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#1
Old 12-13-2006, 01:39 PM
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What Goes Good With Ham?

Okay...we're sick. to fucking. death of turkey, so we're going to do a spiral ham for Christmas. Only problem is, I've never made one and neither has my sister. I'm relatively certain those spirals only need to be warmed through, but I'm at a loss as to what we'll have for sides. Scalloped potatos are out (everyone hates 'em) but I'll be doing au gratins instead. But what else should I make? Spinach and beets aren't gonna happen with this crowd. What do all you fabulous cooks make with a ham?
#2
Old 12-13-2006, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
Okay...we're sick. to fucking. death of turkey, so we're going to do a spiral ham for Christmas. Only problem is, I've never made one and neither has my sister. I'm relatively certain those spirals only need to be warmed through, but I'm at a loss as to what we'll have for sides. Scalloped potatos are out (everyone hates 'em) but I'll be doing au gratins instead. But what else should I make? Spinach and beets aren't gonna happen with this crowd. What do all you fabulous cooks make with a ham?
Don't forget to glaze your ham when you bake it! I recommend either Coke or Dr. Pepper.

As for side dishes: green beans are always good (if cooked properly, i.e. not crunchy) as are mashed potatoes.
#3
Old 12-13-2006, 01:55 PM
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Scalloped potatoes are the perfect accompaniment to ham.
#4
Old 12-13-2006, 02:00 PM
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I second green beans, but make them with bacon. It complements the taste of the ham. And it's bacon.
#5
Old 12-13-2006, 02:01 PM
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Candied yams are just as valid with ham as with turkey.

Seconded on the mashed potatoes, of course, although if you're having au gratin, you might as well not. Anyway, isn't au gratin potatoes just scalloped potatoes with cheese?

Have some dinner rolls handy.

Ambrosia salad. Waldorf salad.

Finaly, AIUI, the real question with a ham or turkey isn't so much what you serve with it at the main feast, but, what marvelous things do you do with the leftovers for the next week?

#6
Old 12-13-2006, 02:01 PM
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The spiral ham will probably come with directions on how to heat it up and an optional glaze packet, if you are so inclined.

I almost always make cheese biscuits to go with ham. Take your standard biscuit recipe (heck, I use a mix) and add grated sharp cheddar cheese and celery seed. (Celery seed is NOT optional!)

Somewhere, I've got a kick-ass recipe for a salad with marinated brussel sprouts, pomegranate seeds, and walnuts. (Writing that just made me think of Waldorf salad, which would be good with ham.) If brussell sprouts are anathema (although they are really good fixed this way because you don't have to cook them to death -- use fresh, not frozen), you could do the same thing with broccolli, which is a little less assertive.

In fact, a tossed salad with some sort of fruit (sliced pears, craisins, dried cherries, etc.) and nut (toasted pecans, walnuts, almonds) ingredients could be really good. I like sliced fresh pears, toasted walnuts and bleu cheese on some sort of greens (spinach!) with a vinaigrette.

Spoonbread is yummy with ham (but unless you want the all-starch side dish selection, I'd have that instead of potatoes/biscuits).

What vegetables will go over with your crowd?
#7
Old 12-13-2006, 02:03 PM
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And why did I say seconded on mashed potatoes? I better slow down and read for comprehension, rather than speed...
#8
Old 12-13-2006, 02:04 PM
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Green eggs are out? Go with the beans then.
#9
Old 12-13-2006, 02:07 PM
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My mother generally does a cold ham for Christmas Day - our celebration meal is Christmas Eve. She glazes it with honey and orange. We have it with potatoes, coleslaw, cucumber, and tomatoes. And a good white wine.
#10
Old 12-13-2006, 02:08 PM
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Homemade mac and cheese! It can be made ahead of time in the morning and kept warm in a crock pot 'til dinner.

Petit (or "young", not "garden") peas are my favorite veggie with ham. I just microwave frozen peas with a sprinkling of tarragon on top. When they're hot, add a good sized pat of butter, salt and fresh pepper.
#11
Old 12-13-2006, 02:11 PM
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I'm not crazy about ham but everyone else is so that's what we have for Christmas. Everyone brings a side dish so we have lots of odd things.


