it would be oh-so logical for an ATM to default to a certain amount when a user selects a withdrawal -- say, $60. Then the user could press up and down buttons to adjust the amount by $20 increments (or $10 if it's one of THOSE ATMs). So if you want $60, you just press "Enter." Want $100? Press Up, Up, Enter.

Want $200? Then it's Up, Up, Left, Trigger, Select, Down, Down, Left. Then you get $200 and an extra life.

Thudlow Boink
02-02-2015, 05:27 PM
If someone is entering how much they are depositing, it could include cents. The subroutine or function that is being used to ask the user for input is generic and needs to accept all increments.And it would probably increase confusion and user error if the procedure for typing in a withdrawal amount were different from the procedure for typing in a deposit amount.

I think it would be oh-so logical for an ATM to default to a certain amount when a user selects a withdrawal -- say, $60. Then the user could press up and down buttons to adjust the amount by $20 increments (or $10 if it's one of THOSE ATMs). So if you want $60, you just press "Enter." Want $100? Press Up, Up, Enter.All the ATMs I've used recently let you select one of the most commonly withdrawn amounts from the touchscreen. I can't remember the last time I actually had to enter a withdrawal amount.

Canadjun
02-02-2015, 05:57 PM
I think it would be oh-so logical for an ATM to default to a certain amount when a user selects a withdrawal -- say, $60. Then the user could press up and down buttons to adjust the amount by $20 increments (or $10 if it's one of THOSE ATMs). So if you want $60, you just press "Enter." Want $100? Press Up, Up, Enter.

Want $200? Then it's Up, Up, Left, Trigger, Select, Down, Down, Left. Then you get $200 and an extra life.

TD Canada Trust ATMs let you define your own default withdrawal and whether when you ask for the default amount you do or do not want a receipt. Assuming you have set up a default you just push the "My favourite withdrawal" on-screen "button" and you get it. I rarely get anything other than my programmed default, but I seem to recall (I'm sure one of the other Canucks will correct me if I'm not) that if you don't want your default you still only have a specific list of amounts to choose from with on-screen "buttons".

74westy
02-02-2015, 06:12 PM
Want $200? Then it's Up, Up, Left, Trigger, Select, Down, Down, Left. Then you get $200 and an extra life.

Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200. Do not get an extra life.

I'm a gamer too!

CinnamonBabka
02-02-2015, 06:22 PM
The problem is that if you changed how the keypad functioned on your ATM some of your users are going to be confused by the change. Someone who is used to typing 2-0-0-0-0 to get $200 is going to be confused when the suddenly have to type 2-0-0 into the ATM to get the same thing. It's looking like ATMs are leaning toward the "quick-cash" buttons right on the home screen (as Boink said) for popular withdraw amounts, but leaving the keypad functionality the same -- this makes the new feature obviously different enough to require inspection to use, while those who are content with their current method of using an ATM have an unchanged experience.

Grrr!
02-02-2015, 06:26 PM
Bizarre, I have no idea what the OP is talking about. On any ATM I've used in the past decade or so, you enter 1-0-0 if you want $100.

Actually, what you really do, is you press the preset keys which has a single button that you push for $100, $80, $60 (Also known as "quick cash") $40, $20 and then there's one other button that says: "Enter amount" which allows you to enter a more specific amount in denominations of 10's or 20's, I can't remember.


And as far as no improvements, that's just crazy talk. My bank's ATMs have a feature that allow you to make cash deposits. All you do is take the stack of cash and cram it into the hole all at once and the machine magically counts it for you. No need to stick a single bill in at a time, just take the whole stack of cash and cram it in there!

wolfman
02-02-2015, 06:30 PM
And as far as no improvements, that's just crazy talk. My bank's ATMs have a feature that allow you to make cash deposits. All you do is take the stack of cash and cram it into the hole all at once and the machine magically counts it for you. No need to stick a single bill in at a time, just take the whole stack of cash and cram it in there!
I have never seen any of those. Maybe it's because I only use credit unions, but ours went from shove whatever you want in an envelope, to no envelope-auto check reader systems. But that is no cash at all, all cash deposits have to be made to a teller.

