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#1
Old 05-24-2003, 04:08 PM
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Songs everyone will recognize, but no one know the name of.

Just the other day I hear Celestial Soda Pop by Ray Lynch. It is a great little song that I guarantee most of you have heard before, but never knew the title of.

What are some other examples of this? I think that O'Fortuna could fall under this category.
#2
Old 05-24-2003, 04:24 PM
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For a helluva long time I didn't know the name or even the artist of a really cool (in my opinion) song. Turned out to be Peter Gabriel's Solsbury Hill.
#3
Old 05-24-2003, 04:56 PM
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That song that Michael Jordan used to come out to. I have no clue what it is called.

That Whoo Hoo! song from Starship Troopers. That one I do know Song #2 by someone.
#4
Old 05-24-2003, 05:04 PM
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That would be Woo Hoo by Blur.
#5
Old 05-24-2003, 05:10 PM
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Don't know about "everyone" and "no one", but a lot of people think Space Oddity is called Major Tom. I guess anytime you give a pop song a title that's not in the lyrics, you're asking for trouble.

Quote:
Originally posted by J String
For a helluva long time I didn't know the name or even the artist of a really cool (in my opinion) song. Turned out to be Peter Gabriel's Solsbury Hill.
Definitely cool.

Quote:
{i}Muad'Dib[i]
...I think that O'Fortuna could fall under this category.
Is that the penny whistle version of "O Fortuna"?
#6
Old 05-24-2003, 05:12 PM
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Nice italicizing, TW.
#7
Old 05-24-2003, 05:17 PM
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The "Woo Hoo" song is actually called Song 2. What Michael Jordan song are we talking about?
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#8
Old 05-24-2003, 05:34 PM
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The Chicago Bulls player intro song, which I think is Sirius, by the Alan Parsons Project. At least it used to be. It fits the topic well.

I think Green Onions by Booker T and the MG's would fit in here. I had to actively seek it out.
#9
Old 05-24-2003, 06:24 PM
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There's Perpetuum Mobile by the Penguin Café Orchestra. A really great song that everyone's heard but no-one knows the name of.
#10
Old 05-24-2003, 06:36 PM
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For those who listen to 70s radio stations, there's the 1970 song "Tighter, Tighter" by the one-hit wonder Alive & Kicking. It the one that goes like this:

Hold on
Just a little bit tighter now, baby
I love you so much and
I can`t let go, no no no
Hold on, a just a little bit
Tighter now, baby


...

Another one from around the same era was the Ides of March tune "Vehicle". Almost everyone recognizes the song, but most everyone who hears the song a) doesn't know the title, and b) thinks it's Blood, Sweat and Tears -- it's a pretty close sound-alike:

I`m your vehicle, baby
I`ll take you anywhere you wanna go
I`m your vehicle, woman
By now, I`m sure you know

That I love you (love you)
I need you (need you)
I want you, got to have you, child
Great God in heaven
You know I love you
#11
Old 05-24-2003, 06:44 PM
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Thought of another one ... Greg Kihn's first top-10 hit. No ... not "Jeopardy", but this driving rocker with a twinge of surf-influenced rhythm guitar:

We had broken up for good
Just an hour before
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh
And now I`m staring at the bodies
As they`re dancing cross the floor
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh

And then the band
Slowed the tempo and
The music gets you down
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh
It was the same old song
With a melancholy sound
Uh uh uh uh uh uh uh uh

They don`t write em
Like that anymore
They just don`t write em
Like that anymore


What's the title? The tune is familiar to classic-rock fans, but the artist and title usually are not. It's "The Breakup Song (They Don`t Write `Em)".
#12
Old 05-24-2003, 07:30 PM
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The prelude to Act 3 of Longerin by Wagner. Used as heroic rescue music today, it was the prelude to what happened below.

"The Bridal Chorus" in the same opera was written for the bridal chamber scene in which intrigues were revealed.

Are you familiar with the Who song with the famous synthesizer play at he beginning? No not "Won't be Fooled Again", the one with the much better opening riff, with "It's Only Teenage Wasteland" in the chorus. Yep, that's "Baba O'Reily".
#13
Old 05-24-2003, 08:29 PM
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Okay, I always thought that the Ides of March recorded "Vechile," then Blood, Sweat, and Tears covered it. That cover is the one we're all familar with or so I thought. Are you sure BST didn't record a version, bordelond, I swear the lead singer of the version I'm thinking of is David-Clayton Jones (isn't that his last name? I'm drawing a blank).
#14
Old 05-24-2003, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Wolfian
Okay, I always thought that the Ides of March recorded "Vechile," then Blood, Sweat, and Tears covered it. That cover is the one we're all familar with or so I thought. Are you sure BST didn't record a version, bordelond, I swear the lead singer of the version I'm thinking of is David-Clayton Jones (isn't that his last name? I'm drawing a blank).
It's David Clayton Thomas, and as far as I know, BST never covered "Vehicle."
#15
Old 05-24-2003, 08:47 PM
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The Bob Dylan song with the refrain "Everybody must get stoned" is actually titled Rainy Day Woman #12 & 35.

