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#1
Old 08-17-2002, 03:38 AM
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did Hitler have a nickname?

I realize that this question shows that I have far too much free time, but me and my pal Action Roberts are wondering about nicknames of despots and dictators. Did Hitler have a nickname? Like "Hits" or something that his pals called him during Tuesday night poker? Stalin got "Uncle Joe" from the English speakers, but did he have a name like "lefty" or "dutch" (ok, probably not "dutch") among his own folk? Rather an odd question, but everyone I know has, at some point in his or her life, and no matter how temporarily, picked up a nickname, so what about the big fellas in, say, the Nazi game?
#2
Old 08-17-2002, 04:04 AM
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Apparently Hitler's nickname was "Wolf".

He was also refered to as The Fuhrer but that is more of a title than a nickname.
#3
Old 08-17-2002, 07:41 AM
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Field Marshal General Erwin Rommel was known as "The Desert Fox".

A bit of googling "nazi nickname" turns up these gems:

SS Captain Klaus Barbie earned the nickname "Butcher of Lyon".

Ante Pavelic was the original 'Butcher of the Balkans."

Christian Wirth, a notorious brute with the nickname 'the savage Christian.'

Hans Frank earned the nickname the "Jew Butcher of Cracow."

General Reinhard Heydrich was known as "The Hangman".
#4
Old 08-17-2002, 08:28 AM
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I once heard that Hitler had the nickname of "Killjoy". I wonder why...
#5
Old 08-17-2002, 08:48 AM
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"Aldi" was a childhod nickname.

It is mentioned someplace in (Chapter 10) of Smith's The Dark Summer, not the most authoritative source, I know.
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#6
Old 08-17-2002, 09:12 AM
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From "Top 59 Mistakes Made by Adolf Hitler" :

2. Changed name from highly catchy 'Schickelgruber' to boring 'Hitler'

so it looks like Hitler is a nickname
#7
Old 08-17-2002, 10:10 AM
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Quote:
Stalin got "Uncle Joe" from the English speakers, but did he have a name like "lefty" or "dutch" (ok, probably not "dutch") among his own folk?
Well, "Stalin". His real name was Josef Djugashvili, after all, Stalin being a nickname. He also had his earlier activist nick, Koba.

For some reason, Finns often (ironically) call Stalin "Isä Aurinkoinen" ("Father Sunny").
#8
Old 08-17-2002, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Shade
From "Top 59 Mistakes Made by Adolf Hitler" :

2. Changed name from highly catchy 'Schickelgruber' to boring 'Hitler'

so it looks like Hitler is a nickname
No. Here's what happened. Adolf Hitler's grandmother had the last name Schickelgruber. She fell in love with this guy named Johann Heidler, who was this Czech German, and she had a baby out of wedlock with him (probably, anyway. The identity of the baby's father is sort of in doubt), who she named Alois Schicklelgruber. Then, she and Heidler got married. When Alois Schickelgruber grew up, he changed his last name from Schickelgruber to Hitler, which is a variant of the name Heidler. Alois then would go on to father Adolf So, Adolf Hitler was always named Adolf Hitler. It was Alois who changed his name.
#9
Old 08-17-2002, 10:32 AM
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Wasnt it "Hiedler", not "Heidler"?

The pronunciation would be much closer to "Hitler".

I think in those days spelling wasnt quite so strict, anyway.

At least not like today!
#10
Old 08-17-2002, 10:38 AM
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Wasnt it "Hiedler", not "Heidler"?

The pronunciation would be much closer to "Hitler".

Upon searching, it seems our esteemed leader concurs:

https://academicpursuits.us/classics/a3_325b.html

RK
#11
Old 08-17-2002, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Kantalooppi
Well, "Stalin". His real name was Josef Djugashvili, after all, Stalin being a nickname. He also had his earlier activist nick, Koba.

For some reason, Finns often (ironically) call Stalin "Isä Aurinkoinen" ("Father Sunny").
I was reading in some old 1940 era magazines that Stalin's acquaintences (I hesitate to say friends) called him "The Boss" or just "Boss".