Salads, au gratin, scalloped potatoes or mashed. My BIL loves potato salad so my sister brings that. The usually blah blah veggies, apple sauce. Good rolls in case people want a sandwich. One of my sisters brings meatless lasagna for the vegetarians.

Here's a ham recipe that's similar to the one I use except for the apples. Someone mentioned Coke, I use gingerale. I guess the same thing.

Baked Ham recipe
1 cooked ham, half or whole
Ground cloves, to taste
1/2 cup brown sugar
Maraschino cherries
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 apple
Pineapple rings

Place cooked ham in pan. Rub in 1 tablespoon brown sugar and sprinkle with cloves. Pare and cut apple in eighths, place around and over ham. Sprinkle brown sugar over apples. Decorate with pineapple rings and maraschino cherries. Cover and bake for about 1 hour at 350 degrees F; baste frequently.
#12
Old 12-13-2006, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uvula Donor
Scalloped potatoes are the perfect accompaniment to ham.
Yeah, but we still all hate 'em.
#13
Old 12-13-2006, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot
Homemade mac and cheese! It can be made ahead of time in the morning and kept warm in a crock pot 'til dinner.

Petit (or "young", not "garden") peas are my favorite veggie with ham. I just microwave frozen peas with a sprinkling of tarragon on top. When they're hot, add a good sized pat of butter, salt and fresh pepper.
Do you have a good recipe for mac & cheese? I might try that for something different and all the kids will love it.
#14
Old 12-13-2006, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhyNot
Homemade mac and cheese! It can be made ahead of time in the morning and kept warm in a crock pot 'til dinner.

Petit (or "young", not "garden") peas are my favorite veggie with ham. I just microwave frozen peas with a sprinkling of tarragon on top. When they're hot, add a good sized pat of butter, salt and fresh pepper.
I second homemade mac and cheese, but how would you get it from the casserole dish to the crock pot and not mess up it's fabulous baked mac and cheese goodness?

Also, deviled eggs might be yummy with it.
#15
Old 12-13-2006, 02:17 PM
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These ideas all look great! Keep 'em coming!
#16
Old 12-13-2006, 02:19 PM
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For my family's taste and sensibilities you can't have Ham without Potato Salad (made with Miracle Whip) and Baked Beans with Bacon.
#17
Old 12-13-2006, 02:24 PM
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Hot Pea Salad

1 package frozen peas
1/2 package bacon, cooked and crumbled
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1/2 cup mayonnaise

Cook the peas until just done. Drain and add the rest of the ingredients. Serve warm.
#18
Old 12-13-2006, 02:29 PM
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I think au gratin potatoes are the best side for ham. For Easter, I always make the recipe from Joy of Cooking, and even I can't mess it up. I also make some kind of green beans, usually the standard green bean casserole, because everybody likes it and it's easy.

Some folks like sweet potatoes with ham...not my favorite, but it seems popular.
#19
Old 12-13-2006, 02:30 PM
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Here is a great macaroni and cheese recipe.
#20
Old 12-13-2006, 02:32 PM
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Ham, roast chicken, cabbage, and potatoes is pretty much my ideal comfort food meal. Colmans mustard on the side and maybe some glazed carrots, mmmmmm.
#21
Old 12-13-2006, 02:40 PM
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Ham, mashed potatoes and fresh pineapple chunks is a nice dish.

Cut up the pineapple yourself.

That's something the two of us eat for an easy meal. It doesn't seem quite complete for a holiday christmas meal, though.
#22
Old 12-13-2006, 02:43 PM
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[utter silliness]

"If we had some ham, we could have a ham & cheese...

...if we had some cheese."

[/utter silliness]
#23
Old 12-13-2006, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissMossie
I second homemade mac and cheese, but how would you get it from the casserole dish to the crock pot and not mess up it's fabulous baked mac and cheese goodness?
Bake it in the crock, of course! Go ahead, it's oven safe. cite. The real question is how to do the breadcrumb topping. Two ways to do it. First, the recipe: AB's mac and cheese, natch.

