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#1
Old 03-11-2004, 06:51 AM
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Who first said "I resemble that remark!"?

Er, that's it. Anyone know where this humorously mangled phrase first appeared?
#2
Old 03-11-2004, 06:53 AM
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No cite, but if this were a game show I would answer "Groucho Marx."
Anyone know if this is right?
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#3
Old 03-11-2004, 06:57 AM
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Yes, that's what I would guess too, but I wondered if anyone had a definite cite.
#4
Old 03-11-2004, 06:59 AM
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I hope it's not Groucho, because I've never thought it was very funny.
#5
Old 03-11-2004, 07:01 AM
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I reckon WC Fields more than Groucho.
#6
Old 03-11-2004, 07:05 AM
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Looks like it mighta been the Three Stooges....

http://www4.citizen.com/news2004/Feb...c_02.02.04.asp
#7
Old 03-11-2004, 07:24 AM
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If that proves wrong, may I suggest: some annoying c**t?
#8
Old 03-11-2004, 07:45 AM
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I would have thought it was Bullwinkle, but it may very well have been Groucho Marx. It sure sounds like something he would have said!
#9
Old 03-11-2004, 09:12 AM
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<fotoman>

I think that this was a generic joke through vaudeville, which would resolve why several origins might be remembered. I remember the line from both the Marx Brothers AND the Three Stooges, as well as several other sources from that period. I need to browse though my Henny Youngman and Milton Berle joke collections to see if I can find it (they're low tech - printed on paper - no search engine!!!)

</fotoman>
#10
Old 03-11-2004, 09:37 AM
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And I thought it was from a spoonerist character in the long running British soap "Coronation Street" http://corrie.net but having never seen the show (the opening music sparks off a Pavlovian movement for the off button) I cannot tell you which character. But maybe there will be a Corrie fan along in a minute to help...

That I have never seen the show but know it to be a Corrie reference must count for something. Even if true it does not mean it is the first usage I grant you though....
#11
Old 03-11-2004, 09:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notquitekarpov
And I thought it was from a spoonerist character in the long running British soap "Coronation Street" http://corrie.net but having never seen the show (the opening music sparks off a Pavlovian movement for the off button) I cannot tell you which character. But maybe there will be a Corrie fan along in a minute to help...

That I have never seen the show but know it to be a Corrie reference must count for something. Even if true it does not mean it is the first usage I grant you though....
I suspect you're thinking about Hilda Ogden. She was more of a malaprop
than a spooner. She had a large muriel on her wall.
#12
Old 03-11-2004, 09:57 AM
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My vote's for the three stooges...I recall Curly using it for sure.
Then again, like Olive said, "this was a generic joke through vaudeville".
O is probably right, But if Uncle Milty originated the joke I'd be surprised.
#13
Old 03-11-2004, 09:58 AM
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Your right, , malapropism not spoonerism. A search on malaprop, Hilda and Sugden came up with a page telling us she nicked her act from Hylda Baker but searching there has led nowhere obvious. She only goes back to the early 1970's though and maybe the joke (if we can call it that) is older than that.
#14
Old 03-11-2004, 10:12 AM
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Oh, good lord, a pun that obvious no doubt has been in pretty steady use since mid-19th century vaudeville and minstrel shows. The only answerable question might be, "who was the first to be filmed or recorded using it?"
#15
Old 03-11-2004, 04:57 PM
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mid 19th century? I didn't think Vaudeville began quite that long ago...maybe the mid 1880's. Ahh what the hell, that's close enough. We don't need to argue about every damn thing, do we?
#16
Old 07-24-2011, 01:51 PM
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This is a maloprop. Curly of The Three Stooges replied to an insult, "I resemble the incineration of that remark" when he (seemingly) meant to say, "I resent the insinuation of that remark"!!! Way funny, and now a nonsensical retort to an insult-obviously. Much like "I couldn't care less" is often said, mistakenly, as "I could care less"-also nonsensical.

Last edited by rmrcon; 07-24-2011 at 01:54 PM. Reason: just wanted to add to my remark
#17
Old 07-24-2011, 05:32 PM
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And here I always thought it came from Foghorn Leghorn.
#18
Old 07-24-2011, 06:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olive, The Other Reindeer View Post
<fotoman> I need to browse though my Henny Youngman and Milton Berle joke collections to see if I can find it (they're low tech - printed on paper - no search engine!!!) </fotoman>
It's safe to say it's not original to Berle. Nothing was original to Berle.