Smeghead
02-02-2015, 07:09 PM
Every ATM I've used had a screen with a bunch of optional amounts ranging from $20 to $200 or $300, plus another option for "Enter another amount" if you want something that's not there.

Askance
02-02-2015, 07:12 PM
Every ATM I've used had a screen with a bunch of optional amounts ranging from $20 to $200 or $300, plus another option for "Enter another amount" if you want something that's not there.
Same here in Australia. AND there is no option to enter cents, only whole dollars; do American ATMs really do that?

SpoilerVirgin
02-02-2015, 07:12 PM
99 times out of a hundred, I take the same amount from the ATM, and my bank was smart enough to recognize this and basically just assume that's what I want. When I put my card in, I get the password screen and a big button with my preferred amount on it. Push the button, get the cash. I do have to remember to enter the password first, though, which I forget about a third of the time. If I do want an alternate amount, I just select from the pre-existing buttons in $20 increments.

TBG
02-02-2015, 07:23 PM
None of this is as bizarre as braille on drive up ATM machines.

(redundant machine redundancy intentional :))

Grrr!
02-02-2015, 07:27 PM
Same here in Australia. AND there is no option to enter cents, only whole dollars; do American ATMs really do that?

I'm an American and I haven't noticed any that the OP is talking about.

Heck, not even those cheap-o ones you see at the Quicky Marts.

opmike
02-02-2015, 08:59 PM
I don't think the problem here is the machines...

Cabin_Fever
02-02-2015, 10:09 PM
Okay, ATM's are notorious for being horribly programmed, and this one has probably come up a time or two. But hang on, let me check my calendar.... yeah, it's now 2015. Surely some improvements have been made, but there is one bit of stupidity that my bank still has programmed into it's ATM's:

Pressing each digit one by one to specify how much cash you want. When the machine only dispenses ten or twenty dollar bills, there's no reason on this green earth that I should be able to type in amounts like these:

0.01
0.10
1.00

Anybody here work for a bank's IT department can explain this stupidity? I used to be a system engineer, so I understand how features sometimes have to be de-scoped from a project. But something as completely brain-dead as this never being fixed in, what, three decades now? Hello?

I love you and want to be your partner! :D

Senegoid
02-03-2015, 02:50 AM
I've lately evolved myself into a creature of the 21st century, meaning that whatever else I do or don't do, I now pay for many purchases with my debit card. I hardly ever have to deal with ATM mochines any more.

Shalmanese
02-03-2015, 05:04 AM
This caught up with us once when we were travelling in the Czech Republic where we weren't paying attention and accidentally withdrew something like $5000 instead of $50. Since it was the weekend, we had to walk around with $5000 worth of Czech Koruna until we finally found a bank that would allow us to convert it back.

Superdude
02-03-2015, 05:19 AM
A few banks in the KY/IN region will let you pull cash out in increments of $5.

Askance, the change function is for deposits. You don't get that option to withdraw. For example, you could deposit, say, $138.72, but you can only pull out whole dollar amounts. You could only withdraw $120/$130 (depending on the machine), in the example I used.

Cheesesteak
02-03-2015, 06:33 AM
Every ATM I've used had a screen with a bunch of optional amounts ranging from $20 to $200 or $300, plus another option for "Enter another amount" if you want something that's not there.My bank's ATM does this, except the touch screen has the various amounts fairly close to each other. So, I'm trying to take out $60 and my finger is riiiiight next to the button for $200, and the damn screen isn't all that well calibrated. You have to sort of hunt and peck around the button you're trying to hit in order to get it to take, and I'm now pecking next to a button I don't want to hit.

There's also no confirmation step, so some day I'm going to wind up with $140 more than I want. Luckily, being at an ATM, I can deposit the cash right back into the account.

MostlyUseless
02-03-2015, 09:13 AM
I am the guy, or at least one of them that you are pissed at. I wrote the ATM console code that is used in the ATMs that you see in two of the large convenience store ATMs.

