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#1
Old 03-08-2004, 11:18 PM
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Fans of Stephen King's "The Stand".....

I have always loved Stephen King's early work "The Stand". Every couple of years I read it again, even after reading most of his later stuff, some of which drains the life out of me as the plots become more and more overdrawn at the far too late endings. (And some of which is also damn good.)

*A quick apology to Mr. King, if he happens to be a Doper. No offense intended - I am a steadfast fan despite my criticisms.*

What is your favorite scene from "The Stand"? (note: I haven't read The Stand for about three years - it's about time to get it out again) One scene immediately comes to mind for me, which is so poignant because it reminds me of real life... the scene where Lucy is talking to Larry in the night and Nadine comes along for her one last chance at evading her fate... then Lucy spouts off a little rant like... [DISCLAIMER - extremely paraphrased and probably very ggurl flavored] "Well, just go on out there to Miss Perfect... she's what you really want even when you have me to warm you up every night... you'll just keep chasing her even though she'll just cross her legs and spit in your eye... maybe I get stuff written about me on bathroom walls, but it's just because I want to love and to be loved..."\

I LOVE that part, I really identify with that little rant from Lucy, but then it gets ruined when Larry comes back. Because in real life, they seem to disappear when Miss Perfect comes around...

I may think of other "The Stand" scenes that I absolutely love. But I want to read about yours too!!! Thanks!
#2
Old 03-08-2004, 11:28 PM
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Almost any part featuring Trashcan Man. Or when Randall Flagg comes to get that guy (it's been awhile) out of jail.

Unrelated bit: I only noticed this after I saw the wedding pictures, but my sister's husband looks disturbingly like Randall Flagg.
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#3
Old 03-08-2004, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
Unrelated bit: I only noticed this after I saw the wedding pictures, but my sister's husband looks disturbingly like Randall Flagg.
My favorite part of The Stand miniseries is just how perfect Jamey Sheridan is as Randall Flagg. That is exactly how I pictured him.

Personally I always loved the interaction between Stu and the doctor at the CDC.

Oh, and the first meeting of the Boulder Free Zone.

And the lunch between Stu and Glen Bateman where they keep the beer in the pond to keep it cold.

And the last minutes of the Judge.

And playing cards with stacks of $100 bills and having it be no fun.

I just love The Stand.
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#4
Old 03-09-2004, 12:26 AM
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Dunno if I'd call this my "favorite" part, but the Harold/Frannie/Stu love triangle was eerily similar to a relationship I had years ago. Unfortunately, I was "Harold". So when he blew up their house, I fuckin' cheered.

(Of course, I'd never blow up someone's house in real life. That's the whole point.)

BTW, there's a couple extra scenes on the DVD that weren't in the original broadcast. Nothing major, just about 15-20 seconds of extra sex & violence that were clearly cut by standards & practices, but it was pretty cool to see something brand new after watching my old VHS tape 1000 times (and wearing it out in the process!)
#5
Old 03-09-2004, 12:30 AM
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I just recently bought that whole unedited version of The Stand (talking about the book in this case), and I particularly liked the part where King described a series of accidents that lead to peoples' deaths directly because of the end of society; one boy fell into a well and died. Another man ran himself to death (his entirely family died in the course of 5 days and running was the only thing that soothed him). Another little girl (?) died of a fractured skull when she fell off of her bike. That just struck me as eerie.

I'm also a big fan of any part with Nick, the part where Tom Cullen spies in the west, the evolution of Harold, and the part in the end where Flagg comes back (also in the unedited version of The Stand).
#6
Old 03-09-2004, 12:39 AM
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I love Flagg!

My favorite book by Stephen King is The Eyes of the Dragon but that's a close second to my favorite series by King, The Dark Tower. The Stand would be my third favorite. I agree on some of his others works being a wee bit drawn out or dull but all in all, he's one of my favorite authors.
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#7
Old 03-09-2004, 01:31 AM
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"You ain't no nice guy, Larry!"

I hear an echo of it in my head every time I have cause to feel guilty about something.
#8
Old 03-09-2004, 02:31 AM
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There are a number of parts that I especially enjoy.

When Frannie describes in her diary how she, Glen and Harold visited the Stovington Plague Center and saw Stu's room. That says more to me about their three characters than much of the rest of the book.

Flagg rescues Lloyd Henreid from prison. I love that scene.