Last edited by dropzone; 07-24-2011 at 06:08 PM.
#19
Old 07-24-2011, 09:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmrcon View Post
This is a maloprop. Curly of The Three Stooges replied to an insult, "I resemble the incineration of that remark" when he (seemingly) meant to say, "I resent the insinuation of that remark"!!! Way funny, and now a nonsensical retort to an insult-obviously. Much like "I couldn't care less" is often said, mistakenly, as "I could care less"-also nonsensical.
You state this as fact, sans cite. In any case, Curly may have said it, but the question is who said it first.

I've always attributed it to Groucho, but that may be merely because, when I hear it in my head, it is Groucho's voice I hear. Yeah, I'm cite-less as well.

Not that this is proof, but didn't Hawkeye say the line in the M*A*S*H episode where he was parading around post-op doing his Groucho impersonation?


mmm
#20
Old 07-24-2011, 09:52 PM
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It's from the 70's British sitcom "Are you being served?" Mrs. Slocum was always saying that.
#21
Old 07-24-2011, 10:33 PM
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Well, Curly did say it.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=H4Pzo...ailpage#t=183s

From "Idle Roomers" (1943):
Quote:

Lady in the room sees werewolf behind Curly
: Wolf! Wolf! Ahhhhhh!
Curly: Who, me? I resemble that remark.
Still, I will not be surprised to see that this came originally from an old vaudeville routine.
#22
Old 07-25-2011, 01:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anna Nimity View Post
It's from the 70's British sitcom "Are you being served?" Mrs. Slocum was always saying that.
Having watched "Are You Being Served" way too many times over the years, I don't recall Mrs Slocum ever saying "I resemble that remark" (although maybe she did once, anything is possible).
Her catch phrase was "And I am unanimous in that", along with various innuedos concerning her "pussy" ("Tiddles" I think, although she did get a new cat later in the series) and stories about her pub outings with Mrs Axelbee.
#23
Old 07-25-2011, 01:09 PM
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I think I first saw it on MASH, so my first guess would be Groucho.
#24
Old 07-25-2011, 01:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
I think I first saw it on MASH, so my first guess would be Groucho.
I'm 99% sure that Groucho never said it in any of the movies, although the last few had lines that were equally stupid. He might have said it on You Bet Your Life, but I doubt that too. Nothing comes up in a search, except people who attribute it to him with no source or cite.

Let's face it. The line is Three Stooges level humor. That alone is proof that Groucho never said it.
#25
Old 09-18-2014, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Er, that's it. Anyone know where this humorously mangled phrase first appeared?
The first time I heard it was Duck's Breath Mystery Theater
#26
Old 09-18-2014, 01:02 PM
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Curly used the line in "Idle Roomers", filmed in 1943. Does anyone know of an earlier use?
#27
Old 09-18-2014, 02:11 PM
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Zombies don't resemble any remarks!
#28
Old 09-18-2014, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Omar Little View Post
Zombies don't resemble any remarks!
Why, you. I oughta...
#29
Old 09-18-2014, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by jjimm View Post
If that proves wrong, may I suggest: some annoying c**t?
Zombie thread and all that, but I agree -- the expression has always struck me as an extremely feeble and un-funny "funny".
#30
Old 09-18-2014, 07:43 PM
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Zombie thread blah blah...

I can't believe I'm the first contestant to identify Quick Draw McGraw (1960's Hannah-Barbera cartoon) as an utterer of the phrase. "Now hold on, thar! I resemble that statement!"
#31
Old 09-19-2014, 12:34 AM
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I wouldn't rule out Popeye. He was a master at mixkin up his words.
#32
Old 09-19-2014, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
Zombie thread blah blah...

I can't believe I'm the first contestant to identify Quick Draw McGraw (1960's Hannah-Barbera cartoon) as an utterer of the phrase. "Now hold on, thar! I resemble that statement!"
I confess to never having heard of him before. No relation, I suppose, to Wallace and Gromit's villainous penguin, Feathers McGraw...?
#33
Old 09-19-2014, 04:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
I've always attributed it to Groucho, but that may be merely because, when I hear it in my head, it is Groucho's voice I hear. Yeah, I'm cite-less as well.
Similarly, every time I hear or read the line "I am serious, and don't call me Shirley!" I think fer sure that's a Groucho line. I'm always surprised to see that the first use, apparently, was in Airplane!, by Leslie Nielson, 1980.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vontsira View Post
I confess to never having heard of him before. No relation, I suppose, to Wallace and Gromit's villainous penguin, Feathers McGraw...?
Quick-Draw McGraw was an anthropomorphic horse of Hanna Barbera, who walked upright on his hind legs and was sometimes shown riding an actual horse-like horse. Like Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear, he had a sidekick -- a little burro named Baba Looey.
#34
Old 09-19-2014, 06:38 AM
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I would just like to point out that, after 10 years, I don't really care all that much.
#35
Old 09-19-2014, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Peanuthead View Post
I wouldn't rule out Popeye. He was a master at mixkin up his words.
Can't speak to the comic strip, but I'm pretty familiar with all the original Fleischer-era animated Popeyes, and I don't recall ever hearing him say this.

