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Cardigan
12-10-2015, 12:02 PM
I guess there are two dominant schools of thought where MASH is concerned: those who think the earlier seasons were better and those who find the later seasons better (and a third group that thinks the show sucked from start to finish - damn those idiots driving AC Nielsen ratings....;))

For my part I prefer the latter half of the show's run. I cheered the day they got rid of the Frank Burns character (start of season 6) and replaced him with Major Winchester - a much better foil, who could actually hit back rather than being a pathetic loser with no redeeming qualities.

How do you think the characters compared?
Frank Burns vs Charles Winchester
Henry Blake vs Sherman Potter?
Trapper John vs BJ Honeycutt?
dress-wearing Klinger vs "serious" Klinger?

Lastly, for the benefit of those who despise the show, do you think it would have been better if they did without all the sanctimonious preaching and just stuck with the original (Robert Altman) formula you saw in the movie?

RealityChuck
12-10-2015, 12:13 PM
It's not a matter of characters, but as scripts. Their best scripts bridged both casts, but the show did jump the shark toward the end.

The loss of Radar also hurt the show. Klinger was better in a dress and better as a minor character.

Robert Altman thought the movie was something of an antiwar film, but it wasn't. It actually was a service comedy akin to Martin and Lewis's At War with the Army. I didn't mind the TV show having a point of view, and it could be used effectively, but it could also be cringeworthy.

Just Asking Questions
12-10-2015, 12:21 PM
In your comparisons, I go for the latter in all choices. If you had a choice for "no Hawkeye", I'd take that in any season! :)

Don't forget there really are three breakdowns: early, early season 1 was much more like the movie. Different tone, more characters. I personally didn't like it as much. (And the fourth breakdown would be the "sanctimonious" episodes, but they're everywhere).

Inner Stickler
12-10-2015, 12:23 PM
I tend toward preferring the latter half of the series. I prefer Winchester to Burns, Honeycutt to Trapper and Potter to Blake. I tended to like Klinger regardless of whether he was 'crazy' or the replacement Radar.

I agree that Winchester was a better foil. It was far more satisfying to see him lose because sometimes he won. I also watched the show almost exclusively as a child and the hypocrisy of Burns' affair with Houlihan bothered me deeply so I appreciated him being replaced with someone lacking that baggage. While Blake's inability to command effectively was amusing, I found Potter's grandfatherly attitude and homespun efficiency to be more attractive. I also liked Houlihan getting to develop her character more and I thought the more nuanced major in the later seasons was far more interesting to watch.

GreenElf
12-10-2015, 12:58 PM
Frank Burns>Charles Winchester

Burns' character was more in line with the original comedic formula. I liked his character up until season 4-5 when the support of Henry Blake and Hot Lips was removed. Without any support from above, his character became to weak vs. the captains and had to be replaced by a more worthy adversary. Which in turn brought Winchester. I liked his scripts in his first season (6), but the show declined in subsequent seasons.

Henry Blake>Sherman Potter

Same as Burns, his character was more in line with the original comedic MASH, and provided some degree of support to the Burns character. Also, he was originally slated to be the leading character and didn't come across as much like a grandfather as the old windbag Sherman Potter, though I liked Potter more in season 4 than subsequent seasons.

Trapper John=BJ Honeycutt

I don't really have a preference between the two although pre-mustached Honeycutt>mustached Honeycutt.

Klinger's cross-dressing was kind of funny the first few seasons, but it grows old after awhile so I didn't mind when he started playing it straight.

Seasons 1-4, 6 and 8 are my favorite as season 5 was the lame duck season for Burns and season 8 beats season 7 in terms of scripts. Seasons 9-11 had a few good episodes each but aren't really essential though I watched them at the time so they do have some nostalgia value. By the time Colonel Potter was wearing hawaiian shirts as much as Pierce, the show had gone downhill.

As for Pierce, his "preachy" liberal slant that many loathe was actually in place from the get-go, season 1, but didn't eclipse the comedy until later seasons.

Laggard
12-10-2015, 01:31 PM
Winchester was just a fish out of water character. Burns was a distillation of all that is silly and messed up with military culture.

My favorite seasons are 1-4. When Radar left that was pretty much the end of the show.

I've seen all episodes so many times now that I can tell when to keep turning the channel. Mustached BJ = find something else to watch. Klinger in Mudhens uniform = find something else to watch.

cmkeller
12-10-2015, 01:38 PM
I like Winchester way better than I like Burns, and Potter way better than Blake. Trapper vs BJ is pretty much a wash, but I have a slight preference for BJ, who was significantly different from Hawkeye rather than just being a second Hawkeye in the cast. Wacky Klinger was way more fun to watch than Responsible Klinger.

