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crypto
03-29-2015, 03:49 PM
Does anyone make purchasing decisions based on the person trying to sell you the product?

And if so, is it a positive decision (you buy) or a negative decision (you don't buy or purchase a competitor's product)?

I cannot personally think of a product I've purchased because I liked the pitchman (or pitchwoman) hawking the product. However, I have definitely NOT purchased a product because I didn't like the person who is selling it.

Examples:

Flo - the Progressive Insurance woman annoys me in such a way that I can not and will not consider purchasing their insurance. The ad campaign around Flo must be successful, because they shove her down our collective throats all day every day. But her impact on me is the exact opposite of what Progressive wants it to be.

Phil Swift - the squat, wider-than-a-cartoon-mouthed pitchman for Flex Seal, causes a similar reaction. All of the "as seen on TV" ads follow the same basic script (Billy Mays probably would have done Flex Seal if he was still alive). I know he is supposed to shout at us... however, I dislike him so much I would never buy the product.

Anyone out there have a simliar example? And does anyone have an example of buying a product because they actually liked the pitchman?

TriPolar
03-29-2015, 04:19 PM
If Progressive offered the best car insurance policy I'd buy it even if Flo annoyed me. Car insurance is expensive, the savings can be substantial . For small items I might skip over something just for not liking the pitch. It doesn't really matter, they don't know or care that I'm not buying that one little piece of junk, but I still don't have to give them my money.

Hail Ants
03-29-2015, 08:58 PM
I do find Progressive's (and all car insurance company's) commercials really really annoying. They are all so dripping with 'overbearing earnest hipness' and yet are all the epitome of stupid, stodgy, Mad Men-esque traditional, manipulative advertising. But being that for the last 15+ years I buy car insurance online therefore the ads aren't important to me (insurance is now completely impersonal, like paying a utility bill) I figured since they spent a lot on advertising I'd check them out first. They turned out to have the best rate so I went with them without a second thought.

Ambivalid
03-29-2015, 09:05 PM
Cialis. My fucking God. If I ever need an ED medication, I'm going with Viagra. Or better yet, Levitra. (Viagra ads are pretty bad too but not as bad as Cialis).

Trancephalic
03-29-2015, 10:02 PM
I've sworn off Burger King for life after their "I want my Whopper" campaign. It was the definition of pervasive, and also misogynistic ("they should now call it Burger Queen" hurr hurr)

Fear Itself
03-29-2015, 10:27 PM
"Sprinkles are for winners." I love that one, so I guess I would buy Progressive, if I were in the market to change companies.

Eddie F.
03-29-2015, 11:57 PM
I admit to parting with my hard earned cash for both Bioré nose strips (https://youtube.com/watch?v=1Wj0hlcVqRo) and Breathe Right Nasal Strips (https://youtube.com/watch?v=oSDvpTR8svc).

Of course, both were as useful as an ejection seat on a helicopter.

SpoilerVirgin
03-30-2015, 12:04 AM
I'm sitting here in my Isaac Mizrahi sweater, on my bed covered with Isaac Mizrahi sheets and an Isaac Mizrahi quilt. In a little while I will be changing into my Isaac Mizrahi pajamas, and putting on my Isaac Mizrahi bathrobe. On my nightstand I have a box of Isaac Mizrahi Kleenex. I might even wear my Isaac Mizrahi boots tomorrow.

It's not that these aren't all perfectly nice products. But Isaac has sold his name, and I doubt he had much involvement in their design. I just personally enjoy watching him and reading about him, and I genuinely like him, which makes me more inclined to buy something bearing his name.

It's not 100% though. I didn't like the scent of his perfume at all, so that was a "no" for me, even with Isaac's name on it.

russian heel
03-30-2015, 12:22 AM
I ALMOST bought a packet of InVINCEable cleaner at the local grocery store because of the Vince commercials, but after a few pick ups and put downs on the shelf, I ultimately passed.

https://invinceable.com

Hilarity N. Suze
03-30-2015, 01:17 AM
I think I'm more likely NOT to buy something because an ad annoys me, than to have an ad motivate me to buy something. But that could be because I have very simple needs and altogether too much stuff already.

