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#1
Old 03-12-2008, 10:14 AM
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Why do Koreans bury kimchi pots?

I understand kimchi needs to ferment a while (weeks? months? I'm not sure) in a sealed container before you can call it kimchi. What I don't understand is why the container has to be buried. Wouldn't it work just as well to leave it sitting on a shelf in the pantry?
#2
Old 03-12-2008, 10:18 AM
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It would ferment very quickly if you just left it sitting outside. You want to ferment to a certain degree and then stop there. Nowadays they have fancy refridgerators that do that for you, but in the past people would bury their kimchii instead and take it out one pot at a time. Usually it only takes a day or so at room temperature for the kimchii to become ideal (although YMMV; some of my relatives liked theirs practically raw, while others waited until the smell could kill a white person at 100 paces ).
#3
Old 03-12-2008, 10:26 AM
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I had a Korean sister-in-law for a while. My brother moved his family in with my parents while I was still living at home. She made a pot of Kimchi and set it on the enclosed back porch. It exploded. There may be other reasons for burying it but I think not having your entire home reek of it for days in the event of explosion might be one of those reasons. Our eyes watered for days whenever we went out on the porch. She made good kimchi though. I bought some at the store recently because I was craving it, and wanted to make some of those pancakes with kimchi in it, but it wasn't as good as hers.
#4
Old 03-12-2008, 10:28 AM
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Oh, yeah, it does explode if the container is too tight and it ferments too quickly. It ALWAYS happens to someone after an international flight. Korean people just have to take their kimchii with them everywhere.
#5
Old 03-12-2008, 10:34 AM
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Related, but does anyone know any good Kimchi brands? I've tried one store-bought brand in the past and it wasn't too great (tasted sort of bland and plasticy), and it's not a type of food that encourages one to be exploratory....

I have access to Uwajimaya in Seattle (for any other Seadopers.)
#6
Old 03-12-2008, 10:35 AM
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I don't have any historical or culinary insights to add, but kimchi, especially buried kimchi always makes me think of my old friend Sang Moon.
#7
Old 03-12-2008, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneCentStamp
I don't have any historical or culinary insights to add, but kimchi, especially buried kimchi always makes me think of my old friend Sang Moon.
That's a cute story.

Sage Rat - there's a brand called Jong-ga-jip ( 종가집 ) that's fairly popular in Korea. It's generic but okay.

Last edited by HazelNutCoffee; 03-12-2008 at 10:45 AM.
#8
Old 03-12-2008, 12:13 PM
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Quick question. I keep buying jars of "Korea Kimchi" at my local asian grocer, eating half of it and then losing it in the back of the fridge. By the time I find it again, it is 3 or 4 months later. How long does kimchi last in the fridge?
#9
Old 03-12-2008, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StinkyBurrito
Quick question. I keep buying jars of "Korea Kimchi" at my local asian grocer, eating half of it and then losing it in the back of the fridge. By the time I find it again, it is 3 or 4 months later. How long does kimchi last in the fridge?
That's really a matter of personal taste. Old kimchii has a very strong taste - some people actually prefer it well-aged. It doesn't go "bad" if that's what you mean.

If you don't like the strong taste of aged kimchii, you can cook it into a stew or put it in fried rice. The latter is probably the easiest. Chop the kimchii up into small pieces and cook it in a frying pan with butter. Add diced ham (or ground beef), vegetables of choice (onion, green pepers, mushrooms, etc) and fry up. Oh, and add rice while you're at it. Cold, day-old rice works best, IMO. (Kind of like the way stale bread is the best for French toast.) Garnish with toasted sesame seeds.

