Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 07-01-2006, 12:41 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
What's the name for that 50's commercial type music?

Whenever some short subject in the documentary or self-help/instructional category was made in the 40's-60's there was this particular style of music that gave it some kind of friendly, light, non-confrontational feel. I have never heard a name for the style or genre. Have you?

The only composer/performer I can name whose style approaches what I'm trying to describe is Leroy Anderson. His compositions have/had some of that flavor, including:

Syncopated Clock
Serenata
Belle of the Ball
Jazz Pizzicato
Plink Plank Plunk
Trumpeter's Lullaby
Forgotten Dreams.

There were usually strings and light percussion instruments like xylophones or marimbas. The arrangements made "elavator music" seem upbeat. But there was surely a style marker on them. You can still hear that style in some commercials and documentaries that are trying to evoke that 50's feel.

Anybody know what I'm trying to describe here? Does it have a standard name?
#2
Old 07-01-2006, 12:48 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 3,111
We just did this a few months ago. It's Library Music.
#3
Old 07-01-2006, 01:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by VCO3
We just did this a few months ago. It's Library Music.
Thanks. I must have missed the older thread.
#4
Old 07-01-2006, 01:23 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 3,111
No problem!
#5
Old 07-01-2006, 01:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: DC area
Posts: 29,442
They play that music between movies at the drive-in! Then comes the booming man telling you to get your hot a delicious food at the concession stand.
#6
Old 07-01-2006, 06:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsgoddess
They play that music between movies at the drive-in! Then comes the booming man telling you to get your hot a delicious food at the concession stand.
I thought drive-ins were extinct!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
#7
Old 07-01-2006, 07:09 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: America's Dairyland
Posts: 12,780
"Library music" is a very broad term, and includes much more than the specific definition given in the OP: "some kind of friendly, light, non-confrontational feel" and "usually strings and light percussion instruments like xylophones or marimbas".

"Library music" is just as likely be a piece used over a chase scene, or in a horror movie, or during a tender romance.
#8
Old 07-01-2006, 07:28 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Bloomingdale, NJ
Posts: 9,387
Also known as "production music." John Krisfaluci (whose Ren & Stimpy used a ton of it, mostly from the KPM/Associated library) calls it something like "weekend afternoon music," or something like that. The idea that it's light and fluffy. Of course, in Ren & Stimpy, it was mostly used in an ironic fashion.
#9
Old 07-01-2006, 07:28 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 3,111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walloon
"Library music" is a very broad term, and includes much more than the specific definition given in the OP: "some kind of friendly, light, non-confrontational feel" and "usually strings and light percussion instruments like xylophones or marimbas".

"Library music" is just as likely be a piece used over a chase scene, or in a horror movie, or during a tender romance.
Yes, but if the OP is looking for a primer or a place to begin looking for the type of music she's asking for, "Library Music" is the overarching thing that she needs to be looking for.
#10
Old 07-01-2006, 07:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by VCO3
Yes, but if the OP is looking for a primer or a place to begin looking for the type of music she's asking for, "Library Music" is the overarching thing that she needs to be looking for.
[nitpick] She's a he. [/nitpick]

I gather that there may be several terms for the category. Somehow I had it in mind that the "light and frothy" aspect had a more definitive name, but I'm content with the labels already mentioned. That is, unless somebody has something more specific for that "Ren and Stimpy" music. That's a good example of what I'm referring to.
#11
Old 02-25-2010, 08:56 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobo85 View Post
Also known as "production music." John Krisfaluci (whose Ren & Stimpy used a ton of it, mostly from the KPM/Associated library) calls it something like "weekend afternoon music," or something like that. The idea that it's light and fluffy. Of course, in Ren & Stimpy, it was mostly used in an ironic fashion.
Replying to a zombie thread I started years ago to thanks mobo85 for providing a name that I believe answers the thread's main concerns.

Here's a YouTube sample of the sort of thing I was wanting to know: Ren and Stimpy Soundtrack - Happy-Go-Lively as well as many others nearby in the Playlist.
#12
Old 02-25-2010, 09:05 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 13,677
Beautiful music, perhaps?:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beautiful_music
#13
Old 02-25-2010, 09:11 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post

Thanks, but that may be a bit too broad, whereas http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Production_music isn't quite descriptive enough for the Wiki alone to solve the problem of the OP.

mobo85 satisfied my curiosity for the specific sound. If there's a more descriptive name than "production music" for that particular sound, I'd like to know. But I mostly revived the thread to post that YouTube has examples of what I had tried to describe in the OP long ago.
#14
Old 02-25-2010, 11:09 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 5,173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post
Replying to a zombie thread I started years ago to thanks mobo85 for providing a name that I believe answers the thread's main concerns.

