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#1
Old 04-29-2003, 08:18 AM
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Anyone own or know about Rhodesian Ridgebacks (dog)?

I was at a friend's cottage last weekend and their were a few dogs there. A Weimar, Vislah, Retriever and a Ridgeback. By far and away the best behaving, best trained, nicest and quietest dog there was the Ridgeback. Know anything about them?

The owner did say he went to a training course with the dog and spent a lot of time with it, so I expect that that explains 90% of the dog's behaviour. The only problem he seems to have is if the dog picks up on a rabbit - GOODBYE! See you in a few hours with blood all over my face!

I've been looking at the US Ridgeback club: http://rrcus.org/
and they have tons of info, but I was wondering if any doper had an opinion on them. I won't be able to get a dog until I move into a house with a yard, but I'm researching now.

Thanks-
-Tcat
#2
Old 04-29-2003, 08:36 AM
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They're generally docile and even-tempered. But any dog has it in them to be a liability, its pretty much down to how you bring them up. Im sure if the owner of the Ridgeback had been the owner of any of the other dogs there, then that dog would have behaved the same.

Good luck!
#3
Old 04-29-2003, 08:36 AM
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I've met a few ridgebacks in my day, and a cow-orker of mine owns one that comes to work pretty regularly. The nicest dog you can imagine. Totally quiet at all times, walking around without disturbing anyone and coming when he calls, never failing. It's the only ridgeback I've known personally, but I've spent quite some time at dog shows and fields where dogs are allowed to run free, and ridgebacks always seem well-behaved, calm animals.

Note that they were originally bred to hunt lions, so it's not like they can't be tough when they want to.
#4
Old 04-29-2003, 09:15 AM
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re: Anyone own or know about Rhodesian Ridgebacks (dog)?

I would certainly hope that if somebody owned or knew about one, they'd realize it was a dog.
#5
Old 04-29-2003, 09:44 AM
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If you do a search on the boards for Rhodesian Ridge Back you'll see I started a thread a while back about them. My wife and I have a Male RR named Grissholm - or Griss - like I call him.

RR's were originally bred in Africa - Rhodesia - to defend against lions. Yes, they actually would defend their owners from bands of roving lions. RR's are notoriously courageous, loyal and very strong. For all those who comment on their being quiet, this is quite true as well. When they want to intimidate they use low growls. It is very eery, and very intimidating.

My wife and I took three weeks off from work, to take Griss to a training course. He is by far a wondrous pup. He never barks when someone is at the door, never even enters the kitchen or eating area when we are in it, and never, ever jumps on guests. As a matter of fact, we usually have to take our guests to see him. He likes our large family room downstairs in our house.

Another little story for you about the renown courage of the RR. Whilst camping with Mrs. Phlosphr and Griss, we were awoken at night by a very low growl. Scrambling out of our tent we saw Griss standing up, with his head bent not moving a muscle. He was growling at something in the woods that we could hear "walking" around our camp site. As it came closer, his growl got louder, and louder. It was so loud at one point my wife was getting quite anxious, as it was a very menacing growl. I grabbed the flashlight and figured out that there was a small herd of deer going by, so it was ok. But I'll tell you we were more scared of the growl coming out of Griss' mouth than anything else.

In all RR's are wondrous dogs. Extremely well behaved and obedient. One thing that could be considered a slight downfall, is their intense loyalty. That means they do not listen to anyone else.

The famed author Andrew Weil - health book author, bald with large white beard - lives in Tucson AZ and has twin RR's. That is where we initially got the idea to get one. One more thing, they are very expensive. our's cost more than a grand when all was said and done, after first vet visit and all.
#6
Old 04-29-2003, 10:27 AM
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I have a friend with a Ridgeback. It is also a well behaved dog. To have a well behaved Ridgeback, you need to train it and exercise it. If the critter gets plenty of exercise out of the house, then in the house it becomes a very large couch potato. Their owners tend to describe them as foodhounds - the dogs will eat as much food as they can whenever they can get it.