With stew, it's best to cook the kimchii a bit first (in sesame seed oil, if you like) before adding water and simmering. Usually my mom adds pork, tofu, mushrooms, green onions, and garlic somewhere along the way. It tastes great but your entire apartment will know what you're having for dinner.
#10
Old 03-12-2008, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
If you don't like the strong taste of aged kimchii, you can cook it into a stew or put it in fried rice. The latter is probably the easiest. Chop the kimchii up into small pieces and cook it in a frying pan with butter. Add diced ham (or ground beef), vegetables of choice (onion, green pepers, mushrooms, etc) and fry up. Oh, and add rice while you're at it. Cold, day-old rice works best, IMO. (Kind of like the way stale bread is the best for French toast.) Garnish with toasted sesame seeds.
Now I'm hungry.
#11
Old 03-12-2008, 12:59 PM
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I love kimchi jjigae (stew). I had a roommate in college who would always open the window when I made it. I noticed that it attracted flies.
#12
Old 03-12-2008, 01:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
Old kimchii has a very strong taste - some people actually prefer it well-aged. It doesn't go "bad" if that's what you mean.
That's great news! Just what I was hoping to hear.
#13
Old 03-12-2008, 01:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneCentStamp
Now I'm hungry.
Hah! I was practically drooling as I typed that.
#14
Old 03-12-2008, 02:17 PM
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I've had grocery-store kimchi of two types: the first type comes in a plastic tub, like cottage cheese, and is not 'fizzy'. The second type comes in a glass jar with a bulging screw-on lid, and is apparently carbonated by fermentation (instructions: "wrap jar in towel and open over the sink to avoid spills"). I find the fizzing to be disconcerting when I am biting down on cabbage. Is authentic homemade kimchi fizzy or flat? The kimchi in our local Korean restaurant is not fizzy, but that may be just to accommodate local palates.
#15
Old 03-12-2008, 02:37 PM
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Did anyone else read the thread title and immediately think of the M*A*S*H episode "Of Moose and Men" where Frank sees a Korean family bury a kimchi pot and he assumes it's a mine?
#16
Old 03-12-2008, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brossa
I've had grocery-store kimchi of two types: the first type comes in a plastic tub, like cottage cheese, and is not 'fizzy'. The second type comes in a glass jar with a bulging screw-on lid, and is apparently carbonated by fermentation (instructions: "wrap jar in towel and open over the sink to avoid spills"). I find the fizzing to be disconcerting when I am biting down on cabbage. Is authentic homemade kimchi fizzy or flat? The kimchi in our local Korean restaurant is not fizzy, but that may be just to accommodate local palates.
The difference between fizzy and flat is probably the levels of fermentation and how tight the container is. My guess about the restaurant kimchii is that it's either "new" kimchii or it's left in an open container that they just scoop it out of.
#17
Old 03-12-2008, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brossa
The second type comes in a glass jar with a bulging screw-on lid, and is apparently carbonated by fermentation (instructions: "wrap jar in towel and open over the sink to avoid spills"). I find the fizzing to be disconcerting when I am biting down on cabbage. Is authentic homemade kimchi fizzy or flat?
That's the kind we have at our local market (I recognize the instructions!). I like the fizziness from the active fermentation. I wonder, too, how authentic it is. Authentic or not, I love how it tastes!
#18
Old 03-12-2008, 08:43 PM
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If you have a local Korean supermarket you'll find all sorts of kimchi. "Regular" cabbage kimchi (several varieties), radish kimchi (several varieties), something my wife calls "water kimchi" which doesn't have any red in it at all but is still strongly flavorful, etc. We've usually got 3 or 4 varieties in our fridge at any one time. Most of it we buy, but she makes a really good traditional cabbage style at home (though no burying of pots).

I love kimchi cold out of the fridge, and like it mixed into the pancake and fried rice and such, but I don't like the hot kimchi stew.

My wife says there is a Korean saying roughly translated as "without the kimchi there is no life."
#19
Old 03-12-2008, 08:55 PM
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There used to be a Korean restaurant around here where your meal came with a whole array of cold appetizers/side dishes (in round dishes arranged in a triangle pattern) -- kimchi, and several pickled vegetables which, based on what I've read in this thread, were probably also varieties of kimchi, tiny dried fish, noodles, and so on.