If your oven is going to be full right up until dinner, then bake the mac 'n' cheese inside the crock of your crock pot. When it's done (crunchies included), put the crock in the outer pot and keep it on warm or low.

If you'll have some oven space open at the last minute (like, when your ham is sitting before carving), mix up the mac-n-cheese and put it in the crock, but don't do the breadcrumb step. Keep warm like before, and put the breadcrumb mixture on top of the mac-and-cheese 10 minutes before dinner and bake. Because it's warm, it only needs a few minutes of baking to brown the crumbs.

The second method would be my first choice, because the crumbs may soften a bit sitting on top of the cheese all day, but either way will work.
#24
Old 12-13-2006, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trunk
Ham, mashed potatoes and fresh pineapple chunks is a nice dish.

Cut up the pineapple yourself.

That's something the two of us eat for an easy meal. It doesn't seem quite complete for a holiday christmas meal, though.
Alton Brown's Pineapple. We have also done this with a brown sugar/ginger glaze that really complements the ham.
#25
Old 12-13-2006, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
Yeah, but we still all hate 'em.
LOL, I missed that completely in your OP. Sorry.
#26
Old 12-13-2006, 03:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
Yeah, but we still all hate 'em.
If you don't mind my asking (and a hijack), what is it about them that you hate? I can imagine hating some scalloped potato recipes, but the recipe used in my family (which we will eat on Christmas Eve) is insanely delicious (and simple). I personally think the best way to mess up scalloped potatoes is to put too much stuff in them. Anyway, just curious.
#27
Old 12-13-2006, 03:23 PM
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Your ham preparation needs have been answered. You can thank me later.

As for sides... mixed veggies, cinnamon apples, some casserole... those will work.
#29
Old 12-13-2006, 03:27 PM
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I love spiced apple rings with my ham, but it's been recently revealed to me that of the 7 other people on Earth who seem to know what I'm referring to, they all hate spiced apple rings.
#30
Old 12-13-2006, 03:27 PM
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oops sorry..you said spinach is a no-no. But..but...this recipe is sooo good.
#31
Old 12-13-2006, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowval
If you don't mind my asking (and a hijack), what is it about them that you hate? I can imagine hating some scalloped potato recipes, but the recipe used in my family (which we will eat on Christmas Eve) is insanely delicious (and simple). I personally think the best way to mess up scalloped potatoes is to put too much stuff in them. Anyway, just curious.
Without wanting to harsh anyone's scallopy mellow, let's just say they're visually offensive to me. http://fotosearch.com/BDX433/bxp153906/ I dunno...I must have a bad memory buried deep in my psyche or something. But we all dislike them.
#32
Old 12-13-2006, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cluricaun
I love spiced apple rings with my ham, but it's been recently revealed to me that of the 7 other people on Earth who seem to know what I'm referring to, they all hate spiced apple rings.
I love apples with pork. I'll be doing an apple-something with this meal. All suggestions are welcome!
#33
Old 12-13-2006, 03:33 PM
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The 'shrooms look great. (check!)
#34
Old 12-13-2006, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
Without wanting to harsh anyone's scallopy mellow, let's just say they're visually offensive to me. http://fotosearch.com/BDX433/bxp153906/ I dunno...I must have a bad memory buried deep in my psyche or something. But we all dislike them.
Well, okay, guess. But I'm still confused. How does adding grated cheese between the layers before you bake the potatoes affect the visual appeal so significantly?
#35
Old 12-13-2006, 03:39 PM
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Cheese Grits go good with ham. Of course, if no one at your table has a drawl, they probably wouldn't recognize the dish....
#36
Old 12-13-2006, 03:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakminster
Cheese Grits go good with ham. Of course, if no one at your table has a drawl, they probably wouldn't recognize the dish....
That's ok, you could make Cheese Polenta instead.
#37
Old 12-13-2006, 03:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylasdad99
Well, okay, guess. But I'm still confused. How does adding grated cheese between the layers before you bake the potatoes affect the visual appeal so significantly?

