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#1
Old 06-05-2003, 02:15 AM
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What is the Advantage of Painting Your Street Numbers on Your Curb?

A little while back a man came to our house asking if we wanted him to paint the numbers to our address on our front curb. We said we weren't interested at that time, and he said alright, but informed us having the numbers painted was a good security precaution. I found that interesting, and have heard that a couple more places since--so apparently he wasn't just trying to make a sale.

Exact how is painting your numbers on your curb a security precaution? The only thing I can think of is maybe it would make your house easier for the police to spot in an emergency. Is that the only reason? Or is/are there another/others?

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#2
Old 06-05-2003, 02:28 AM
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That was the reason I got it done. Luminous paint that is easy for emergency vehicles to spot unlike house numbers. My brother the fireman says it is true - they use the same principle with luminous reflectors in the middle of the road where the hydrants are.
#3
Old 06-05-2003, 02:49 AM
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Having tried to find people's houses in lower-income neighborhoods, I can tell you that I hope they don't have some keel over in those houses. Unless they drag the person outside in the lawn, the ambulance may take a while to find them.

Realistically, of course, I guess you'd be out there waving them down, but what if you couldn't, or no one else were home?

Plus, you drive the pizza guys crazy.

Get a decent set of numbers on the house!
#4
Old 06-05-2003, 03:45 AM
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What they said. I delivered both pizzas and medical supplies during my school days. Numbers on the curb make life SO much easier. Unless you have big glowing numbers on the front of your house, bushes, trees, heck even shadows make reading them difficult. Plus, you don't only help yourself out, you help your neighbors out too. If I'm looking for 3543 and you are 3541, I'm pretty sure I'm close.

-Tcat
#5
Old 06-05-2003, 03:57 AM
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People's usual house numbers suck.

Gold reflective numbers may look pretty and shiney in the daytime, but at night they're as black as the house is. Sometimes people put black numbers on a brown house.

Even worse, others have a number on their mailbox, but not their house. If two houses are across from eachother, it's sometimes difficult to figure out which is which. If there's five boxes in a row, then you're really screwed. Even worse, the numbers will be on the side of the box, blocked from view by the other boxes. Often times the number is only on one side of the box, the side I'm not looking at.

Around here we have these nice green reflective signs that are easy to see, unfortunatly people put them in bad places too. Often their on mailboxes, which helps the mail man out maybe, but not the pizza guy or paramedic. Other smart people put the sign on it's own stick in their yard, if they're really smart they won't put it in an ambiguous location like between their driveway and their neighbors. Others stick these signs on their house, which is helpful, but only if you pull out a flashlight and shine it at the house. By the road is best.

As for curb numbers, I don't even look for them. Most people don't have them, and when they do, they're so faded that they're practically unreadable at night anyway.

Only about 1/3 of the houses I go to have visable numbers. The only thing that saves the rest is that after dealing with this for a long time you tend to become good at guessing which house is the correct one. Needless to say, a paramedic who goes to far fewer houses than a pizza guy is going to need more help finding the house. And I still get screwed sometimes when there's eight houses in a row with no number on a street that doesn't follow any sort of numbering pattern.
#6
Old 06-05-2003, 06:15 AM
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I was a pizza guy for about a year over in a super rich neighborhood in dallas..

of course everything you guys say is correct, downright pain in the ass. at night its impossible, hell even in the daytime it was hard as hell, you definitely had to guess half the time, as people would put their numbers in such great locations as:

on the front of the house, but behind a bush!

in a flowerbed, with tall flowers!

on the TOPS of steps leading up to the house!

and my favorite, in their ass!

So many hosues had no visible numbers it was amazing.. i swear it is a law in texas that you have to have visible numbers.. i dont know for sure but wow, it should be. With 2 and 3 family mansions around, it really sucked to have to disturb 3 or more people just to find the right person.

so, for the love of god, put your numbers on both curbs on your driveway edges, or right on the curb right infront of your house.

if you dont have curbs, put a small reflective sign in your yard close to the street.. dont hide it behind plants or be cutesy by putting it on your mailbox.. cause your mailbox is most likely way too far away to actually see correctly
#7
Old 06-05-2003, 06:18 AM
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I deliver pizzas part-time (it's a *really* fulfilling job... *cough*) and numbers on the curb are fantastic, especially when on a main road. On side streets you can cruise along at 15kmh trying to divine what the houses' numbers are, but on a main road you have no hope unless you want to annoy everyone behind you. Half the time I have to keep circling in concentric circles until I eventually see the number hidden away.

