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View Full Version : What's your normal name for a Flat Cap?


Zeldar
03-16-2016, 01:00 PM
There must be dozens of names for the Flat Cap (https://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0LEV2CykOlWM1QAfV1XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE0aGgwa3JwBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDQjE1NjNfMQRzZW MDcGl2cw--?p=flat+cap&fr=yfp-t-201&fr2=piv-web) so which one is your usual one?

SanVito
03-16-2016, 01:04 PM
Er, what's wrong with 'flat cap'?

I can't off hand think of any other words for it.

kayaker
03-16-2016, 01:04 PM
My gf brought me one back from Ireland. I look great in it. I call it my Irish cap.

DrFidelius
03-16-2016, 01:09 PM
Flat cap.

Unless it has a pom-pom on the top. Then it is a tam.

DCnDC
03-16-2016, 01:12 PM
That's usually a "newsboy"; occasionally it's a "golf cap."

Kamino Neko
03-16-2016, 01:13 PM
Salt and Pepper Cap, though that really refers to ones with a particular fabric pattern, it's the name in my head for the style in general.

Zeldar
03-16-2016, 01:13 PM
Er, what's wrong with 'flat cap'?

I can't off hand think of any other words for it.

Neat you should ask, because it was only the other day that I first saw Flat Cap (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flat_cap) referred to as such. Of the names in that article, I think I would have used driving cap or Newsboy cap to distinguish the style, although I had always heard snap-brim before that other day.

Since I educated myself on the topic, I wondered how many others have their own names for such headgear.

Zeldar
03-16-2016, 01:15 PM
Flat cap.

Unless it has a pom-pom on the top. Then it is a tam.

For my own usage, a tam without a pom-pom is a beret. No brim.

running coach
03-16-2016, 01:17 PM
I always knew it as a driving cap.

missred
03-16-2016, 01:19 PM
I've always known it as a newsboy. I knew instinctively which style you meant with the term "flat cap" though, without ever having heard it used.

Timchik
03-16-2016, 01:24 PM
I like the Russian term for them - aerodrome (https://google.ca/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1507&bih=799&q=%D0%B0&oq=%D0%B0&gs_l=img.3..0l10.3719.6450.0.7127.6.4.2.0.0.0.174.458.1j3.4.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.6.464.cejFut6xe Tw#hl=en&tbm=isch&q=%D0%BA%D0%B5%D0%BF%D0%BA%D0%B0+%D0%B0%D1%8D%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B4%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%BC) [кепка аэродром]. Stereotypically worn by Georgians or Azerbaijanis.

Zeldar
03-16-2016, 01:27 PM
I like the Russian term for them - aerodrome (https://google.ca/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1507&bih=799&q=%D0%B0&oq=%D0%B0&gs_l=img.3..0l10.3719.6450.0.7127.6.4.2.0.0.0.174.458.1j3.4.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.6.464.cejFut6xe Tw#hl=en&tbm=isch&q=%D0%BA%D0%B5%D0%BF%D0%BA%D0%B0+%D0%B0%D1%8D%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B4%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%BC) [кепка аэродром]. Stereotypically worn by Georgians or Azerbaijanis.

Damn if there aren't some extreme examples there! :D

DrCube
03-16-2016, 01:28 PM
Flat cap is a generic term. It could be a newsboy cap (https://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=newsboy%20cap&tbs=imgo:1), a driving cap (https://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=driving%20cap&tbs=imgo:1) (golf cap), a floppy baseball cap (https://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=early%20baseball%20cap&tbs=imgo:1), or one of those new kinds that are like a baseball cap but the cap part is connected to the brim to make that duckbill look (https://google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=ivy%20pub%20cap&tbs=imgo:1).

Soul Brother Number Two
03-16-2016, 01:45 PM
Scally cap.

Crotalus
03-16-2016, 01:52 PM
My father called them mugger caps. My wife bought me one a few years ago, I referred to it as a mugger cap, and got a weird look. I looked up hats on Wikipedia and found them referred to as flat caps, and that is how I refer to them now.

silenus
03-16-2016, 01:52 PM
Driving cap for silly gits.

Emtar KronJonDerSohn
03-16-2016, 01:57 PM
Kangol

Rhiannon8404
03-16-2016, 01:58 PM
I would have called it a newsboy or driving cap.