Here's a YouTube sample of the sort of thing I was wanting to know: Ren and Stimpy Soundtrack - Happy-Go-Lively as well as many others nearby in the Playlist.
MAde me think of the great Land of Chocolate theme from The Simpsons:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=hmFD15m-2fg
#15
Old 02-25-2010, 11:20 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by drastic_quench View Post
MAde me think of the great Land of Chocolate theme from The Simpsons:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=hmFD15m-2fg
Excellent! Right on the money. The pizzicato strings are an important ingredient, and it's the lilt to the music itself, too.

In more "serious" settings such as sex education and what to do in the event of a nuclear attack the music had less lilt but it was still upbeat and non-threatening. Always B&W things with no-name actors in period clothes and hair.

I wager YouTube even has some examples of those things, too.
#16
Old 02-25-2010, 11:26 AM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,303
Well, "Muzak" is not exactly what you're looking for, but it comes pretty close... that's the term I would use to try to convey the general idea. As typically used, it's basically synonymous with "elevator music".
#17
Old 02-25-2010, 11:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjepson View Post
Well, "Muzak" is not exactly what you're looking for, but it comes pretty close... that's the term I would use to try to convey the general idea. As typically used, it's basically synonymous with "elevator music".
Again, too broad. Thanks for the input, though.
#18
Old 02-25-2010, 12:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 17,208
I've heard it called Space-Age Music.
#19
Old 02-25-2010, 12:11 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cisco View Post
I've heard it called Space-Age Music.
That's another broader category. Including:

Exotica
Space Age Bachelor Pad Music
Jet Set Pop
The Now Sound
Cocktail Music
Incredibly Strange Music
Outsider Music

If anybody cares, Space Age Pop Music Page is a great place to browse for all sorts of 50's and 60's non-rock music.
#20
Old 02-25-2010, 01:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Liverpool NY USA
Posts: 9,479
What about that "Tip-Toeing Elf" music? The kind they play on Desperate Housewives, when Susan is, say, spying on Mike and about to fall and get a bucket stuck over her head?
#21
Old 02-25-2010, 01:13 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Bloomingdale, NJ
Posts: 9,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post
Thanks, but that may be a bit too broad, whereas http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Production_music isn't quite descriptive enough for the Wiki alone to solve the problem of the OP.

mobo85 satisfied my curiosity for the specific sound. If there's a more descriptive name than "production music" for that particular sound, I'd like to know. But I mostly revived the thread to post that YouTube has examples of what I had tried to describe in the OP long ago.
Associated Production Music, one of the largest providers of production music in the United States, provides all styles of music, from parodies of well-known tunes and/or popular genres to indeed that stereotypical '50s style of music which is nowadays usually used in an ironic fashion in cartoons and comedy (most of which came from the British production house KPM). APM/KPM themselves refer to it as "archival" or "archive." I don't really know if you can get any more specific than that. "Production music" is indeed too vague a term, but I can't think of anything else.
#22
Old 02-25-2010, 01:13 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
What about that "Tip-Toeing Elf" music? The kind they play on Desperate Housewives, when Susan is, say, spying on Mike and about to fall and get a bucket stuck over her head?
I religiously don't watch the show. Any samples of the music itself, maybe?
#23
Old 02-25-2010, 01:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Third Rock From the Sun
Posts: 1,561
Ummmm...bossa nova?
#24
Old 02-25-2010, 01:36 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by ministryman View Post
Ummmm...bossa nova?
Nope
#25
Old 02-25-2010, 03:37 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Liverpool NY USA
Posts: 9,479
Not just Desperate Housewives. You hear it all the time on TV and in movies when a character is bent on some mischief. It's a 'lighthearted' plinking (violin?) music played when, say, someone is sneaking into a room. It's sneaky music.
#26
Old 02-25-2010, 03:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
Not just Desperate Housewives. You hear it all the time on TV and in movies when a character is bent on some mischief. It's a 'lighthearted' plinking (violin?) music played when, say, someone is sneaking into a room. It's sneaky music.
Would that be the same sort of music behind a Tom & Jerry or Roadrunner & Wile E. when one of them is sneaking up on the other?

