Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#51
Old 08-14-2010, 09:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlainJain View Post
It's a loooong shot sure, but doable. I know because I've done it. My only regret is that I'm not a better writer so I could have capitalized on it.
Well, most of us probably just wish for the OP that (s)he have the confidence and commitment do it him/herself, as you did. Your dedication and sincerity and effort and commitment to your story are likely a huge part of what got your foot in the door. I just have to think the same message/passion/excitement is not going to come through if the approach is -- give me one chance, I had an idea that was so important to me that I . . . hired someone else to do the detail work.
#52
Old 08-15-2010, 05:36 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 15,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huerta88 View Post
What are our rules? What do we do with guys who had popular blogs/websites (Fark, Real Ultimate Power, Four Hour Workweek (??)) first and then got book deals? That seems to be a not-super-rare route (though the "books" are often just lame-o rehashes/compilations of the web postings).

Or are we only talking straight self-published fiction?
I was doing straight published fiction.

Yes, Doctorow's books were published as books in addition to the eBooks, but I believe it was the eBooks that fuelled his popularity until Little Brother. Scalzi had no published fiction until putting Old Man's War on his website made him a huge sci-fi star. And Sigler's first fiction book, Earthcore, was published as an eBook before he hit it big with his podcast novels.
#53
Old 08-15-2010, 11:53 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 29,310
I admit I'm not familar with these, but here's what Wikipedia lists:
Quote:
Books in print
Scott Sigler, Phil Masters, Dean Edgell, Dana Edgell (1991) Champions Presents #1 ISBN 1-55806-123-1 Hero Games
Scott Sigler (1998) Asp Technocracy (Silent Death, the Next Millennium) Iron Crown Enterprises
Scott Sigler (1993) Shadows of the City ISBN 1-55806-181-9
Scott Sigler (1997) Silent Death House Sigurd Archdiocese ISBN 1-55806-295-5 Iron Crown Enterprises
Scott Sigler, Don Dennis (1997) Sigurd Archdiocese: Forces Book ISBN 1-55806-295-5
They appear to be gaming adventures, but that doesn't mean they don't count as books.
#54
Old 08-15-2010, 11:59 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huerta88 View Post
Well, most of us probably just wish for the OP that (s)he have the confidence and commitment do it him/herself, as you did. Your dedication and sincerity and effort and commitment to your story are likely a huge part of what got your foot in the door. I just have to think the same message/passion/excitement is not going to come through if the approach is -- give me one chance, I had an idea that was so important to me that I . . . hired someone else to do the detail work.
This is BS.

First, I never said that "I had an idea that was so important to me...". I'm not consumed by it. I have a job and a good income. I'm not waiting on tables, diligently working on this idea and waiting and hoping for it to make me some money. The fact of the matter is that I just happen to be mulling an idea for a movie in my head for a few years now, and I thought it would be cool to see it on paper. That is all.

Second, I don't see why I need to "have the confidence and commitment do it myself" and I don't see why doing it myself would show "dedication and sincerity".

If I thought that a painting with two galloping horses in a meadow would look great in my living room, why would the preferred route be to take some art lessons, learn how to paint, and paint it myself?

Why would it be a lesser painting if I found an art student, and paid him to paint it for me, after we went through some sketches and I explained to him what I want? The art student would actually likely do a better job than me, even if I took some art lessons.

Same with the screenplay. Why would it be a lesser screenplay if I just found a screenwriting student or amateur screenwriter and paid him to write it for me, after we go through a lot of discussions and I explain to him what I want? The screenwriting student or amateur screenwriter would actually likely do a better job than me, even if I took some screenwriting lessons and worked on my script for a long long time.

Just because some people feel the all-consuming need to put their story on paper themselves, and so learn how to write and spend a lot of time and effort writing it themselves, that doesn't mean that that should be the only route.

You guys have one thing right: A script from someone outside the industry has a snowball's chance in hell to ever amount to anything. I know that.

But that's about the only thing you got right.
#55
Old 08-15-2010, 12:02 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 15,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
They appear to be gaming adventures, but that doesn't mean they don't count as books.
It does when you're talking about fiction versus non-fiction. Before Earthcore, Sigler wrote a computer help manual and four rulebooks for tabletop RPGs. Those aren't fiction of any kind.

