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#1
Old 04-21-2005, 10:49 PM
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"Conventional oven OK, no broiler" -- what about an oven on broil?

I have some glass cookware that says it's safe for conventional ovens, but not "broilers." Can I use it in my conventional oven when it's set to broil?
#2
Old 04-21-2005, 10:53 PM
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Then you are using a broiler. Or is your broiler separate from the oven?

If so, why would you set the oven on broil and stick something in a place that is getting no heat?
#3
Old 04-21-2005, 10:59 PM
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OK, so a conventional oven on broil is what they mean by a broiler?
#4
Old 04-21-2005, 11:01 PM
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When you turn your conventional oven on "broil" it heats up the broiler part of your oven. Which is a separate heating element.
#5
Old 04-21-2005, 11:03 PM
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Okay. I was confused because the sentence was constructed in such a way that it made me think that a "broiler" was a separate piece of equipment.

Guess I'd better take it out, then. Damn -- that's what I was hoping to use them for.
#6
Old 04-21-2005, 11:11 PM
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Broilers can make some glass do funny things. Like break.

It's not fun to clean up.
#7
Old 04-22-2005, 12:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt_mcl
Okay. I was confused because the sentence was constructed in such a way that it made me think that a "broiler" was a separate piece of equipment.
Well, there is the salamander type of standalone broiler, but you're not likely to see them in home kitchens.
#8
Old 04-22-2005, 12:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobT
Broilers can make some glass do funny things. Like break.

It's not fun to clean up.
Try not to put cold items in intense heat. They do funny things. Like break.
#9
Old 04-22-2005, 12:56 AM
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To be precise, I put some glass cookware in a broiler and when I took it out, the lid was really hot. So I put some cold water on it so I could clean it and hold it. And the lid sort of exploded into my sink. So I assume the heat is too intense.
#10
Old 04-22-2005, 01:32 AM
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Ah. Well, fortunately I've been avoiding that... instead letting it cool on my stovetop.

I guess it's off to the Tire to buy a metal broiling pan.
#11
Old 04-22-2005, 09:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobT
To be precise, I put some glass cookware in a broiler and when I took it out, the lid was really hot. So I put some cold water on it so I could clean it and hold it. And the lid sort of exploded into my sink. So I assume the heat is too intense.
I don't think you'd need broiler temps to do that. Probably 400F or even 300F might be enough. I'm gonna go try it, again.
#12
Old 04-22-2005, 10:05 AM
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Some ovens have broilers in the main oven compartment, with the sliding drawer under the main oven being for storage of pots/pans/baking sheets.

Some of them have the broiler section located in the drawer under the main oven.

I've found that (in general) electric ranges have the broiler inside the main oven, and gas ovens have the broiler in the drawer underneath the main oven.

The basic point is that if you are using it for standard oven temperatures, they are safe. If you put it under the broiler, which is a direct source, high intensity heat, coming from above (the broiler element/flame source), rather than the non-direct source of a standard oven, they are not safe.

The breaking that BobT encountered was due to thermal shock, which glass and it's like products do not handle very well. You will get similar reactions from putting a glass (or pyrex) baking dish on top of a stove top... trust me on this one. Early in my cooking experience, I attempted to make gravy in one, after I had roasted a chicken, only to have it explode all over the kitchen. I found the one sliver of pyrex that I missed in the cleanup a few weeks later, when I got it imbeded in my finger while cleaning up. A 3/8" long, 1/4" wide triangle of glass will insert very nicely between the fingertip, and 2nd section of your ring finger. I lived with it there for a few weeks, until it began giving me problems with my grip, so a few drinks and a needle surgery later, I got it out to my great relief. ( I had no insurance at the time).

Be careful with glass, it can be dangerous, but also a fantastic cookware.

-butler
#13
Old 04-22-2005, 10:24 AM
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Just to be clear, there are at least two configurations of the standard household oven.

The first is that there is a separate broiler located below the main oven. When you turn the dial to "broil," the heat is shut off in the main oven and the lower broiler is activated.

The second is that the broiler heating element is located in the main oven itself. You put your food in the same place you would if you were baking and then just turn the dial to "broil." In these ovens, the lower compartment is usually a storage space instead of a broiler.
#14
Old 04-22-2005, 10:25 AM
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Glass cookware is made from a specific type of glass called "borosilicate." Borosilicate glass has a high (relative to ordinary soda-lime window glass) resistance to fracture from thermal stress. Corning manufactures borosilicate glass under the trade name Pyrex and claims is is generally able to withstand D100 C when immersed in liquid. Surface scratches and small chips on the edges of a piece of borosilicate cookware will significantly reduce its resistance to thermal (and even mechanical) shock.

http://65.108.128.37/pub/prodsvc/cor...properties.php
#15
Old 04-22-2005, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by butler1850
I've found that (in general) electric ranges have the broiler inside the main oven, and gas ovens have the broiler in the drawer underneath the main oven.
Respecting the "in general" comment, I'll further add that "in general" the "better" (non-economy model) gas ranges, too, have the broiler at the top of the main oven compartment rather than below, and with a storage drawer underneath. Some of the even better models have an electric booster element, too (which causes me not to be able to use the built-in microwave at the same time, stupid same circuit).
#16
Old 04-22-2005, 03:44 PM
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Avoid thermal shock with all your cookware; it can warp a pan too. Never pour cold water on a hot thing.
#17
Old 04-22-2005, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt_mcl
Ah. Well, fortunately I've been avoiding that... instead letting it cool on my stovetop.

I guess it's off to the Tire to buy a metal broiling pan.
If you haven't already bought a pan, might I suggest a cast iron fry pan. Some stores will even sell pre-seasoned pans. As long as what I'm broiling isnt acidic or too large, I much prefer my cast iron pans (one ridge, one flat). Plus, cast iron pans are cheap, and with regular, easy maintenance, last a lifetime.
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