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#1
Old 07-07-2005, 02:26 AM
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Do Texans (and other gulf-coasters) really say Pure-Dee?

In a book by Larry McMurtry and maybe a book called something like Topsy Dingo Wild Dog, people used "pure-dee" as an adverb. For example, "If you think that, you're a pure-dee fool," or "...make your life a pure-dee Hell."

Is that a real-life usage? I may have used it once or twice, and I'll be embarrassed if it's only fiction.
#2
Old 07-07-2005, 03:57 AM
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As a fifth-generation Texan (and a girl raised on the Gulf Coast, in Corpus Christi) I can honestly say I have never heard of the word "Pure-Dee." I don't honestly even know what it means. Is it a version of "pretty?" Is it....what is it?

I have also never read any Larry McMurtry. Perhaps that is my problem.

But if he's been to Texas, particularly the southern Gulf region, he was high on something if that's what he heard. Even my West and East Texas relatives (where the accents actually do live up to the stereotypes) have never, to my knowledge, said such a thing.

I suggest he do his research.
#3
Old 07-07-2005, 04:12 AM
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I believe the OP means pure D, as in wholesale or complete, not purdy as in pretty.
#4
Old 07-07-2005, 04:13 AM
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Still never heard of it, or anything similar to it.
#5
Old 07-07-2005, 04:13 AM
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Adding, I think it's more of a "Hollywood" depiction, though I've got some older relatives who have used the term for whimsical effect, though they are old Midwest farmer types.
#6
Old 07-07-2005, 04:56 AM
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I've gotta say that I heard it quite often, in Texas, back in the 40s and 50s. It was usually said in a kind of self-mocking tone, as if the user knew it was a cornpone expression but was using it anyway.
#7
Old 07-07-2005, 06:59 AM
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Ditto to LouisB's reply. I've only heard it used ironically (in a "Minnie Pearl" sorta voice).
#8
Old 07-07-2005, 08:23 AM
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Freda Black used "pure-t" in court in North Carolina. I thought it was very unprofessional, but she won the case. I've never heard anyone else use it.
#9
Old 07-07-2005, 08:31 AM
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I grew up in Arkansas, and I've heard it.
#10
Old 07-07-2005, 09:14 AM
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It's used in these here parts. Usually combined with "bullshit", as in, "My boss told me I had to be at work on Saturday. Man, that's pure D bullshit."
#11
Old 07-07-2005, 12:49 PM
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I have never heard of it.

I have heard people say purr-dee instead of pretty though.

(Makes my skin crawl.)
#12
Old 07-07-2005, 02:23 PM
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In Georgia it's "pure-t", but actual usage is rare.
#13
Old 07-07-2005, 02:50 PM
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Heh. It seems the Pure Dee is the Net's hottest 18 year old camgirl.


Anyway, I can't find a definition, but taken in context, the D might mean "damn".
#14
Old 07-07-2005, 03:26 PM
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I use it while speaking sometimes. I'm New Mexican but with a Texan and Okie background. Pure-D loco; Pure-D mean; Pure-D insane.. It's kind of like using "plumb." Plumb mean; plumb loco; plumb crazy.
#15
Old 07-07-2005, 03:27 PM
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Hamsters got this before..

I'm sort of surprised no one else has heard this. I'm in the Texas Panhandle, the Texas accent and regionalisms are very pronounced here.

For more context, I guess "bona fied" or "genuine" would come close.

"My boss made me work Saturday, he's a pure D asshole."

Something along those lines.
#16
Old 07-07-2005, 03:54 PM
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I grew up in northeastern Oklahoma, where "pure D" is often used as an intensifier. I don't hear it as much these days as I did in the '50s and '60s, but it's a genuine expression. My mother used to call things "pure D bull," meaning "total bullshit." My mom must have used this expression several times a day when I was a kid. We get a lot of bullshit in northeastern Oklahoma (both the real kind and the figurative kind).
#17
Old 07-07-2005, 04:07 PM
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My mom (who is from Kansas) uses it, but only when it's followed by "fit", as in, "She had a pure-d fit when I told her I'd been using her toothbrush to de-flea the dog." She does not use it as an adjective with any other word except "fit". But it has the same meaning as others here have said.
#18
Old 07-07-2005, 05:04 PM
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Cajun country checking in - it's used here in the same manner Duke of Rat outlined.
#19
Old 07-07-2005, 06:00 PM
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Yeah, "pure d" is used in the sense of "bona fide," "genuine," or "first class," as in "man, you must think I'm a Pure D, Grade A idiot if you think I'll believe that."
#20
Old 07-07-2005, 06:45 PM
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I've heard it, too, in North Carolina and Mississippi. Always figgered the "D" was a shortening of Damn(ed), but couldn't find any internet cite for it.
#21
Old 07-07-2005, 11:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AskNott
In a book by Larry McMurtry and maybe a book called something like Topsy Dingo Wild Dog, people used "pure-dee" as an adverb. For example, "If you think that, you're a pure-dee fool," or "...make your life a pure-dee Hell."