There are a few things that you need to understand.

1. All coding for ATMs uses the standards for ACH. The code functions the way it does because those is the rulz.

2. Most of the ACH rules were established in the late 70's, early 80's when ATMs started popping up. Technology available today wasn't available then. Changing things for thousands of banks to ensure standardization and conformity is like turning a large ship; it takes a while.

3. Before you over-gripe because you have to enter amounts that you find unnecessary, remember that I have to code not just to YOU, but to the entire world and not only that, I have to code for what may come down the line in the future. A few extra or seemingly redundant keystrokes does not a bad system make.

4. Have you noticed how damned fast your transaction is? You type in your keystrokes and less than 60 seconds (usually a LOT less than 60 seconds) later, you are holding money. My system has to be able to find your bank amongst thousands and thousands, make an ACH connection securely and perform all the validation to ensure that Petrov in Moscow isn't hacking our system to steal your money AND deliver your money into your fat, bitching hand in less than a minute.

If I were you, I would worry more about donning surgical gloves to touch the keypads rather than bitching about four to five keystrokes.

WHINER.

MostlyUseless
02-03-2015, 09:16 AM
Also, the braille on the drive up ATM keypads? That kind of stupid you can't even blame on banks. It is required by the US Govt.

Ken001
02-03-2015, 09:28 AM
Genuinely, I'm not sure if this is a First World problem (= trivial) or not.

My Bank of New Zealand hole in the wall gives me the option of "$200 from Cheque Account No Statement". It is fast and efficient.

I note that my various friends (40s - 50s) don't use cash very much and I'm an unusual outlier. My late teen children on the other hand never have cash - everything is plastic.

Thudlow Boink
02-03-2015, 09:29 AM
Also, the braille on the drive up ATM keypads? That kind of stupid you can't even blame on banks. It is required by the US Govt.as explained by Cecil (https://academicpursuits.us/columns/read/946/why-is-there-braille-on-drive-up-teller-machines)

MostlyUseless
02-03-2015, 09:35 AM
The same coders that write ATM code also write the code for the point of sale consoles you use your debit card with. Typically, with the exception of say, 200-300 really large banks, most banks don't write their own code for anything. Your bank likely outsources all of their technology needs to a company like mine.

Your online statement? You probably aren't even looking at a page controlled by the bank. The odds are when you click the view my statement button, you are diverted to the website of the third party vendor who displays your data.

robert_columbia
02-03-2015, 10:13 AM
There might come a time when ATMs dispense money orders or similar instruments that could have penny-accurate amounts, so better to have the capability now then try to add it later....

This. Another scenario could be massive deflation in the future that makes it so that $.01 is a lot of money. You wouldn't want to make the programmers go back and re-implement stuff, would you?

Or, maybe the machine can be exported to other countries where in one, 10,000 units of money is a trifle, and in the other, the average monthly wage is 0.6 units. With a flexible ATM like you saw, they should be adaptable to local conditions pretty easily with a switch to the currency units option, a change to the "minimum" and "maximum" withdrawal units, and a change to the denomination units stocked in the machine (should just be a setting or two). No reprogramming necessary.

robert_columbia
02-03-2015, 10:14 AM
I love you and want to be your partner! :D

<3

Nava
02-03-2015, 11:13 AM
If someone is entering how much they are depositing, it could include cents. The subroutine or function that is being used to ask the user for input is generic and needs to accept all increments.

It doesn't have to be, plus there are these nifty features such as offering shortcuts for common amounts or for acceptable amounts. I'm used to ATMs that offer shortcuts (generic ones if you're not a customer, specific if you are) as well as the possibility of entering a different amount. If you want one of the suggested amounts, just press that big button. My bank with the bad designers doesn't have ATMs smart enough to offer shortcuts in 50€ increments or in 20€ increments when that's the only available type of note, but others do.

Ravenman
02-03-2015, 11:46 AM
This. Another scenario could be massive deflation in the future that makes it so that $.01 is a lot of money. You wouldn't want to make the programmers go back and re-implement stuff, would you?If that happened, it probably wouldn't cost more than a few cents for a programmer to go back and fix it.

