#1
Old 09-21-2006, 01:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 3,970
Mr. and Mrs. in Russia

In English speaking countries the formal method of identifying a person's gender is the use of Mr., Mrs., Miss and Master. Other countries employ a similar procedure e.g. Monsieur, Madame, and Mademoiselle in France.

It seems that Russians have three names. From Wikipedia:
Quote:
It is obligatory for people to have three names: a given name, a patronymic, and a family name (surname). They are generally presented in that order, although the patronymic is sometimes omitted, just as English middle name or names are usually omitted.
Women normally take the name of their husband (if married) or their father (I think) if unmarried, and add the letter 'a':

Quote:
Russian surnames usually end with -ov (-ova for female); -ev (-eva); -in (-ina).....The ending -iy (-aya) is common in both Russia and Ukraine.
I can't find any detail concerning the use of a formal 'Mr' and 'Mrs' in the Russian language. For example:

Quote:
The first name followed by the patronymic is usually used in formal or respective forms of address. In the media, the respected persons (e.g. leaders of the Soviet Union and Russia) are sometimes mentioned using their full names (first name + patronymic + family name).
I am curious to know whether or not there a Russian equivalent to the English Mr. and Mrs. and under what circumstances these terms are used. Or are the appellations unnecessary?

Many thanks.
#2
Old 09-21-2006, 01:15 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Milton Keynes, UK
Posts: 1,347
Mr = Gospodin
The female form is Gospazha but I don't know whether it applies to married women, unmarried women, or both.
#3
Old 09-21-2006, 01:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Manor Farm
Posts: 16,576
Gospodin (Господин ), Gospazah (Госпожа ), and Gospazitza (Госпожица ) are the Russian equivilents of Mister/Master, Mistriss/Missis, and Miss respectively. Madam (Мадам ) is also used in a formal context (as in Madam <formal title>) as with American English but is not in informal use. I think the terms fell out of common parlance with the rise of Communism, replaced by the gender neutral Comrade (товарищ ), but have come back into limited use after the collapse of Soviet Communism. (The term Comrade is still in use in official titles, at least in the military, similar to the way American jourists are referred to as "The Honorable Hosebag Longwinded".) There are a variety of other terms that also serve with varying degrees of informality and familiarity, but I'm not current enough on my Russian lexicon to know how and when they are used, though I know that the term молодой человек (young man) is often used by and to men of all ages.

Stranger
#4
Old 09-21-2006, 02:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Austin TX USA
Posts: 1,595
IME, while you would might use Gospodin, etc with a foriegner, to use it to describe a native would be somewhere between rare and bizarre. Where an English speaker would say "Mrs. Ivanova", a Russian speaker would say "Irina Igorevna".
#5
Old 09-21-2006, 03:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,116
Cite from Genevra Gerhart's The Russian's World: Life and Language (1994) p. 63

Господин Смирнов (Mr. Smirnov), Госпожа Смирнова (Ms. Smirnov) was formerly only used in diplomatic circles toward or from foreigners of the non-Communist persuasion. (This was the common pre-Revolutionary form of address abandoned earlier because its root is "Lord" Господь.) Nowadays the title is coming into use again, but 70 years of "Comrade" makes any address form difficult. Nothing sounds right unless you are talking to someone you know, in which case a title is not necessary. Newspapers use [gospodin]. In the store, calling the cashier [gospozhá] remains quite a ways from thinkable.
#6
Old 09-21-2006, 04:05 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: A better place to be
Posts: 26,718
It should be noted that the Western custom of politeness calling for Mr-type-title-plus-surname until invited to use the first name is not a Russian usage, for the most part. Gospodin or Tovarishch with the surname is an accommodation to Western usage, much as we would address the gentleman as Monsieur Chirac, not Mr. Chirac. Polite usage, including almost all circumstances, is to use first name plus patronymic, which is why it is well nigh universally asked for and given. In other words, a polite nine-year-old, introduced to a high dignatory named Ivan Dmitrovich Smolenski, would not say, "Zdravstuitye, Gospodin Smolenski" but "Zdravstuitye, Ivan Dimitrovich" with perfect courtesy and no smartaleckiness implied. The first-name/tutoyer usage is in being invited to drop the patronymic and address by first name only.
#7
Old 09-21-2006, 04:31 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: the Keystone State
Posts: 13,619
Would somelike President Putin be addressed as; Mr President, Your Excellecy, or Vladimir Vladimirovich>
__________________
No Gods, No Masters
#8
Old 09-21-2006, 09:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,146
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphaboi867
Would somelike President Putin be addressed as; Mr President, Your Excellecy, or Vladimir Vladimirovich>
Vladimir Vladimirovich. Perfectly respectful.
#9
Old 09-22-2006, 04:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Posts: 4,731
Isn't молодой человек (young man) and девочка (young woman/miss) used?
#10
Old 09-22-2006, 07:42 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chicago-ish, IL
Posts: 10,334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rune
Isn't молодой человек (young man) and девочка (young woman/miss) used?
Only if you don't know the person's name (strangers on the street, etc.), or ironically, as a parent would use a misbehaving child's full name in a scolding voice.
#11
Old 09-22-2006, 09:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 3,970
On most application forms in the UK there is a requirement to state one's gender. This detail is also mandatory when filling in government and other official documents.