TreacherousCretin
03-16-2016, 02:24 PM
In the 70's I worked with a middle-aged Irishman who had emigrated to the US in his 20's. He sometimes wore one of those hats, and told me they were called "caps."

RivkahChaya
03-16-2016, 02:32 PM
Bocher hittel, or boys' everyday hat, in Yiddish. A lot of boys wore those kind of hats at the Jewish schools, but had nicer hats for Shabbes, and then on their Bar Mitzvah, they'd get a wide-brimmed, sort of fedora-type hat like the men wore, and it was a big deal to have it, because it showed everyone you were a Bar Mitzvah.

Some adult men wore Bocher hittles as everyday hats, but they were usually men in their late 20s or early 30s. Young enough not to feel silly in one, but old enough that they didn't feel the need to show off their Bar Mitzvah hat.

Bayard
03-16-2016, 02:53 PM
Growing up, I thought they were called "roadster caps", which may have just been something my older brothers came up with. Or maybe they somehow got to roadster from driving cap. Anyway, a couple years ago when I wanted to buy one, I looked online and learned they were called "flat caps", so that's what I think of them as now.

Sattua
03-16-2016, 03:15 PM
Driving cap.

kayaker
03-16-2016, 03:17 PM
Kangol

Heh, I put mine on backwards and recite Samuel L Jackson's Pulp Fiction soliloquy sometimes. Scares babies.

ETA: "soliloquy" is probably the wrong word.

Penfeather
03-16-2016, 04:06 PM
It's a cheesecutter, of course. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flat_cap) What else would you call it?

thelurkinghorror
03-16-2016, 04:38 PM
Newsboy, Kangol, etc. are a different shape than a flat cap, which is what I call the style associated with rural Ireland and England. The flat cap is more *ahem* flat while the newsboy is bulgy. And the flat never has a button.

Kangol is officially of course a brand who makes many different types of hat, but generically it's the Sam Jackson special (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kangol#/media/File:Samuel_L_Jackson_at_San_Diego_ComicCon_2008.jpg).

DrCube
03-16-2016, 05:03 PM
Kangol is officially of course a brand who makes many different types of hat, but generically it's the Sam Jackson special (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kangol#/media/File:Samuel_L_Jackson_at_San_Diego_ComicCon_2008.jpg).

Really? When I hear "kangol" as a generic term for a hat, I think 80s rapper headgear like this (http://xxlmag.com/files/2014/01/LLCoolJ.jpg).

MeanOldLady
03-16-2016, 05:08 PM
Page boy.

Chefguy
03-16-2016, 05:52 PM
I always called it a "go-fast cap". Bearded older men driving MG convertibles like to wear them.

Mangetout
03-16-2016, 06:13 PM
Flat cap.

I don't have one as they don't suit me.

Peers of my late-teenage children seem to have started referring to a particular style of straight-sided, deep baseball cap (like this (http://g04.a.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1UUq6KFXXXXbOXXXXq6xXFXXXB/6pcs-NEW-NEW2014-Men-Rapper-Snapback-font-b-Hats-b-font-font-b-COOL-b-font.jpg)) as 'flat caps', but this is wrong.

Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor
03-16-2016, 07:27 PM
newsboy

SCAdian
03-16-2016, 07:43 PM
Golf cap.

Arrendajo
03-16-2016, 07:55 PM
A newsboy is bigger and floppier than a flat cap. I just bought a flat cap for my son and the hatter showed me the different styles of similar hats. I had always called a flat cap a driving cap. Those duckbills are what I always called gangsta hats. Only the bill is flat, so they should call them flat bills, not flat caps. I'll mention that to the next gangsta I see.

Pai325
03-16-2016, 07:55 PM
I've heard it called driving cap. I've never heard the term flat cap until now, although that name does seem to fit it really well.

minor7flat5
03-16-2016, 08:21 PM
A flat cap.

I like mine.

Last year when I first wore it I took my tween kids to grab some fast food and they suddenly decided to put on fake British accents and act like we were from the UK. The woman behind the counter smiled and asked if I was British, at which point I had to tell them to knock it off--they really were quite convincing.

So the rest of the day they put on the act wherever we went in public.

kopek
03-16-2016, 08:42 PM
Brit cap or sometimes sports car cap. In my clan, most of us don't wear anything like that except at the wheel of a MG-B or Bug-eyed Sprite. Maybe a Triumph.

Dr. Strangelove
03-16-2016, 08:45 PM
Hat.