When you're talking about getting your start in fiction, those really don't count.
#56
Old 08-15-2010, 12:36 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 29,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin_Bailey View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
They appear to be gaming adventures, but that doesn't mean they don't count as books.
It does when you're talking about fiction versus non-fiction. Before Earthcore, Sigler wrote a computer help manual and four rulebooks for tabletop RPGs. Those aren't fiction of any kind.

When you're talking about getting your start in fiction, those really don't count.
OK. That still fits exactly into my experienced writer leveraging a new form scenario. Basically he and John Scalzi went the same route.
#57
Old 08-15-2010, 12:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 13,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
The fact of the matter is that I just happen to be mulling an idea for a movie in my head for a few years now, and I thought it would be cool to see it on paper. That is all.
I think part of the problem is that you have said both that you just want to see your idea on paper and that you might be interested in actually getting this script turned into a movie. These are two very different things.

Setting aside the difficulties of actually selling a script in Hollywood, it sounds like you would want to have legal control of the document. First of all, I'm not certain this is even possible. There is a provision in US copyright law regarding "work for hire", where the copyright belongs to the person who commissioned the work rather than the person who actually created it, but this is limited to certain types of work. It's not clear to me that a screenplay would qualify. If it does, then the writer would have to sign a contract saying that you would be considered the legal author of the work and would hold the copyright. Some writers would be willing to do this, but I suspect that many would not as a matter of principle.

If you commissioned a painting for your bedroom then you'd own the physical object but the original artist would still hold the copyright. You wouldn't have the legal right to turn the image into a line of greeting cards or something. If you wanted to commission a writer on similar terms then s/he would just give you a copy of the finished screenplay but you would not be able to publish it or sell the rights to a studio. The writer could attempt to sell the script to Hollywood if s/he wanted to, but you'd have no say in the matter either way. I think you'd be a lot more likely to find a writer willing to work with you on those terms.
#58
Old 08-15-2010, 12:41 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: ___\o/___(\___
Posts: 11,548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
You guys have one thing right: A script from someone outside the industry has a snowball's chance in hell to ever amount to anything. I know that.

But that's about the only thing you got right.
Yeah, that opens my eyes. All of us are wrong, and you are correct. You are much cleverer than we are, and don't need our advice.

Guys, I think we should all stop even trying to advise him. Our puny intellects are obviously no match for him. Let's all just bow to his superior wisdom, and move on.

Last edited by Peter Morris; 08-15-2010 at 12:41 PM.
#59
Old 08-15-2010, 12:52 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 29,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
First of all, I'm not certain this is even possible. There is a provision in US copyright law regarding "work for hire", where the copyright belongs to the person who commissioned the work rather than the person who actually created it, but this is limited to certain types of work. It's not clear to me that a screenplay would qualify. If it does, then the writer would have to sign a contract saying that you would be considered the legal author of the work and would hold the copyright. Some writers would be willing to do this, but I suspect that many would not as a matter of principle.
The standard practice in Hollywood is that the production company owns the screenplay (or teleplay). Anyone familiar enough with the industry to be capable of writing a screenplay would know this and have no expectation of retaining copyright.

Here's something from Wikipedia which looks right to me:
Quote:
if the work is created by an independent contractor or freelancer, the work may be considered a work for hire only if all of the following conditions are met:

the work must come within one of the nine limited categories of works listed in the definition above, namely (1) a contribution to a collective work, (2) a part of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, (3) a translation, (4) a supplementary work, (5) a compilation, (6) an instructional text, (7) a test, (8) answer material for a test, (9) an atlas;

the work must be specially ordered or commissioned;

there must be a written agreement between the parties specifying that the work is a work made for hire. [3]

3. US Copyright Office, Circular 9: Work-Made-For-Hire Under the 1976 Copyright Act.

Last edited by Exapno Mapcase; 08-15-2010 at 12:53 PM.
#60
Old 08-15-2010, 01:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 13,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
The standard practice in Hollywood is that the production company owns the screenplay (or teleplay). Anyone familiar enough with the industry to be capable of writing a screenplay would know this and have no expectation of retaining copyright.
But Polerius isn't a production company, and wouldn't be paying anywhere near what a screenwriter would expect to get from a Hollywood production company. It's one thing to sell a screenplay for lots of money to someone with the ability to turn it into a movie. It's another thing to sell one for a much smaller amount of money to a middleman who will then attempt to sell it to Hollywood for a lot more money. The odds are against this attempt being successful, but either way the writer is better off with the fee from Polerius AND the copyright to the work than s/he would be with the fee and no legal right to the work. If the final screenplay is good then even if Hollywood isn't interested the writer might want to turn it into a novel or something, and if it's bad then the writer would probably prefer that it not be shown around too much.