Thudlow Boink
02-03-2015, 11:50 AM
If that happened, it probably wouldn't cost more than a few cents for a programmer to go back and fix it.:D

MostlyUseless
02-03-2015, 12:03 PM
Nah, they don't even pay us that much; they just throw sandwiches into darkened programmer rooms. However, there are managers on multiple levels, project managers and business analysts who do expect to be paid.

Any change to code is big, BIG dollars to implement especially when spread across multiple ATM brands, types, countries, etc.

curlcoat
02-03-2015, 05:04 PM
What I want to know is why it is the ATM requires me to re-enter my PIN number between depositing checks and depositing cash (yes, I have to do it separately, the machine wants it that way!) to the same account? It's bad enough I'm taking time away from the impatient prick behind me to be doing deposits on the drive up ATM, but dammit, I need to use the drive up most days and he doesn't.

Hell, why do I have to deposit checks and cash separately?

Donovan
02-03-2015, 05:46 PM
There might come a time when ATMs dispense money orders or similar instruments that could have penny-accurate amounts, so better to have the capability now then try to add it later.

Speculating, of course.

There was an ATM at my workplace that did just that - it dispensed change to the penny, probably so you could use the check cashing function on it - you could actually cash a check there (I think you had to have enough money to cover the amount in your account in case the check bounced, but don't remember). You could, however, ask it it to give you $47.53 and you would get just that. You could also buy postage stamps. I don't think it was common though, I worked at a place that handled ATM connections and monitored status of ATMs, so it was probably test ATM as much as a production ATM. Suffice to say it's no longer there, probably because it tended to need attention more often than a 'basic' ATM.

Regarding your speculation that it was there in case of future upgrades, I somewhat doubt it - ATMs have different loads tailored to the hardware, you make an upgrade to a piece of hardware of an ATM, it requires a different load (OS) that has to be sent, even if you aren't swapping out the ATM itself (some ATMs still run on 56k circuits, and some of the more modern loads can take a while to finish).

BrainGlutton
02-03-2015, 06:14 PM
Thought you meant something like this (http://snltranscripts.jt.org/76/76satm.phtml).

minor7flat5
02-03-2015, 07:04 PM
The same coders that write ATM code also write the code for the point of sale consoles you use your debit card with.Those gadgets that assume Debit + PIN until I hit a magic key? 2 out of 3 times the Cancel key is the magic key. 1 out of 3 times that cancels the transaction and the cashier glares at me. On one store's machines the labels were placed ambiguously between the keys, so I couldn't tell which one was for which key.

The whole credit/debit thing is apparently not needlessly complicated enough on its own—to liven things up, they manufacture twenty different kinds of POS terminals, each one slightly different.

Askance
02-03-2015, 07:34 PM
Askance, the change function is for deposits. You don't get that option to withdraw. For example, you could deposit, say, $138.72, but you can only pull out whole dollar amounts. You could only withdraw $120/$130 (depending on the machine), in the example I used.
The OP clearly says she has to type in cents to withdraw dollars:

Pressing each digit one by one to specify how much cash you want. When the machine only dispenses ten or twenty dollar bills, there's no reason on this green earth that I should be able to type in amounts like these:

0.01
0.10
1.00

robert_columbia
02-04-2015, 12:21 PM
If that happened, it probably wouldn't cost more than a few cents for a programmer to go back and fix it.

But the market cap of the bank is only three cents - where are you expecting those "few cents" for reprogramming to come from?

bump
02-04-2015, 02:17 PM
Bizarre, I have no idea what the OP is talking about. On any ATM I've used in the past decade or so, you enter 1-0-0 if you want $100.

Actually, what you really do, is you press the preset keys which has a single button that you push for $100, $80, $60 (Also known as "quick cash") $40, $20 and then there's one other button that says: "Enter amount" which allows you to enter a more specific amount in denominations of 10's or 20's, I can't remember.