If so, that's the plinky sound, but in a much more sinister usage.

This ought to give the mood I'm trying to describe: Ren and Stimpy Soundtrack - Workaday World

Visualize this sort of thing behind a mother preparing lunches for the kids or getting ready for a Tupperware party or neutering a hog.
#27
Old 02-25-2010, 07:18 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 2,956
Here's the Soviet version. (YouTube link that will blow your mind)
#28
Old 02-25-2010, 07:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 652
Don't know if I'm in the right neighborhood, but David Rose played music that sounded like this when he was the bandleader on the Red Skelton Show. Am I thinking of the right stuff?
#29
Old 02-25-2010, 10:42 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Liverpool NY USA
Posts: 9,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeldar View Post
Would that be the same sort of music behind a Tom & Jerry or Roadrunner & Wile E. when one of them is sneaking up on the other?

If so, that's the plinky sound, but in a much more sinister usage.

This ought to give the mood I'm trying to describe: Ren and Stimpy Soundtrack - Workaday World

Visualize this sort of thing behind a mother preparing lunches for the kids or getting ready for a Tupperware party or neutering a hog.
That's in the ballpark, the plinking (that music sounds like "Holiday For Strings"). The sound I'm thinking of doesn't follow any particular tune, but when you hear it, it signifies the scene in a farce or a comedy when someone is sneaking. Like, the heroine is having an affair with her neighbor Lulu's husband, and she's sitting in Lulu's kitchen and realizes she left her bra in the neighbor's bedroom. While Lulu is talking on the phone, the guilty heroine sneaks down the hall and into the bedroom to retrieve her bra. Plinka-plinka-plinka-plink... Maybe it did originate in cartoons, it's pretty common.
#30
Old 02-25-2010, 10:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanibelMan View Post
Here's the Soviet version. (YouTube link that will blow your mind)
This is not all that far off. I love those comments at YouTube. It's a fun clip, no matter how near or far from the genre I'm trying to identify.

Nice work! How did you manage to zoom in on this clip?
#31
Old 02-25-2010, 10:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by C. Montgomery Burns View Post
Don't know if I'm in the right neighborhood, but David Rose played music that sounded like this when he was the bandleader on the Red Skelton Show. Am I thinking of the right stuff?
Quite so. "Holiday for Strings" is an excellent example of the type of sound.

Here's a decent clip: Geoff Love Holiday For Strings

If this floats your boat, others are nearby.
#32
Old 02-25-2010, 10:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
That's in the ballpark, the plinking (that music sounds like "Holiday For Strings"). The sound I'm thinking of doesn't follow any particular tune, but when you hear it, it signifies the scene in a farce or a comedy when someone is sneaking. Like, the heroine is having an affair with her neighbor Lulu's husband, and she's sitting in Lulu's kitchen and realizes she left her bra in the neighbor's bedroom. While Lulu is talking on the phone, the guilty heroine sneaks down the hall and into the bedroom to retrieve her bra. Plinka-plinka-plinka-plink... Maybe it did originate in cartoons, it's pretty common.
I believe we're on the same wavelength, especially with the "Holiday for Strings" connection.
#33
Old 02-25-2010, 11:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Liverpool NY USA
Posts: 9,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by SanibelMan View Post
Here's the Soviet version. (YouTube link that will blow your mind)


The winner of Russian Idol? lol...just kidding!
#34
Old 02-25-2010, 11:27 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post


The winner of Russian Idol? lol...just kidding!
He reminded me of a cross between Ed Ames and one of those Old Navy mannequins. The corpse references seemed apropos, as well.

I'm very afraid I could wind up dreaming about this!
#35
Old 02-25-2010, 11:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 24,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobo85 View Post
Associated Production Music, one of the largest providers of production music in the United States, provides all styles of music, from parodies of well-known tunes and/or popular genres to indeed that stereotypical '50s style of music which is nowadays usually used in an ironic fashion in cartoons and comedy (most of which came from the British production house KPM). APM/KPM themselves refer to it as "archival" or "archive." I don't really know if you can get any more specific than that. "Production music" is indeed too vague a term, but I can't think of anything else.

