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#1
Old 09-22-2006, 03:19 PM
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Are American accents sexy to non-Americans?

I know we've asked similar questions before, about what accents we all find most attractive. Based on another thread ("Is this boy crazy?") about an American lad who visits England and drops his native accent, it made me wonder.

Do people outside America find American accents sexy, the way Americans often enjoy French, British, Irish, or other accents? If so, are there any regional accents in particular?
#2
Old 09-22-2006, 03:22 PM
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Depends on the accent, but yah, American accents can be kind of sexy.

I'm in Canada, BTW. And yes, there is a difference in accent.
#3
Old 09-22-2006, 03:40 PM
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Nope, sorry, not in the slightest.
#4
Old 09-22-2006, 03:46 PM
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Don't apologize, they're nothing special to me over here, either. It's hard to understand how somebody would find it exotic, which is why I asked.
#5
Old 09-22-2006, 03:50 PM
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I've heard that Brits found Marisa Tomei heavy Brooklyn accent attractive, but I think it had more to do with the looks of the actress that produced the sounds.

Jim
#6
Old 09-22-2006, 03:51 PM
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Yeah, I think if you took an English girl and gave her an American accent she would move one notch up my personal hotness scale. But for many people, perhaps the American accent is just too familiar from TV and film to have much of an exoticifying effect.
#7
Old 09-22-2006, 03:56 PM
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Not at all. Partly because I don't find typical American accents very pleasing to the ear, and partly (mostly, I guess) because I've been exposed to so many American voices through movies and television that my subconscious considers it the "default".
#8
Old 09-22-2006, 04:02 PM
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I've had a couple of Brits tell me that they found my Southern accent (acquired by living in Oklahoma, Texas, and Tennessee) sexy. Maybe they are thinking of Scarlett O'Hara and the flouncy Southern belle stereotype.
#9
Old 09-22-2006, 04:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkfreud
I've had a couple of Brits tell me that they found my Southern accent (acquired by living in Oklahoma, Texas, and Tennessee) sexy. Maybe they are thinking of Scarlett O'Hara and the flouncy Southern belle stereotype.
I suppose maybe I could go with that. My initial response was, I suppose, mainly directed towards Californian/New York/etc. accents which are the commonest in various media.

FWIW, no accent is as much of a turn-off as an Aussie one.
#10
Old 09-22-2006, 04:13 PM
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I find some of them quite sexy, but not the Californian accent (sounds too airheaded) or the New York Brooklyn accent (sounds like they are constipated).

Elvis had a great accent, not sexy to me, but great non the less.
#11
Old 09-22-2006, 04:14 PM
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It seems like you're talking about english speakers but what about other languages.

As an english speaker I can sometimes tell where a non-english speaker is from based on their accent when they speak english.

So, is an american speaking French or Spanish or German or Japanese considered an interesting or nice sounding accent to native speakers of those (or any other) languages.

Can you immediately tell an American speaking Spanish (or French or German) from say an Australian or a Brit?