What most people call "the Charlie Brown music" is titled Linus and Lucy.
#16
Old 05-24-2003, 09:18 PM
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Spanish Flea by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass. It's most often referred to as "The Dating Game theme".
#17
Old 05-24-2003, 09:26 PM
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"Classical Gas." I'd heard it dozens of times, but I didn't know the name of it until I saw an infomercial for "best instrumentals." Same with "Run, Don't Walk."
#18
Old 05-24-2003, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
"Everybody must get stoned"
Not only does nobody know the real name of the song, everybody hears that line and goes "Huh huhuh, stoned. He's talking about pot!"
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#19
Old 05-24-2003, 10:19 PM
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Suicide Is Painless.

Yes, there are people who know that the theme music to M*A*S*H is actually a song, but those who know (or heck, those who can sing it) seem to be a minority.

Through early morning fog I see
Visions of the things to be...
#20
Old 05-24-2003, 10:41 PM
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O fortuna?
The music from from the omen??
if so then its by Carl Orff, and is from a piece of music called Carmina Burana.... I think anyway.
#21
Old 05-24-2003, 10:59 PM
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It took me forever to figure out that the Buffalo Springfield song I really liked was called "For What It's Worth" - (Stop, hey, what's that sound?)
#22
Old 05-24-2003, 11:26 PM
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Jerry Goldsmith's Oscar-winning score to The Omen, especially its "Ave Satani" chorus, was very likely influenced by Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, but none of the latter work is present.
#23
Old 05-24-2003, 11:38 PM
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That song by The Who that many people call "Teenage Wasteland" is really named Baba O'Riley.

While we're here, does anybody know the name of the piano piece used in the chase scenes of The Keystone Kops movies? You know, duntaladunt-duntaladunt-duntala-duntala-duntala-dunt.
#24
Old 05-24-2003, 11:40 PM
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Everyone has heard "The Entertainer," but I don't think a lot of people know the name - I didn't until fairly recently. I forget the author - Scott Joplin, maybe?

Is that the song you were thinking of, Fear Itself? Agh, how do I ask that?
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#25
Old 05-24-2003, 11:41 PM
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Oh, and another song nobody knows the name of is The Powerhouse, which appears in every cartoon where a character in a factory gets smushed and compressed into a little box (or anything of the sort).
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#26
Old 05-24-2003, 11:41 PM
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When my gee-tar is handy, I often play a few bars of Alice's Restaurant (without lyrics) and challenge people to name that tune. Everyone recognizes it, but not a lot can name it until I start singing.
#27
Old 05-25-2003, 12:15 AM
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Barrytown: I needed to see VH1's top 100 countdown to know that one!
#28
Old 05-25-2003, 12:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Eats_Crayons
Suicide Is Painless.

Yes, there are people who know that the theme music to M*A*S*H is actually a song, but those who know (or heck, those who can sing it) seem to be a minority.
I can sing it. I also feel the need to point out two things related to this.

a) Even if its only existance was as the theme of MASH the TV series (a logical impossibility, though I'll address that in my second point), it's still, by definition, 'actually a song'.