I'd expect it would apply for the emergency services as well. Plus you won't have irate pizza deliverers when you combine this with no light on!
#8
Old 06-05-2003, 06:21 AM
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So, you get your number on the curb and then you park your car right in front of it...............
#9
Old 06-05-2003, 06:30 AM
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That's what I was thinking, herman and/or bill. If you paint numbers on a curb, what's to stop anyone from parking in front of it? Unless there's a hydrant right there, or it's a yellow curb, or something like that. Wouldn't it be just as likely that someone would be there?
#10
Old 06-05-2003, 08:04 AM
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Quote:
That's what I was thinking, herman and/or bill. If you paint numbers on a curb, what's to stop anyone from parking in front of it?
Presumably, you tell them not to. I mean, it should be the curb in front of your house, so you just can ask people not to. Do stange people regularly park in frontt of your house?
#11
Old 06-05-2003, 08:33 AM
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If it's right next to or on the driveway entrance, that part of the kerb should be clear of parked cars.
#12
Old 06-05-2003, 08:37 AM
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It's pretty handy when you're crawling home from the boozer, in the gutter, and you're nearly blind with the drink...
#13
Old 06-05-2003, 08:43 AM
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Well, I dunno about where you guys live, but the homeowner here rarely has the authoity to tell people not to park in front of his house. That's the jurisdiction of the township.

Also, there's nothing wrong with parking next to a driveway. It's not illegal, certainly - although this might be different in other communities.
#14
Old 06-05-2003, 10:05 AM
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Most subdivisions don't have people parking in the street.
#15
Old 06-05-2003, 10:08 AM
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Around our area, local charities send out volunteers to paint your number on the curb, and in return you (the homeowner) kick back a few bucks to the charity doing the painting. Almost everyone complies and it is really helpful because the house numbers are often hard to see.
As an aside, although nearby there is a upper income village (Note: on Long Island, village != quaint, cozy, idyllic hamlet: village = suburban municipality) that, although many have little good to say about it, does seem to do something smart - many (if not most) of the homeowners attach house numbers to a tree next to the curb, these number facing, and roughly the height of, the view of a driver in an approaching car. Very easy to see, so no need to putz around on the roads looking for house numbers.
#16
Old 06-05-2003, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by smiling bandit
Do stange people regularly park in frontt of your house?
All the time.

What's puzzling me is how it can be legal to paint what must be public property?
#17
Old 06-05-2003, 10:25 AM
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If you're the only one in your neighborhood to have the house number on the curb, it does little good, as people won't be looking there.

The value of having street numbers on the curb is more or less proportional to their frequency. A blocked number is completely worthless but any numbers that can be seen are clues to other addresses.
#18
Old 06-05-2003, 12:25 PM
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quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by smiling bandit
Do stange people regularly park in frontt of your house?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

They are neighbors but that makes the no less strange.

(I
#19
Old 06-05-2003, 12:25 PM
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quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by smiling bandit
Do stange people regularly park in frontt of your house?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

They are neighbors but that makes the no less strange.

(I might
#20
Old 06-05-2003, 12:26 PM
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quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by smiling bandit
Do stange people regularly park in frontt of your house?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

They are neighbors but that makes the no less strange.

(I might not of clicked submit so I'm gonna hit it again, sorry for a double post if any)
#21
Old 06-05-2003, 01:27 PM
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Let's get this thread restarted on some key issues.

1. Many municipalities ban painting of house numbers on curbs. This is their curbs, not yours. What gets painted on them is under their control and many places really want to limit what goes there. E.g., what if people starting painting their curbs red or yellow? I have read articles about people getting a warning to remove the numbers the day after they are painted on. So check with your local government before having this done.

2. The main purpose of painting numbers on the curb is to make money for the painter. Some groups that do this are of the "Traveller" variety. They don't know or don't care if they are breaking the law.
#22
Old 06-05-2003, 01:35 PM
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My favorites are the houses that have the built-in numbers on the houses with backlights. The LEDs or whatever in there must be controlled by a light sensor, because the entire neighborhood has them lit at night, even if they're not home.
#23
Old 06-05-2003, 01:56 PM
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This practice depends a lot on where you live. In cities, cars will be parked all along a street. (Although it is illegal to park within five feet of a driveway in my city, this is seldom enforced.) And most of the suburbs around here don't have curbs at all.

Then there is also the issue of snow. Curbs here will be obscured as many as six months a year because of piled snow or piled leaves.