There are probably writers who'd be willing to sign away their rights for the amount of money Polerius is offering, but there must be even more who'd be willing to take on the project if they got to keep the copyright. It's unclear to me whether a screenplay counts as "part of a motion picture" if you're writing it for someone with no connections to the movie industry and who isn't going to attempt to shoot it independently, so I'm not certain it's even legal for Polerius to ask a writer to do the project on a work for hire basis. So if he wanted to go that route he'd probably need to check with a lawyer about it, and would definitely need someone to draw up a work for hire contract. If he were fine with allowing the writer to keep the copyright then this wouldn't be necessary.

Last edited by Lamia; 08-15-2010 at 01:57 PM.
#61
Old 08-15-2010, 02:32 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
I think part of the problem is that you have said both that you just want to see your idea on paper and that you might be interested in actually getting this script turned into a movie. These are two very different things.
Yes.

He attacks my questioning his plan to sell a farmed-out screenplay to the movie industry with a hypothetical about commissioning a schlock painting to hang on his living room wall for his own private delectation.

OP: if your question had been, can I pay some hack screenwriter to turn my "idea" into a screenplay that I can read and re-read as (expensive, commissioned) fanfic -- . . . . sure, it's your money. But that wasn't the question you asked, and our responses to the question you did ask are hardly "BS."
#62
Old 08-15-2010, 02:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: LIC
Posts: 20,673
When you bury your pet monkey, a writer will drive up and be mistaken for the funeral director.

Hilarity ensues.
#63
Old 08-15-2010, 04:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Yeah, that opens my eyes. All of us are wrong, and you are correct.
Sorry if it came out that way, I didn't mean to imply that everyone who replied in this thread is wrong. There was lots of useful info and posts that made good points and gave much-needed warnings about this whole process.
#64
Old 08-15-2010, 04:14 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
The fact of the matter is that I just happen to be mulling an idea for a movie in my head for a few years now, and I thought it would be cool to see it on paper. That is all.
I think part of the problem is that you have said both that you just want to see your idea on paper and that you might be interested in actually getting this script turned into a movie. These are two very different things.
Well, there are two stages to what I want. The first stage is to simply see my idea on paper. This in itself is worth something to me, but not that much that I would pay tens of thousands of dollars on it. If I find someone to get me to the first stage with an amount of money that I find is worth it for that stage, then, if the script, now on paper and more "evaluable" than a simple idea in my head, doesn't look totally ridiculous, then I may spend more effort and/or money to see whether this has any chance to go to the next stage.

Quote:
Setting aside the difficulties of actually selling a script in Hollywood, it sounds like you would want to have legal control of the document. First of all, I'm not certain this is even possible. There is a provision in US copyright law regarding "work for hire", where the copyright belongs to the person who commissioned the work rather than the person who actually created it, but this is limited to certain types of work. It's not clear to me that a screenplay would qualify. If it does, then the writer would have to sign a contract saying that you would be considered the legal author of the work and would hold the copyright. Some writers would be willing to do this, but I suspect that many would not as a matter of principle.
Thanks for the info.

What happens in case of books (like biographies) "written" by famous people, but actually ghostwritten by professional writers? Do the ghostwriters own the copyright, or does the famous person that paid the ghostwriter?