I went to a Ridgeback "party" - a gathering of people and dogs at a farm that allowed the Ridgebacks off their leads. Individually and as a goup, the Ridgebacks were well-behaved. They have a very rough play style amongst themselves. The pack would try to run one of the dogs down, and one or two dogs would try to herd the target dog by pushing into its body. The dogs seemed quite pleased with this - the people had to dodge out of the way occasionally. Also, as an example of a well-behaved food hound, when it was the people's turn to eat, the Ridgebacks wandered around with a "feed me" expression, but not a single one tried to take food.

They seem to be good dogs if you have the space and time for them. I thought about getting one, but I think my house is too small.
#7
Old 04-29-2003, 10:34 AM
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I met one once that was a therapy dog, when my great-grandmother was in the hospital a few years ago. He was gorgeous, and of course very friendly and well-behaved. Also quite large!
#8
Old 04-29-2003, 10:51 AM
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As for size our's is 75 pounds - large for a RR - and he's reddish with a dark muzzel. Absoluelty beautiful if I do say so for myself!

As for roaming room, we have a large modern log home, and about 10 acres that is our own, but about 500 acres of woods right behind our house. He runs alot. He loves to play with my tractor when I am mowing the lawn. (which reminds me I have to do that soon)
#9
Old 04-29-2003, 10:56 AM
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i have a ridgeback beagle mix and she is, without question, the sweetest, lovliest, cutest, best dog in the world

YES SHE IS! OH YES SHE IS! WHO'S A GOOD DOG???

I love the ridge of hair on her back that stands up when she gets excited
#10
Old 04-29-2003, 10:58 AM
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My sister has one: and he's pretty much the sweetest dog I've ever met. He knows that the cats are higher up on the totem pole than he is, and that my Dad is a sucker for taking him walkies.

Keep in mind that they don't always know their own strength... something to keep in mind with anyone who has problems staying on their own two feet at the best of times, and/or small children, lightweight furnature, etc.

___
<< Finals: that time frame when students' minds turn to mush, and professors go insane. >>
#11
Old 04-29-2003, 11:07 AM
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jarbabyj, that sounds like a neat mix! My dad-in-law has a beagle he uses for hunting- great dog. I could see the two temperments blending well.

Eth, I put (dog) in there to keep non-dog owners/lovers out...

Thanks for the info! I don't know when I'll be able to get one, but this is now the official dog for Tomcat...

-Tcat
#12
Old 04-29-2003, 11:11 AM
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Oh good thing you mentioned that Nightsong. Our 75 pound pup, knocks over my 3 year old nephew all the time, especially when competing for my attention, which he gets little of when nephew is over.

One thing I will say about him around kids is this, he would never nip or anything. So RR's are good with kids. Also, my nephew pulls his ears, tail, jowls, everything he can get his hand on, and Griss does nothing.
#13
Old 04-29-2003, 11:27 AM
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Okay I have met two not so well trained RRs. They had to be put down because they were taking down cattle.

But as with mst dogs, the problem was owner related, not enough time, training or stimulation.
#14
Old 04-29-2003, 02:24 PM
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I've met some sweet RRs. Of course it was obvious that the owners had put a lot of effort into their training. Also, they were active owners and kept up with their energy needs.

I've also met a couple out-of-control RRs. Their owners did nothing with them, and they were out killing small animals and jumping all over the place.

As long as you're recognize their exercise needs and train, you'll have a wonderful, beautiful dog.

Glad to see you researching early. I hate to sound like a broken record, but join a mailing list for the breed and you'll learn tons.
#15
Old 04-29-2003, 03:19 PM
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My boyfriend has a part boxer/part RR - and she is the sweetest dog I have ever met. She is loving, docile, even-tempered, does not bark much, and is very affectionate. She's large, and sheds quite a bit however.

If she does see a rabbit, be careful... she'll drag you across the pavement if need be. And around other dogs (whether excited or nervous), her ridge will stand up in the back
#16
Old 04-29-2003, 03:30 PM
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My 5 Year Old, 75# Ridgeback, Bayser, was truly our nemisis as a puppy.