The anti-war preaching was really over-the-top. They acted like no one in the Army in the 1950s could coherently justify the US's involvement in protecting South Korea from North Korea. It got to the point where, in one episode, Colonel Potter, who's a career army man, breaks down crying to "stop this stupid war!" Obviously, it's a Vietnam-era sensibility superimposed on a Korean setting, but it got way out of hand.

What really hurt the later seasons was that the writers seemed to forget how to end an episode with a decent punch line.

Scumpup
12-10-2015, 01:46 PM
I don't really prefer any of the characters over others. What I will say is that episodes that had a minimum of Radar, Klinger, and Hotlips are preferred. Episodes where Alan Alda was still on a leash are preferred. "Message" episodes should be avoided.

DrFidelius
12-10-2015, 01:51 PM
I always felt the casting/ character changes were all for the better, however the better stories happened earlier.

madsircool
12-10-2015, 02:22 PM
It's not a matter of characters, but as scripts. Their best scripts bridged both casts, but the show did jump the shark toward the end.

The loss of Radar also hurt the show. Klinger was better in a dress and better as a minor character.

Robert Altman thought the movie was something of an antiwar film, but it wasn't. It actually was a service comedy akin to Martin and Lewis's At War with the Army. I didn't mind the TV show having a point of view, and it could be used effectively, but it could also be cringeworthy.
Lol..a service comedy. The movie was a dark comedy about the tragedy and boredom of war. Imagine the stress of 12 hours of basically life and death surgery? No way to battle the stress and boredom excepting alcohol, sex and hijinks.

Imo it was far better than the tv show because it didnt romanticize the characters nor the situation. It was human beings trying to make it through a horrendous period in their lives.

silenus
12-10-2015, 02:23 PM
^^^This. (Reply to DrFidelius) But the characters that remained throughout the run of the show got progressively worse as time went on. Army Margaret was a lot more fun than Compassionate Margaret, just like Drag Klinger was more fun than Vanilla Klinger.

Johnny Bravo
12-10-2015, 02:42 PM
Winchester and Potter were actual characters while Burns and Blake were caricatures. The transition was necessary to keep the show going - you can only have so much distilled silliness. Winchester and Potter were great straightmen to the Hawkeye and Honeycutt.

But really, I don't judge the show in terms of which characters were around. I think the quality of the show was inversely proportional to how much creative control Alan Alda had. The longer it wore on, the worse it got.

Kimballkid
12-10-2015, 02:47 PM
As stated above, as Alan Alda got more creative control and pushed his agenda the show got preachy and declined dramatically.

That said, I liked Potter over Blake, Winchester over Burns, Hunnicut and McIntyre were pretty much a wash, the two Klingers were pretty much a wash too. I did prefer early Radar over later Radar when they dumbed him down. And I prefer Radar in general over Klinger.

Laggard
12-10-2015, 06:59 PM
Winchester and Potter were actual characters while Burns and Blake were caricatures. The transition was necessary to keep the show going - you can only have so much distilled silliness. Winchester and Potter were great straightmen to the Hawkeye and Honeycutt.


You don't think Winchester was simply a caricature of a upper class Bostonian Yaleman.

Hail Ants
12-10-2015, 07:38 PM
You don't think Winchester was simply a caricature of a upper class Bostonian Yaleman.I was a kid through most of the show's run and the first time I saw/heard David Ogden Stiers speak in his normal, non-BAAASTEN accent (in a PBS documentary about the show) it was almost as much of a shock as the first time I heard House's Hugh Laurie speak with his native British accent! Almost, as when you're a kid these things are harder to grasp. Interestingly, Stiers went on to do a lot of voice over work for PBS shows.

I definitely liked Winchester more than Burns, as once Hot Lips left him he became a lonely, pathetic yet unsympathetic, disturbing, semi-psychotic character. And although as a kid I liked BJ, when watching the show later on I found his whole 'nice guy' persona to be more a deliberately limp, milquetoast sidekick to not get in Alda's way. Wayne Rogers had much more personality. And the reason he quit is he saw that he was only ever going to be second banana to Alda.