Quote:
If you wanted to commission a writer on similar terms then s/he would just give you a copy of the finished screenplay but you would not be able to publish it or sell the rights to a studio. The writer could attempt to sell the script to Hollywood if s/he wanted to, but you'd have no say in the matter either way.
In the context of ghostwritten books, wouldn't the above imply that the ghostwriter can sell the book and the famous person that commissioned it have no say in the matter? Or are you saying that a ghostwriter for a famous person has a contract that gives up his/her copyright to the work, in exchange for a huge fee and/or royalties from sales, and that no writer would agree to such a contract with an unknown outsider?
#65
Old 08-15-2010, 04:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huerta88 View Post
OP: if your question had been, can I pay some hack screenwriter to turn my "idea" into a screenplay that I can read and re-read as (expensive, commissioned) fanfic -- . . . . sure, it's your money.
If I can find some hack screenwriter to do the above, then, if I did want to try to go to the next stage and see if it has any potential to be sold, why is the script that this hack screenwriter comes up with worse than a script that I would put together after taking writing classes and spending a long time writing as a total beginner?

Is it basically that the script from the hack screenwriter would totally suck in quality (much more than what I could produce myself), or is it because of copyright issues (i.e. the hack screenwriter would write the commissioned fanfic for me to read at home, but would not release the copyright to me to enable me to potentially sell it later [or could release the copyright to me but for much more money than for just writing fanfic for me to read at home])
#66
Old 08-15-2010, 04:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
In the context of ghostwritten books, wouldn't the above imply that the ghostwriter can sell the book and the famous person that commissioned it have no say in the matter? Or are you saying that a ghostwriter for a famous person has a contract that gives up his/her copyright to the work, in exchange for a huge fee and/or royalties from sales, and that no writer would agree to such a contract with an unknown outsider?
IRL, no one will generally pay someone solely for writing without having a written contract. It's just much tidier. Once you have a contract, which will/should contain an assignment and disclaimer of rights from the ghost, the statute/common law on work-for-hire don't even come into play; contract trumps.

If you ever go through with this, pls. make sure to get the arrangement in writing before hand.
#67
Old 08-15-2010, 04:32 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 13,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
What happens in case of books (like biographies) "written" by famous people, but actually ghostwritten by professional writers? Do the ghostwriters own the copyright, or does the famous person that paid the ghostwriter?
I doubt I know any more about ghostwriting than you do. It's my limited understanding that the celebrity "authors" often do write at least some of the material themselves, and I know I have seen books where the ghostwriter is credited on the cover: "My Life, by Famous Person, with Ghostwriter." This suggests to me that in these cases the celebrity and the ghostwriter are legally co-authors of the work, but I really don't know.
#68
Old 08-15-2010, 04:32 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
Is it basically that the script from the hack screenwriter would totally suck in quality (much more than what I could produce myself), or is it because of copyright issues (i.e. the hack screenwriter would write the commissioned fanfic for me to read at home, but would not release the copyright to me to enable me to potentially sell it later [or could release the copyright to me but for much more money than for just writing fanfic for me to read at home])
I don't know how much the screenwriter would balk at releasing all rights. Maybe, maybe not. If he's hard-up enough to put his own projects to the side, he's probably hard-up enough not to demand too much extra for a right that is statistically unlikely to ever come into the money (see my post of a moment ago -- you should certainly demand all rights). So I guess I'm saying the story-by-committee would, yeah, probably not be very good. You certainly wouldn't want to tell any studio exec. that you somehow cajoled into reading it how it had been cobbled together, I'd think.
#69
Old 08-15-2010, 05:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eris001 View Post
I am a screenwriter. I've finished two features, sold a short, attend a writer's group and am willing to give your idea a try for $10,000.
Yes, I have lots of my own ideas that I could be working on, but working on them means I'm working for free. Giving your idea a whack means at least I'd be getting paid for my time. And as long as I'm writing, I'm working on my skill.
Some conditions: 1) I'd like to hear your idea first to see if it's a story or a bare-bones idea. 2) What genre were you thinking this would be? I have my strengths and weakness when writing. 3) I'd like to know what sort of time frame your thinking about.
There you go Polerius, start with Eris001 and go from there. If you get your screenplay to the stage where it does pique at least a modicum of interest from someone relevant in the industry and it would benefit from the services of a talented script doctor, I guarantee I can give a mediocre script (not to imply Eris001 only does mediocre work) a treatment to make it great, particularly, but not exclusively, if its a comedy. Ill do it cheap on the front end because Im not in the industry and have no track record, for some consideration on the back end. Wed both be taking some risk, but I know Im up to the task, love to write, find comedic angles everywhere. and am a perfectionist. I'll undercut any offer from Rand Rover, toojust because I can.
__________________
Do you believe in such nonsense? "No, but they say it works even if you don't believe in it.Niels Bohr
#70
Old 08-15-2010, 05:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lost Strangeles
Posts: 2,488
In Hollywood, people who hire writers are called producers. They play a specific role in the movie making process, by rounding up all the people, organizations, and money needed to make a movie.