Is that a real-life usage? I may have used it once or twice, and I'll be embarrassed if it's only fiction.
THAT's exactly how they pronounce it... it's true... i hear it to this very day... as well as the infamous, "hey y'all!" ohhhh Lordy!
#22
Old 07-08-2005, 12:01 AM
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Say it! Hell, I've posted it! Shameless recovering Texan.
#23
Old 07-08-2005, 12:28 AM
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I've seen it in one book

In Christopher Paul Curtis' book The Watsons Go to Birmingham, 1963, a thirteen year old character says to his little brother, "That was pure D welfare food."

Author grew up in Flint Michigan; the novel takes place there, too.

Great young adult book, btw.
#24
Old 07-08-2005, 12:32 AM
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It should be noted that "pure-D" is almost always used in a negative way. You'll hear "that's pure-D bullcrap," but you aren't likely to hear "this is pure-D orange juice." Although it means "genuine" or "bona fide," it's generally used to emphasize an entirely bad or undesirable thing.
#25
Old 07-08-2005, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkfreud
It should be noted that "pure-D" is almost always used in a negative way. You'll hear "that's pure-D bullcrap,"
Well this hasn't been my experience.... every single time I heard it, it was in the context of beauty:

"thaa-atz sUHch a PUR-Dee dress yure wear-rin!"
"ohhhh she's soooooo PUR-dee!!!"
#26
Old 07-08-2005, 07:46 AM
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Anyone notice that the "region of use" for this phrase seems centered near the Texas panhandle? (At least based on the locations above... NE Okla, Amarillo, Abilene, etc.) For some reason, this stuff fascinates me (regional dialects, I mean).
#27
Old 07-08-2005, 08:55 AM
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Ah, but Pace, you're using the word purty, as in pretty, and they're talking about some bizarre expression, pure-D.
Even if it stood for damned, how does that make any more sense?
#28
Old 07-08-2005, 11:28 AM
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It almost makes sense, "That's just pure damned nonsense" or "That's just pure-D nonsense".
#29
Old 07-08-2005, 12:16 PM
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Thanks, all. Real people really say it. I learned something here.
#30
Old 07-08-2005, 12:47 PM
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Looking around the net I found several people who claim it is a mispronounciation of purdy. If you substitute purdy for pure-D in any of the phrases people have mentioned, like "pure dee fool" and "pure-D bull" you get nonsense phrases, indicating those people made the connection between purdy for pure-D solely by a similarity in the spelling. The technical, etymological name for this is "pulling it out of your ass."
#31
Old 07-08-2005, 01:08 PM
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The OED identifies "D" or "dee" as a euphemism for "damn(ed)" and dates it to the late 19th century.
#32
Old 07-08-2005, 02:35 PM
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Well lah-dee-effing-dah, Mr "I don't have to go to the library because I have my own copy of the OED!"



That could be read as "Thanks, it was nice to be validated," spoken in Male-Bonding Trashtalk, but I think you knew that.
#33
Old 09-27-2016, 03:45 AM
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Found this because I just used it.

Ive heard this said since I was a child (living in New Orleans). I never knew what the d stood for. My boyfriend asked and your post was the only place I found where people were using it correctly. Folks are right here too...It typically has a negative connotation, but I have heard it paired with words like fun (when the fun wasn't exactly wholesome.) Thanks for posting!
#34
Old 09-27-2016, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Audrey Levins View Post
As a fifth-generation Texan (and a girl raised on the Gulf Coast, in Corpus Christi) I can honestly say I have never heard of the word "Pure-Dee." I don't honestly even know what it means. Is it a version of "pretty?" Is it....what is it?

I have also never read any Larry McMurtry. Perhaps that is my problem.

But if he's been to Texas, particularly the southern Gulf region, he was high on something if that's what he heard. Even my West and East Texas relatives (where the accents actually do live up to the stereotypes) have never, to my knowledge, said such a thing.

I suggest he do his research.
I know this is a zombie thread, and you may not even still be a board member, but I want to point out that McMurtry was born and raised in Archer City, Texas, spent some of his formative years living on his grandfather's ranch, is deeply steeped in the history and culture, and at one time was a rare book dealer in both Houston and Archer City. I would suggest that his research is very thorough.
#35
Old 09-27-2016, 12:56 PM
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To me, I associate it with Appalachia. And then only thru TV/movies so no doubt unlikely even in the hollers.
#36
Old 09-27-2016, 07:08 PM
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I'm sure I've heard the phrase "pure dee wrong" in a song lyric (or a spoken section in a song), but I can't remember which song for the life of me. I thought it was Ray Stevens, but Google isn't helping me.
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