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#1
Old 09-24-2003, 05:44 PM
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FedEx, UPS, and the post office: what's the dang difference?

Suppose I got a big package, say a computer to deliver from one place to another within this country. What would make me want to use one service over the other? Are they just competitors with similar prices and services, when it comes to large packages?
#2
Old 09-24-2003, 05:57 PM
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FedEx, UPS, and USPS offer different services and different prices. One example: UPS and FedEx offer parcel pickup; USPS does not.
#3
Old 09-24-2003, 06:37 PM
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UPS is GOOD at what they do!!!
#4
Old 09-24-2003, 07:08 PM
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Each has its own particular strengths.

USPS excels at moving letters. With boxes, they're not so good at keeping track of a package's progress, or at keeping it intact.

UPS excels at tossing boxes into trucks and moving them from Point A to Point B in a few days.

FedEx excels at tossing packages and packets onto airplanes, flying every single one of them to Tennessee, sorting them, then flying them out to wherever they're going. The intelligence is entirely centralized and fairly goof-proof - the origin locations just put everything on the plane going to Tennessee.

In recent years, UPS discovered airplanes, and with them, moves packages overnight from Point A to Point B. For this, the routing and intelligence is in the hands of the origin location. If a sorter goofs at the origin airport, your package will be late.

A recent-ish relevation at FedEx is the acquisition of RPS (formerly a direct competitor to UPS) and the discovery that packages can be moved in trucks.

With either the overnight air or ground service, FedEx has an immense computer infrastructure to track the progress of each item in the system. UPS's system is similar, but not quite as elaborate. Tracking with the USPS generally works on the "Well, it's a box...brown...about so big...with an address label.." scheme. In other words, if something goes missing, they have to physically wander around and look for it.
#5
Old 09-24-2003, 09:20 PM
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I just wanted to add that, unlike gotpasswords' experience, I haven't seen FedEx routing any of my packages anywhere out of the way. Though, nearly all of my packages have been from California up to Washington, which probably changes things. They travel in a fairly straight line right up the west cost, get sorted in Tacoma, then delivered to me. In my experience, Fedex is a bit cheaper and a bit faster than UPS, usually delivering a day before their website lists expected delivery. This may well vary by region, of course.
#6
Old 09-24-2003, 09:27 PM
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Competition. Without it, the sole delivery folks would charge whatever they want, unless and until another company comes along to provide less expensive costs with service equal to or better than the sole provider.

Your best bet is to research each company and choose the one that best suits your needs for that delivery. I say it this way because not everything you may ship should be shipped by one company.
#7
Old 09-24-2003, 09:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by gotpasswords
FedEx excels at tossing packages and packets onto airplanes, flying every single one of them to Tennessee, sorting them, then flying them out to wherever they're going. The intelligence is entirely centralized and fairly goof-proof - the origin locations just put everything on the plane going to Tennessee.
I work for a large production company in Atlanta. We have a customer ACROSS THE STREET that is basically several big cable networks (figure it out). We routinely FEDEX materials to that company. Sometimes, we send a driver to the airport (12 miles) to accommodate the timing. They fly the box to Memphis, scan it, fly it back to Atlanta and drive it up to the building across the street. I'm not kidding, and it ain't funny at all.

BTW, from my ebay experience: USPS Priority Mail is great.
#8
Old 09-24-2003, 10:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by stockton
BTW, from my ebay experience: USPS Priority Mail is great.
USPS Priority Mail uses FedEx to ship long distances. It's essentially Fedex with USPS handling local delivery.
#9
Old 09-24-2003, 10:05 PM
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Remember, USPS Priority mail is just first class mail in a fancy envelope. It doesn't get your letter anywhere any faster than putting on a first class stamp. In fact, first class mail over a certain weight is automatically deemed Priority Mail.

If you want things faster, use their Express Mail.

That said, I find that, despite the jokes, the USPS does a fine job delivering mail. I've been sending out manuscripts for over twenty years and can't think of a time I had a problem -- and these were often sent at the cheapest rate (Special Fourth Class -- Manuscript).