In short, painting numbers on curbs is virtually unheard of around here.
#24
Old 06-05-2003, 08:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by herman_and_bill
So, you get your number on the curb and then you park your car right in front of it...............
Dumb and dumber
The city I worked for, a few years ago, got some kind of federal grant to put kids to work during the summer. They grouped them in squads of 10 with a DPW worker as their boss. They proceded to spend the grant by painting a 12 inch wide line from the curb to the middle of the road, to signify the location of fire hydrants. It worked just great. Then, November rolled around and the first snow fell. In the spring, after the snow plowing and salting, guess what? All gone.:wally
#25
Old 06-05-2003, 10:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by SmackFu
Most subdivisions don't have people parking in the street.
Nearly every subdivision I've ever seen has parking in the street.
#26
Old 06-06-2003, 12:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by dantheman
Nearly every subdivision I've ever seen has parking in the street.
Ditto. Even if there are large driveways, a lot of people choose to park cars in the street--usually in the most inconvenient place (for everybody else) they can possibly find. The only places I can think of that would forbid this would be places controled by up-tight homeowner's associations that would also frown on painting stuff on the curbs.
#27
Old 06-06-2003, 02:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by SirRay
As an aside, although nearby there is a upper income village (Note: on Long Island, village != quaint, cozy, idyllic hamlet: village = suburban municipality) that, although many have little good to say about it, does seem to do something smart - many (if not most) of the homeowners attach house numbers to a tree next to the curb, these number facing, and roughly the height of, the view of a driver in an approaching car. Very easy to see, so no need to putz around on the roads looking for house numbers.
This is true of the suburbs where my parents and sister live as well. They're middle class suburbs, so not every house was issued with a suitably large tree. Some people have them on the pole for their driveway lights, or the pole holding up the mailbox; some even on poles specially placed just for the sign. But better than 2/3 of the houses have a reflective sign with the house number placed close to the road somewhere. I seem to remember my mother mentioning that the local volunteer fire departments had been selling them, partly as a fundraiser, partly because it helps them out.
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#28
Old 06-06-2003, 03:25 AM
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This is interesting. I have never heard of people putting their house numbers on the curb before.
#29
Old 06-06-2003, 08:56 AM
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I can tell you this much: Your new paper carrier will LOVE you forever if your number is on the curb. It's nearly impossible to find house numbers at 3:00 a.m.

Trust me.

karol (aka "The Papergirl")
#30
Old 06-06-2003, 10:21 AM
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Painting numbers on the curb must be common(or mandatory) in some areas. The subject was of some importance in the testomony of the limousine driver in the OJ Simpson trial.
#31
Old 06-06-2003, 12:33 PM
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I've seen numbers on curbs around here, but it's pretty rare. Snow in winter, leaves in fall, and parked cars any time of the year means that you will likely not be able to see the number. OTOH, most houses have the address numbers mounted right next to the front door.

Have you ever seen houses where the address is spelled out in fancy cursive wriitng? Like, if the address is 41225, the sign will say "Four One Two Two Five" in ornate script? God, I hate that! You can't read the damn sign fast enough while driving by, so you have to come to a complete stop in the street. I can only assume that the people who use these "numbers" have never tried to find a house that is so identified. 'Cause if they had, they'd rip down those words and get some normal, easy-to-read house numbers.
#32
Old 06-06-2003, 03:38 PM
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Growing up in Southern California, all of the houses around us had the numbers, black with a reflective white background, painted on the curb. They lasted a couple years and every so often someone would come along and paint them new, then leave a bill for the painting behind, usually about $5. My father loved it because he never paid it and got the work done for free. After all, he hadn't asked for it done in the first place.

I can say that it would really have helped later when I lived in Massachusetts if people would have put their numbers *anywhere* on their building. I swear, I never could find street names or numbers on buildings in the four and a half years I lived there....
#33
Old 06-06-2003, 03:55 PM
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bodypoet... if you're delivering papers at 3 AM.. Isn't it too dark to read the curb?

Besides, as someone noted earlier, it only makes sense if everyone in the neighborhood does it, too - otherwise, why would anyone look at the curb, and if they did look, why would they assume those were the house numbers?

I think it looks like graffiti, to tell the truth. It looks ugly. Better to have your number emlazoned on your mailbox by the street or right next to the front door in big numerals than to have it buried on a curbside.
#34
Old 06-06-2003, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
I think it looks like graffiti, to tell the truth. It looks ugly. Better to have your number emlazoned on your mailbox by the street or right next to the front door in big numerals than to have it buried on a curbside.
Some of the most neat and orderly graffiti I've ever seen.

As someone who has previously worked in the "delivery industry" I can also testify as to how much easier it is for us when you have your address numbers painted on your curve.

They are visible from a moving car so instead of us having to take our eyes off the road in order to hunt down where an address might be we can keep easy track of where we are. When the numbers are on the curve we know where to look for them and that they will always be well lit (if your neighborhood has streetlights anyway). Mailbox addresses are a pain if the numbers aren't large enough, but at least those are visible. It's when the addresses are either obscured in darkness or hidden away entirely that you are just making things harder on yourself in terms of late pizzas or paramedics. So if numbers on the curve aren't an option then I'd at least suggest backlighting the address (and remembering to have it on).