Back to the OP though (sort of) - It does make one wonder how history would have been different if while Hitler was a struggling artist someone would have given him the nickname of "Skippy".
#12
Old 08-17-2002, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by regnad kcin
Wasnt it "Hiedler", not "Heidler"?

The pronunciation would be much closer to "Hitler".

Upon searching, it seems our esteemed leader concurs:

https://academicpursuits.us/classics/a3_325b.html

RK
I think that Germans pronounce the second vowel of the "i and e" combination. So "Hiedler" would be "Heedlehr" and "Heidler" would be "Heyedlehr." Take your pick.
#13
Old 08-17-2002, 12:32 PM
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"Skippy" Hitler? Well, it would have been a different world. Didn't know Stalin was "the Boss". Springsteen would be so proud. That's why I started this thread, for info like that. But I meant nicknames among friends. I can't picture Hans Frank's friends saying "Hey, let's have a party, we'll invite Schultz, and Schmidt, and the Jew butcher of Cracow..."

What about Pol Pot?
#14
Old 08-17-2002, 01:07 PM
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It's not exactly a nickname, but his staff took to referring to him privately as "Der Teppenfrescher", or "the carpet chewer". Apparently when he got really, really mad he would fall to the floor and gnaw on the rug.
#15
Old 08-17-2002, 02:17 PM
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I cannot recall where but I have heard Hitler called "the little corporal"
On Stalin
"Born Jospeh Djungashvilli, Aka Ryaboi or 'Pockmark', aka Koba, aka Zakhar Melinkyants, aka Nisharadze, aka Joseph Stalin."*
If I remember correctly Stalin means "steel" in russian.

Oh and for a side note Lenin's wife was nicknamed 'the fish'

* found on page 55 THE RUSSIAN CENTURY copywright 1994 UK* found on page 55 THE RUSSIAN CENTURY copywright 1994 UK
#16
Old 08-17-2002, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Osip
Oh and for a side note Lenin's wife was nicknamed 'the fish'
I don't even wanna know........
#17
Old 08-17-2002, 06:09 PM
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Spit-look up a picture of Nadezha Krupskaya (AKA Mrs. Lenin), and you'll see why.

Don't forget Mussolini was "Il Duce" . What was up with that?
#18
Old 08-17-2002, 06:34 PM
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Ach, dear old Dolfy! What a character he was! What times we had together in Vienna, him and I! The madcap schemes he would come up with over the strudels! For some reason, I know not why, he hated shoes, he would often insist that shoes were a menace to the world, that we must rid ourselves of the shoes. I forbore to point out that, despite his arguments, he himself always wore them! Still, what a card! I wonder what became of him?
#19
Old 08-17-2002, 06:54 PM
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Quote:
It's not exactly a nickname, but his staff took to referring to him privately as "Der Teppenfrescher", or "the carpet chewer". Apparently when he got really, really mad he would fall to the floor and gnaw on the rug.
I believe that's a UL. I've read that what was actually reported was that Hitler was "carpet pacer" not "carpet chewer" (apparently the two terms are almost identical in the original German). For propaganda reasons, the mistranslated version was spread. Hitler may have been nuts but he was no rug-muncher.

Quote:
If I remember correctly Stalin means "steel" in russian.
Yes, and one of Stalin's top henchmen was Molotov whose name means "Hammer". So you had "Steel Man" and his trusty sidekick "The Hammer" - mild-mannered Bolsheviks by day, Proletariot Heroes of the Masses by Night.
#20
Old 08-17-2002, 07:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Guinastasia
Don't forget Mussolini was "Il Duce" . What was up with that?
Well, my Italian is almost non-existent, but I believe it's Italian for "The Leader." In other words, same meaning and fascist symbolism as "Der Fürher."