I don't think I know a single person that wears hats, so on the off chance that I need to use it as a distinguishing characteristic, "hat" is good enough.

Emtar KronJonDerSohn
03-16-2016, 08:48 PM
Heh, I put mine on backwards and recite Samuel L Jackson's Pulp Fiction soliloquy sometimes. Scares babies.

ETA: "soliloquy" is probably the wrong word.

I prefer to dilly, dally, run through an alley, and bump into my old girl Sally from the Valley.

Count Blucher
03-16-2016, 08:53 PM
I've only ever seen them in tweed... and they were called tweed caps by the people talking about them then.

YMMV

Roland Orzabal
03-16-2016, 10:32 PM
British Cab Driver Hat. My father has taken to wearing one every waking moment at age 55, for reasons known only to him. Good to learn some of the actual parlance, but I doubt I'll change it up.

Richard Pearse
03-17-2016, 12:39 AM
I'm a bit embarrassed to say that I totally misread the OP and was getting ready to post:

Cat door.

Then I clicked the link and briefly thought "cat flap is a weird name for a hat". :smack:

Zeldar
03-17-2016, 01:00 AM
I'm a bit embarrassed to say that I totally misread the OP and was getting ready to post:

Cat door.

Then I clicked the link and briefly thought "cat flap is a weird name for a hat". :smack:

That's some righteous dyslexia, I'll say! :D

Siam Sam
03-17-2016, 01:05 AM
A policeman friend back in West Texas told me his fellow officers all called it a Cocksucker's Cap due to this one particularly annoying reporter on the police beat always wearing one.

Greg Charles
03-17-2016, 01:50 AM
I've never heard flat cap before, but I'm fine with it. I've called it variously just cap or driving cap. It seems like I've heard Gatsby cap somewhere.

Mangetout
03-17-2016, 03:34 AM
It might be worth noting that in the UK, the wearing of flat caps is part of a (usually good-natured humourous) stereotype about 'northerners' (which for southerners used to mean anyone north of Watford, Northamptonshire - but this seems to have become confused with Watford, Berkshire, and so now the stereotype may be jokingly applied to anyone north of London).

Northerners in this stereotype are characterised as Yorkshiremen by speech and attitude, proudly poor, owning a whippet, drinking tea, brown ale and bitter, eating black pudding and lard, talking about the moors, or trouble at t' mill, and wearing a flat cap.

Lord Feldon
03-17-2016, 05:24 AM
I don't know that I would have known what to call it, other than a hat. It's not something I experience enough to have a "normal name" for. I guess I associate them with old men (I think my great grandfather used to wear one or something like it), so maybe I'd call it an "old man hat" if I was trying to differentiate it from other hats for some reason.

DrFidelius
03-17-2016, 05:50 AM
It might be worth noting that in the UK, the wearing of flat caps is part of a (usually good-natured humourous) stereotype about 'northerners' (which for southerners used to mean anyone north of Watford, Northamptonshire - but this seems to have become confused with Watford, Berkshire, and so now the stereotype may be jokingly applied to anyone north of London).

Northerners in this stereotype are characterised as Yorkshiremen by speech and attitude, proudly poor, owning a whippet, drinking tea, brown ale and bitter, eating black pudding and lard, talking about the moors, or trouble at t' mill, and wearing a flat cap.

Flay rod's gone out of skew on the treadle?

j666
03-17-2016, 07:24 AM
Scally cap

Acsenray
03-17-2016, 07:26 AM
I've always called it an "English cap" or "English driving cap."

don't ask
03-17-2016, 08:02 AM
An embarrassment. I'm not sure how you pronounce it, perhaps it is French or Spanish?

MrDibble
03-17-2016, 08:16 AM
I call it the Ecky Thump hat. (https://google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiDx5zI2cfLAhWBXQ8KHZtxBiEQtwIIGzAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DTJxGi8bizEg&usg=AFQjCNEGKzWtO_X3lU7CCQG4-aSOyhCI2g&sig2=PQbOhC6PxmeyOdkpstGz3g)

No, I don't, I call it a flat cap, or a cameraman's hat when worn backwards. Where the definitive example for me is Ben Volpeiere-Pierrot (https://google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=video&cd=7&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjomPu32cfLAhVC6Q4KHej9DqYQtwIILTAG&url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Di5tpuCcPfGk&usg=AFQjCNGn2F_jl_DQEkTkzfhr5BE69jBdpA&sig2=Kfb-UALjMqS6R0DXwmTFzQ), not SLJ.

dba Fred
03-17-2016, 01:06 PM
I called it a Jackie Stewart racing hat because I saw a photo of him wearing one in a racetrack pit.