After he brought us to the breaking point we called in a pro. About 5 in home obedience classes and 2 months in a "prong collar", he was finally broken of most of his worse habits .

Things Like:

1. Chewing through both the sheetrock & metal corner beads of a room he wanted to get out of.
2. Running around the den and living room so fast in circles that he'd literally be up on the walls in a sort of soup bowl effect.
3. Destroying so many shoes it would have made Imelda Marcos shed a tear.
4. Not coming when called.
5. Running out in the street.
6. Shredding a Leather Couch
7. Taking the toilet paper roll off the wall and making the house look like the Cheerleading Squad stopped by to pull a High School prank.

Unbroken Bad habits I Still Deal With
1. Jumping up in excitement on anyone who comes in the house. He brought my 70 year old Grandmother down on her ass so hard last month I though it was bye-bye hip.
2. Over-Aggressive protectiveness, especially around my daughters.
He bit a jogger who was in leash range as he ran by the girls while I was pulling them in their wagon.
He bit a mason who was using a blacktop rake in my vicinity.
3. He hates to get wet. I have to literally use a 6' Diameter patio umbrella when I take him out for a walk in the rain.
4. His evil snarl when someone goes near his bones.
5. Scratching the shit out of the window sills with his front paws to bark at every Tom, Dick and Rover that walks past the house.
6. An indescribable hatred of the mailman, who won't deliver the mail if the front door is open and there's only a screen or storm door between them.
7. Picking fights with every strange dog his size or larger
8. Being a total bed-hog

Even though I probably sound like Mr. or Mrs. Peterson in defense of their son Scott, I wouldn't trade him for all the tea in China (notice I didn't say all the weissbeir in Bavaria).

I'll continue putting up with all his flaws, those pine-needle like hairs that are almost impossible to clean up and his energetic, overzealous ways...After all, he's my Bayser boy & I love him.
#17
Old 04-29-2003, 03:31 PM
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You truly can learn something new every day on SDMB. I had seen the name Rhodesian Ridgeback on a car sticker, and assumed it was a J.R.Rowling invented Dragon Breed.
#18
Old 04-29-2003, 04:19 PM
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Our next-door neighbor had a Ridgeback named Andy or Charlie or Lucky or something like that. We got to know him pretty well (it's been a while, so I've forgotten the name).

He was a smart, strong, relatively well-behaved dog. He didn't bark too much, but he was obviously fairly territorial, and took his duties in the back yard seriously. Once he was introduced to us and knew we were no threat, he immediately warmed up to us. (I compare him to a friend's Rottweiler that way: very disciplined in his social connections.) We liked him too.

But: The owners weren't all that serious about keeping track of him. There was one specific incident where they had lent him to a friend with a German Shepherd to be walked, and when he came back, they let him out of the car unleashed. He spotted our cat and was off like a shot; I had to physically restrain the dog from chasing our cat through our front door and into our house. Things were a little tense after that between us and our neighbors, obviously. They were better about keeping him on a leash, but a little while later they sent him away to live with a relative on a farm. Clearly he was a little too much dog for them, or something.

From this I conclude that the Ridgeback would be a wonderful dog for somebody who's willing to put in the time. This is true for any dog, obviously, but I get the impression the Ridgeback is a little higher-maintenance than the average.
#19
Old 04-29-2003, 04:53 PM
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Sasserfras is 2 1/2 yr old mostly Rhodesian Ridgeback. Sasser was a pound puppy. I do not know what else she has in her, but I have had vets say everything from she is almost pure RR to she has some Pit in her.

She is a sweetheart who loves kids. But she is aggressive to certain other dogs, especially pit bulls and Chinese Pugs but will play with other breeds at the park when she is offleash. She has problems with men, especially if they are drug users. She has been raised around a cat and at first she was too rough with the kitty, but after some training and punishment they now get along great. The punishment I have done has been time-outs. Since she wants to be around people all of the time, being alone is a terrible punishment and she responds really well to it.