Kojak. I can't say enough about this character. And he is a character, even though he is only a dog. I love it when he finds his way to Boulder, I love the description of Kojak defending Hemmingford Home against the wolves, and I love it when Kojak returns to Stu and brings him firewood and rabbits. What a great dog. I almost feel like he's a dog I knew.

Flagg visits Glen Bateman in prison and Glen essentially laughs at him. "Oh, we made such a business of you. Why don't you get yourself a pile of sand, find a hammer, and pound all that sand right up your ass?"

The part that always gave me chills: Nick's note to Mother Abigail that he doesn't believe in God, but Abigail says, "That don't matter, child. God believes in you."

Trashcan Man. What a wonderful character. His glorious return to Las Vegan for REDEMPTION is beautiful.

Larry sending The Judge off to spy on the West. It's a shame we didn't get to see more of that old guy.

And actually, I also like Lloyd talking with his young upstart lawyer. Devins? I think that's his name. "You're in deep shit, Sylvester!"
#9
Old 03-09-2004, 03:25 AM
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I liked the parts towards the beginning of The Stand with Larry's narration of the apocalyptic and surreal empty city.
It's been a long time since I've read Secret Window, Secret Garden (Four past Midnight). The movie adaptation is coming out, so I figure I'll reread it. I barely remember reading it, but found it a bit plodding and forgettable to my recollection.
They're doing a film version of Riding the Bullet, don't understand how that one will work translated to film. Seems like they'll have to make it cheesy and hollywoody to get it to work. Everything's Eventual is IMHO the best book of short stories from SK to date. The title story (Everything's Eventual) spoke to me, more than any SK story ever has. And that frankly is too close to home. It was too fucked up and eerily relatable to my engrammatic banks (I am not a Scientologist!). Everything's Eventual is "14 dark tales", I think it was originally only 13 stories (befitting) and then they threw in Riding the Bullet after its success as an E-story. I think Stephen King might be superstitious and thought twice about throwing out 13 stories like this- his idea or the editor's?
I just read Dreamcatcher, and thought it was pretty brilliant. Not the best SK- but right up there. He reused/recycled some of the general themes of The Body/Stand by me and added a scary alien quasi-plague to track the whole story. Some classic thematic SK agents and a worthwhile read.
#10
Old 03-09-2004, 07:33 AM
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I liked Trashcan's trip across the country with The Kid, the one guy who's too evil and crazy even for Flagg.
#11
Old 03-09-2004, 07:42 AM
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Dear Friends;
I only read The Stand, once, and it's been at least 20 years. Is it worth slogging through the extra several hundred pages of the "expanded" version that was released? On another Stephan King note, can y'all recommend
any of his books written after Pet Sematary? I read everything up to, and including
Pet sematary, and then quit. I did read Delores Claiborn and Insomnia(I think it was called)(?) but would like to read some more. Thanks







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#12
Old 03-09-2004, 08:06 AM
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Dr. Memory, I'd hate to think you missed out on Misery. I suppose it's too much to hope you haven't seen the movie?

Favorite Stand scene: Flagg and Nadine in the desert. Also anything with Trashy.

Least favorite: Frannie tells Jess she's pregnant.
#13
Old 03-09-2004, 08:18 AM
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Favorite scene- Frannie after the explosion has a fractured/broken neck, found out who has died, & goes off on Mother Abigail..."F*** your killer God!"...

And then finds her neck is miraculously healed-

and she's STILL damn angry! *G* Yeah!

Also-

Harold writes his note of repentance, realizing how lame it is but that he
has to write it all the same.

Yes, it is worth reading the expanded version- if only for the two cameos by Charles Starkweather ("The Kid") and Jim Morrison. Though there's lots more cool stuff!

Much as I liked the TV version, it really suffered in flattening Harold & Nadine, especially in dropping the Leo-Nadine connection.
#14
Old 03-09-2004, 08:28 AM
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For some reason, I'll hear this snippet in my head - "Baby, can you dig your man?"

One of my favorite scenes was Larry walking through the Holland (?) Tunnel, with all the corpses and dead cars lying about. Tough stuff.
#15
Old 03-09-2004, 08:42 AM
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M-O-O-N. That spells "Straight dope!"

I love Tom Cullen.