FedEx does route things through Memphis, even when they're going across town. It sounds nonsensical, but it does make sense: All packages are delivered to one point in a city to go to Memphis, and all packages go out from that one point the next day. You don't have to have routes from street A to street B and can be much more efficient.

Even the USPS is doing something similar: all mail goes to a central post office and then out to the towns in that area. That allows for one pickup (to the central office) and one delivery each day, keeping costs down.
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#10
Old 09-24-2003, 10:15 PM
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USPS can deliver to mail boxes and P.O. boxes, but UPS and FedEx only deliver to your door.
#11
Old 09-24-2003, 10:15 PM
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At the risk of hijacking this thread -

Quote:
Originally posted by stockton
I work for a large production company in Atlanta. We have a customer ACROSS THE STREET that is basically several big cable networks (figure it out). We routinely FEDEX materials to that company.
Wouldn't it be more advantageous, financially, logistically and most of all, environmentally speaking, to simply courier or hand-carry the materials across the street? I'd truly love to hear the rationale for the utter waste of resources, the pollution and the time suck (for your company's employees and FedEx employees alike) involved in such a dimwitted delivery scheme.
#12
Old 09-24-2003, 10:51 PM
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I don't know about stockton, but I'm guess it's for book keeping purposes. If something doesn't arrive, they can PROVE that it was infact sent, and it was lost by fedex, or it was infact sent and it was infact signed for, so it was lost after it arrived. And there's third party records of all of this. Otherwise it's one's word against the other. But it could be for different reasons. (Maybe it's a really busy street and they don't want to cross it )
#13
Old 09-25-2003, 01:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Alereon
I just wanted to add that, unlike gotpasswords' experience, I haven't seen FedEx routing any of my packages anywhere out of the way.
FedEx does have smaller hubs, I know one is located in Peoria, IL. I'm guessing they have one somewhere on the west coast too, it would make no sense to fly everything to Memphis. I have friends that work there and can ask tomorrow, if they disagree with me (and say EVERYTHING is flown to Memphis) I'll report.
#14
Old 09-25-2003, 02:21 AM
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In anticipation of what Bob55 will find out....FedEx does NOT, obviously, route everything through Memphis. They have "sort" hubs at Indianapolis, Newark and LAX (I have several friends who fly for them, and these are the cities they mentioned while griping about "sitting the sort" i.e. sitting around waiting for all the boxes to get sorted and put on the correct airplane. There may be more.)

To differentiate between the three delivery systems, think of this:
The USPS is a government controlled, federally funded system with an enormous infrastructure. It is the ONLY way to get that Sears catalogue to Aunt Gracy way out on Rural Route #9.

Fedex is an airplane company that recently discovered trucks.

UPS is a truck company that recently discovered airplanes.

Other than that, they compete and also complement one another. Although it sounds ridiculous to fly a package to Memphis to deliver it across the street, it really isn't. FedEx moves packages by airplane.

To compare, consider you sending out something important - say a wedding invitation or a Christmas card. One of the recipients is your neighbor a block away. Amazingly, this person in a white truck with stripes picks up your envelope from your house and drives it several miles away where it sits overnight, only to have someone else drive it to your friend's house and deliver it. Although when looked at individually it may seem ridiculous, it is the only way to get things done when you gather thousands or millions of items a day that need delivering. Substitute airplanes for trucks and you essentially have what FedEx does.

Besides, if it didn't work Fedex wouldn't be doing it! And I suspect that the amount that Fedex charges to deliver something across the street pretty much covers what it costs them to fly it to Memphis and back.
#15
Old 09-25-2003, 04:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by pilot141
To differentiate between the three delivery systems, think of this:The USPS is a government controlled, federally funded system with an enormous infrastructure. It is the ONLY way to get that Sears catalogue to Aunt Gracy way out on Rural Route #9.
IIRC USPS used to be government controlled. I beleive they are now privatly owned and self sufficient. Also they are a non-profit orginazation.
#16
Old 09-25-2003, 04:16 AM
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Joey P we may be splitting hairs here, but everyone who works directly for the USPS is still a federal employee. They still have Postmasters, which are federal positions.