However, I quit buying Quizno's sandwiches after a particularly bad couple of campaigns and it's not very likely I'll go back. And after being a Geico customer for like 15 years I switched because their ads are fucking annoying and it is actually impossible to get certain questions answered by their reps on the phone.

Mr Shine
03-30-2015, 06:26 AM
When compareng car insurance, I used comparison websites, didn't use them all. I ended up using GoCompare as they are functionally identical and I liked the pitchman. I have a feeling that I probably end up buying a lot of fungible goods that are funcionally identical, because of the likibility of the person selling, but I can't think of any other examples.

Urbanredneck
03-30-2015, 06:38 AM
Anymore I'm going to want to go online and check out reviews of the product before I buy no matter how good the commercials are.

not what you'd expect
03-30-2015, 06:45 AM
I don't eat at Carl's Jr. The ads are usually so offensive to me that I have no desire to even give the food a chance.

So, yes, I think the pitch can impact my buying decisions.

Amateur Barbarian
03-30-2015, 09:15 AM
Focusing on ads as the motivation or reason or inspiration to buy things is to miss the point. Ads are as much stalking horses as sales tools.

Hail Ants
03-30-2015, 09:35 AM
Cialis. My fucking God. If I ever need an ED medication, I'm going with Viagra. Or better yet, Levitra. (Viagra ads are pretty bad too but not as bad as Cialis).I still miss the commercials for 'Longitude'!

Best. Boner Pill Name. Ever.

Quimby
03-30-2015, 10:21 AM
When I was a kid there was a ad with a kid who wouldn't eat his lunch until he had some Fritos with it and for some reason that clicked with me and for a long time I had to have Fritos with my sandwich (not on them, just with them).

Hilarity N. Suze
03-31-2015, 01:54 AM
Focusing on ads as the motivation or reason or inspiration to buy things is to miss the point. Ads are as much stalking horses as sales tools.

Stalking horse? As in decoy? As in kind of a front? Please explain.

Amateur Barbarian
03-31-2015, 10:05 AM
Stalking horse? As in decoy? As in kind of a front? Please explain.
The cyclical rage against "advertising" - whether it's defacing billboards, playing AdBuster games or this sort of discussion - is misplaced in that advertising is only a small part of consumer product marketing, and it isn't even the important part.

The marketing industry knows this - has for many decades - and a good part of a major ad campaign is to give consumers a target to "hate" - vent feelings from mild rejection to outright torch mob violence - and deflect attention from the rest of the marketing effort. Ads are crafted as much to be something to laugh at (in the dismissive sense) and take heat from the market audience as they are to serve any of the tired old verities about informing, amusing, advising, notifying.

Most people are right when they say "advertising never makes me buy anything" - but not for the reasons they think they're right. Being "anti-advertising" is somewhere between useless and wearing a KICK ME sign for the marketing industry. You might as well be a pilot trying to shoot every piece of chaff out of the sky. (While the real target slips past, possibly without ever being noticed.)

Chefguy
03-31-2015, 10:16 AM
Anymore I'm going to want to go online and check out reviews of the product before I buy no matter how good the commercials are.

This, in spades. The only influence from a commercial might be in the styling of a car, but to buy something merely because you like the spokesperson is just. . .stupid. Prescription drug commercials are the worst: you can't buy them OTC, and your doctor will prescribe whatever he thinks will work best for you; and most likely, you'll end up with a generic version anyway. I don't understand the deluge of those ads.

Amateur Barbarian
03-31-2015, 10:30 AM
Prescription drug commercials are the worst: you can't buy them OTC, and your doctor will prescribe whatever he thinks will work best for you; and most likely, you'll end up with a generic version anyway. I don't understand the deluge of those ads.
Because they lead to a deluge of people (almost all of them older, with essentially unlimited insurance) demanding those miracle cures from their doctors. Who are already under heavy barrage from the rest of the PharmCo's marketing effort and being all but bribed and coerced to prescribe WondraMaxElite left and right.