Just curious.
#12
Old 09-22-2006, 04:22 PM
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Oh yes, I find pretty much all American accents sexy. Even the Valley Girl one (though it would have to be on a very sexy slutty 20-something for that to work). A whiny New York one might put me off a bit - speaking from experience. But the Deep South one really does it for me: it hints at conservatism compromised by animal magnetism... phwoooar.
#13
Old 09-22-2006, 04:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
FWIW, no accent is as much of a turn-off as an Aussie one.
I consider them to be highly appealing. I have a customer with a very distinct Aussie accent who comes in every week and I'm always searching for excuses to keep him talking.
#14
Old 09-22-2006, 04:50 PM
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One of my friends married a Houston gal. She was at Harvard for college, then lived in Edinburgh for five or six years, then back to Houston, and currently lives in Cambridge (the English one). Her husband has a very broad Glaswegian accent, but he can communicate with other English speakers if pushed. It's an odd combination of influences, but dammit I'd listen to her read the phone book. It's especially great when she's back up here visiting, the Scottish-ims come back after the first pint.
#15
Old 09-22-2006, 04:53 PM
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"phwoooar" ??
#16
Old 09-22-2006, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
FWIW, no accent is as much of a turn-off as an Aussie one.
I don't think I can judge sexiness on accent alone but to my ears the harshest native-English-speaking accent is a South African one, the most complicated that of an Indian kicked out of Uganda, the most incomprehensible a tie between a drunk Geordie and a drunk Aberdonian, and the sweetest, most euphonious is that of young women from Inverness. The last accent reminds me of larks ascending, early morning curlews, and nightingales.
#17
Old 09-22-2006, 05:11 PM
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A few (well, 9 or 10) years ago I was in line to get into a rave in an underground parking garage in Prague with a bunch of English kids and they were all apparently entranced with my American accent. They said I sounded like a gangster from "Pulp Fiction." Made my day, for some reason.
#18
Old 09-22-2006, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Struan
I don't think I can judge sexiness on accent alone but to my ears the harshest native-English-speaking accent is a South African one, the most complicated that of an Indian kicked out of Uganda, the most incomprehensible a tie between a drunk Geordie and a drunk Aberdonian, and the sweetest, most euphonious is that of young women from Inverness. The last accent reminds me of larks ascending, early morning curlews, and nightingales.
I'll go with the last one. Two friends of mine have married women from that direction, and both of them have very attractive accents (although I don't find them attractive )
#19
Old 09-22-2006, 05:59 PM
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When I worked in Israel, Israelis had a hard time placing my accent, which didn't register as "American." For them, an American accent was a New York accent, which they disliked, whereas my dulcet nominally Southern rendition of Hebrew was evidently very attractive.
#20
Old 09-22-2006, 06:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
FWIW, no accent is as much of a turn-off as an Aussie one.
Seriously? I (an American) love an Aussie accent. What don't you like about it?
#21
Old 09-22-2006, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoshana
When I worked in Israel, Israelis had a hard time placing my accent, which didn't register as "American." For them, an American accent was a New York accent, which they disliked, whereas my dulcet nominally Southern rendition of Hebrew was evidently very attractive.
Shalom, y'all!
#22
Old 09-22-2006, 06:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monica
Seriously? I (an American) love an Aussie accent. What don't you like about it?
One word - squawk.
#23
Old 09-22-2006, 06:09 PM
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I am constantly told that I have a "cool accent". It is usually followed by "So, what part of Ireland are you from?".
#24
Old 09-22-2006, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan

FWIW, no accent is as much of a turn-off as an Aussie one.
Agreed. I love my aussie mates and my wee cousins are from down under but I find the accent very grating.
#25
Old 09-22-2006, 08:07 PM
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Having heard various Brits comment on and imitate American accents, I will say that their view of its potential sexiness is clouded by the misperception they have that every American speaks with a nasal New York drone. I don't know why. They may think more kindly of different American accents, such as the afore-mentioned refined southern belle one.
#26
Old 09-22-2006, 08:09 PM
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I've never listened to an American speak and though "Wow, what a hot accent" but generally I don't find them horrifying, either.
#27
Old 09-22-2006, 11:11 PM
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When I visited London some.. well, pushing a decade ago now... I was told that I had a sexy accent.

Take that for what you will.
#28
Old 09-23-2006, 12:09 AM
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When I first got on the Internet around a decade ago I met quite a lot of Americans and rang a lot of them around Christmas time etc. I loved the accents but I don't think you can they are the same- one of the broadest (I thought) was from a lady in Wisconsin while one of the ladies from Georgia was no where near as pronounced. Did I find them attractive? My word! Sexy? Guess so.