Also loved it when Trashy blew up the oil storage tanks.
#16
Old 03-09-2004, 09:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sqube
I just recently bought that whole unedited version of The Stand (talking about the book in this case), and I particularly liked the part where King described a series of accidents that lead to peoples' deaths directly because of the end of society; one boy fell into a well and died. Another man ran himself to death (his entirely family died in the course of 5 days and running was the only thing that soothed him). Another little girl (?) died of a fractured skull when she fell off of her bike. That just struck me as eerie.
Those scenes are what made the unabridged version for me. I read the original when I was about 13 years old, and the unabridged version was released about five years later or so, right around the same time as the miniseries. I remember thinking at the time how the "original" hadn't seemed all that choppy and cut up--until I read the new version. So, DrMemory, I highly recommend reading the unabridged version. (And if you've never read The Talisman, that's my absolute favorite, and the one I'd recommend most.)

Other favorite scenes--Frannie burying her father gets to me every time. Stu's escape from the CDC, and Larry following the trail of Payday candy wrappers. The Lincoln Tunnel scene freaks me out completely, probably because I'm inside it so often. Joe/Leo and the guitar, Tom and Stu snowbound in the hotel ... really, I just love the whole damned book.
#17
Old 03-09-2004, 09:31 AM
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M-O-O-N Spells "Good Movie"!

I never did read the book but I thought the film adaption was great. And I usually don't even like post-apocalypse stories.
#18
Old 03-09-2004, 10:01 AM
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I think The Stand, along with The Dark Tower series will be thought of as King's mangum opus. Really a great book.

I liked the beginning, when Captain Trips is just starting to get out of control, following the chain of how it's spread. Seemed to me like... it could happen. It really could.

Other than that, all my favorite scene have already been mentioned. I wasn't wild about the miniseries, though. I felt like Flagg's should never really have been displayed directly; I always thought of that line from "Come Together": "Got to be good-looking 'cause he's so hard to see."
#19
Old 03-09-2004, 10:12 AM
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Two scenes in The Stand have always resonated with me, and they're both minor, almost throwaway little riffs on the story.

The first is when the four heroes are walking to Las Vegas, per Mother Abigail's instructions. Glen Bateman goes off to bury their trash from (breakfast? Supper? Some meal, anyway) and Kojak comes bounding up to him. The other three men hear Bateman say, "Well, there you are, you big lazy turd."

I don't know why, but that has always made me laugh.

The other scene is very touching. When Stu and Tom Cullen are traveling by Snowcat back to Boulder, Stu wakes Tom up one morning by telling him "Merry Christmas." Stu has raided some stores in the nearby town, and gotten presents for Tom and for Kojak. He's even set up a little Christmas tree with tinsel. In a brilliant (and, I feel, completely correct and insightful) characterization of Tom, King has Tom at first experience joy and excitement about Christmas, just like any child. And then, almost immediately afterward, Tom becomes angry with himself for not remembering to get Stu anything. Stu's handling of that situation is perfect. I just love that scene.

Further proof, to me, that King's strength isn't necessarily writing horror -- it's writing characters that the reader comes to care about.
#20
Old 03-09-2004, 11:26 AM
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The part that gave me chills. Trashcan man motoring around in the desert looking for weapons for Flagg and 'knowing' there's a stockpile of more bio-weapons, possibly ones even worse than Captain Tripps, but not touching them because he realizes that those kind of weapons are too unpredictable. It's the momentary sanity in his mind that was creepy.

Also, the part where the US gov't decides to unleash Tripps on other parts of the world so it won't look like the US created it. Creepy.
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#21
Old 03-09-2004, 12:16 PM
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It may not have been in the book, but the scene where Larry sits on the hood of a car singing Eve of Destruction with a burning city in the background was my favorite part of the miniseries.

I'm curious to know what the original, abridged version of the book was like. For one, I would have been perfectly happy not to know about The Kid or the intimate details of his relationship with Trash.
#22
Old 03-09-2004, 12:33 PM
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I also liked the vignettes of the aftermath of the 'flu...how the weaker elements were filtered out. The one where the woman kept her husband and son in the basement cooler, then accidentally locks herself in with them, gives me chills.
#23
Old 03-09-2004, 01:08 PM
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The last moments of Harold's life, as he considers the gun in his hand and suicide.

He remembers going up to the edge of the ledge where kids jumped off into the quarry, trying to work up the courage to jump in. He chants the magic talisman that seems to work for all the other kids: "One, two, three!" But his legs lock, and he's still too scared to jump. And the other kids laugh at him and chase him home, calling him Harold the Pansy.