Very few drugs that you see in such ads even have generic equivalents; they tend to be the highest-profit, new or at least still-under-patent proprietaries.

There are only two countries on earth that permit DTC - Direct To Consumer - pharma ads. So you can forget about retiring to New Zealand if you wanted to escape them.

D18
03-31-2015, 10:45 AM
The cyclical rage against "advertising" - whether it's defacing billboards, playing AdBuster games or this sort of discussion - is misplaced in that advertising is only a small part of consumer product marketing, and it isn't even the important part.

The marketing industry knows this - has for many decades - and a good part of a major ad campaign is to give consumers a target to "hate" - vent feelings from mild rejection to outright torch mob violence - and deflect attention from the rest of the marketing effort. Ads are crafted as much to be something to laugh at (in the dismissive sense) and take heat from the market audience as they are to serve any of the tired old verities about informing, amusing, advising, notifying.

Most people are right when they say "advertising never makes me buy anything" - but not for the reasons they think they're right. Being "anti-advertising" is somewhere between useless and wearing a KICK ME sign for the marketing industry. You might as well be a pilot trying to shoot every piece of chaff out of the sky. (While the real target slips past, possibly without ever being noticed.)

I've been in marketing research for 20 years, tested a tonne of ads, and never once had heard this as being a motivation for creating an advertisement. Quite the opposite - ad agencies and the client develop a set of objectives for the ad/campaign/whatever, then craft the effort to meet those objectives. Never once have I seen an objective of the ad to be "deflect attention from the rest of the marketing effort and take heat from the market audience".

So, I ask this from a true desire to learn, and I love counter-intuition as much as the next guy, but is this conjecture, or do you have reason to know what you're talking about?

D18
03-31-2015, 10:50 AM
Because they lead to a deluge of people (almost all of them older, with essentially unlimited insurance) demanding those miracle cures from their doctors. Who are already under heavy barrage from the rest of the PharmCo's marketing effort and being all but bribed and coerced to prescribe WondraMaxElite left and right.

Very few drugs that you see in such ads even have generic equivalents; they tend to be the highest-profit, new or at least still-under-patent proprietaries.

There are only two countries on earth that permit DTC - Direct To Consumer - pharma ads. So you can forget about retiring to New Zealand if you wanted to escape them.

Slight nitpick - there are only two countries that permit DTC pharma ads to make claims about the product. Canada allows DTC pharma ads that don't communicate what the product is for.

Son of a Rich
03-31-2015, 11:01 AM
I've been in marketing research for 20 years, tested a tonne of ads, and never once had heard this as being a motivation for creating an advertisement. Quite the opposite - ad agencies and the client develop a set of objectives for the ad/campaign/whatever, then craft the effort to meet those objectives. Never once have I seen an objective of the ad to be "deflect attention from the rest of the marketing effort and take heat from the market audience".

So, I ask this from a true desire to learn, and I love counter-intuition as much as the next guy, but is this conjecture, or do you have reason to know what you're talking about?

I too am curious. They want us to hate "Flo" :confused:

D18
03-31-2015, 11:12 AM
I too am curious. They want us to hate "Flo" :confused:

Well, depends on who "us" is. If by "us" you mean, the general population, then they don't care whether we hate her or not. If by "us" you mean the target they are directing the ad toward, then yes, they care greatly.

DCnDC
03-31-2015, 11:52 AM
Ads are a way for me to learn about the existence of a product or service. Further research and review is required before I will consider purchase of said product or service.

Ads for products I already know exist have zero impact on me.


.

Maserschmidt
03-31-2015, 12:14 PM
I've been in marketing research for 20 years, tested a tonne of ads, and never once had heard this as being a motivation for creating an advertisement. Quite the opposite - ad agencies and the client develop a set of objectives for the ad/campaign/whatever, then craft the effort to meet those objectives. Never once have I seen an objective of the ad to be "deflect attention from the rest of the marketing effort and take heat from the market audience".

So, I ask this from a true desire to learn, and I love counter-intuition as much as the next guy, but is this conjecture, or do you have reason to know what you're talking about?