b) It was written by Robert Altman's then 14-year old son, Mike (and Johnny Mandel) FOR the movie which is why it was used as the theme of the TV series. (I include the note that Mike Mandel was only 14 when he wrote it for no reason other than it's a fairly neat little fact. Most 14-year olds music/poetry about suicide ain't this good, folks. )
#29
Old 05-25-2003, 12:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tengu
Mike Mandel
ACK! Mike Altman! Damn brain!
#30
Old 05-25-2003, 01:19 AM
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Scott Joplin wrote "The Entertainer", and the movie The Sting made it famous, but it's not chase scene music, and it doesn't fit the rhythm pattern Fear Itself gives above.
#31
Old 05-25-2003, 01:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Marley23
Oh, and another song nobody knows the name of is The Powerhouse, which appears in every cartoon where a character in a factory gets smushed and compressed into a little box (or anything of the sort).
I came into this thread specifically to post that. There's no "the," though. It's Powerhouse, by Raymond Scott, and believe it or not it was never intended for use in a cartoon. He was an experimental musician who was trying to make real music that is evocative of a specific place or experience, and damn did he accomplish that - it's a pity he's not better-known. Several of his pieces have been used in cartoons from Looney Tunes on.
#32
Old 05-25-2003, 01:44 AM
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I didn't think so, but I don't know my Keystone Kops. Hmm...
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#33
Old 05-25-2003, 01:53 AM
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Wow! Okay, this BARELY fits the topic... but if there are any Monty Python fans out there, I just learned something interesting. There's a song they sing in a couple of sketches, I'd always wondered what it was. It's in the Mattress sketch, for one.
Well, as I was searching for something else (for the "Lyrics that Make You Cringe" thread), I found it! It's called Jerusalem, and it's by Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
It starts "And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the Holy Lamb of God
on England's pleasant pastures seen?"

I thought it was either a hymn or an original song (because I though the first line was "And did those teeth..."
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#34
Old 05-25-2003, 02:34 AM
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Alice's Restaurant--the melody was used at the '8' song on Sesame Street.
#35
Old 05-25-2003, 03:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Loneraven
There's Perpetuum Mobile by the Penguin Café Orchestra. A really great song that everyone's heard but no-one knows the name of.
Good Call! This is exactly the sort of song I was thinking of when I started this thread. I have heard this song dozens of times yet have never known, or even given thought to, the title.
#36
Old 05-25-2003, 03:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Marley23
Not only does nobody know the real name of the song, everybody hears that line and goes "Huh huhuh, stoned. He's talking about pot!"
Actually, I always thought that he was singing about people getting hit with rocks. I thought that it was about remaining good-natured and upbeat when you are forced to go through life troubles and tribulations.
#37
Old 05-25-2003, 05:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Muad'Dib
Actually, I always thought that he was singing about people getting hit with rocks. I thought that it was about remaining good-natured and upbeat when you are forced to go through life troubles and tribulations.
Personally, I think Dylan had both meanings in mind when he wrote the song.
#38
Old 05-25-2003, 06:09 AM
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I only found out recently that "The Benny Hill Music" is called "Yackety Sax."

Fear Itself, going by your spelling, I'm thinking that it's the same classically-influenced intro that starts the band Extreme's "Play With Me." Does that help anyone identify it?
#39
Old 05-25-2003, 07:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Marley23
Wow! Okay, this BARELY fits the topic... but if there are any Monty Python fans out there, I just learned something interesting. There's a song they sing in a couple of sketches, I'd always wondered what it was. It's in the Mattress sketch, for one.
Well, as I was searching for something else (for the "Lyrics that Make You Cringe" thread), I found it! It's called Jerusalem, and it's by Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
It starts "And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the Holy Lamb of God
on England's pleasant pastures seen?"

I thought it was either a hymn or an original song (because I though the first line was "And did those teeth..."
Actually, it is originally a poem (ca 1804) by William Blake, melody added later (1916) by Charles Parry. ELP covered it on their album "Brain Salad Surgery".

William Blake - Rather an interesting person.

Lyrics and really tinny melody
#40
Old 05-25-2003, 07:54 AM
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And do many realise that the theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey is actually called "Also Sprach Zarathustra", by Richard Strauss, and not "Theme from 2001: A Space Odyssey" ?!?!
#41
Old 05-25-2003, 09:19 AM
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And there is quite a bit more to it ("TSZ") than just the opening chords and the tympani.
#42
Old 05-25-2003, 09:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Marley23
Wow! Okay, this BARELY fits the topic... but if there are any Monty Python fans out there, I just learned something interesting. There's a song they sing in a couple of sketches, I'd always wondered what it was. It's in the Mattress sketch, for one.
Well, as I was searching for something else (for the "Lyrics that Make You Cringe" thread), I found it! It's called Jerusalem, and it's by Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
It starts "And did those feet in ancient time,
Walk upon England's mountains green?
And was the Holy Lamb of God
on England's pleasant pastures seen?"

I thought it was either a hymn or an original song (because I though the first line was "And did those teeth..."
I remember hearing this in one sketch about the "Church police"


Quote:
Originally posted by screech-owl
Actually, it is originally a poem (ca 1804) by William Blake, melody added later (1916) by Charles Parry. ELP covered it on their album "Brain Salad Surgery".

William Blake - Rather an interesting person.