(What I found amusing was that without hesitation they all commented on my accent. I thought I sounded normal, but was given varying descriptions ranging from sounding like Alex Guiness (not likely) to sounding like I was talking inside a submarine- hardly flattering. Yet when I was in Ireland I was mistaken a few times for an American because of the accent).
#29
Old 09-23-2006, 03:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inigo Montoya
"phwoooar" ??
Roughly translated as "hubba hubba" or "yowzer".
#30
Old 09-23-2006, 05:20 AM
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another vote here for a southern accent on women

Emily Proctor in CSI:Miami does it for me every time (the mix of the sweet looks, gentle accent and gun play... YUM!)
#31
Old 09-23-2006, 06:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by e-logic
another vote here for a southern accent on women

Emily Proctor in CSI:Miami does it for me every time (the mix of the sweet looks, gentle accent and gun play... YUM!)
Gerroff!!!

She's mine I tell ya, all mine!!!!







drool, slobber, pant
#32
Old 09-23-2006, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by What Exit?
I've heard that Brits found Marisa Tomei heavy Brooklyn accent attractive, but I think it had more to do with the looks of the actress that produced the sounds.

Jim
Whe I read the title of the thread, the first thought that came to mind was a French couple in bed, and the woman, delirious from ecstasy, shouts out, "Talk to me like you're from New Jersey!"
#33
Old 09-23-2006, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
I suppose maybe I could go with that. My initial response was, I suppose, mainly directed towards Californian/New York/etc. accents which are the commonest in various media.

FWIW, no accent is as much of a turn-off as an Aussie one.


Are there any Brit accents that are close to the stereotypical Aussie accent?

I suppose we all recognize that Aussie accents differ from region to region, don't we? (Or, better yet: Do they?)
#34
Old 09-23-2006, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnac the Magnificent!
Are there any Brit accents that are close to the stereotypical Aussie accent?
Not to British ears, no, which is why we find it baffling how the two are mixed up by Americans.
#35
Old 09-23-2006, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
Not to British ears, no, which is why we find it baffling how the two are mixed up by Americans.

Maybe because while Americans might be dimly aware that there is a variety of British accents they aren't intimately familiar with most of them? So when they hear an obviously native English speaker talking "funny" (meaning not like an American) the default assumption is that they must be British.

Carnac I have heard that there is some regional variation in Australian accents but I don't know if most Americans would be able to distinguish them.
#36
Old 09-23-2006, 01:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GorillaMan
Not to British ears, no, which is why we find it baffling how the two are mixed up by Americans.
I don't know, I cannot tell a Liverpool accent from a London accent, but I can tell Aussie from Brit very easy. I do not hear them as being very similar.

Jim
#37
Old 09-23-2006, 03:40 PM
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Carnac, most Brits and Americans can't distinguish between Australians and Kiwis, let alone pick regional differences in Aussie accents! But, there is a distinct difference, particularly between country/rural and urban accents. Country accents tend to be a lot more nasal and people also tend to drawl more (some say it's becuase they need to keep their mouths closed to keep the flies out!).

To answer the OP, I don't find anything particularly sexy about an American accent (particularly when it's being used to butcher a language other than English), although I do think the Boston accent is quite amusing!
#38
Old 09-23-2006, 04:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laughing Lagomorph
Maybe because while Americans might be dimly aware that there is a variety of British accents they aren't intimately familiar with most of them? So when they hear an obviously native English speaker talking "funny" (meaning not like an American) the default assumption is that they must be British.
I think this was a main complaint of The Thorn Birds, in that most of the actors except for Bryan Brown were English or American. Brown was the only one with an authentic Aussie accent.
#39
Old 09-23-2006, 06:32 PM
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My Superfannish Chicago accenting of certain words (vahdcuh=vodka, saawsich=sausage, sangwich=sandwich, innadah=into the) hasn't exactly netted me the phone numbers I've hoped for.
#40
Old 09-23-2006, 10:23 PM
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Though a born Californian, I have a transplanted (as a teen, so pretty honest )southern accent, which seemed to be attractive to Euro gents while travelling there, especially Germans.