Any business that can get the price of buying their service (stamps) changed unilaterally and without dissent by the federal government is under government control in my book.

As for being non-profit, yes the USPS has managed to lose money every year for several years!
#17
Old 09-25-2003, 04:19 AM
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Make that middle sentence read "changed unilaterally by the federal government and without dissent" and it probably makes more sense!
#18
Old 09-25-2003, 05:47 AM
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I'm going to really stir the pot here and mention that when we needed a piano shipped niether USPS nor UPS nor FedEx would touch it (largely due to weight). It turns out DHL has a unit specializing in moving pianos. So there's another difference between competitors. DHL will move a piano, and the others won't.

I my experience, FedEx is best at getting it there overnight (although occassionally there are problems), UPS is best if you need the ability to track a passge but don't need it there overnight, and USPS is best for standard letters mainly because of price.

More differences - if you have a problem with a missing package or a billing problem FedEx is much easier to deal with than UPS, and the USPS screws up well, you're pretty much screwed because if they've lost it, it will probably stay lost.
#19
Old 09-25-2003, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Joey P
I don't know about stockton, but I'm guess it's for book keeping purposes. If something doesn't arrive, they can PROVE that it was infact sent, and it was lost by fedex, or it was infact sent and it was infact signed for, so it was lost after it arrived. And there's third party records of all of this. Otherwise it's one's word against the other. But it could be for different reasons. (Maybe it's a really busy street and they don't want to cross it )
But when things are sent by courier, they're still accounted for. We use them all the time to go from the District to Richmond, Virginia. There's no lack of verification - but you can't track it as easily.
#20
Old 09-25-2003, 06:24 AM
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DHL is under-appreciated in the US. Now that they've bought Airborne (or the other way around) maybe that will change. I always liked Airborne for speediness and inexpensiveness back when I bought everything from Outpost.com. DHL was always great for huge, heavy packages. If they/it were conveniently located to me, I'd consider use them/it exclusively. As it is, the USPS is everywhere, and UPS is really close.

For packages it's always great to go to the UPS building. You get the good, UPS rate. Anyone have any idea how the rates are at the new UPS Stores? You know, the ones that bought out "Mailboxes, Etc."? They were always super, super expensive for UPS shipments, but they would pack your stuff for "free."
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#21
Old 09-25-2003, 08:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Balthisar

For packages it's always great to go to the UPS building. You get the good, UPS rate.
No, you get their "dick the little guy" rate. Go to ups.com, and get a rate quote for a 50 pount package from 44001 to 90210, no UPS account, and try the different pickup options. You'll get a rate between $44.96 and $49.97. They have actually improved - until about 6 months ago, taking the package to their customer counter was way more expensive than calling them and asking for a pickup.

Now go to fedex.com and do the same thing: $32.13

Unless you are a high-quantity shipper and have a great deal with UPS (or know somebody that does, so you can ship on their account), I can't understand why anybody would use UPS.
#22
Old 09-25-2003, 09:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Broomstick
I my experience, FedEx is best at getting it there overnight (although occassionally there are problems), UPS is best if you need the ability to track a passge but don't need it there overnight, and USPS is best for standard letters mainly because of price.
From the comic strip Shoe:

"This package absolutely, positively, needs to be there tomorrow!!!'

"OK, we'll ship it by overnight express. They have airplanes, computers, all the most up-to-date technology to make sure it will be there on time."

"What if it absolutely, positively, needs to be there today?"

"Then we turn it over to the bicycle messangers!"
#23
Old 09-25-2003, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
I beleive they are now privatly owned and self sufficient. Also they are a non-profit orginazation.
The U.S. Postal Service is a government-owned corporation, like the Tennessee Valley Authority. It is self-sufficient and not-for-profit, but it is subject to the regulation of the federal government, such as its postal rates.