It's derived from the same Latin roots as "duke." "Dux" and "ducis" originally meant a war-leader, from whence it became a feudal title of nobility.
#21
Old 08-17-2002, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Osip
I cannot recall where but I have heard Hitler called "the little corporal"
For some reason, I thought Napolean was "The Little Corporal."
#22
Old 08-17-2002, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Stalin got "Uncle Joe" from the English speakers, but did he have a name like "lefty" or "dutch" (ok, probably not "dutch") among his own folk?
I missed this before. But considering that Stalin's right arm was crippled from birth and he was apparently very sensitive about it, and the fact that he ordered several million people to their death at the least whim, I'm guessing the nickname "Lefty" was not used much.
#23
Old 08-17-2002, 09:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Little Nemo


I believe that's a UL. I've read that what was actually reported was that Hitler was "carpet pacer" not "carpet chewer" (apparently the two terms are almost identical in the original German). For propaganda reasons, the mistranslated version was spread. Hitler may have been nuts but he was no rug-muncher.
I can't speak as to its accuracy, but the "carpet chewer" story does come from an otherwise credible source: Shirer's "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich". I would guess even if the story wasn't mistranslated, it wasn't entirely literal, but rather a poetic description of his bizzare paroxysms.
#24
Old 08-17-2002, 09:20 PM
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Napoleon has a much better claim to the tilte of "The Little Corporal", but Hitler was a corporal during WWI.
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Old 08-17-2002, 09:38 PM
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I've found a reference in Shirer, quoting a a passage from Guderian's memoirs. It's one of Guderian's final encounters with Hitler in February of 1945.
Quote:
His fists raised, his cheeks flushed with rages, his whole body trembling, the man stood there in front of me, beside himself with fury and having lost all self-control. After each outburst, Hitler would stride up and down the carpet edge, then suddenly stop immediately before me and hurl his next accusation in my face. He was almost screaming, his eyes seemd to pop out of his head and the veins stood out in his temples.
I assume Guderian wrote in German - perhaps some other English writer mistranslated this passage is some other work? (or, it could be Allied wartime propaganda, of course).
#26
Old 08-17-2002, 10:45 PM
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Hi Indy!
Quote:
Ell

Apparently Hitler's nickname was "Wolf".
Also sometimes said "Wolfi". As far as I know this was the only nickname that he went under as an adult. I think that only Gelli Raubal and Eva Braun called him Wolfi to his face regularly though. I vaguely recall a letter from his sister Paula where she used Wolfi as address as well, but I might be mistaken.
Quote:
Osip

I cannot recall where but I have heard Hitler called "the little corporal"
Apparently Hindenburg habitually referred to him disdainfully as "that little corporal from Bavaria." It stuck with amongst others Churchill who also at times referred to him as "the little corporal." As noted the nickname is more famously attributed to Mr. Bonaparte.

As for “Der Teppichfresser" (note spelling) this does in fact refer metaphorically to his habit of pacing and thereby wearing carpets down.

Sparc
#27
Old 08-17-2002, 10:52 PM
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Hi Indy!
Quote:
Ell

Apparently Hitler's nickname was "Wolf".
Also sometimes said "Wolfi". As far as I know this was the only nickname that he went under as an adult. I think that only Gelli Raubal and Eva Braun called him Wolfi to his face regularly though. I vaguely recall a letter from his sister Paula where she used Wolfi as address as well, but I might be mistaken.
Quote:
Osip

I cannot recall where but I have heard Hitler called "the little corporal"
Apparently Hindenburg habitually referred to him disdainfully as "that little corporal from Bavaria." It stuck with amongst others Churchill who also at times referred to him as "the little corporal." As noted the nickname is more famously attributed to Mr. Bonaparte.

As for “Der Teppichfresser" (note spelling) this does in fact refer metaphorically to his habit of pacing and thereby wearing carpets down.

Sparc
#28
Old 08-18-2002, 03:20 AM
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Trivia Hijack:

During the Iran hostage crisis, the Canadian Embassy supplied some fake passports for some Americans to get out of the country.
One of the Americans got a German passport with the name,
Wolfgang A. Muller.
The Iranian checking passports pulled him out of the line.
German passports NEVER have middle initials, they always have the full name.
The American, a quick thinker, spoke in hushed tones:
"My middle name is Adolf, and they made an exception and let me use my middle initial instead."
He was allowed on the plane and escaped.
#29
Old 08-18-2002, 04:20 AM
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Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt, who oversaw Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in 1944, purportedly referred to Rommel as "Bubi" (Baby). There was a vast disparity in their ages. It does not appear to be a term of endearment, either.