There's a specific path which leads to the job which usually involves being an assistant to a producer or an agent, and working your way up the ladder one tortuous rung at a time. Along the way, you make the connections and develop the skill set you need.

Polerius, you seem to be setting yourself up as an amateur producer. Not a good plan.

If your story is as good as you think it is, tell it in a novel, or a web comic. If it develops a following, chances are pretty good Hollywood will come to you.
#71
Old 08-15-2010, 05:34 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: NY but not NYC
Posts: 29,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia
Quote:
Setting aside the difficulties of actually selling a script in Hollywood, it sounds like you would want to have legal control of the document. First of all, I'm not certain this is even possible. There is a provision in US copyright law regarding "work for hire", where the copyright belongs to the person who commissioned the work rather than the person who actually created it, but this is limited to certain types of work. It's not clear to me that a screenplay would qualify. If it does, then the writer would have to sign a contract saying that you would be considered the legal author of the work and would hold the copyright. Some writers would be willing to do this, but I suspect that many would not as a matter of principle.
Lamia is flat-out wrong, in this and in subsequent posts. Please be careful to ignore any "facts" provided, although the advice about contracts is sound.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius
What happens in case of books (like biographies) "written" by famous people, but actually ghostwritten by professional writers? Do the ghostwriters own the copyright, or does the famous person that paid the ghostwriter?
The famous person normally owns the copywrite. It's easy enough to check. Just open any book by a famous person and check the copyright page. (Remember, no book by a famous person is written by a famous person unless proven otherwise.) However, see below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia
If you wanted to commission a writer on similar terms then s/he would just give you a copy of the finished screenplay but you would not be able to publish it or sell the rights to a studio. The writer could attempt to sell the script to Hollywood if s/he wanted to, but you'd have no say in the matter either way.
Crap. Just write the appropriate clauses into the contract.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Polerius
In the context of ghostwritten books, wouldn't the above imply that the ghostwriter can sell the book and the famous person that commissioned it have no say in the matter? Or are you saying that a ghostwriter for a famous person has a contract that gives up his/her copyright to the work, in exchange for a huge fee and/or royalties from sales, and that no writer would agree to such a contract with an unknown outsider?
That's why it's crap. Ghostwriters go into the deal with known expectations. They are written into the contract.

It is certainly possible for a ghostwriter to share credit, copyright, and money. I know because I've done it. I wrote a nonfiction book for someone for money. The situation wasn't quite the same as this. I was approached by an agent who knew my work. The sale was more or less guaranteed. I negotiated my name onto the cover, because all the writing would be mine. I wouldn't have any of these expectations is I were writing a celebrity autobiography, though. And I would never, ever go through such a horrible experience again. Unless you paid me really, really well.

Every aspect of the situation is subject to the contract that is signed. Get a lawyer who specializes in intellectual property law. (NOT an ordinary lawyer. They know no more about the subject than people posting here evidently do.) It's your money. Set it up anyway you want. If somebody wants your money - and somebody will - they will sign. That's the way the business works.

Last edited by Exapno Mapcase; 08-15-2010 at 05:35 PM.
#72
Old 08-15-2010, 05:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lost Strangeles
Posts: 2,488
If you're going to be buying scripts, you need to be an expert on scripts. Otherwise, you stand to get ripped off, and you won't have the knowledge or vocabulary to make useful critiques.

So, read these books. Read every script and watch every movie covered in these books, and do a structural analysis on each script.

http://amazon.com/Myth-Movies-Di.../dp/0941188663

http://amazon.com/Save-Cat-Goes-...1908291&sr=1-1

http://amazon.com/Good-Scripts-B...1908384&sr=1-1

http://amazon.com/Tools-Screenwr...ref=pd_sim_b_2


Overkill? Not at all.