The postal service has a government mandated monopoly on delivering regular (non-expedited) letters.

I don't use FedEx very often for personal matters. It's rather expensive and I rarely send something that has to get there within a certain deadline.

I have had a lot of trouble with United Parcel Service. So far as I am concerned, if you work during the day, you are screwed when it comes to a U.P.S. delivery. Their customer service for getting you a package when you weren't home the first time they tried to deliver is crappy. They require a two-day lead time in order to route it to another address (say, your office instead of home) and in this age of wireless communication, they apparently have no way of finding out where their delivery trucks to get you an e.t.a. on your delivery. They also need a two-day lead time to hold it at their central office, which is always way out in the middle of bum-fuck-nowhere and is open only until 7 p.m. and not on weekends. How is a working man supposed to pick up a package, for fuck's sake?

Whenever someone is deliver something to me, I insist on Postal Service, because if I'm not home, I can always walk the two blocks to my local post office and pick it up on a Saturday morning.

Thank Og for government bureaucracies.
#24
Old 09-25-2003, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by acsenray
for fuck's sake?
#25
Old 09-25-2003, 01:17 PM
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Hm ... it seems the automated censor's not working ...
#26
Old 09-25-2003, 02:33 PM
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My only experience in any difference between the lot of them is the following:

The post man (USPS) has a hard time deciding that Smith at 25 Oak St is a different person/address than Jones at 25 Maple St. (where Maple St. is a loop off of Oak St., names changed to protect the innocent)

The UPS guy is a former USPS delivery man. Same problems.

The Fex-Ex guy somehow knows how to read, and doesn't deliver my packages to my neighbor's address.

I can tell you that my neighbor didn't really appreciate having to bring over 2000 rounds of ammunition in clearly marked boxes. But since I bring his stuff to him, he must have felt that it was only right to do the same for me.
#27
Old 09-25-2003, 03:15 PM
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If youi live in Memphis, anywhere near the flight paths, it is not hard to believe that every package goes through there. Yesterday morning as I sat outside, one FedEx plane after the other was coming in for a landing. I had never seen this before and could not figure out how that fit into the schedule. Mostly the flights I've seen were the late evening arrivals. I've heard that the take-offs in the early morning are even more impressive, but I probably will never know for sure.
#28
Old 09-25-2003, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by butler1850
My only experience in any difference between the lot of them is the following:

The post man (USPS) has a hard time deciding that Smith at 25 Oak St is a different person/address than Jones at 25 Maple St. (where Maple St. is a loop off of Oak St., names changed to protect the innocent)

The UPS guy is a former USPS delivery man. Same problems.

The Fex-Ex guy somehow knows how to read, and doesn't deliver my packages to my neighbor's address.
Anecdotes really mean very little. I can tell you that FedEx was unable to deliver a package to me in downtown DC even though the adress was clearly marked on the door and I emailed the sender the photo of the street sign and the door right next to it. Fedex kept screwing around and finally the package was returned to the sender and sent by other means.
#29
Old 09-25-2003, 05:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Balthisar
Anyone have any idea how the rates are at the new UPS Stores? You know, the ones that bought out "Mailboxes, Etc."? They were always super, super expensive for UPS shipments, but they would pack your stuff for "free."
According to a rep I asked, they charge a 10% premium over the standard UPS counter rates. Of course, now you pay for your packaging.