And as far as no improvements, that's just crazy talk. My bank's ATMs have a feature that allow you to make cash deposits. All you do is take the stack of cash and cram it into the hole all at once and the machine magically counts it for you. No need to stick a single bill in at a time, just take the whole stack of cash and cram it in there!

Wells Fargo? That's who I use, and it gives me the opportunity to choose the breakdown of the money I withdraw- if I say $50, it asks 1 $50 bill or 2 $20 bills and a $10 bill.

It also takes s stacks of cash and checks for deposit like you mention.

JcWoman
02-04-2015, 03:06 PM
Yeah, I admit it's a first world problem. I've had user experience principles pounded into me after 25+ years as a system engineer, so I notice these things. My ATM that does this is located at a bank branch in Virginia. I can't even blame the bank because that branch was inherited from a recent merger and for all I know the software was like that from the start.

It does have one pre-programmed option for withdrawing $60 but that's it. Sometimes we want a different amount.

Another bit of tomfoolery is that a couple years ago we created a money market fund with the same bank, and ever since then, when we try to withdraw money from the ATM, it asks us which checking account to pull from. Only within the last month did we get a notice from the bank that they're re-classifying the money market account as savings rather than checking. (They didn't issue any checks with the account, so it's anyone's guess why they classified it as a checking account.)

control-z
02-04-2015, 04:27 PM
Wells Fargo? That's who I use, and it gives me the opportunity to choose the breakdown of the money I withdraw- if I say $50, it asks 1 $50 bill or 2 $20 bills and a $10 bill.

It also takes s stacks of cash and checks for deposit like you mention.

Yeah my Wells Fargo ATM is pretty impressive. I can feed it a stack of checks and it reads the handwriting on each one and gives me an on-screen summary that I confirm. No more deposit slips! And it can email me a receipt. It rarely reads handwriting incorrectly and even when it does it's usually because of bad writing like numerals touching/overlapping each other. You can type in the correct amount on the keypad, and in that case dollars and cents are required.

However, IIRC, if you ask for a custom cash withdraw amount I think it does ask for dollars and cents even though it only gives out $20 bills.

gotpasswords
02-05-2015, 07:04 PM
Yeah my Wells Fargo ATM is pretty impressive.
Do any other banks wish you a happy birthday via their ATMs? First time I saw that, I was not expecting it.

flatlined
02-05-2015, 07:20 PM
None of this is as bizarre as braille on drive up ATM machines.

(redundant machine redundancy intentional :))

I was just going to post this. Makes :mad: at you. Those scare me every time I see them.

pulykamell
02-05-2015, 09:34 PM
I was just going to post this. Makes :mad: at you. Those scare me every time I see them.

Several obvious reasons occur to me: 1) A blind passenger in the rear, like in a taxi, might want to use one. 2) Seems to make more sense to make one type of machine rather than separate ones for drive-up and walk-up ATMs. And possibly 3) Sometimes one uses the drive-up ATM if the walk-up ATM is down or inconvenient (although this probably is not a very good idea, I suppose, especially for a blind person, though I've done this quite often. But at least the first two points.)

Darth Nader
02-06-2015, 01:01 AM
Many years ago, I would occasionally cash a paycheck after hours at my credit union's drive through ATM. Deposit it, withdraw the amount I needed from my new balance, and good to go. Didn't know the whole setup was based on the honor system 'til that one night I gave them the stub and kept my check. Oops. They were MAD about that.

Giles
02-11-2015, 07:21 AM
This caught up with us once when we were travelling in the Czech Republic where we weren't paying attention and accidentally withdrew something like $5000 instead of $50. Since it was the weekend, we had to walk around with $5000 worth of Czech Koruna until we finally found a bank that would allow us to convert it back.
Something similar almost happened to me recently when I visited Japan after a week in South Korea. I don't know whether it was because I was tired, or because I'd grown used to 1,000 South Korean won being about a dollar. but I asked the Japanese ATM for 500,000 yen. For a while I couldn't understand why the transaction was refused, but then realised that $5,000 was way over my daily limit: I could get 50,000 yen instead.