Keep in mind that even super low budget movie costs as much as a nice house. When someone buys a script, they're buying the blueprint for a house. They want expertise, and preferably experience and personal recommendations from past buyers.

Your script would be in competition with those written by the thousands of writers in Hollywood who are expert in film and dramatic storytelling.

And yeah, before you spend a dime, watch Tales from the Script and Dreams on Spec

Last edited by Belowjob2.0; 08-15-2010 at 05:51 PM.
#73
Old 08-15-2010, 06:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 13,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia
Setting aside the difficulties of actually selling a script in Hollywood, it sounds like you would want to have legal control of the document. First of all, I'm not certain this is even possible. There is a provision in US copyright law regarding "work for hire", where the copyright belongs to the person who commissioned the work rather than the person who actually created it, but this is limited to certain types of work. It's not clear to me that a screenplay would qualify. If it does, then the writer would have to sign a contract saying that you would be considered the legal author of the work and would hold the copyright. Some writers would be willing to do this, but I suspect that many would not as a matter of principle.
Lamia is flat-out wrong, in this and in subsequent posts. Please be careful to ignore any "facts" provided, although the advice about contracts is sound.
How many times are you planning on replying to the same post? I really don't understand why you're being so unpleasant about this. The "facts" I provided in the passage above were that there is such a thing as work for hire, that this is limited to certain types of creative works, and that there must be a contract signed up-front for any work to be considered a work for hire. This is consistent with your own later posted cite (post #59), so if I was "flat-out wrong" on those points then so were you. For everything else I was careful to make it clear that I was offering nothing more than my best guess based on a limited understanding of the issues involved. I did not pretend to be offering any sort of expert opinion, and if Polerius wants legal advice then he shouldn't be asking here.

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamia
If you wanted to commission a writer on similar terms then s/he would just give you a copy of the finished screenplay but you would not be able to publish it or sell the rights to a studio. The writer could attempt to sell the script to Hollywood if s/he wanted to, but you'd have no say in the matter either way.
Crap. Just write the appropriate clauses into the contract.
You have stripped the quoted passage from its context. I was referring the Polerius hiring a writer in the same way he'd hire an art student to paint something for his bedroom. Many young artists are happy to do this sort of thing on an informal basis with no contract, and this was apparently what Polerius had in mind. If there's a contract involved in the proposed screenwriting project then that's not "on similar terms" as a casual arrangement with an art student to paint something to display in one's home.

Last edited by Lamia; 08-15-2010 at 06:56 PM.
#74
Old 02-03-2014, 02:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1
I'll do it for a cool 1 grand (British Pound)
#75
Old 06-04-2014, 08:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1
Ghostwriting Links

http://ghostwords.com/pricing/
http://screenwritingandghostwrit...vices_Fees.php
http://thumbtack.com/ca/north-ho...er-ghostwriter

A quick "something" search would have settled this thread back in 2010 but for some reason, nobody did... Anyway, it looks to me like you can hire a ghostwriter for between $4,500 and $10,000. Most of them have relevant writing samples available and, while not members of the screen writer's guild, I'm sure many are experienced veterans of the industry. They also require signed contracts that clearly stipulate who owns what and for how much.

It's called "work for hire" and it's common in every industry I've ever worked in.

I've actually written a screenplay. I even won an award. What I learned from the experience is that neither the idea or the screenwriting is really all that difficult. What's difficult is selling the screenplay. If Polerius has the money to pay for a script, perhaps he already has the money to produce the film or has a buyer already lined up.

Bottom line: the money is the hard part.
#76
Old 06-04-2014, 09:50 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by SydV View Post
I'll do it for a cool 1 grand (British Pound)
Too late. The OP turned out to actually be Roman Coppola, who won the 2012 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay along with his co-writer Wes Anderson, for Moonrise Kingdom.











j/k. But that would have been interesting, wouldn't it?
#77
Old 06-04-2014, 11:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Beyond The Fringe
Posts: 26,645
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherrerd View Post
j/k. But that would have been interesting, wouldn't it?
How do you know it's not true?
#78
Old 06-05-2014, 12:22 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Posts: 7,727
I really was hoping that the op bumped and said everything worked out and he's now filthy rich.
#79
Old 06-05-2014, 12:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Port Orchard, WA
Posts: 11,045
Me, too.