And although the phrase wasn't around back then, once Houlihan's hair turned silver it had jumped the shark. Actually it was a while before that. They turned her and Winchester into total 'good guys' always on the same side as Hawkeye and BJ, and the show had absolutely no conflict left. That's when it became the Alan Alda soapbox show...

zbuzz
12-10-2015, 09:32 PM
"A guy crying about a chicken and a baby? I thought this was a comedy show."

BigT
12-10-2015, 10:52 PM
Huh. I was going to say I didn't know, but then I realized that I liked all the later characters better. So I guess I like the later version better. Though I did prefer when Radar was present. And I didn't like when the show got too maudlin.

BigBlue
12-10-2015, 11:03 PM
Robert Altman, who directed the movie, referred to the actor who played Hawkeye on TV as "Alan Albert, or whatever his name was."

#FunFact Robert's son Mike made more money writing the lyrics to the theme song than dad did for directing it.

Ike Witt
12-10-2015, 11:13 PM
The bottom line is that the show, no matter how great it was, was on too long. They told some very good stories but there was no more war, the show lasted longer than the war. And long before the end all the character development that could be done had been done.

Col. Flagg and Dr. Freeman and any other recurring characters were wrung dry by the end as well.

The patient/observer with the guitar. He had a bunch of episodes that were all directed by the same guy. I hated those.

aceplace57
12-10-2015, 11:48 PM
Frank and Margaret were great characters in the early seasons. They weren't interesting after Potter took command. He was too experienced an officer to listen to their complaints about the Doctors.

Winchester was a very good character. I soon liked him better than Frank. Margaret got pretty bland in the later seasons. There just wasn't much for her to do in the stories.

Klinger was best in a dress.

aceplace57
12-11-2015, 12:31 AM
Would you agree that Hot Lips Houlihan was miscast in the tv show? Sally Kellerman oozed sexuality. It was always a trademark of her characters.

Loretta Swit seemed too reserved. I never believed she'd carry on with Frank Burns. She just didn't carry herself like someone that would get the nickname Hot Lips. The make out scenes with Frank seemed awkward and forced.

Swit did a good job and eventually made the role her own. The Hot Lips references quickly disappeared. All the characters called her Margaret. I've wondered how things would have worked if they would have cast a real sex pot in the role. Teresa Ganzel or Loni Anderson maybe.

BigBlue
12-11-2015, 01:09 AM
I've wondered how things would have worked if they would have cast a real sex pot in the role [of Hotlips]. Teresa Ganzel or Loni Anderson maybe.

Ganzel was 15.

GuanoLad
12-11-2015, 01:16 AM
The early seasons were a bit too silly, the later seasons were a bit too dramatic. I prefer the AF era to the BC era. But it peaked in the middle, when everyone was still playful, but the plots were more involving.

*AF = After Frank; BC = Before Charles

BigT
12-11-2015, 01:27 AM
The early seasons were a bit too silly, the later seasons were a bit too dramatic. I prefer the AF era to the BC era. But it peaked in the middle, when everyone was still playful, but the plots were more involving.

*AF = After Frank; BC = Before Charles

That may be where I am, too.

aceplace57
12-11-2015, 01:48 AM
Ganzel was 15.
I don't recall the names of the sexy actresses working in 1972. But, there were quite a few. I remember that Ganzel was popular in the 1970's. Apparently, that was the late 1970's, and she was a few years too young for MASH.

Ranger Jeff
12-11-2015, 04:23 AM
Yeah, as the show progressed and Alda got more control, it got way too preachy. I've been rewatching the complete series. I'm up to season 7. There are times I really wish Pierce would just shut up. Winchester is a much better foil for Pierce than Burns. Houlihan always reminds me of Miss Piggy. Not her looks, but her attitude. Potter was a much better CO than Blake. Hunnicut versus McIntire? shrug. Occasionally B.J. would go on a prank spree and he was good at those. Trapper, on the other hand, would occasionally grab Margaret and lay a big smooch on her that would leave her limp. I preferred movie Radar over TV Radar completely. Cross-dressing Klinger was good in small doses, but they rode that one-trick pony way too long.

The occasional guitar strumming doctor (Capt Spaulding) was played by Loudon Wainwright III. I've got a couple of his albums; they're not that bad if you're in the mood for a singer/songwriters on acoustic guitar.

Yeah, it's a helluva stretch going 11 seasons about a war (or police action) that lasted 3 years. But that's the standard TV time warp. How long did the gang from Happy Days or That 70s Show spend in high school? Oh, and one thing that always bugs me in films and TV about the military is that the haircuts are usually incredibly wrong. In the latter seasons of Black Sheep Squadron, Conrad's son played one of the pilots and his hair was halfway covering his ears. Acceptable in 1970s civilian world but NOT in the Marines in 1944.