I have some experience in this area, and also have never heard anyone talk about "deflecting attention." Every meeting I've been in has centered around unaided awareness, brand recognition, and - the holy grail - how to get into the consumer consideration set.

Amateur Barbarian
03-31-2015, 12:39 PM
I've been in marketing research for 20 years, tested a tonne of ads, and never once had heard this as being a motivation for creating an advertisement. Quite the opposite - ad agencies and the client develop a set of objectives for the ad/campaign/whatever, then craft the effort to meet those objectives. Never once have I seen an objective of the ad to be "deflect attention from the rest of the marketing effort and take heat from the market audience".

Marketing has levels of theory and implementation just like any other craft, and that there are many thousands or even millions of those who work at prosaic, everyday levels has nothing to do with the way the industry works at higher levels. Thousands of people formulate Coke every day, and many thousands distribute it, without knowing secret formula 7X.

I have indeed spoken with industry figures who are candid about this alternate focus for major advertising campaigns, and seen white papers and internal memos discussing the connections between ads and an overall marketing plan, all quite baldly putting it much as I put it above.

No one who's taken a few marketing classes and maybe worked around the low level implementation departments has much of a basis for an opinion, any more than an undergrad poli-sci student is ready for the rough and tumble of the state capitol. And I know many who have a decade or two under their belt in the trenches of marketing, and still view it all much the way it's taught in those early classes. It's all about what viewpoint and understanding you need to get your job done.

It's not until you start asking the next level of questions that the real reasons for making, say, Flo an irritating presence become more clear than verities about getting and holding viewer attention and building a company image.


ETA: Make no mistake - this is almost 100% about major, national product campaigns at the highest levels, mostly in fields where deflecting the consumer from thinking about the product and presence too much is a good thing. It doesn't really apply to anything smaller, or to the legion of fairly straightforward, "honest" ads for products that... don't have perceptual problems. You can find traces of the thinking down to, say, regional food campaigns, but in no way read this that your local car dealer's ads are working this way. No matter how much like "Cal Worthington" they may try to be. :)

The Other Waldo Pepper
03-31-2015, 12:44 PM
Let me see if I'm following you: some people are silly enough to buy insurance because they like Flo or the gecko; and some are a little smarter, (a) thinking about how irritating and irrelevant Flo and the gecko are while (b) basing their purchase on who gives them the best return on investment; but truly sharp folks would realize they shouldn't buy insurance at all?

Lowdown
03-31-2015, 12:49 PM
This applies to nearly every interaction I have with beggars. Some of them do a great sell, others are very bad at it. I'll donate for a good one.

RobDog
03-31-2015, 12:59 PM
I too am curious. They want us to hate "Flo" :confused:


... advertising is only a small part of consumer product marketing, and it isn't even the important part.
...
(While the real target slips past, possibly without ever being noticed.)

Like Son of a Rich you've piqued my curiosity too.

What is the "important part" ? What is the "real target"?

D18
03-31-2015, 01:37 PM
Marketing has levels of theory and implementation just like any other craft, and that there are many thousands or even millions of those who work at prosaic, everyday levels has nothing to do with the way the industry works at higher levels. Thousands of people formulate Coke every day, and many thousands distribute it, without knowing secret formula 7X.

I have indeed spoken with industry figures who are candid about this alternate focus for major advertising campaigns, and seen white papers and internal memos discussing the connections between ads and an overall marketing plan, all quite baldly putting it much as I put it above.

No one who's taken a few marketing classes and maybe worked around the low level implementation departments has much of a basis for an opinion, any more than an undergrad poli-sci student is ready for the rough and tumble of the state capitol. And I know many who have a decade or two under their belt in the trenches of marketing, and still view it all much the way it's taught in those early classes. It's all about what viewpoint and understanding you need to get your job done.

It's not until you start asking the next level of questions that the real reasons for making, say, Flo an irritating presence become more clear than verities about getting and holding viewer attention and building a company image.