For a better UPS rate, sign up at my.ups.com and print your shipping label yourself. Then you can bring it to a UPS customer counter (NOT the UPS store, unfortunately), or schedule a next-day pickup for $2.00 (if you do it online).
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#30
Old 09-25-2003, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by 5cents
Unless you are a high-quantity shipper and have a great deal with UPS (or know somebody that does, so you can ship on their account), I can't understand why anybody would use UPS.
UPS only charges $2.00 for a next-day pickup ($4.00 for same day on air shipments). Last time I checked, Fedex wanted $10 for a pickup (I don't ship enough to have a regularly scheduled pickup). Once you take that into account, the pricing advantage goes to UPS. If Fedex has changed this policy, please let me know.
#31
Old 09-25-2003, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Running with Scissors
UPS only charges $2.00 for a next-day pickup ($4.00 for same day on air shipments). Last time I checked, Fedex wanted $10 for a pickup (I don't ship enough to have a regularly scheduled pickup). Once you take that into account, the pricing advantage goes to UPS. If Fedex has changed this policy, please let me know.
Last time I used it, the pickup charge for Fedex was about $2. The actual charge isn't specified on the web site, so you'll have to call them up and ask. But even an $8 difference in pickup charges is less than the $14 to $19 difference on the example 50 pound package.
#32
Old 09-25-2003, 05:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by kniz
If youi live in Memphis, anywhere near the flight paths... <snip>
Well, that covers just about all of Memphis... (Espically the mid-town and U of Memphis area.)

I can normally tell when it's a FedEx plane coming in, as opposed to a passenger jet, because of the noise. (FedEx is normally flying in large cargo jets: it seems most of the passenger traffic I see going in and out of the airport are the mid to small sized jets.)

But, as mentioned before, one of the main differences is who will deliver to PO Boxes and who won't. When I have a PO Box, I prefer my packages go to there where it'll stay behind a counter until I pick it up, as opposed to sitting on my doorstop where anyone can walk by and grab it.

Service really depends on the area: I've been in places where the local drivers for UPS couldn't find their arse with a GPS and a platoon of Marines, I've been in places where FedEx couldn't find their nose (so they could pick it) without the help of a local Army base, and I've been in places where the USPS is like a giant black hole: if you're lucky, your mail will use it as a gravity sling-shot to get to where it's going. If not... well... But I've also had drivers from all three places who did their best to place the boxes where they were protected from the elements, and away from casual view of the street, and who always had a ready smile and a polite wave.

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#33
Old 09-25-2003, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nightsong
I can normally tell when it's a FedEx plane coming in, as opposed to a passenger jet, because of the noise. (FedEx is normally flying in large cargo jets: it seems most of the passenger traffic I see going in and out of the airport are the mid to small sized jets.)
I work across the street from an airport and live in a flight path about a mile away (so the planes are just loud enough that when watching TV I have to pause it (shamelss TiVo plug)). Anyways, there is a FedEx hub connected to it so there's plenty of large planes coming in and out. The funny thing is, I always know a FedEx jet when I hear it to, the ones I always notice are little prop planes that come in at a really strange angle. It must just be for overnight/rush deliveries.
#34
Old 09-25-2003, 07:24 PM
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They come in at strange angles? Like what, sideways? Perpendicular to the ground? Interesting!
#35
Old 09-25-2003, 09:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Running with Scissors
According to a rep I asked, they charge a 10% premium over the standard UPS counter rates. Of course, now you pay for your packaging.

For a better UPS rate, sign up at my.ups.com and print your shipping label yourself. Then you can bring it to a UPS customer counter (NOT the UPS store, unfortunately), or schedule a next-day pickup for $2.00 (if you do it online).
This is no longer the case... I dropped an internet-shipped pre-paid package at a UPS Store tonight and the smiling counter staff lady gleefully accepted it without demanding payment. I drop off packages about twice a month at a UPS Store.
#36
Old 09-25-2003, 09:08 PM
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I should clarify my above post.

I was referring to the
Then you can bring it to a UPS customer counter (NOT the UPS store, unfortunately), or schedule a next-day pickup for $2.00 (if you do it online).
part only.
#37
Old 09-25-2003, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by BrotherCadfael
From the comic strip Shoe:

"This package absolutely, positively, needs to be there tomorrow!!!'

"OK, we'll ship it by overnight express. They have airplanes, computers, all the most up-to-date technology to make sure it will be there on time."

"What if it absolutely, positively, needs to be there today?"