Sasser does not have a loud growl, but it is intimidating to say the least cause of her size. Sasser weighs about 90lbs. She is constantly on a diet cause she does like snacks. But she is a delicate eater and doesn't gulp down her chow.

One thing if you get a RR, be prepared to be the Alpha dog. You need to be in control or the dog will definitely take over and become a menace. You definitely need to take this breed to obedience school and I suggest you start with the puppy classes. The benefit of this is that the puppy will be able to socialize with other dogs while they are learning. Plus it will train you how to work with your dog.

Also you need to socialize the dog starting as a puppy with all different peoples. You will need to take him/her to places where s/he can meet a variety of ages as well as different skin types.

One thing I am happy that I did with Sasser is not to allow her to be food aggressive. She needs to sit before she is fed and allow people to touch her while she is eating. I can also take away her food or treats at any time. Any food that is hand given to her, she must take gently.

Sasser is a great companion. She is definitely a Mommy's girl who I am certain would protect me from danger. She hogs the bed and wants under the covers cause she gets cold easily since her hair is very short. And gosh do I love her.
#20
Old 04-29-2003, 05:09 PM
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MPSIMS, A True story...

Quote:
Originally posted by jellen92
...If she does see a rabbit, be careful... she'll drag you across the pavement if need be. And around other dogs (whether excited or nervous), her ridge will stand up in the back
[Estelle Getty]Picture it, Long Island, NY, Easter, 2000.[/Estelle Getty]

A beautiful Sunday Morning. The girls get up at the crack of dawn, wake up Mom & Dad so they can see what they got it their baskets. Hey, the weatherman was right...it didn't rain this year! That means the eggs are hidden outside! Yay! Come on Mom, Come on Dad, Come on Bayser.

"Hon, you want Coffee or A Tab?," asked the Mrs.
"Neither, it's too early for caffeine, grab me a boubon on the rocks," I grunted.

(All right, I admit, I hid the eggs a little too well the night before. I wanted the girls first outdoor Easter egg hunt to be memorable. Not like those shlocky ones they have at the White House or at Church when you're a kid and they're just strewn all over the lawn to the point Mr. Magoo could find a couple dozen in the matter of a minute).

After about a half hour, only 4 out of 12 eggs had been found. (I guess hiding a 1/2 dozen 15' up in the trees wasn't such a great idea after all).

Then, it happened.

Out of the ivy patch, he came. Bouncing around the back yard without a care in the world. A cute little gray bunny. No, he wasn't carrying a basket or wearing a bow tie, but he did look alot like the rabbit in the kid's story books.

Before we had the time to comprehend both how cute and coincidental this visit from one of the neighborhood rodents had been, things got a little hare-y.

Up sprang our Ridgeback, who was lying in a square patch of sunlight on the deck. Within a half second, the dog was chasing that poor rabbit all over the yard. All we saw gray and tan colored blur, similar to the entance and exit the Tazmanian Devil makes on the old Warner Bros. cartoons.

"Daddy, Stop Him!," the girls screamed in unison.
"Bayser, Don't Kill The Easter Bunny!," they shrieked in stereo.

I knew it was only a matter of time, that either:
A. That gray and tan hurricane swarming throughout the yard was gonna have a red eye pretty soon. Causing both girls irreparable mental damage.
or
B. Like Christmas, there are such a things as Easter Miracles and that fast moving rabbit was somehow gonna make the right moves and avoid being torn to shreds by a sharp set of canines.

Needless to say, my older daughter is currently seeing a therapist.






















SPOILER:
But that's because her Mom & I divorced last year, the rabbit came away unscathed
#21
Old 04-29-2003, 06:55 PM
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I'm glad to see that Ridgebacks are ok around kids, because we had a neighbor whose Ridgeback wanted to tear us to pieces. The owner told us a boy had hit it over the head with a baseball bat and that was why it hated children. Until reading this thread, I always wondered if the boy hit it because it was going to rip him to shreds, or because the boy was a little a$$hole. I guess I know now.

It was an intimidating dog, but not the most intimidating. I once lived near a large German Shephard whose felon owner had trained it to threaten anything that moved. That dog was worse.