And he thinks to himself that all of what happened to him might have been different if, just once, back then, he had been able to bring himself to jump.

And then he looks at the gun in his hands.

"One, two, three!"

The gun went off.

Harold jumped.
#24
Old 03-09-2004, 01:40 PM
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Add me to the list of people who consider The Stand to be one of Stephen King's best. I agree that The Talisman (with Black House riding along), The Dark Tower Series, and The Stand will be considered his best works.

I have so many memorable moments from the books (having read them many times over). Stu's nightmare escape from the CDC, Frannie not drinking beer and Stu figuring it out pretty quickly, Stu and Frannie finding each other after the odds of finding your soulmate dropped so dramatically, Nick's super-competence, Mother Abigail running home through the corn with the rats chasing, when they all finally come together in Boulder, when Kojak shows up when Stu is expecting to die - I loved it all.

So, The Stand on DVD, eh? It's about time for me to watch it again, I think.
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#25
Old 03-09-2004, 03:27 PM
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I liked the last scene with Flagg (when he meets the new people he's going to work on converting). Can't beat that.
#26
Old 03-09-2004, 03:37 PM
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My favorite scene is when Nick is acting sheriff, and he's sitting in the jail watching TV. One station is off the air, one is showing "I Love Lucy" reruns, and one station has a sign about "microwave relay difficulties." I can just see him in the building, flipping through those three stations.
#27
Old 03-09-2004, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Number
I'm curious to know what the original, abridged version of the book was like. For one, I would have been perfectly happy not to know about The Kid or the intimate details of his relationship with Trash.
Wassamatter? Don't like having a .45 jammed up yer ass?

The original book was written in 1978 but set in 1985, which ironically was the year I first read it. Therefore it had some strange anachronisms, such as using a dime to make pay phone calls (which cost twenty cents by '85) and Larry Underwood reminiscing about his band opening for Led Zeppelin...in 1981.
#28
Old 03-09-2004, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Number
I'm curious to know what the original, abridged version of the book was like. For one, I would have been perfectly happy not to know about The Kid or the intimate details of his relationship with Trash.
If I remember right, The Kid didn't appear in the original version, Trashy just kinda eventually made it to Vegas, and I don't think we heard much of him between Indiana and there. On the other hand, there also was no ending scene with Flagg and the natives, and I'm pretty sure the opening scene with Campion and his family was quite a bit different, too.
#29
Old 03-09-2004, 06:03 PM
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[QUOTE=DrMemory] On another Stephen King note, can y'all recommend
any of his books written after Pet Sematary? I read everything up to, and including
Pet sematary, and then quit. I did read Delores Claiborn and Insomnia(I think it was called)(?) but would like to read some more. QUOTE]

Read the Dark Tower Series. Starts with The Gunslinger, then The Drawing of the Three, Wastelands, Wizard and Glass, Wolves of the Calla, Song of Susannah (not yet published) and The Dark Tower (not yet published).

His best work ever.

The Talisman is one of my all time favorites. Black House (the sequel) was so-so, but good because I wanted to get back to the Territories.
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Old 03-09-2004, 06:09 PM
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#31
Old 03-09-2004, 06:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by featherlou
So, The Stand on DVD, eh? It's about time for me to watch it again, I think.
Me too. I have it on tape, but DVD would kicko el asso.
#32
Old 03-09-2004, 07:26 PM
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I have to agree with Sauron:
Quote:
Further proof, to me, that King's strength isn't necessarily writing horror -- it's writing characters that the reader comes to care about.
Most of my favorites have been mentioned but here they are anyway. I love the bravery/terror of Glen, Larry and Ralph when they reach Vegas and meet Flagg--Glen's death in the jail, and Larry and Ralph's final Stand. Chokes me up just to think of it.

When things start going to shit in Vegas and Flagg becomes vulnerable.

The whole rescue of Stu including Kojak, Tom Cullen's flight and the search for a car to push start.

All the early stuff about the spreading of the flu and the disintegration of society. How about that takeover of the TV studio and executions?