"Then we turn it over to the bicycle messangers!"
Actually, one day at work in Chicago I got a phone call from some lawyers in Massachusetts. Without going into details, they were very very very concerned we get some information in a very timely manner. I gave them the delivery address. They said thank you.

The package was delivered four hours later.

Heckuva bike messenger, ay?
#38
Old 09-25-2003, 09:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by dantheman
They come in at strange angles? Like what, sideways? Perpendicular to the ground? Interesting!
Cargo and non-airline planes without paying passengers can and sometimes do come in at a much steeper angle than passenger jets.

As an example, the standard descent angle for a passenger jet is about 3 degrees and the descent at roughtly 500 feet per minute (or so I recall - if that's off I'm sure a "real" pilot will be along shortly to correct me). When out flying on my own, though I have come in as steep as 30 degrees, and in a considerably faster descent than 500 feet per minute through part of the approach. The reasons are various - simulated engine out training, spacing and timing considerations at an airport, the design of the airplane (some ultralights have a normal approach considerably steeper than more convential planes), situations where I want to keep adequate altitude above hostile terrain in case of engine trouble, or (I must confess) sometimes I just don't judge the approach as well as I'd like. Without "civilian" passengers and their screams of terror/outrage I am much more inclined to take a steep approach.
#39
Old 09-25-2003, 09:46 PM
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I'm having trouble picturing it, Broomstick - do you know of any photos that show that kind of descent? (I'm not doubting you in the least; just wondering what it looks like.)
#40
Old 09-25-2003, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mr2001
USPS can deliver to mail boxes and P.O. boxes, but UPS and FedEx only deliver to your door.
Not true. UPS and FedEx deliver to non-PO mailboxes, like a Mailboxes Etc. (now the UPS Store, but I've had no problems getting my few FedEx things there), which is part of the reason I pay for my MBE box instead of a PO Box.
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#41
Old 09-25-2003, 10:11 PM
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I used to work in the air traffic control field. Three degrees is the standard approach. The radar (for ground assist landing) is programmed with a 3-degree glidepath. The lights (I don't remember what they're called) that tell the incoming pilot from the ground if he's on glidepath, above, or below (red and white, white, red) were set for three degrees. Any time we had to verify the radar with a theodolyte, we always shot for three degrees.

What's really funny is this was the Army. And helicopters capable of coming in at 90 degrees. But they only ever came in at 3-degrees, even for training.
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#42
Old 09-25-2003, 10:14 PM
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Since when are you not a "real" pilot Broomstick? Your answer was correct, but may I elaborate?

To figure the descent in feet per minute for a 3 degree glidepath you take half your groundspeed and multiply it by ten.

100 knots GS/2=50*10=500 FPM descent.
120 GS=600 FPM
140 GS=700 FPM

You get the idea. Approach speeds on large jets are anywhere from 120 knots to 160 knots. So the rate of descent can vary from 600 to 800 feet per minute, but the ANGLE of descent is the same. You would notice the jet moving faster across the ground, but the angle of descent is the same.

Having said all that, both cargo and passenger carriers have to be "stabilized" on approach by 500 feet at the latest. That means fully configured, on approach speed and engines spooled up (ie NOT at idle). If there is bad weather (ie IFR) this is moved up to 1000 feet.

So even FedEx must have everything stabilized and on a nice 3 degree glidepath by 500 feet. Before that, though they are much freer to do what it takes to put the jet where they want it. As the saying goes, "Boxes don't bitch". Several times I've seen a cargo carrier accept a visual approach and start the turn to final (or something) MUCH earlier than I could ever get away with. Yes, my airplane could do it but I'd have a load of scared, puking, angry passengers at the end.