Lyrics and really tinny melody
Here is a slightly better sounding version:And did those feet

This hymn/poem provided the title for the movie "Chariots of Fire", one of my all time favorites. It's the hymn the congregation sings at the end of the memorial service, in the closing moments of the film.
#43
Old 05-25-2003, 10:38 AM
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How about the theme to The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? Turns out it's an Eagles tune, Journey of the Sorcerer, which I was happy to be able to get from the iTunes music store.

In the book of Hitchhiker's radio scripts, Douglas Adams mentions that many people wrote to the BBC, wondering what that theme music was, and were surprised to learn that they already had it in their record collections.
#44
Old 05-25-2003, 11:27 AM
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Anyone who grew up watching old Warner Brothers cartoons is familiar with a whole repertoire of classical music, even if they don't realize it. (How many people know the "early morning music" in those cartoons is from Grieg's Peer Gynt, for example?)

It's been in a million commercials over the last five years, so just about everyone recognizes Benny Goodman's "Sing Sing Sing," even if they only know it as "that swing song with the drum solo."

Sticking to the same era, everyone recognizes Glenn Miller's "In the Mood." And most folks have heard "Mood Indigo" and "Take the A Train" by Duke Ellington in some commercial/TV show/movie or another.
#45
Old 05-25-2003, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Biffy the Elephant Shrew
It's David Clayton Thomas, and as far as I know, BST never covered "Vehicle."
Allmusic.com confirms it -- BST never recorded "Vehicle". The David Clayton Thomas sound-alike on "Vehicle" is a young Jim Peterik, who later fronted the '80s rock group Survivor.
#46
Old 05-25-2003, 12:38 PM
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Jerusalem is practically a second National Anthem for many in England. It's sung at the Last Night of the Proms, at political party annual conferences as well as at church.
#47
Old 05-25-2003, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Wumpus
Sticking to the same era, everyone recognizes Glenn Miller's "In the Mood." And most folks have heard "Mood Indigo" and "Take the A Train" by Duke Ellington in some commercial/TV show/movie or another.
Names of a bunch of instrumentals people have heard, but may not know the names of:

"Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu" - Domenico Modugno, better known as "Volare". "Volare" later became the de facto title of the song.
"Theme from 'A Summer Place'" - Percy Faith
"Theme from 'Summer of '54" - Peter Nero
"Fire on High" - ELO
"I Robot" - [Dr. Evil air-quotes]The Alan Parsons Project[/Dr. Evil air-quotes]
"Frankenstein" - Edgar Winter Group
"La Grange" - ZZ Top (has some lyrics)
"Bouree" - Jethro Tull
"Rise" - Herb Alpert

...

Speaking of Ellington ... you know that song "You Can Feel It All Over" by Stevie Wonder? It's actually titled "Sir Duke".

How about Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give it Up, Pt. 1"? I heard that song forever before I knew the title. The title appears in the song, but not until the end of the song, and it is sung fairly indistinctly on a backing vocal track.

Here's another good one I'm surprised hasn't been mentioned yet -- "Valotte" by Julian (not John) Lennon, heard frequently on light-rock stations:

Sitting on a pebble by the river playing guitar
Wond'ring if we're really ever gonna get that far
Do you know there's something wrong?
'Cause I've felt it all along
#48
Old 05-25-2003, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Another one from around the same era was the Ides of March tune "Vehicle". Almost everyone recognizes the song, but most everyone who hears the song a) doesn't know the title, and b) thinks it's Blood, Sweat and Tears -- it's a pretty close sound-alike:
I've gotta take exception to this one. Anyone who's ever been in a high scool or college marching band recognizes the tune of "Vehicle", even if we don't know the words.
#49
Old 05-25-2003, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Tengu
b) It was written by Robert Altman's then 14-year old son, Mike (and Johnny Mandel) FOR the movie which is why it was used as the theme of the TV series. (I include the note that Mike Mandel was only 14 when he wrote it for no reason other than it's a fairly neat little fact. Most 14-year olds music/poetry about suicide ain't this good, folks. )
I knew that it was written for the movie -- most people who know it's a song are people who heard it in the movie first (gah! I've met a lot of people who thought the words came later!).

That it was written by a 14-yr-old is news to me... Sounds like the kid had a real fun time in highschool.
#50
Old 05-25-2003, 04:22 PM
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Todd Rundgren - I Saw The Light (people often think it's called In Your Eyes)

Kiki Dee - Amoureuse (not keen on the song but it fits this thread)

Allman Bros - Jessica (known in the UK as 'the music from that car programme')
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