I guess that DVD is going on my birthday wish list.
#33
Old 03-09-2004, 07:54 PM
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Proudest Monkey: I love the scene where the flu turns the Marines turn into loincloth wearing savages and they just start shooting the normal people, good call!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArrMatey!
Also, the part where the US gov't decides to unleash Tripps on other parts of the world so it won't look like the US created it. Creepy.
Is that right? I haven't read it in two years now (I think it's time again), but really?

I remember the U.S. not telling any other country what the hell was going on and just didn't care that they got infected. Did they really do it on purpose?

Regardless, it's definitely time to reread it.
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#34
Old 03-09-2004, 09:04 PM
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My favorite scene would have to be when Larry is walking through the Lincoln Tunnel over all the crashed cars and things. I've been to New York a lot, and every time we go through the Lincoln Tunnel, I always think about it.

Oh yes, I also always manage to mention it to whoever is in the car with me
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#35
Old 03-09-2004, 10:35 PM
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Ah, I love this book & the movie. It's the only SK I've ever read, that I can recall. My favorite/most effective scenes:

--Fran buries her dad
--Fran & Harold sit and listen to Don't Dream it's Over
--Larry gets out of the tent and does something funny but I can't remember what it is
--Dana kills herself
--Nick visits Tom after he's dead
--Nadine says "DO IT HAROLD!!"
--crazy gal at the drugstore

There's much more...

And of course I love Trashy--crazy, lovable Trashy. Ci-a-bola!! Bumpty bumpty bump! My Life for You!!
#36
Old 03-10-2004, 12:03 AM
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I read this book pretty much every year, usually in early summer. Which makes it eerie when they're mentioning dates (especially if I have a bit of a cold), but the only reason I used to read it at that time was because the school year was over and I had time to read.

One way I prefer the original version to the unabridged one is how Stu, Glen, Fran, and Harold meet Dana and Sue. Dana pulls a gun on them and says "Which one is it? The old lady or the dark man?" That just seemed to be such a distillation of her character. I always liked Dana--her "last stand" was just as heroic as Larry and Ralph's.

One part that always creeps me out is when Harold and Nadine are fooling around and Nadine starts wishing that they'll just have sex so Flagg doesn't have a hold over her, and then she looks in the window and sees Flagg's face. And then it's gone. I'm always good at scaring myself, so I liked how she wasn't sure if Flagg was checking up on her or if she was going nuts.

I loved Kojack, too. Often I'll just reread the part starting with Stu in the canyon and ending with him going to Boulder. I just love that journey--it's like a repeat of the journey that everyone else made that summer. And Nick and Tom have such a good relationship. I liked how you got inside Nick's head, and at first he feared the plague took everyone but deaf-mutes. After Tom, he worried that it left only deaf-mutes and the mentally disabled.

Some of my other favorite parts are the breakdown of society in the later stages of the plague (it seems so believable) and the efforts of the Free Zone to try to rebuild some version of society. In the very end, before Stu and Fran leave, I always feel sad. There's a big Free Zone meeting where they debate whether they should arm their deputies or not. One of the residents makes some comment like "I lived in Miami for 20 years and locked my door every night. That was one of the old habits I didn't miss." And Stu's meditation in the last scene (if you don't count Flagg's return). That despite all of this death, that someday it's going to happen again.
#37
Old 03-10-2004, 12:04 AM
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Man, I love that book.

Nadine, with her sunburn and new white hair, ruins Flagg's plans for the next generation, "And we'll go up in the air..."
Frannie (I think, it's been a while) happening to watch the TV station that we just read about and thinking it's some crazy reality TV show. That whole thing in the TV station was pretty intense.
The scene in the Lincoln Tunnel actually led to a years-long tunnel phobia which I have barely gotten under control.
The vignettes that all end, 'No great loss'.

Let me just say again, I love that book.
#38
Old 03-10-2004, 01:04 AM
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The Stand is probably my favourite Stephen King novel. It's been a long while since I've read it, though. When did the unexpurgated version come out? 1990? I guess I should pick it up again.

When I think about The Stand, I tend to over-personalize it. It's the one book that I really connected with my late brother on, and for some reason I really identify with Larry Underwood. (The part where, after greeting the dawn with The Star Spangled Banner, he brings his raging erection back into the tent to find... ...that part is the part that's burned into my brain forever.)

What was the short story it's based on called again? I don't have a copy of Night Shift anymore. "Just the flu." Heh.