Zeldar
03-17-2016, 01:27 PM
This is just a trivia thing I'm wondering if anybody else can relate to: when I was a kid (back in the 1950s) my aunt had a deck of playing cards for something like Old Maid or one of those games where you had to get a matched set of four of the same face to win the game. A lot like Authors, too.

Anyway, there was a character in that set named Toughie Yegg. He was a safe-cracker or burglar or some other type of ne'er-do-well. He had on a broad-striped polo shirt and was wearing one of these caps and a Lone Ranger looking mask (like most cartoon and comic strip shady characters did). That's the first time I can recall seeing the type of cap we're discussing. And I think at least one of the Bowery Boys wore one, too.

Just trivia, but does it ring a bell with anybody else?

CGav8r
03-17-2016, 02:30 PM
It might be worth noting that in the UK, the wearing of flat caps is part of a (usually good-natured humourous) stereotype about 'northerners' (which for southerners used to mean anyone north of Watford, Northamptonshire - but this seems to have become confused with Watford, Berkshire, and so now the stereotype may be jokingly applied to anyone north of London).

Northerners in this stereotype are characterised as Yorkshiremen by speech and attitude, proudly poor, owning a whippet, drinking tea, brown ale and bitter, eating black pudding and lard, talking about the moors, or trouble at t' mill, and wearing a flat cap.

Guessing Fred Dibnah (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Dibnah)would be a good example?

CGav8r
03-17-2016, 03:09 PM
Also, I call it a flat cap or driving cap.

swampspruce
03-17-2016, 05:56 PM
I've had a few of them and were referred to as Salt and Peppers or Gatsby Caps.

Mangetout
03-17-2016, 06:26 PM
Guessing Fred Dibnah (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Dibnah)would be a good example?

Pretty much, although the stereotype often also includes a sort of attitude of bitter misery. Fred was quite a joyous man.

Arrendajo
03-17-2016, 09:48 PM
Hat.

I don't think I know a single person that wears hats, so on the off chance that I need to use it as a distinguishing characteristic, "hat" is good enough.

You seriously don't know a single person who wears a hat? I can see six hats from where I'm sitting in the library. They are pretty common.
Oh, there's number seven.

MrDibble
03-18-2016, 02:36 AM
Pretty much, although the stereotype often also includes a sort of attitude of bitter misery.
As contrasted with when Cockneys wear them (http://static.gamesradar.com/images/totalfilm/i/is-it-just-me-or-is-dick-van-dykes-cockney-accent-not-that-bad-124840-470-75.jpg).

OK, I may be off on the Cockney bit ... :D

Gunslinger
03-18-2016, 04:48 AM
No, I don't, I call it a flat cap, or a cameraman's hat when worn backwards. Where the definitive example for me is Ben Volpeiere-Pierrot (https://google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=video&cd=7&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjomPu32cfLAhVC6Q4KHej9DqYQtwIILTAG&url=https%3A%2F%2Fyoutube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Di5tpuCcPfGk&usg=AFQjCNGn2F_jl_DQEkTkzfhr5BE69jBdpA&sig2=Kfb-UALjMqS6R0DXwmTFzQ), not SLJ.

Heh. I have a couple of 'em, and am a photographer. Looks better when turned backward than a ballcap. (the bill gets in the way of the camera viewfinder, y'see.)

I've only ever heard "flat cap" or "driving cap". A "newsboy" is entirely different, it's floppy on the sides, made of several panels coming together at the top and has a button on top, sort of like a collapsed extra-tall ballcap; a flat cap is, well, flat on top (has a top bit and a side bit, fabric-wise) and doesn't have any extra floof in the sides.

A "Kangol" like Sam Jackson wears is a brand name used generically for a certain style of one-piece felt flat cap (cf. "Stetson" or, if you're old and from certain parts, "Resistol" as a generic term for cowboy hats.)

Similarly, "tweed cap" is a subset of "flat cap".

Martini Enfield
03-18-2016, 04:59 AM
I've always called them "Cabdriver hats" or "Gamekeeper hats" - I've always associated them with London Black Taxi drivers or, gamekeepers from posh estates.

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