However, a boy also hit me over the head with a baseball bat. I didn't even tear him to pieces, let alone generalize it to everything under 5 foot in height. Perhaps the same traits that make the Ridgeback so loyal also make it an unforgiving enemy?
#22
Old 04-29-2003, 08:06 PM
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I had a Ridgeback as a kid. Wonderful dog. Simply the sweetest animal I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. If the dog is brought up right, it will be a loyal, lovable and enjoyable pet. Our dog was the runt of his litter and because he was so small, the other puppies didn't give him room to nurse. The owner of the pups carried him around in a Snugli and fed him from a bottle. The result was a 120 pound dog that would love you to death if he could. He never barked once in his 11 years. He was very protective but not to the point of being aggressive, although I'm sure he would have taken off an attacker's head if someone had actually threatened our family.

The only bad things I can say about him is the begging for food, hating to be wet (my dad had to lift this giant dog into the bathtub. Not an easy feat), occasionally nosing through the trash, and the shedding. Minor things though.

I would recommend a Ridgeback to anyone, provided they can put the time into training him properly and taking him for walks regularly. If you can do that, you'll have a fab pet.

I miss my baby now!
#23
Old 04-29-2003, 08:45 PM
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A friend of mine has a RR, which is his world. To quote him, "Who needs a human mate when they've got a dog?" He brought it to North America from Zimbabwe, the small Southern African country that was called Rhodesia till 1980. Which brings me to my point.

Since most people in that country prefer to forget the country's former name (except when it comes to blaming someone else for the country's woes, but that's another story), I found it surprising that there were few PC-driven calls for the dogs to be called Zimbabwean Ridgebacks.

Does anyone know anything more about this? Other than sociohistoric reasons that make the name change impossible, is the problem simply that there isn't any word beginning with Z that could replace the word Ridgeback? I'm not calling for a name change or anything, just curious to know if anyone ever did.

Is this akin to the situation with Siamese cats or Pekinese?
#24
Old 04-30-2003, 07:57 AM
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I have read that the original breed name was "South African Lion Dog," and it was originally bred in SA for work/protection/police work. It could be used to bay lions, ie, keep them at bay while its owner lined up a shot, but would not be expected to attack and kill a lion.

I think the popularity spread to Rhodesia from SA.

In the US, the AKC classifies the RR as a sighthound. Sighthounds are considered risky to have off-lead because off-lead is their natural state and they revert to coursing (prey-chasing) behavior when the opportunity presents itself.
#25
Old 04-30-2003, 08:39 AM
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I have issues with dogs that bite, and even more issues with the owners that think it's just a "little idiosyncracy that he has". The poster who said this:
Quote:
He bit a jogger who was in leash range as he ran by the girls while I was pulling them in their wagon.
Quote:
He bit a mason who was using a blacktop rake in my vicinity.
better have good insurance, as well as a great attorney. Once a dog bites, it's not a matter of IF he will bite again, it's WHEN. Some friends have two RR, they have been "highly trained", but are still ticking timebombs. Oh, things are just fine unless kids are in the neighborhood, or the UPS driver comes by, or friends try to shake hands with someone.

I love dogs, and will always have at least one, but will not have an aggressive breed. As sweet as she is, my 6 year old mutt still has teeth, and you don't always know what is going through their heads. If she ever bit ANYONE, she'd be in the car being driven to the vet for the big blue shot immediately.

Yes, I've been bitten by a friend's dog, and this dog also bit their babysitter, AND one of their children's friends. Oh, but it was their puppy-wuppy... It died of "natural causes" while being boarded - if you ask me, it was a "mercy killing".

Sorry for the rant.
#26
Old 04-30-2003, 09:26 AM
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I was seriously considering a Ridgie for my first dog, but ended up getting a Norwegian Elkhound instead since I wasn't sure I could handle a dog the size of a Ridgie for my first. Despite the fact that they look nothing alike, they share a fair amount of temperament traits according to what I'd read. I was all set as a Ridgie for my next dog - I was planning on getting one from rescue - but then I met some retired racing greyhounds and have pretty much decided that's going to be my next dog. But I still have a fondness for Ridges.