Of course we don't get much snow down here in Houston so that might make them a little more useful year round. But when cars are parked in front of the numbers we can usually use the surrounding addresses as a guide.
#35
Old 06-06-2003, 09:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by dantheman
bodypoet... if you're delivering papers at 3 AM.. Isn't it too dark to read the curb?
...Better to have your number emlazoned on your mailbox by the street or right next to the front door in big numerals than to have it buried on a curbside.
Generally my headlights (I drive my routes, although I do a lot of hopping in and out to run up driveways) light up the curbs enough to see the numbers. Otherwise, I have to pull into drives and search around for house numbers, assuming that I'm not in one of the few neighborhoods that have standard, well-lit, BIG house numbers on every house. I worry about having to wander around folks' yards in the dark.
I have worked in one neighborhood in which each and every house had the big numbers you're referring to. *sigh* It was heaven for paper carriers. Unfortunately, it's not common around here...those numbers have to be pretty darn big, well-lit, and clear in order to be easy to read. Even in the heavenly neighborhood, it can be slow going if there is the slightest rain or mist.
If I'm looking for a particular house, I always check the curbs first; some neighborhoods have them, some don't. Mailbox numbers can be helpful too, but some of my neighborhoods have clusters of mailboxes rather than individual ones by each drive.
Of course, delivery people will eventually figure it all out, but it can have a serious effect on the PIA factor involved in new routes or one-time deliveries.
#36
Old 06-06-2003, 09:27 PM
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Maybe they differ in how they're applied to the curb, Azael, because I've seen some that were just spraypainted. That's what I mean when I say they look graffitic.

I can understand if an entire development does this and also has few if any cars parked along the curb, but it just seems more sensible to have a highly visible set of numbers on the house itself - that way there's no question to which house it belongs to. Oh, and also you won't have to go through a shakedown by the local charity.
#37
Old 06-07-2003, 12:57 AM
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It may be helpful to distinguish that some neighborhoods of single-family dwellings have their mailboxes roadside, while others have them on the house.

Putting the numbers in reflective paint on both sides of a roadside mailbox would be the ideal, IMO, because:[list=1][*]Less likely that a car parked in the steet will block the number.[*]A car's own headlights will 'light up' the numbering, rather than relying on the homeowner to have a front light on.[*]The number faces the driver while they are still tens of yards away. Curbside numbers are at an oblique angle until you are on top of the house.[*]It'll help the postal deliver, for sure.[/list=1]

Of course, not all houses have roadside mailboxes, and not all domiciles are single-family units.

The next best thing would be, IMO, large black letters on a yellow background sign with a low wattage light with a light sensor for it to go on at night tacked up right next to the entrance of the house, visible from the roadside.

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#38
Old 06-07-2003, 01:11 AM
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Most of the houses in my neighborhood have reflective white numbers stenciled on a black background on the curb right where the driveway begins. No one's parking that close to a driveway (of course, out here in the Wide Open West, there's street parking going begging), and the numbers are easy to read. In other neighborhoods, I've seen the numbers painted two to a driveway, on the places where the pavement starts to curve down. Every few years, someone comes by with the stencils and spray paint and does them over for a few dollars apiece.
#39
Old 06-07-2003, 02:30 AM
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I'm an EMT and drive an ambulance and had to register to post in this topic.
The advantage is I love street numbers on curbs. Nothing makes finding places easier than those. Almost everyday I end up having to make annoying U-turns in the middle of busy traffic cause I couldn't find the address and I over shoot the location, it happened twice today. I don't have to turn my head to see the curb numbers, and I can keep driving my normal speed. If you don't have curb numbers I end up having to keep slowing down at every house/store/business in the rare chance i get a glimpse of something that remotely resembles a street number.
#40
Old 06-07-2003, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by moriah


The next best thing would be, IMO, large black letters on a yellow background sign with a low wattage light with a light sensor for it to go on at night tacked up right next to the entrance of the house, visible from the roadside.
I think that's unlikely to happen, though, because most home owners would consider it extremely unattractive to have big yellow signs tacked onto their houses...and actually, the same goes for some people with their mailboxes. It seems to me that curbside numbers, if painted neatly with reflective paint, also provide the visibility without all the hassles of aesthetics--even if people object to them, the curbs don't belong to them and can be painted any way the local authorities please. This also gets rid of house-to-house variations, which can really trip you up even if every single house has well-displayed numbers in its own right.
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