Closed some years ago.

Have you ever been to a Korean restaurant where that's typical? Is there a collective name (along the lines of dim sum) for such dishes?

Last edited by BrainGlutton; 03-12-2008 at 08:55 PM.
#20
Old 03-12-2008, 08:59 PM
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Banchan. All Korean restaurants around here have them. It's a given in any "authentic" Korean restaurant.
#21
Old 03-13-2008, 01:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneCentStamp
I don't have any historical or culinary insights to add, but kimchi, especially buried kimchi always makes me think of my old friend Sang Moon.
Excellent post. Illustrative of why I love the SDMB.
#22
Old 03-13-2008, 01:50 AM
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To make Frank look foolish, natch.
#23
Old 03-13-2008, 03:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
If you don't like the strong taste of aged kimchii, you can cook it into a stew or put it in fried rice. The latter is probably the easiest. Chop the kimchii up into small pieces and cook it in a frying pan with butter. Add diced ham (or ground beef), vegetables of choice (onion, green pepers, mushrooms, etc) and fry up.
You forgot to mention the Spam!

Thank god for this thread. I'm about to leave for Minneapolis for 4 days and forgot about my batch of kimchi. I'll bet it's perfect now and might have blown up if I forgot about it! My local Dollar store doesn't carry Spam, but did have a knock-off brand called Prem, made with mechanically separated chicken and pork.
#24
Old 03-13-2008, 08:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl Lict
You forgot to mention the Spam!
Well, that's what I meant when I said ham.

I am so making fried rice with kimchii tonight.
#25
Old 04-08-2008, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl Lict
My local Dollar store doesn't carry Spam, but did have a knock-off brand called Prem, made with mechanically separated chicken and pork.
Amazing.

There's such a thing as knockoff Spam.

The End Is Nigh.
#26
Old 09-29-2011, 02:06 PM
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Traditionally, kimchi was buried in clay pots because it ferments best at a steady, cool temperature. In the old times you would make enough kimchi in the fall so that you would have vegetables to eat throughout the winter. You wouldn't want the kimchi to freeze (Korean winters are very cold) as that would kill the good fermentation bacteria, and you wouldn't want it to get too warm either (it would get sour too quickly).

As someone else mentioned, the kimchi fridge can do all this now. As you know, a regular home refrigerator waits until the temperature gets up to a certain point before kicking on the cooling mechanism again, but a kimchi fridge is cool (haha) because it keeps contents at a constant temperature... also it helps to keep the kimchi separate so it doesn't stink up everything else in your regular fridge!

Cheers,
Granny Choe
Granny Choe's Kimchi Co.
#27
Old 09-29-2011, 03:24 PM
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Want kimchi now, the industrial strength stuff that strips chrome off a truck bumper.
#28
Old 09-29-2011, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Granny Choe View Post
Traditionally, kimchi was buried in clay pots because it ferments best at a steady, cool temperature. In the old times you would make enough kimchi in the fall so that you would have vegetables to eat throughout the winter. You wouldn't want the kimchi to freeze (Korean winters are very cold) as that would kill the good fermentation bacteria, and you wouldn't want it to get too warm either (it would get sour too quickly).

As someone else mentioned, the kimchi fridge can do all this now. As you know, a regular home refrigerator waits until the temperature gets up to a certain point before kicking on the cooling mechanism again, but a kimchi fridge is cool (haha) because it keeps contents at a constant temperature... also it helps to keep the kimchi separate so it doesn't stink up everything else in your regular fridge!