Pardon the sidetrack, but as we're not likely to see a "favorite Popeye mutterings" thread, I'll post mine here.

In "I Never Changes Me Altitude," Popeye and Bluto are engaged in a mid-air fight with their respective small planes. Bluto gives Popeye's craft a whack with the wings of his plane and knocks him out of the open cockpit.

Popeye slides down his now-vertical wing, avoiding being hurled into the air by clutching at the skin of the plane, which is gradually separated from the framework by his downward momentum. He responds by saying "This is terrible, this is terrible (tearable)."

The sailor then gets his bearings, and clambers back up the still-vertical wing, patching up the skin as he goes. His positive, resourceful outlook returning, he mutters, "Hmm, just need a little mucilage on the fuselage."

All hail the great Jack Mercer, who apparently ad-libbed many of Popeye's mutterings on the spot as the soundtracks were being recorded onto the already-finished animation.
#36
Old 09-19-2014, 09:16 AM
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Baba Looey was a burro? I always thought he was supposed to be a calf or small bull. "Queecksdraw, eet's the golden spike!"
#37
Old 09-19-2014, 10:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post

Quick-Draw McGraw was an anthropomorphic horse of Hanna Barbera, who walked upright on his hind legs and was sometimes shown riding an actual horse-like horse. Like Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear, he had a sidekick -- a little burro named Baba Looey.
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Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright View Post
Baba Looey was a burro? I always thought he was supposed to be a calf or small bull. "Queecksdraw, eet's the golden spike!"
Thanks, people. I have to wonder whether there might be any "crossover / borrowing" with the Glaswegian strip-cartoon which flourished some three-quarters of a century ago, hero thereof Lobey Dosser. Glasgow is IMO one of the world's delightfully insane places: there was a long-running feature by a local cartoonist, which surreally mixed up Glasgow, and the Wild West. Lobey Dosser was the Sheriff of Calton Creek (Calton being a notorious Glasgow bad neighbourhood) -- he rode a two-legged and permanently upright horse called El Fideldo, and had innumerable strange adventures, accompanied by much spectacularly-awful punning.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bud_Neill
#38
Old 09-20-2014, 01:08 AM
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Originally Posted by DChord568 View Post
Pardon the sidetrack, but as we're not likely to see a "favorite Popeye mutterings" thread, I'll post mine here.
In "The Jeep," Olive Oyl opens the door while an oblivious Popeye continues knocking on her head. When he realizes what he's doing, he mutters "I didn't know I was knocking on a Dumb Door-a!" Later, Popeye is hunting for a missing Swee'pea, and checks behind a painting, muttering "Searchez la frame!"
#39
Old 09-20-2014, 02:21 AM
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Izzat So?
#40
Old 09-20-2014, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biffy the Elephant Shrew View Post
In "The Jeep," Olive Oyl opens the door while an oblivious Popeye continues knocking on her head. When he realizes what he's doing, he mutters "I didn't know I was knocking on a Dumb Door-a!" Later, Popeye is hunting for a missing Swee'pea, and checks behind a painting, muttering "Searchez la frame!"
Missed the first one but remember the second one well! A classic.

Another just occurred to me...in "Ghosks is the Bunk," Bluto rigs up an abandoned house with haunted-house type gags, then lures Popeye and Olive there to have some fun. He gets the better of them for a while, until they discover Bluto behind the scenes working the gags.

From this point on, the tables are turned...especially when Popeye discovers some "invisible paint" that causes him to disappear when applied. As he's slathering it on his upper limbs, he mutters "Well, farewell to arms."
#41
Old 10-31-2016, 08:48 PM
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Not so fast, there

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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
I would just like to point out that, after 10 years, I don't really care all that much.
Sorry, OP - you can't get out of it now.
I concur w/MrKnowItAll re: Curly in "Idle Roomers". Fyi - the scene involved the Wolfman -- and I'm posting on Halloween!!
#42
Old 11-01-2016, 06:05 AM
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Since the thread has been resurrected, can I cite Aristophanes' Clouds, 400+ BC?
#43
Old 11-01-2016, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Sir Dopey View Post
Sorry, OP - you can't get out of it now.
12 and a half years. Still don't care.
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