Gender is indicated by writing Mr., Mrs., Miss or Ms. Alternatively there may be a box containing these descriptions, one of which must be ticked or three of which must be scored through, depending on the form.

The same information is requested on a computer based form by the use of a drop down box.

How is such information recorded on a Russian application form? If there is no method of so doing, it might make analysis of the total applicants difficult i.e. if the issuers of the form wish to know how many women have applied for their goods/services/driving licences/government benefits etc.
#12
Old 09-22-2006, 09:52 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Austin TX USA
Posts: 1,595
I don't have a Russian-language form handy, but the easiest way would be just to ask. Like the multiltude of forms in the US that have "Sex / Gender: M/F" on them.

If you want to make it difficult, and you have only natives filling out the forms, you can parse the patronymics to find sex.
#13
Old 09-22-2006, 01:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 3,970
I doubt Russian form filling activities are confined strictly to natives of Russia. Many people of different nationalities will be required to complete such documents. Furthermore, parsing patronymics for gender doesn't seem efficient.

Quote:
I don't have a Russian-language form handy, but the easiest way would be just to ask.
Just to ask. Yes, that's what I thought.
#14
Old 09-22-2006, 02:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: the Keystone State
Posts: 13,619
Speaking of patronymics, what happens if the mother's umarried and the father doesn't recognize the child? Is it given a matronymic?
__________________
No Gods, No Masters
#15
Old 09-22-2006, 04:53 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by alphaboi867
Speaking of patronymics, what happens if the mother's umarried and the father doesn't recognize the child? Is it given a matronymic?
There is no matronymic. The child will usually have the biological father's name, unless the mother is completely opposed, in which case any other male name can be used. [Gandfather, or ANY male name]
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:01 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: 24x36 scanner ulc monastery valves per cylinder joke bands japanese cds carl athf quotes shower floor sealer coke can penis rubber match origins nfl copyright disclaimer chinese circumcised red drug freddy ingalls godzilla lobster 220 to 110 grav3yardgirl teeth drano gasoline cartilage healing time dental slap peggy hopkins joyce famous backup singers cat with scars tsuro tiles torn song meaning cartoon etymology lossless png captain 20 dark bluegrass faint smell president bush binoculars glass headlights weight of 1/2 sheetrock slang for 20 dollars is trazodone water soluble hung with a new rope how long does food last in the stomach how to make hard putty soft again animals that spray like a skunk do you have to put a sender address on an envelope lost mailbox key usps how to cut obsidian how bout them apples origin is 20 years old young how much does a box of soda syrup cost inseam for 6 foot male ms marvel and rogue how smart are seals coffee smells like cat pee quit smoking cant breathe what unit is momentum measured in shelf life of bar soap paid for item but never received it should i watch lost wavy gravy ice cream what is economy shipping usps what is the oldest profession basic instinct sharon stone pussy van de kamp's fish fillets cooking directions when bob marley died what was found in his hair toilet auger harbor freight stainless steel smells bad printing personal checks at home opening a deli sandwich shop dulcolax not working after 12 hours is it legal to own a human skull can a drop of sperm cause pregnancy