Johnny Bravo
12-11-2015, 08:04 AM
You don't think Winchester was simply a caricature of a upper class Bostonian Yaleman.

Of course he was a caricature, but he wasn't simply a caricature. He was an actual character with his own story arcs. Burns and Blake (and to a lesser extent early Margaret) weren't characters at all; they were just collections of jokes for Pierce to play off of. This worked fine for a while, but moving to more complete characters in Winchester and Potter was a really good move and kept the show interesting for a little while longer.

Tom Tildrum
12-11-2015, 08:32 AM
The show flipped its basic message, from "look how cold and dehumanizing war is," to "look how we built a warm family during war."

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
12-11-2015, 08:34 AM
The patient/observer with the guitar. He had a bunch of episodes that were all directed by the same guy. I hated those.

Loudon "Dead Skunk" Wainwright III? I thought he was only ever in two episodes, although Wiki tells me it was three.

Knowed Out
12-11-2015, 03:03 PM
I prefered Winchester over Burns mostly, but after watching the reruns, Burns is a lot funnier than I realized. He always felt like he had to justify his manhood because he really knew he was a cowardly weasel, so he gloated in any situation where he came out on top, no matter how despicable he appeared. He gladly capitulated (and copulated) with Margaret's patriotism because it made him look like a stud.

I think my favorite Frank moment is when Hawkeye got worried when he heard his dad was in surgery, so he took out his frustrations on everybody around him. He woke up Frank and asked him where he was from, because he was wanting to dull his worry with nostalgia. Frank told him Fort Wayne Indiana and snarled at him to go back to bed. Hawkeye instead reminisced about Crabapple Cove Maine, population 2300 or some small amount, and Frank propped back up and said "Fort Wayne's bigger than that" in the same tone of voice as "Nanny nanny boo boo!"

I had a theory about BJ that he was secretly jealous of Trapper, much like a sibling rivalry, even though the two never met. I felt vindicated when he tearfully confessed that to Hawkeye. Before that episode, I always looked for signs that BJ wanted to be better than Trapper. He wanted to be the carefree lothario, but held his marriage vows as sacred, so he made up for it by being the sneaky instigator. He wanted somebody to say "Gosh, you're much better than Trapper ever was," but it never happened because everybody had already moved on without him, except for that one episode where they reminisced about his practical jokes. BJ felt determined to upstage him because of sheer jealousy.

Typo Negative
12-11-2015, 03:07 PM
I could not handle the Burns character. He was too much of a boob to be Major. In the film, Burns was an incompetent doctor but had force of will and that gave him a sense of menace. He could at least give the appearance of competence. TV Burns announces his boobery to every new character withing 5 seconds.

Kimballkid
12-11-2015, 03:38 PM
I was a kid through most of the show's run and the first time I saw/heard David Ogden Stiers speak in his normal, non-BAAASTEN accent (in a PBS documentary about the show) it was almost as much of a shock as the first time I heard House's Hugh Laurie speak with his native British accent! Almost, as when you're a kid these things are harder to grasp. Interestingly, Stiers went on to do a lot of voice over work for PBS shows.

You want a real shock, watch the movie Better Off Dead. Stiers plays the father in that and it's bizarre.

Col. Flagg and Dr. Freeman and any other recurring characters were wrung dry by the end as well.

Dr. Sydney Freedman not Freeman.

Totenfeier
12-11-2015, 03:40 PM
The way I've always thought of it is that, as the show went on, everybody stopped speaking dialogue and started speaking litt'ra'chure. The sheer sanctimoniousness got increasingly hard to bear.

SCAdian
12-13-2015, 12:52 AM
How do you think the characters compared?
Frank Burns vs Charles Winchester
Henry Blake vs Sherman Potter?
Trapper John vs BJ Honeycutt?

I thought all three of those replacements were improvements (especially trading Ferretface for Charles).

SCAdian
12-13-2015, 12:55 AM
You want a real shock, watch the movie Better Off Dead. Stiers plays the father in that and it's bizarre.
That's nothing - Kim Darby (the girl in the original True Grit) played the mother....

kiz
12-13-2015, 04:14 AM
Later seasons, no question. I hated Alda's preachiness too, but by then I'd been watching every week since the beginning so I wouldn't fully pay attention.