I'm not so fond of them either. It's not just grated cheese for me, it's the whole milky sauce thing. But I'm the first to admit I have weird food issues. I don't like any kind of creamy sauces. I rarely eat potatoes but I'd take a plain old baked potato any day. I'm outnumbered in this meal by about 18-1 so I go with the flow.
#38
Old 12-13-2006, 04:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianjedi
As for side dishes: green beans are always good (if cooked properly, i.e. not crunchy) as are mashed potatoes.
Wrong.

(ok, depends on what you mean by crunchy)

Fresh green beans should be steamed until you can just get a fork through. Any more than that and you're just losing flavor and vitamins.

and bacon is fine with canned green beans, but don't spoil the fresh ones with it.

Sorry, but fresh green beans is one of my favorite vegetables and I hate seeing people ruin them.
#39
Old 12-13-2006, 05:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylasdad99
Well, okay, guess. But I'm still confused. How does adding grated cheese between the layers before you bake the potatoes affect the visual appeal so significantly?
They get kind of a curdled, slimy look to them that you just don't get with an au gratin. Plus, they're very beige. TOO beige.
#40
Old 12-13-2006, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Asgardking
Wrong.

(ok, depends on what you mean by crunchy)

Fresh green beans should be steamed until you can just get a fork through. Any more than that and you're just losing flavor and vitamins.

and bacon is fine with canned green beans, but don't spoil the fresh ones with it.

Sorry, but fresh green beans is one of my favorite vegetables and I hate seeing people ruin them.
French cut, with butter, pepper, and slivered almonds. And yes, they need to maintain a degree of crisposity. I don't dig the "baby food soft" texture at all.
#41
Old 12-13-2006, 05:13 PM
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Personally, I prefer au gratin any day of the week. As a child, I always found plain scalloped potatoes too bland. And perhaps because of the blandness, I perceived them as dry, as well, even when they were obviously saucy.
#42
Old 12-13-2006, 05:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
They get kind of a curdled, slimy look to them that you just don't get with an au gratin. Plus, they're very beige. TOO beige.
You do realize that Scalloped potatoes are typically cooked au gratin, right? I still can't figure out what it is about the two dishes that allows you to differentiate between the two. Is it the cheese?

I'm not trying to be snarky here, honest.
#43
Old 12-13-2006, 05:26 PM
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With ham I like twice baked potatoes--bake them, slice them in half lengthwise and scoop out the insides while they're still nice and hot. Mash them up with sour cream and a blob of cream cheese. Stir in diced scallions, bacon bits, fried garlic, finely chopped red bell pepper, lightly steamed broccoli, whatever you happen to like. Season with salt, garlic salt, pepper, again whatever you like. Spoon the potato mixture back into the reserved skins, top with sharp cheddar cheese and bake for a half hour or so. Best part about these guys is you can put them all together the day before and only pop them into the oven for the final bake, saving oodles of time on your holiday.

I know you don't like spinach, but how about a spinach salad? Spinach, red onions, toasted pecans, cranberries, bleu cheese and a balsamic vinaigrette maybe? Or spinach, hard boiled eggs, bacon bits, shredded cheese (jack or a sharp cheddar) red onions, croutons and a ranch style dressing? Fresh spinach and ham go together like Martin & Lewis...
#44
Old 12-13-2006, 05:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Swan
You do realize that Scalloped potatoes are typically cooked au gratin, right? I still can't figure out what it is about the two dishes that allows you to differentiate between the two. Is it the cheese?

I'm not trying to be snarky here, honest.
I think it's the milky sauce. It gets curdly looking. Plus, the cheese (at least in any scalloped recipe I've ever had) is white; not orange...so it's extremely blah-looking. Also, it's way soupier in texture than au gratins.
#45
Old 12-13-2006, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
I think it's the milky sauce. It gets curdly looking. Plus, the cheese (at least in any scalloped recipe I've ever had) is white; not orange...so it's extremely blah-looking. Also, it's way soupier in texture than au gratins.
Classic french "potatos au gratin" are made with a bechamel (white) sauce. Other recipes contain cheese. There are hundreds.

In other words, you like one recipe for potatoes au gratin (what you will have for Christmas) and dislike another recipe for potatoes au gratin (what you call scalloped potatoes).