I remember this thread, and I recently got a sortofa foot-in-the-door into the industry*. I just started using a crazy-silly pitch idea to practice creating characters and a story. Sort of developing a screenplay like I enjoyed so much in college. I was hoping the OP could inspire.

*: Nothing really likely, just contract work at a motion capture startup that hasn't actually started up quite yet.
#80
Old 06-05-2014, 03:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4,277
Quote:
Originally Posted by buddha_david View Post
How do you know it's not true?
Quite so. And that could be the basis for a good screenplay.............^_~
#81
Old 10-07-2015, 01:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Venice California
Posts: 2
Polarieus:

Did you ever find a screenwriter for your script?

I'm a professional screenwriter with many scripts optioned, sold, and produced. You don't need to pay WGA scale to see your vision translate to the page. I've written 30+ features and hundreds of short scripts for clients just like you: they want to see their ideas in script form. Now that it's a half decade since your post, there are resources out there so that you can try to produce the film on your own.

Answers to your question:
How much would this cost? Is it around $5,000, $10,000, $30,000, more?
A. I write features for 5K and short scripts for 300 bucks. Screenwriting is easy for me, I've written hundreds of features and shorts for over 20 years.

PM to discuss.
#82
Old 10-08-2015, 01:24 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,995
The Short Script, I reported your post as possible spam. It's suspicious-looking enough that I thought it warranted a look by the moderators. If it is, so long. If it isn't, my apologies, and I owe you one.
#83
Old 10-27-2015, 04:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Venice California
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Esox Lucius View Post
The Short Script, I reported your post as possible spam. It's suspicious-looking enough that I thought it warranted a look by the moderators. If it is, so long. If it isn't, my apologies, and I owe you one.
Definitely not spam

The OP can find many decent screenwriters on sites like Elance, Upwork, Freelancer... There are just a ton of avenues out there right now for people who don't want to write, yet want to direct or produce content (which happens to be everybody and his Grandma right now...).

I happen to be one of those avenues. Just wanted to post to this thread to reply to OPs questions. And for anyone else (or their Grandma) out there looking for a qualified and excellent screenwriter - there are MANY options.
#84
Old 10-27-2015, 04:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 3,244
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandMcnally View Post
I really was hoping that the op bumped and said everything worked out and he's now filthy rich.
It turned out that the real treasure was in our hearts all along.
#85
Old 01-10-2016, 11:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Penfeather View Post
It turned out that the real treasure was in our hearts all along.
Literally mucus expelled from my body when reading this.
#86
Old 01-11-2016, 02:49 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 7,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by MywifeisasCrankyasaseashell View Post
Literally mucus expelled from my body when reading this.
Gesundheit.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:57 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: strip club franchises ac belt slant engines chocolate and lemon electric blanket watts green frankenstein wife lactating gemini pronounce claire danes beautiful al aqsa meaning austin devan hill netflix n8109 social justice bullshit burrito vs fajita do chinese circumcise mri weight limit miracle thaw abreviation for pages sexy david duchovny bowling lane cost male balerina acetaminophen abbreviation next minutes polythene paint medication dosages bust her cherry amonia and bleach black berry trees skin dent bacon number lassie passion party names german american dual citizenship requirements statute of limitations on hospital bills shipping cost to norway from us carl aqua teen hunger force quotes how long does chloroform take to work can i put my straight talk sim card in another phone why is it advantageous for an animal to be hermaphroditic shoe stores like payless bah ba ba ba bah da da da bah lyrics canon mx880 printer not responding mini cooper s gas type law and order attorney client american dad discover card several vs a few paper shredder oil alternative does a millipede have 1000 legs dog ear yeast infection monistat home depot basin wrench how long is seven inches how to pronounce kielbasa how to make a stink bomb with household items del taco chicken soft taco sauce recipe kol st sneaky pete's day tpms rebuild kit worth it dermatologist mole check what to expect parking for customers only signs how to protect leather couch from cats where do djs get acapellas post it glue stick staples how to treat bitten tongue lock pick sets illegal