On the other side of the fence, General George S. Patton's diaries and letters are supposedly rife with references to "Omar the Tentmaker," better known as his boss, General Omar Bradley.

A recent edition of Military History magazine has an interview with a former fifteen-year old conscript with the Luftwaffe antiaircraft corps. In that interview, he says his fellow gunners regularly referred to Field Marshal Hermann Goering as, "Meyer."

The term of course extends from the fairly famous (and variously translated) quote from Goering, which essentially stated, "if Allied planes ever bomb Berlin, you can call me Meyer," a short-lived and innacurate boast if ever there was one.

What I didn't know until I read that interview is that Meyer was a fairly common Jewish German name. I had always thought it was simply a nonsensical, flippant remark, but no, Goering was speaking like the classic Nazi asshole that he was, and was deliciously schooled by it. I'm glad the nickname stuck, at least with the kids.

(Apparently, everyone but me understands this nuance of the quote implicitly, but it was somehow lost on me. We learn something new every day, I guess.)
#30
Old 08-18-2002, 06:15 AM
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In his series of "Strange.." books, writer Frank Edwards, whose writings are full of the supernatural, mentioned a woman of the eighth century A. D., St. Odelia, whose prophecy very closely described Hitler and said that this ruler would be called the Antichrist. Edwards said Hitler "was indeed called that, and worse." My father left the Navy not long after the U. S. entered World War II, and presumably he was in a ship in the Pacific, so he said little about the Fuehrer but I'm sure that, like most people in Allied (and perhaps Axis) countries, he had some cuter sobriquets for Dolf.
#31
Old 08-18-2002, 02:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Captain Amazing


No. Here's what happened. Adolf Hitler's grandmother had the last name Schickelgruber. She fell in love with this guy named Johann Heidler, who was this Czech German, and she had a baby out of wedlock with him (probably, anyway. The identity of the baby's father is sort of in doubt), who she named Alois Schicklelgruber. Then, she and Heidler got married. When Alois Schickelgruber grew up, he changed his last name from Schickelgruber to Hitler, which is a variant of the name Heidler. Alois then would go on to father Adolf So, Adolf Hitler was always named Adolf Hitler. It was Alois who changed his name.
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#32
Old 08-18-2002, 02:56 PM
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German troops (at least, not sure about civilians) called Hitler GRÖFAZ, abbreviation of Grösster Feldherr Aller Zeite, The Greatest Warlord Of All Time.
Obviously, it was used when a political officer wasn't around...
#33
Old 08-18-2002, 04:10 PM
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...I'll need one of our pals in Orange to verify this, but I also recall that Dr. Artur Seyss-Inquart, the Nazi ruler of the Netherlands during its occupation, was often symbolized in graffiti by a number, "6 1/4," which is apparently what his last name sounds like in Dutch.
#34
Old 08-18-2002, 05:01 PM
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I guess Shirer's description of "the carpet chewer" is somewhat disputed (thanks to Sparc for the correct spelling, by the way). Here's more from "Hitler as his Associates Know Him, Part II. Hitler, Psychological Profile, OSS Study":


"Almost everyone who has written about Hitler has commented on his rages. These are well known to all of his associates and they have learned to fear them. The descriptions of his behavior during these rages vary considerably. The more extreme descriptions claim that at the climax he rolls on the floor and chews on the carpets. Shirer (279) reports that in 1938 he did this so often that his associates frequently referred to him as 'Teppichfresser'. Not one of our informants who has been close to Hitler, people like Hanfstaengl, Strasser, Rauschning, Hohenlohe, Friedelinde Wagner, and Ludecke, have ever seen him behave in this manner. Moreover they all are firmly convinced that this is a gross exaggeration and the informant of the Dutch Legation (655) says that this aspect must be relegated to the domain of 'Greuelmaerchen.' "

http://ess.uwe.ac.uk/documents/osssection3pt2.htm
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