[/nitpick]
#46
Old 12-13-2006, 05:37 PM
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Most cruciferous veggies are very good with pork or ham. Brussel sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, that sort of thing. My mother makes a casserole of broccoli, rice, and cheese which is good with about any dish. Cole slaw is a good cold dish that works well with ham. Most fruits go well with ham and pork, too, but apples and pineapples are especially good. If you make the Waldorf salad as suggested above, that's something that can be served cold, and it's very attractive. We were out of raisins one time and substituted dates, and it made an excellent salad.

I think that cornbread goes better with ham than wheat flour rolls. Others might disagree with me. However, the cornbread MUST accompany the ham and bean soup.

There's nothing wrong with baked potatoes, except that they take up oven space. I've been known to make mashed potatoes, spoon them into an oven dish, and top them with sour cream, cheddar cheese, and parmesan cheese. Much easier to serve than baked potatoes.

When planning a meal of whatever size, I try to aim for a variety of color. For instance, I don't serve sweet potatoes AND carrots for the only veggies. Nor will I serve ONLY peas and green beans, though I might serve two of the same color if I have a third veggie dish with a contrasting color. Of course, if the meal is serving a large number of people, then it's fine to have two dishes of the same color, since there's likely to be half a dozen side dishes. I also try to vary textures and temperatures...so, I'd serve something like Waldorf salad, broccoli rice and cheese casserorle, green beans, cornbread, squash, and pie. If your family likes fruitcake, this would be a good time to eat small bits of it.

Personally, I prefer a savory ham to a sweet one (and I don't like honey roasted turkey, either), but sweet hams seem to be the fashion these days. If your ham has a bone in it, be sure to save that bone for bean soup. Late December and early January is probably going to be good bean soup weather, too.
#47
Old 12-13-2006, 05:41 PM
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Aw, there's no "harshing my scallopy mellow." That picture was like scalloped potato porn to me! But au gratin is fine with me, too.

I have a couple suggestions here for after the big event. Your spiral ham will leave a wonderful, meaty ham bone. We always use this to make split-pea soup in the crock pot. I never really liked split pea soup until I tried this way.

Another tasty option is toasted open face sandwiches with apple butter and Swiss or other white cheese. Spread the apple butter on a slice of bread, mustard is optional, then put on ham and cheese and toast in the oven. Sounds strange, but is surprisingly delicious.

Because eternity IS two people and a ham...
#48
Old 12-13-2006, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Swan
Classic french "potatos au gratin" are made with a bechamel (white) sauce. Other recipes contain cheese. There are hundreds.

In other words, you like one recipe for potatoes au gratin (what you will have for Christmas) and dislike another recipe for potatoes au gratin (what you call scalloped potatoes).

[/nitpick]
Correct. The au gratin potatoes I've grown up on aren't soupy; they're saucy. Scalloped are more like this http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Scallop...II/Detail.aspx

Au gratin is more like this: http://southernfood.about.com/od/pot...r/bl30119t.htm

Sorry...no pictures, but they're pretty descriptive recipes.
#49
Old 12-13-2006, 06:22 PM
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Very interesting discussion. My scalloped potato recipe, which I inherited from my mom and grandma, contains only potatoes, heavy whipping cream, and half & half. I was a little embarrassed the first time I called my mom to ask for the recipe.

I'm personally a fan of the make-ahead mashed potatoes that have the sour cream mixed in with them. I've seen them with cheese on top or plain served with gravy. Either way, they're delicious, simple, and go well with ham (if you make ham gravy; some people don't).
#50
Old 12-13-2006, 06:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalhoun
Correct. The au gratin potatoes I've grown up on aren't soupy; they're saucy. Scalloped are more like this http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Scallop...II/Detail.aspx

Au gratin is more like this: http://southernfood.about.com/od/pot...r/bl30119t.htm

Sorry...no pictures, but they're pretty descriptive recipes.
No pictures needed. The first recipe is almost identical to a recipe I once had when I was young. It is basically the exact same ingredients as a traditional gratin, but the bechamel sauce is not put together ahead of time. Travesty.
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