Perhaps, too, that Southern US talk also has gracious pauses, listening, smiles and eye contact as subtext modus operandi.
#41
Old 09-23-2006, 11:13 PM
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What about the imitation of American accents by certain British* musicians in the blues/rock tradition, who wanted to sound more authentically like their idols from Memphis, Chicago, New Orleans, etc.? I wonder if these musicians ever succeeded so well at sounding American that they managed to fool any casual fans? (And if their fans tended to find their put-on accents sexy, funny, or pathetic?)


*Not to let any continentals off the hook in this respect, but this phenomenon has, rightly or not, been associated most strongly with British blues rockers.
#42
Old 09-23-2006, 11:24 PM
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Scrivener: I'll tell ya from time spent in Mississippi with blues musicians, the Euros may *pass* in the general culture, but when they start to sling it down south, it's a bust. That said, I've seen many a bluesman be truly gentlemanly to visiting European musicians: "Yeah, they want to be like us, why not, and go ahead, but please remember that when the paycheck comes around."
#43
Old 09-23-2006, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnac the Magnificent!
I suppose we all recognize that Aussie accents differ from region to region, don't we? (Or, better yet: Do they?)
Yes, they do differ, but not much. I very much doubt a non-Aussie could pick it. Most of the time I can't and I've lived here my entire life.

Back to the OP - American accents don't really do much for me...
#44
Old 09-23-2006, 11:53 PM
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I can identify the Kiwi/Aussie split, but I'll admit that's due to having a number of friends from both sides, including a number who happily compare their accents to others. And yes, I'm aware that there's a lot of variety in Australia, but I struggle to hear anything other than 'not to bad' and 'broad whine'. No offence....
#45
Old 09-24-2006, 01:07 AM
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Not particularly.
#46
Old 09-24-2006, 01:09 AM
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I was told by a Dane once that English speakers sound snobbish.

Quote:
GorillaMan: My initial response was, I suppose, mainly directed towards Californian/New York/etc. accents which are the commonest in various media.
Actually, most people in television and radio journalism and acting try to develop a Mid-western accent. That's been considered the broadcast standard for decades.

If you want to hear one of the New York accents, listen to Judge Judy. She has that terrific Brooklyn accent. Thank goodness no one changed it!
#47
Old 09-24-2006, 03:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by What Exit?
I've heard that Brits found Marisa Tomei heavy Brooklyn accent attractive, but I think it had more to do with the looks of the actress that produced the sounds.
I love a New Yawk Sephardic accent.

FWIW, I have never, ever, ever heard a Southern accent that sounded "refined", even from the stereotypical belles. Total turnoff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe
Actually, most people in television and radio journalism and acting try to develop a Mid-western accent. That's been considered the broadcast standard for decades.
Television and radio journalism, sure--in America. Which is irrelevant to the exposure to American accents experienced in other countries. (Except for CNN, maybe.) Anyway, news people are starting to sound more and more like Californians to me. Could be just me, though. And famous movie actors all sound like Californians to me.
#48
Old 09-24-2006, 06:42 AM
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No.

To be honest everytime I hear an American in person I think "they sound much more normal on tv" by normal I mean I am used to the tv accent. In person the accent sounds much more harsh and in a weird way false, almost like they are faking it.

Blame Hollywood but REAL Americans sound false and odd to me. Certainly not sexy.
#49
Old 09-24-2006, 07:02 AM
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anecdotal evidence. About 15 years ago I visited Sydney and shagged a couple of Sheila's that just loved my west coast accent. It wa wierd in a good way.

I didn't normally have such experiences back in the day, but they loved and took the total piss out of my california accent. "Oh man, no way, dude. That's some gnarly stuff" would result in a lot of merriment and eventually doing the wild thing.
#50
Old 09-24-2006, 10:51 AM
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Well, I live surrounded by Americans now, but even before that I didn't find any American accents particularly sexy.
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