JohnBckWLD, I hope you are seeing a good animal behaviorist about the biting. It's not clear from context if these were things done as a puppy or an adult dog. If my dog bit anyone unprovoked, after a trip to the vet to make sure there was nothing physically wrong, the next one would be to a behaviorist. If the biting repeated, as difficult as it woudl be, the dog would be put down.
#27
Old 04-30-2003, 04:53 PM
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A quick not about "leash behavior" vs. "off-leash behavior"-

Most working dogs, when leashed, believe that they are "working" (out with you, excercising you, taking care of you, etc). They will be much less indulgent of other animals or suspicious people, becuase they are protecting you.

Off leash, they are usually much more relaxed, as seen with bark park behavior.

Don't expect your dog to act the same way on-leash and off-leash. The dog sees those two scenarios very differently.

Our Newfs are always working when they are on-leash, and very different dogs off-leash. It takes an aware, trained owner to handle them, but that it is also due to their size and intelligence.
#28
Old 04-30-2003, 05:22 PM
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One more owner checking in.

Ours is also a rescue dog. Believed to be a 50-50 RR and Rottweiler. 100lbs, almost 2 years old.

Leo is very loyal and really needs to know where we are at all times. When my wife went on a 5-day trip recently, he spent every night moving from the couch to the front windows waiting for her to come home.

He has a very happy disposition, despite being abused and abandoned as a puppy.

He loves playing. And he is a big dog that does play roughly. Especially with other dogs. We were asked to not bring him back to the Doggy Day Care place, because he was a little too rough and intimidating to some of the smaller dogs. One beagle in particular responded by biting him, to which Leo also responded by biting. SInce a bite by Leo could be potentially lethal or maiming, this was not going to work for them.

He has never bitten a person intentionally. He has bitten me during play, but instantly relaxes his grip. He has not broken skin.

He needs lots of exercise. Long walks and play time.

Unlike some others listed above, Leo likes water and rain, but not baths.

He eats a lot, and does beg at the table, but does not attempt to steal food.

His world absolutely revolves around me and my wife, so he really wants to be with us and to please us. We have been able to use this for training.

The comment about establishing dominance as the Alpha is entirely true.

That's all I can think of right now.
#29
Old 04-30-2003, 09:50 PM
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ridgebacks dogs

I have had one. His name was Merlin. He was very strong but gental and tolerant. I remember once going to spank my son for some reason. Merlin grabed my wrist and would not allow any harm to come to my son. He did not hurt me. He held all of the qualities that a dog should.

I do recall that they can have hip displacement. My need to be aprt of your life. Large amounts of food and out the other end.

If I lived where I could I would get another. The best dog ever!!!!!

Oh yeah they were raised to hunt loins./
#30
Old 05-01-2003, 09:19 AM
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Paperbackwriter - I live in Southeastern Connecticut with my wife, and we have a full blooded RR. He too loves the water and the rain. We - my wife and I - had to establish early who the dominant couple are. I'm a rather big guy, 6'1" lean 220, Grissholm listens to me at all times. We are currently training him to only be in certain rooms. He is not allowed in the kitchen ever. He doesn't go in the living room either. Mainly because he doesn't like TV.

The Odd thing about our RR is he can amuse himself for hours in the back yard. He never wanders off, but sometimes I notice large holes dug next to rock and such. He's definitely a digger. But when I call him, he comes barreling out of the woods in less than a few seconds.
#31
Old 05-01-2003, 01:33 PM
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Phlosphr, we are up in the Hartford area. I'm about the same size as you. Once he understood the "pack structure", he was great.
We have tried to let his personality determine his behavior, within limits. An approach that I picked up from reading Elizabeth Marshall Thomas's books. He is not a working dog, and our only reason for having him around is as a companion, so we let him do more than many others would. But Rhodies make a great companion, as you've also discovered.
#32
Old 05-01-2003, 03:36 PM
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I had a RR as a child. His name was Hanibal and he was smarter than many people I've known. He was very gentle, loving and well behaved. BUT... if he saw a cat he was uncontrolable. He went through the screen door of my parents' house several times - which came out of my allowance! He also loved to ride in cars and would jump in wagging his tail and "smiling" if anyone had a car door open. Neighbors, strangers, ANYONE. The local dog-catcher got to know him so well that he'd drive to our street, just open the truck door and call Hanibal's name. They'd double the fine each time we had to go bail him out - which also came out of my allowance! It was worth every penny.
#33
Old 05-01-2003, 09:35 PM
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To Tomcat:

You will not be disappointed with choosing to be owned by an RR. I have two myself and was previously primarily a cat person. I still have two house lions that I would not trade for the world and my RR's love them dearly along with my IG (Italian Greyhound).

As to the other posters and to Tomcat as well, a ridgeback is not for everyone, they have to understand where they are in the Pack and yes they are very Pack oriented. They have to be trained in obedience in order to be a respectable member of society, people and dog socialization is crucial as an unsocialized RR is a danger to society. They will however, be a very loyal and trusting companion to you.

They were not bred to fight or hunt lions, they were bred to hold the wild african game at bay since the hunters of those days had to get really close in order to shoot at the game. They were the only breed who could successfully bay a lion and of course there are stories of them fighting them and living which would not be that far fetched.

My RR's play rough with each other but are very gentle with my house lions and my IG. They are very social and absolutely adore children, although I do not have any myself.

To Tomcat: I would definately make sure that you get one from a reputable breeder, there are many out there that have questionable temperments or health. I would suggest starting with the Ridgeback Rescue; Barbara Sawyer Brown is the coordinator and also a very respected breeder, they will be able to help you locate a puppy. They are rather expensive, even the pet quality ones. Be prepared to fill out questionaires, have people visit your home, be interrogated. If this does not happen do not buy from that breeder, reputable RR owners are very protective of their children and I would not be surprised if they do not insist on being listed as a co-owner. If you do not plan on showing the pup expect it to be sold on a spay/neuter contract. If you have any questions feel free to contact me.
__________________
"A Ridgeback will steal all of your heart and most of your bed"
#34
Old 05-01-2003, 09:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 2
To Tomcat:

You will not be disappointed with choosing to be owned by an RR. I have two myself and was previously primarily a cat person. I still have two house lions that I would not trade for the world and my RR's love them dearly along with my IG (Italian Greyhound).

As to the other posters and to Tomcat as well, a ridgeback is not for everyone, they have to understand where they are in the Pack and yes they are very Pack oriented. They have to be trained in obedience in order to be a respectable member of society, people and dog socialization is crucial as an unsocialized RR is a danger to society. They will however, be a very loyal and trusting companion to you.

They were not bred to fight or hunt lions, they were bred to hold the wild african game at bay since the hunters of those days had to get really close in order to shoot at the game. They were the only breed who could successfully bay a lion and of course there are stories of them fighting them and living which would not be that far fetched.

My RR's play rough with each other but are very gentle with my house lions and my IG. They are very social and absolutely adore children, although I do not have any myself.

To Tomcat: I would definately make sure that you get one from a reputable breeder, there are many out there that have questionable temperments or health. I would suggest starting with the Ridgeback Rescue; Barbara Sawyer Brown is the coordinator and also a very respected breeder, they will be able to help you locate a puppy. They are rather expensive, even the pet quality ones. Be prepared to fill out questionaires, have people visit your home, be interrogated. If this does not happen do not buy from that breeder, reputable RR owners are very protective of their children and I would not be surprised if they do not insist on being listed as a co-owner. If you do not plan on showing the pup expect it to be sold on a spay/neuter contract. If you have any questions feel free to contact me.
#35
Old 05-02-2003, 01:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 329
The one Ridgeback that I met was a wonderful animal...but, when we got out a basketball and started shooting some hoops in the driveway, it was like having Shaq out there! The dog, obviously having a great time, went after the ball without mercy. Trying to get a rebound was nearly impossible against that mass of solid muscle!
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