ETA: Make no mistake - this is almost 100% about major, national product campaigns at the highest levels, mostly in fields where deflecting the consumer from thinking about the product and presence too much is a good thing. It doesn't really apply to anything smaller, or to the legion of fairly straightforward, "honest" ads for products that... don't have perceptual problems. You can find traces of the thinking down to, say, regional food campaigns, but in no way read this that your local car dealer's ads are working this way. No matter how much like "Cal Worthington" they may try to be. :)

OK - you've talked to people and seen documents that are at a higher level than I've been privy to. Fair enough. Just genuinely curious - in what capacity were you given access to these people and documents?

At any rate, can you point us to a publicly accessible case history where "deflecting the consumer from thinking about the product and presence too much is a good thing" or a cite that discusses the theory behind this. I'd genuinely like to understand it better.

Don't get me wrong - I understand fully that there are a variety of ways to achieve the client's goals in advertising and there are times to irritate the consumer, to create an ad that is - on the face of it - stupid, or to do one of a multitude of things that the general audience may not understand the rationale behind. But this whole idea of deflection is new to me, and I would like to know where it's coming from.

Vinyl Turnip
03-31-2015, 01:37 PM
This applies to nearly every interaction I have with beggars. Some of them do a great sell, others are very bad at it. I'll donate for a good one.

I only give to the most incompetent beggars, because the slick ones are overqualified to be beggars.

Crotalus
03-31-2015, 01:46 PM
OK - you've talked to people and seen documents that are at a higher level than I've been privy to. Fair enough. Just genuinely curious - in what capacity were you given access to these people and documents?

At any rate, can you point us to a publicly accessible case history where "deflecting the consumer from thinking about the product and presence too much is a good thing" or a cite that discusses the theory behind this. I'd genuinely like to understand it better.

Don't get me wrong - I understand fully that there are a variety of ways to achieve the client's goals in advertising and there are times to irritate the consumer, to create an ad that is - on the face of it - stupid, or to do one of a multitude of things that the general audience may not understand the rationale behind. But this whole idea of deflection is new to me, and I would like to know where it's coming from.I'm pretty sure someone as important as Amateur Barbarian can't disclose the super-secret stuff he's privy to. We should consider ourselves lucky that he deigned to coyly hint at it.

Claverhouse
03-31-2015, 01:48 PM
Canada allows DTC pharma ads that don't communicate what the product is for.


*Whisper* "Buy This" "You'll be pleasantly surprised" *Whisper*

Maserschmidt
03-31-2015, 01:52 PM
Marketing has levels of theory and implementation just like any other craft, and that there are many thousands or even millions of those who work at prosaic, everyday levels has nothing to do with the way the industry works at higher levels. Thousands of people formulate Coke every day, and many thousands distribute it, without knowing secret formula 7X.

I have indeed spoken with industry figures who are candid about this alternate focus for major advertising campaigns, and seen white papers and internal memos discussing the connections between ads and an overall marketing plan, all quite baldly putting it much as I put it above.

No one who's taken a few marketing classes and maybe worked around the low level implementation departments has much of a basis for an opinion, any more than an undergrad poli-sci student is ready for the rough and tumble of the state capitol. And I know many who have a decade or two under their belt in the trenches of marketing, and still view it all much the way it's taught in those early classes. It's all about what viewpoint and understanding you need to get your job done.

It's not until you start asking the next level of questions that the real reasons for making, say, Flo an irritating presence become more clear than verities about getting and holding viewer attention and building a company image.


ETA: Make no mistake - this is almost 100% about major, national product campaigns at the highest levels, mostly in fields where deflecting the consumer from thinking about the product and presence too much is a good thing. It doesn't really apply to anything smaller, or to the legion of fairly straightforward, "honest" ads for products that... don't have perceptual problems. You can find traces of the thinking down to, say, regional food campaigns, but in no way read this that your local car dealer's ads are working this way. No matter how much like "Cal Worthington" they may try to be. :)

This is utter, Illuminati-quality nonsense. Flo has nearly 5 million likes on Facebook, and more than 5 million friends. That's because Progressive has spent a fantastic amount of money to create brand engagement around Flo, not to make her unlikeable.