Cheers,
Granny Choe
Granny Choe's Kimchi Co.
You owe us all a jar now, Granny!
#29
Old 09-29-2011, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Granny Choe View Post
Cheers,
Granny Choe
Granny Choe's Kimchi Co.
Go go Granny Choe. I'll have to swing by Whole Foods and pick up a jar.
#30
Old 09-29-2011, 04:29 PM
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Kimchi is some foul stuff. Tastes like what I would imagine rotten ball sacks taste like with a bad case of jock itch and crabs.
#31
Old 09-29-2011, 04:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wile E View Post
I had a Korean sister-in-law for a while. My brother moved his family in with my parents while I was still living at home. She made a pot of Kimchi and set it on the enclosed back porch. It exploded. There may be other reasons for burying it but I think not having your entire home reek of it for days in the event of explosion might be one of those reasons. Our eyes watered for days whenever we went out on the porch. She made good kimchi though. I bought some at the store recently because I was craving it, and wanted to make some of those pancakes with kimchi in it, but it wasn't as good as hers.
The old refrig on our back porch was the kimchi/beer refrig.
#32
Old 09-29-2011, 04:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
Kimchi is some foul stuff. Tastes like what I would imagine rotten ball sacks taste like with a bad case of jock itch and crabs.
EWW GROSS! Do grow up.
#33
Old 09-29-2011, 04:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
Kimchi is some foul stuff. Tastes like what I would imagine rotten ball sacks taste like with a bad case of jock itch and crabs.
I think it's one of the most delicious things I've ever eaten: so there!
#34
Old 09-29-2011, 07:09 PM
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I imagine a real wine cellar would provide a perfect temperature to age kimchi.
#35
Old 09-29-2011, 07:34 PM
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I used to work for a guy who made sauerkraut and he always buried it in clay pots in his backyard, just like kimchi. I can't speak to how good his kraut was, but the beer he had on hand (usually Grolsch) was excellent.

Bri2k
#36
Old 09-29-2011, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubsfan View Post
Kimchi is some foul stuff. Tastes like what I would imagine rotten ball sacks taste like with a bad case of jock itch and crabs.
Really? You should try kim chi fried rice. It's amazing.
#37
Old 09-29-2011, 10:56 PM
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The question is not why they bury them. The question is why they dig them back up.

I'm reminded of this passage from P. J. O'Rourke's Holidays In Hell:

Quote:
I was squeezed and heaved and, most of all, overwhelmed by the amazing stink of kimchi, the garlic and hot-pepper sauerkraut that's breakfast, lunch and dinner in Korea. Its odor rises from this nation of 40 million in a miasma of eyglasses-fogging kimchi breath, throat-searing kimchi burps and terrible, pants-splitting kimchi farts.
#38
Old 09-30-2011, 03:47 AM
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Originally Posted by BrainGlutton View Post
Amazing.

There's such a thing as knockoff Spam.

The End Is Nigh.
Can it get any worse? Apparently so. Here, Lassie!

Last edited by Pitter Patter; 09-30-2011 at 03:48 AM. Reason: comma
#39
Old 09-30-2011, 04:17 AM
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there is summer kimchi which is basically just pickled vegies with garlic and chili. hardly any fermentation there. it's good 3 days after it's mixed. the fermented/aged version is the winter kimchi. it's not so much fermentation but rather aging. burying maintains contant temeperature.
#40
Old 09-30-2011, 06:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gaffa View Post
The question is not why they bury them. The question is why they dig them back up.

I'm reminded of this passage from P. J. O'Rourke's Holidays In Hell:
I was squeezed and heaved and, most of all, overwhelmed by the amazing stink of kimchi, the garlic and hot-pepper sauerkraut that's breakfast, lunch and dinner in Korea. Its odor rises from this nation of 40 million in a miasma of eyglasses-fogging kimchi breath, throat-searing kimchi burps and terrible, pants-splitting kimchi farts.
And this is exactly why [in addition to the horrid taste of rotting cabbage and pepper] I will probably never visit Korea, nor again eat in a korean restaurant. The stench of rotting kimchee that my roomie both buys and makes is nasty in a chthulian level way. Even 3-4 days after stopping eating the garbage the stench exudes from her pores. After 2 years of tolerating that crap, I forbade kinchee anywhere on the farm.
#41
Old 09-30-2011, 06:11 AM
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funny thing is koreans have the fewest skin pores for a given skin area (or is that a 10-year old crap long debunked?)
#42
Old 09-30-2011, 06:38 AM
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I once grilled me a wild boar steak and ate it with loads of kimchi. Excellent!
#43
Old 09-30-2011, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by mac_bolan00 View Post
funny thing is koreans have the fewest skin pores for a given skin area (or is that a 10-year old crap long debunked?)
Do you have a citation that indicates it is true?
#44
Old 09-30-2011, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Leaffan View Post
I think it's one of the most delicious things I've ever eaten: so there!
Based on restaurant experiences, I'd say the quality of kimchi is highly variable and there seem to be a lot of recipes. Some taste too much like raw onions.