Somebody upthread said that the earlier cast, while being truer to the movie, were merely caricatures. I agree, Even after all these years I find that Hawkeye and Trapper incredibly annoying, especially with the laugh track. Frank Burns is a slapstick foil. You also wonder why Hot Lips is having an affair with him (well, I did, but granted I was a kid when MASH first started airing so I didn't quite understand). I didn't find Col. Blake particularly funny.

MASH started being interesting to watch when the producers dropped the slapstick quality and let the characters develop into actual people. Yeah, Klinger was comic relief, but he too had his own arc. even if it wasn't as developed as the others'.

I loved Sidney Freeman and Col, Flagg. I remember being all can't-miss-this if either of them were on.

Urbanredneck
12-13-2015, 05:49 AM
I read the actor who played Frank Burns was really, truly hated off the set just as much. That's why we never had an episode where Frank was redeemed or did anything good.

In the early seasons it seems comedy was the focus. But at the end they were scraping by looking for something to base an episode around. They really should have just pulled the plug around season 6.

GreenElf
12-13-2015, 08:51 AM
I read the actor who played Frank Burns was really, truly hated off the set just as much. That's why we never had an episode where Frank was redeemed or did anything good.

In the early seasons it seems comedy was the focus. But at the end they were scraping by looking for something to base an episode around. They really should have just pulled the plug around season 6.

I hadn't heard they hated Larry Linville. So they should have stopped the show when they finally got rid of Linville, the actor they despised? :confused: I guess hindsight is 20/20.

Johnny Bravo
12-13-2015, 09:36 AM
I read the actor who played Frank Burns was really, truly hated off the set just as much. That's why we never had an episode where Frank was redeemed or did anything good.

Did a little internet googling on this.

The Wikipedia articles for both Linville and the show don't mention anything about that. It says that Linville had a five-year contract and declined to continue the role when they offered to renew it for two more years.

Harry Morgan (Potter) apparently said something to the effect that everyone loved Linville, but absolutely despised Burns. I'm sure playing an irredeemable character took its toll after a while, but by all accounts he was one of the few actors who didn't cause problems on the set.

Apparently Gary Burghoff (Radar) was extraordinarily difficult and disliked.

Laggard
12-13-2015, 01:32 PM
I think it was a great comedy but a mediocre drama which is why earlier seasons are generally better.

Urbanredneck
12-14-2015, 12:20 AM
Did a little internet googling on this.

The Wikipedia articles for both Linville and the show don't mention anything about that. It says that Linville had a five-year contract and declined to continue the role when they offered to renew it for two more years.

Harry Morgan (Potter) apparently said something to the effect that everyone loved Linville, but absolutely despised Burns. I'm sure playing an irredeemable character took its toll after a while, but by all accounts he was one of the few actors who didn't cause problems on the set.

Apparently Gary Burghoff (Radar) was extraordinarily difficult and disliked.Well Gary Burghoff they say was tired of the Radar character and who wouldnt? The young virgin with his teddy bear. Plus he was the sole holdover from the MASH movie and he thought his character should have had more prominence.

What I dont get about Harry Morgan is his first appearance was this racist general just visiting and then they decide to make him the new colonel?

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
12-14-2015, 12:27 AM
What I dont get about Harry Morgan is his first appearance was this racist general just visiting and then they decide to make him the new colonel?

Yeah, it was kind of unfortunate that he had already made such a memorable appearance as a different character. It was bad enough that we had to stop thinking of him as the guy from Dragnet!

Kimballkid
12-14-2015, 12:38 PM
Sidney Freeman

Freedman

Skywatcher
12-14-2015, 12:47 PM
MASH started being interesting to watch when the producers dropped the slapstick quality and let the characters develop into actual people. Yeah, Klinger was comic relief, but he too had his own arc. even if it wasn't as developed as the others'.Klinger really came into his own as The Scrounger, even outdoing Radar.

Pity his best lines from that episode have been excised to fit in more commercials.

Knowed Out
12-15-2015, 09:51 AM
Did a little internet googling on this.

The Wikipedia articles for both Linville and the show don't mention anything about that. It says that Linville had a five-year contract and declined to continue the role when they offered to renew it for two more years.

Sometimes Linville didn't show up for the read-throughs because he got tired of being put down all the time. The writers hardly ever gave Frank a chance to redeem himself, so he didn't care for being constantly reviled. Charles at least got to put in his share of good deeds, so maybe the writers learned something from that.