Thanks again, mobo85. I had managed to locate this site earlier when I found the YouTube clips on the Ren & Stimpy goodies. It's been quite some time since I found them and just today, when I was looking through my old threads looking for something else, that I saw this one still hadn't been resolved completely. It occured to me to risk the dreaded zombie curse by thanking you for the help in locating them. Lots of good additional stuff has come in today, thanks to all of you.

APM looks like a real outfit! I played around with it a bit when I first located it.
#36
Old 02-27-2017, 05:47 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 14,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by salinqmind View Post
That's in the ballpark, the plinking (that music sounds like "Holiday For Strings"). The sound I'm thinking of doesn't follow any particular tune, but when you hear it, it signifies the scene in a farce or a comedy when someone is sneaking. Like, the heroine is having an affair with her neighbor Lulu's husband, and she's sitting in Lulu's kitchen and realizes she left her bra in the neighbor's bedroom. While Lulu is talking on the phone, the guilty heroine sneaks down the hall and into the bedroom to retrieve her bra. Plinka-plinka-plinka-plink... Maybe it did originate in cartoons, it's pretty common.
FWIW, the musical term for this technique is pizzicato:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pizzicato
#37
Old 02-28-2017, 05:43 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Moscow/Toronto
Posts: 14,448
This may be of interest to some: "Music for TV Dinners"

https://youtube.com/watch?v=xELD...=RDQLM_tP1_sz0

Enjoy!
#38
Old 02-28-2017, 07:08 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,190
The Sims games by Maxis use this sort of music to great effect, though I believe most of it was original productions. So I imagine that they must have had a brief term for the genre in order to tell the music director what was required. Some of it I would characterize as very light Latin jazz/bossa nova. The first few songs on this clip definitely qualify.

Last edited by Elemenopy; 02-28-2017 at 07:10 AM.
#39
Old 02-28-2017, 10:14 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: London
Posts: 2,221
In the UK, we have a category of "light music", where the likes of Leroy Anderson would certainly belong, along with our own home-grown Eric Coates, Charles Williams or Ronald Binge, who had their heyday with pieces that became very popular when used as theme/signature tunes for radio programmes, as well as undemanding (for the audience) concert pieces.

These pieces are classical in style, without any deep technical musical development or emotional intensity: but they have a recognisable programme, structure and resolution, whereas a lot of the off-the-peg library music that's slapped on top of documentaries these days sounds to me like relatively empty vamp-till-ready noodling.
#40
Old 02-28-2017, 10:49 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 24,103
Quote:
Originally Posted by terentii View Post
FWIW, the musical term for this technique is pizzicato:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pizzicato
Yes, and while it's used in cartoons and soundtracks for a "tiptoe" effect, it's also a legitimate technique used in serious concert music, such as in the second movement of Debussy's String Quartet or the third movement of Tchaikovsky's Symphony #4.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: powerlisting wiki random julian may ynab spreadsheet glowed up meaning paint won't dry spaces in filenames condolences money electric cold blanket popeye theme lyrics asian hair type backlit projection screen fake return address wb superstar usa set foot into smooth salsa xl 1x carol brady haircut gallon of vodka girls of greek mirror screen savers dvd won't load boy ejaculate dominate my wife upack pod later skater fever of 109 galaga pronunciation k pro computer dose titration alternative to nutmeg bww vs wingstop spark plug oil deliver phone books sudden change from hot to cold where to get condoms in walmart pet wombat in usa how to kill ground hogs battery pack for lighted wreath remove paint from wallpaper can body spray be used as deodorant is russian roulette legal how do fish get in ponds how to stop publishers clearing house mail romper room theme song lyrics photoelectric smoke detector keeps going off is carhartt a good brand smoke and a pancake austin powers how long can you wear monthly contacts why is my fire alarm going off for no reason when are weigh stations open how to run electrical wire in unfinished basement does grecian formula work on beards is it possible to fall asleep standing up send it to zoom why do steam engines chuff usually one must go to a bowling alley how to fix a windshield wiper that won't move how to take off stripped nut large volume of ejaculate how do they disassemble tower cranes transplanting a maple tree chrysler town and country interior dimensions henry foots cause of death