About the miniseries... I hated it. I wish they'd make a proper film, or more like three proper films. Some of the casting was fine, but often it was so wide of the mark that it hurt. Harold Lauder is not some pretty boy with a few unconvincing spots. And for Christ's sake, hire a dialect coach. Larry and Stu were embarassing. Jesus.
#39
Old 03-10-2004, 01:15 AM
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I don't think that I can pinpoint just one scene that qualifies as my favorite.

However, I have to admit that I have always felt a strange affection for Larry Underwood. I see A LOT of myself in him.
#40
Old 03-10-2004, 01:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Draelin
If I remember right, The Kid didn't appear in the original version, Trashy just kinda eventually made it to Vegas, and I don't think we heard much of him between Indiana and there. On the other hand, there also was no ending scene with Flagg and the natives, and I'm pretty sure the opening scene with Campion and his family was quite a bit different, too.
The Kid was in the first book, but his part was smaller. I still have copies of both.
#41
Old 03-10-2004, 01:51 AM
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All my favorite parts have already been mentioned.

How do you like that happy crappy?
#42
Old 03-10-2004, 07:51 AM
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Larry Mudd, the short story is Night Surf.
#43
Old 03-10-2004, 08:05 AM
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My favorite scene is in the beginning, when a group of reporters barricade themselves in a TV station, and actually broadcast what's going on with Tripps. Although the effectiveness of the government cover-up dated the book for me. I remember thinking, "If there was some kind of nationwide plague, I'd hear about it on the Straight Dope if nowhere else." Even if the government could disable the Internet, that alone would cause a massive panic.
#44
Old 03-10-2004, 08:11 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Posts: 10,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dung Beetle
Larry Mudd, the short story is Night Surf.
Although to nitpick it's not based on "Night Surf"; the story is merely a prologue to The Stand. Both were published in 1978.
#45
Old 03-10-2004, 10:13 AM
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Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: IN USA
Posts: 13,223
Btw, the best-done movie scene-

the military base cafeteria full of the dead & dying... and the jukebox comes on....


MORE COWBELL!!!!
#46
Old 03-10-2004, 10:25 AM
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Location: Republic of Marylandistan
Posts: 9,900
Quote:
Originally Posted by picunurse
The Kid was in the first book, but his part was smaller. I still have copies of both.
Actually, the only "part" he had in the original version was Larry, Stu, Ralph and Glen finding his body (and the wolves he killed) outside the Eisenhower Tunnel.

"Fuck you! You're shut down! Do you believe that happy crappy?"
#47
Old 03-10-2004, 10:45 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: SC
Posts: 1,609
I just like the whole book. I can't think of one scene that I didn't like, although there are plenty of them that make me cringe.

If I had to pick favorites they'd be ones that have already been mentioned:

Fran buries her dad, the trail of PayDay candybars, walking through the tunnel, and the little vignettes at the beginning that explained how other people died in ways indirectly related to Mr. Tripps.


And after watching the miniseries countless times, "Don't Fear the Reaper" is forever seared into my brain along with an image of Flagg.
#48
Old 03-10-2004, 03:58 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Kalamazoo, MI
Posts: 5,142
...damn you all for making me go out and order the miniseries...and then notice that It wasn't all that expensive either...

Seriously, I just finished the book for the first time this weekend. Loved it. I'd seen most of the miniseries when it first aired and it always left an impression on me. Now I want to go back and reread Wizard and Glass so I can catch the Stand references.
#49
Old 03-11-2004, 07:48 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Orlando(ish)
Posts: 21,252
In the extended version of the book, Nick loses an eye in the fight with Ray Booth, in addition to being shot. He wears a patch after that.

Also, how they meet Dana is explained...and that was very scary, because I could see that happening in a post-'flu world.

There's also more detail of Nadine and Harold's non-sex life, and Mother Abagail's condition after she comes back from her "getting right with God."

There's also a scene where Fran tells her mother she's pregnant, that explains why she's in a hotel room and not at home.

The ending and the beginning are different too.

I like the extended version...it may not be more substance, but it fleshes out some of the storyline.
#50
Old 03-11-2004, 09:48 AM
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Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Republic of Marylandistan
Posts: 9,900
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivylass
In the extended version of the book, Nick loses an eye in the fight with Ray Booth, in addition to being shot. He wears a patch after that.
Huh? You must have a different copy than I do, I don't remember that at all. 'Course, I've only read it about 2 dozen times, but still...Do you have a passage backing this up?
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