Or, more succinctly: "Imagine the number of Facebook likes if they'd tried to make her likeable!"

D18
03-31-2015, 01:59 PM
*Whisper* "Buy This" "You'll be pleasantly surprised" *Whisper*

The irony is that in Canada, pharma companies that make products that everyone knows what they're for has it better off than the US. They can advertise the product by name, build a brand identity and all that good stuff, but don't have to list all the nasty side effects like they do in the States.

Of course, this only works for a very small number of products and doesn't do any good for drug brands that aren't well known.

lieu
03-31-2015, 02:13 PM
"Sprinkles are for winners." I love that one, so I guess I would buy Progressive, if I were in the market to change companies.That is a kick butt commercial, the lighting, grainy film, locker room feel, the delivery. My favorite go with the Flo moment. Like TriPolar it's probably going to take a lot more than an amusing commercial to sway me in an insurance purchase (my agent and I discuss a number of factors in the bundle) but I am planning on going to a Fiesta supermarket to buy some homemade tamale fixins just because it's got a sharp dressed Billy Gibbons as pitchman (http://lockebryan.com/fiesta-billy-gibbons-tamale-cooking/). Have mercy.

Son of a Rich
03-31-2015, 02:22 PM
This is utter, Illuminati-quality nonsense. Flo has nearly 5 million likes on Facebook, and more than 5 million friends.


That's pretty sad. I've never felt bad for 5 million people before, and I don't like it.

Crotalus
03-31-2015, 02:31 PM
That is a kick butt commercial, the lighting, grainy film, locker room feel, the delivery. My favorite go with the Flo moment. Like TriPolar it's probably going to take a lot more than an amusing commercial to sway me in an insurance purchase (my agent and I discuss a number of factors in the bundle) but I am planning on going to a Fiesta supermarket to buy some homemade tamale fixins just because it's got a sharp dressed Billy Gibbons as pitchman (http://lockebryan.com/fiesta-billy-gibbons-tamale-cooking/). Have mercy.Have mercy, indeed. That is a product I would buy because of the pitchman. No markets near me, unfortunately.

Master Wang-Ka
03-31-2015, 02:36 PM
Trouble is, I used to BE a salesman, and if a pitch isn't working and the salesman just keeps pushing it, this is a sure way to get me to leave. Then again, the hard sell has never been my favorite approach.

I also do NOT respond well to the Opportunity Pitch. Every time I shop at Target, the clerk at the till asks some variation of the phrase, "I have to try to get you to sign up for a Target card, therefore we must have this little exchange whether you want one or not, although I will drop the subject like a hot rock if you say no," and I refrain from screaming in the checker's face because her bosses make her do it and it's not her fault.

It has, however, kept me out of Target except when it's necessary to avoid Wal-Mart.

Bam Boo Gut
03-31-2015, 02:51 PM
That is a kick butt commercial, the lighting, grainy film, locker room feel, the delivery. My favorite go with the Flo moment. Like TriPolar it's probably going to take a lot more than an amusing commercial to sway me in an insurance purchase (my agent and I discuss a number of factors in the bundle) but I am planning on going to a Fiesta supermarket to buy some homemade tamale fixins just because it's got a sharp dressed Billy Gibbons as pitchman (http://lockebryan.com/fiesta-billy-gibbons-tamale-cooking/). Have mercy.

Unless like me you thought she was saying 'sprinkles are for women' :smack:

Claverhouse
03-31-2015, 02:53 PM
That's pretty sad. I've never felt bad for 5 million people before, and I don't like it.


Buying Facebook likes is pretty simple (http://buylikes.reviews/), even leaders of countries do it --- $20 per 1000 is reasonable --- not that a reputable insurance company would sink so low.

Crotalus
03-31-2015, 02:58 PM
Buying Facebook likes is pretty simple (http://buylikes.reviews/), even leaders of countries do it --- $20 per 1000 is reasonable --- not that a reputable insurance company would sink so low.I think it is pretty likely that those likes are legit. I think a lot of people really enjoy the Flo ads.