What does this look like? If you put all of the drag devices out (gear, flaps and speedbrakes if you've got 'em) and bring the power to idle you can get some truly impressive descent rates - something on the order of 6,000 - 8,000 feet per minute. That is ten times the rate you see on final approach. It's perfectly safe and a great way to get rid of excessive altitude quickly, but it is a long way from what passengers consider "normal". So FedEx, UPS, DHL and everyone who flies boxes around can use the limits of the airplane as their "boundary", while passenger carriers use the much more restrictive passenger "boundary".
#43
Old 09-25-2003, 10:18 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Posts: 10,316
Very instructive, pilot. Thanks.

(I wonder which boundary is used when live animals are being transported?)
#44
Old 09-25-2003, 10:28 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 424
Quote:
Originally posted by dantheman
I'm having trouble picturing it, Broomstick - do you know of any photos that show that kind of descent? (I'm not doubting you in the least; just wondering what it looks like.)
Here's a sequence of pictures of a very steep descent: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~caltino/migcrash.htm

(aka "mig-29 lawn dart")

OK, but seriously, any STOL aircraft can come in pretty steep. I looked around for Dash-7 or Dash-8 approach, but couldn't find one. Find a small downtown airport (i.e. Toronto Island), or one with a tortuous approach (San Diego, Washington Reagan, former Hong Kong Kai Tak). Here's some photos from Kai Tak http://jetphotos.net/showphotos....ai%20Tak%20Int'l%20Airport%20-%20VHHH, including this one http://jetphotos.net/viewphoto.php?id=114702 out the cockpit window.
#45
Old 09-26-2003, 12:04 AM
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Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Spokane, WA, USA
Posts: 7,213
Quote:
Originally posted by GMRyujin
Not true. UPS and FedEx deliver to non-PO mailboxes, like a Mailboxes Etc. (now the UPS Store, but I've had no problems getting my few FedEx things there), which is part of the reason I pay for my MBE box instead of a PO Box.
Ah, that's true, I didn't think of that. I was referring to the regular postal mailbox (e.g. at the end of your driveway), which is only for the USPS.
#46
Old 09-26-2003, 08:40 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 26,536
I think you guys misundertood what I meant by "strage angles." First of all here's a picture of the airport with it's runways highlighted Mitchell International. First of all the little blue dot is where I work. The red line is the main runway that 60%-70% or the planes use for landing and taking off, the yellow line is used the second most often. When the large FedEx planes land and take off, they use the yellow runway. In fact at the far left end of the yellow line, there are two perpendicular lines that connect the runway to another area (about an 'inch' above it) that's FedEx property. Anyways, when the FedEx's single engine prop planes come in, they use the green runway. That's what I mean by strange angle. They come in over the corner of the airport, and just in front of where I work, which is the blue dot like I mentioned earlier. Does that clear things up a bit?
#47
Old 09-26-2003, 08:54 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Posts: 10,316
It does, Joey. But the green and yellow runways are parallel, so the planes that use them come in at the same angle - just a different angle than those using the red or magenta (?) runways. Right?
#48
Old 09-26-2003, 09:01 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 26,536
Hmm, yea that's true Dan, BUT the it's a combonation of the green one being so much closer and the prop planes making a distinctive prop noise that makes me realize there's a fedex plane landing. Also on the yellow runway then tends to be more for take off, and landing seems to be more from the other (left) side. Either way the red runway is used the most, so I don't pay all that much attention to the others. (All though it's kinda neat, if you're in the right place at the right time, the yellow runway goes over a very main road. It'll scare the crap out of you the first time, your going under a tunnel just as a large plane is landing on it.)
#49
Old 09-26-2003, 09:05 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Posts: 10,316
I bet it's really kind of exciting to see any nonpassenger aircraft coming in, just for the sheer uniqueness of it. (I'm one of those who stops what he's doing to stare at the sky --- Oooh! A helicopter!)
#50
Old 09-26-2003, 09:20 AM
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Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 26,536
There's actually TWO military bases on the field so we see alot of non-passenger air craft/helicopters/fighterjets, flying in formation even (including the blue angles from time to time). I really enjoy working across the street from an airport. So much more dynamic then staring at the front of another building all day. (Now living directly under a flight path I DON'T like.)
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