RTFirefly
02-11-2015, 11:38 AM
I'm gonna say something good about ATMs, at least the ones that PNC bank has.

1) They make you insert - and then remove - your ATM card before you can begin your transaction. They put this improvement in about 2 years ago. It makes it impossible for you to leave your ATM card in the machine, and next to impossible to leave it behind at all.

I'm a big fan of this bit of idiot-proofing, because I'm the sort of guy who would be that sort of idiot.

2) Their ATMs also let you define your own standard cash withdrawal. So if you normally take out $120 in cash, it will let you set a button on the ATM for withdrawing that amount. And in subsequent visits where you want $120, after inserting and withdrawing your card and punching in your 4-digit code, you hit the $120 button, it spits out the money, and you're done.

3) I think this one's more widespread, but when depositing checks, just being able to feed the check into the machine, and getting a transaction slip with a photo of the check you deposited, is a significant improvement. It used to be next to impossible to tell whether you had deposited a particular check or not. Now you've got a picture that says you did.

JohnGalt
02-11-2015, 11:59 AM
Do any other banks wish you a happy birthday via their ATMs? First time I saw that, I was not expecting it.

So they looked on Facebook and saw it was your birthday? Cool!

Smeghead
02-11-2015, 01:03 PM
3) I think this one's more widespread, but when depositing checks, just being able to feed the check into the machine, and getting a transaction slip with a photo of the check you deposited, is a significant improvement. It used to be next to impossible to tell whether you had deposited a particular check or not. Now you've got a picture that says you did.

One of my favorite things about smartphones is that I can now just take a picture of a check with my bank's app, and it's deposited. Brilliant.

Boyo Jim
02-11-2015, 01:17 PM
Do any other banks wish you a happy birthday via their ATMs? First time I saw that, I was not expecting it.

My car says goodbye to me when I turn off the ignition.

DrDeth
02-11-2015, 01:26 PM
Horrible in a first world problems sort of way.

Only assholes use that term.

DrDeth
02-11-2015, 01:33 PM
None of this is as bizarre as braille on drive up ATM machines.

(redundant machine redundancy intentional :))

Not entirely redundant. One of the reasons they picked ATM as it was also called a "Any Time Money Machine" . After all, for decades it wasn't really a "teller" since all it could do was dispense cash.

Superdude
02-13-2015, 08:02 AM
My car says goodbye to me when I turn off the ignition.

Your car was made by AOL?

The OP clearly says she has to type in cents to withdraw dollars:


I'd venture to say that, if she tried to withdraw an amount that didn't end with zero cents, it wouldn't go through.

Boyo Jim
02-13-2015, 08:51 AM
Your car was made by AOL?...

Nah, if it was from AOL or Yahoo, it would be spamming me.

RTFirefly
02-13-2015, 12:00 PM
One of my favorite things about smartphones is that I can now just take a picture of a check with my bank's app, and it's deposited. Brilliant.Yeah, I was thinking of mentioning that, but since this thread's about ATMs, I thought I'd stick to that.

Besides, I get money out of the machines often enough that it's simpler just to stick the checks in the machine when I'm pulling cash out, than figure out how to do a deposit from my desktop or tablet.

Cabin_Fever
02-14-2015, 12:16 AM
My car says goodbye to me when I turn off the ignition.

So did my ex. Your point is...?
:)

Springtime for Spacers
02-14-2015, 12:47 AM
Also, the braille on the drive up ATM keypads? That kind of stupid you can't even blame on banks. It is required by the US Govt.

So the blind person sitting in the back seat behind the driver can use it?

Bryan Ekers
02-14-2015, 01:51 AM
Your car was made by AOL?


Nah, if it was from AOL or Yahoo, it would be spamming me.

Plus it would be prone to random crashes.

betterlifethroughchemistry
02-15-2015, 11:28 PM
None of this is as bizarre as braille on drive up ATM machines.

(redundant machine redundancy intentional :))

We live in really upstate NY, so it always gets me that I have to choose 'English' to get to the next screen...

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