AHunter3
03-31-2015, 03:31 PM
Another one here for whom the most likely outcome to remembered ad pitches is aversion to the product.

I'm one of those annoyingly sanctimonious non-TV-watchers so the products I recoil from because of their ads are mostly still reaping the harvest of ads they put on TV decades ago: MacDonalds, Procter & Gamble, Pepto-Bismol, ... if I were in the market for stereo equipment and the guy were still in business, I'd not be buying mine from Crazy Eddie... I'm a bit past the target audience for toy purchases but mine would not be from Mattel... etc

Maserschmidt
03-31-2015, 03:41 PM
Buying Facebook likes is pretty simple (http://buylikes.reviews/), even leaders of countries do it --- $20 per 1000 is reasonable --- not that a reputable insurance company would sink so low.

No, they wouldn't, because it would be a terrible investment - their FacebookEdgeRank (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EdgeRank) would be incredibly low, and the content Progressive wants circulated would not get circulated.

eclectic wench
03-31-2015, 04:07 PM
Over here there's a cleaning fluid called Cillit Bang. For a while their entire ad campaign consisted of some guy shouting at you

HI I'M BARRY SCOTT CILLIT BANG IS AMAZING BECAUSE BLAH BLAH BLAH BUY CILLIT BANG

while you frantically lunged for the sound button on your remote.

I still don't know who the fuck Barry Scott is or why I should care what he thinks. I do know I will never, ever, ever be buying Cillit Bang.

buddy431
03-31-2015, 04:31 PM
Everyone says advertising doesn't affect them or turns them off to a product, but it obviously works for some people. There are genuinely bad ad campaigns that turn people off to a product, but Flo is not one of them.

I have Geico insurance. It's not that I particularly like the Gecko, but it sure made me know about them. When it came time to buy insurance, they gave me a pretty good rate, and I recognized the name, so they're who I went with.

Drunky Smurf
04-01-2015, 02:07 PM
Over here there's a cleaning fluid called Cillit Bang...

CILLIT BANG IS AMAZING...CILLIT BANG
...Cillit Bang.

This is the cleverest product name ever. I'm sure most males see that name as "Clit Bang". So their brains automatically go, "Yes please." Also the cleverest ad ever. It does not need fancy advertising. Its' name alone sells it. So a guy shouting its' name at you so you want him to shut up makes you do a Fry from Futurama and your brain says, "SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!."

https://youtube.com/watch?v=8QfSzgV1q5g

eclectic wench
04-01-2015, 06:35 PM
*snort*

The only thing is that you don't see the product name, just hear it, and it's pronounced 'SILL-it Bang' (except with the volume up to eleven), not 'Kill-IT Bang'. So I'm not sure the subliminal message would really make it in there.

Voyager
04-01-2015, 08:09 PM
The pitch can make me not be interested, especially if it is full of holes in logic. The pitchperson won't affect me at all, I've sat in enough casting directors waiting rooms to see the actor or actress as someone who needs to eat.
The Flo character is annoying, but doesn't affect me. The Erin Esurance character might have been too attractive. If the kind of stuff that sprung up around her has sprung up around Flo I don't want to know about it.

lieu
04-02-2015, 08:07 AM
The Flo character is annoying, but doesn't affect me. The Erin Esurance character might have been too attractive. If the kind of stuff that sprung up around her has sprung up around Flo I don't want to know about it.Woah, I had no idea that (http://cbsnews.com/news/esurance-axes-erin-after-the-secret-agent-took-on-an-x-rated-life-of-her-own/) had even happened. The concept that companies let go of their brand and let consumers own them... it'll be interesting to see where that goes and who participates in the process.

pulykamell
04-02-2015, 08:45 AM
I think it is pretty likely that those likes are legit. I think a lot of people really enjoy the Flo ads.

She sure seemed to have her fans here at the SDMB (http://boards.academicpursuits.us/sdmb/showthread.php?t=513859) back in the day. I don't mind Flo. And, heck, I like the Geico ads. They're one of the few ads I tune in to watch.

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