Loach
12-15-2015, 10:43 AM
The best character by far was Captain Tuttle. Spearchucker Jones was second.

Ike Witt
12-15-2015, 03:27 PM
What did happen to Spearchucker Jones? Is he trapped in the same attic as Chuck Cunningham?

Ranger Jeff
12-15-2015, 04:02 PM
What did happen to Spearchucker Jones? Is he trapped in the same attic as Chuck Cunningham?

They ended up as roommates, I believe. They adopted the Brady's dog, Tiger.

Kimballkid
12-15-2015, 04:39 PM
That's probably one crowded apartment.

Jim's Son
01-02-2016, 12:08 PM
You want a real shock, watch the movie Better Off Dead. Stiers plays the father in that and it's bizarre.



Dr. Sydney Freedman not Freeman.

Another shock is Stiers appeared as Scott Woodville, the head operative of the Townsend Detective Agency, in the pilot film for "Charlie's Angels" in March, 1976. Bosley (David Doyle) was his bumbling assistant. Apparently audiences didn't react like his character so when it went to a series, they got rid of Woodville, made Bosley more competent and promoted him. I'd say it worked out well for Stiers. Comedies usually do better in syndication than dramas (if we can call a show featuring women without bras as a drama).

Little Nemo
01-02-2016, 12:53 PM
What did happen to Spearchucker Jones? Is he trapped in the same attic as Chuck Cunningham?They ended up as roommates, I believe. They adopted the Brady's dog, Tiger.That's probably one crowded apartment.I think Mandy Hampton's in there too.

Little Nemo
01-02-2016, 12:58 PM
Another shock is Stiers appeared as Scott Woodville, the head operative of the Townsend Detective Agency, in the pilot film for "Charlie's Angels" in March, 1976. Bosley (David Doyle) was his bumbling assistant. Apparently audiences didn't react like his character so when it went to a series, they got rid of Woodville, made Bosley more competent and promoted him. I'd say it worked out well for Stiers. Comedies usually do better in syndication than dramas (if we can call a show featuring women without bras as a drama).The weird thing is I can remember watching the pilot and I remember the character of Woodville but I hadn't realized it was Stiers playing him.

burpo the wonder mutt
01-02-2016, 01:25 PM
I think Mandy Hampton's in there too.

Along with Donna Pinciotti's younger sister.

lo12
03-04-2016, 10:55 PM
I'm surprised at the number of people who vote for later seasons. For me, the initial cast was pure comic gold. The Blake-Hawkeye-Trapper-Burns dynamic was hysterical, and the rest of the cast, in my memory at least, never hit a false note. Some episodes were better than others, but I loved the show most when it was FUN. During the early years, I really don't think anybody who watched it was under the impression that the moral of the show was about anything but the senseless destruction of Vietnam. We got it. And it was powerful. But it was able to carry that moral without beating us over the head with it like it did in the joyless, ultra-self-serious later seasons. Some of those episodes were just exhausting. And soon after Hunnicutt showed up, the lines he got were so unbelievably lame that it felt like they had a special intern writer or something that was just in charge of his dialogue. His lines started tanking almost every good line Alda would get off. It was a terrible thing to witness!:smack:

Richard John Marcej
03-04-2016, 11:51 PM
You want a real shock, watch the movie Better Off Dead. Stiers plays the father in that and it's bizarre.


Another shock is Stiers appeared as Scott Woodville, the head operative of the Townsend Detective Agency, in the pilot film for "Charlie's Angels" in March, 1976. Bosley (David Doyle) was his bumbling assistant. Apparently audiences didn't react like his character so when it went to a series, they got rid of Woodville, made Bosley more competent and promoted him. I'd say it worked out well for Stiers. Comedies usually do better in syndication than dramas (if we can call a show featuring women without bras as a drama).

No, No, No, NO!

Everyone knows the weirdest, oddest most bizarre performance/appearance by David Ogden Stiers was as J'onn J'onzz / Martian Manhunter in the 1997 film Justice League of America. http://imdb.com/title/tt0118365/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_73

If you ever want to see the Martian Manhunter with a large gut....

Guest-starring: Id!
03-05-2016, 12:51 AM
Finest alltime TV character -

Colonel Flagg

Well, next to Jerry Hubbard.

Northern Piper
03-05-2016, 09:38 AM
You don't think Winchester was simply a caricature of a upper class Bostonian Yaleman.

Please! Haavahd!

Yale is that down-market school near New York.

:p

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