Last edited by BrainGlutton; 09-30-2011 at 09:44 AM.
#45
Old 09-30-2011, 10:17 AM
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We made kimchi last week using this recipe (except we left out the radish as we didn't have any.) It is delicious. And very spicy. And my mother told me I smelled like garlic when I saw her the day after eating a bunch of it.
#46
Old 09-30-2011, 10:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrainGlutton View Post
Based on restaurant experiences, I'd say the quality of kimchi is highly variable and there seem to be a lot of recipes. Some taste too much like raw onions.
Oddly enough, I have found that there is kind of a "standard" kim chi taste, though. I think most kim chi has only really been aged about a week or so by the time it is eaten, at least the common stuff I've seen. My wife and I only leave our kim chi out on the counter for about 3 days or so and we get a pretty standard taste.
#47
Old 09-30-2011, 10:28 AM
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We ought to get together and have a DopeFest Banquet of really-strong-flavored-foods-you-might-eat-on-a-dare-but-you-know-you'd-regret-it-the-next-day. Kimchi, haggis, lutefisk, durrian fruit, steak-and-kidney pie, limburger cheese, Corsican maggot cheese . . . Got any more?
#48
Old 09-30-2011, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mac_bolan00 View Post
funny thing is koreans have the fewest skin pores for a given skin area (or is that a 10-year old crap long debunked?)
Based on a (admittedly) small sample set, this is not true for my family.

I doubt it's true in general. I might believe the visibility of pores may vary with race, but I'd still want to see evidence for it.

Also, Kimchi quality is highly variable. It's almost the case that each individual family has a slightly different way of preparing it. I often dislike (sometimes strongly) what is ostensibly the same kimchi prepared at a different household.

And even that doesn't get into the fact that there are several different types of Kimchi, from cabbage kimchis (several types) to green onion kimchis to radish kimchis and others. I've even read there's jalapeno kimchi out there. For reasons that are fairly self-evident, most people prefer their own family kimchi. Store-bought is often acceptable, but it's not usually as good as your mother's or grandmother's.

Last edited by Great Antibob; 09-30-2011 at 10:36 AM.
#49
Old 10-03-2011, 10:28 PM
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Has anyone here tried Kim chi that is months old? I mean, like 2+ months?
#50
Old 10-03-2011, 11:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Granny Choe View Post
Traditionally, kimchi was buried in clay pots because it ferments best at a steady, cool temperature. In the old times you would make enough kimchi in the fall so that you would have vegetables to eat throughout the winter. You wouldn't want the kimchi to freeze (Korean winters are very cold) as that would kill the good fermentation bacteria, and you wouldn't want it to get too warm either (it would get sour too quickly).

As someone else mentioned, the kimchi fridge can do all this now. As you know, a regular home refrigerator waits until the temperature gets up to a certain point before kicking on the cooling mechanism again, but a kimchi fridge is cool (haha) because it keeps contents at a constant temperature... also it helps to keep the kimchi separate so it doesn't stink up everything else in your regular fridge!

Cheers,
Granny Choe
Granny Choe's Kimchi Co.
Holy cow!
You're serious!

Very cool!
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