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#1
Old 07-21-2008, 11:01 AM
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At what age do Asian children begin using chopsticks?

While eating with chopsticks yesterday, I began to wonder about this. Kids' fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination take awhile to develop. In cultures where chopsticks are the primary or only eating utensil, at what age do kids learn to use them well?

I taught myself to use chopsticks when I was 10 or so, when ads for Chicken McNuggets Shanghai (which were served with chopsticks as a gimmick) showed a bunch of different people attempting to use chopsticks with varying levels of success. It became all the rage among my 5th grade classmates to learn the technique, using a pair of pencils to pick up various small school supplies. These days I can pick up chunks of meat or vegetables and sushi pieces just fine, but I never figured out how to eat rice without resorting to a fork.
#2
Old 07-21-2008, 11:22 AM
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I work with dozens of Japanese people and they confessed to me that most times they "cheat" and use a spoon to eat rice.
#3
Old 07-21-2008, 11:26 AM
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I don't know what age Asian children start to learn. I presume they start with chopsticks first.

Generally, though, the rice meant to eat with chopsticks is stickier than ours, so it's just scooped up in whole chunks to eat, and the bowl is held very close to the face so there's less chance of dropping it. I (Indian) do indeed eat Chinese rice with chopsticks, but I could never eat Indian rice with chopsticks, where the beauty of the long-grain basmati is to have every grain distinct from the next.
#4
Old 07-21-2008, 11:53 AM
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In Korea chopsticks are mostly used for reaching, wrapping, and for noodles. If you have a rice dish (like fried rice, or bi bim bap--rice with mixed vegetables) it's generally eaten with a spoon.

I've seen little kid chopsticks that are joined together at the top.
#5
Old 07-21-2008, 12:14 PM
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My great aunt taught me to eat with chopsticks when I was 4 or 5. However, when I'm in Asia I get laughed at because I use chopsticks like a child. Apparently my grip is very cute.
#6
Old 07-21-2008, 02:43 PM
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My kids (my son is Korean but we are a pretty white family) could use chopsticks about the same time they could use a spoon or fork - and long before they could dependably use a knife. Probably around three or four. We did have kids chopsticks - they are connected at the top - and there is the starter chopstick trick that you use a rubber band for. They are eight and nine now and I honestly can't remember ever taking them out for Chinese or Thai or Sushi and having them use a spoon or fork (other than the spoon for soup).

The rice you eat with chopsticks tends to be sticky rice and is easy to eat with chopsticks.
#7
Old 07-21-2008, 02:53 PM
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I've had what was supposedly sticky rice, but it wasn't so sticky that I could make it work very well!

I never thought about using chopsticks with "training wheels" so to speak. It seems like having them connected at the top would teach you to grip things the wrong way, but it might be a decent do-fer until a kid was old enough to control real chopsticks better.
#8
Old 07-21-2008, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xizor
I work with dozens of Japanese people and they confessed to me that most times they "cheat" and use a spoon to eat rice.
Chopsticks are never used for rice in Thailand except by hardcore ethnic Chinese. Western tourists who think they are being "local" by using chopsticks with rice are quietly snickered at. For rice, a spoon is always used. Chopsticks are for noodle dishes and picking up items from commual dishes in the middle of a table.

The practice of using chopsticks with rice seems to be purely Chinese, although I don't know about Japanese or Koreans.
As for what age, I'm not sure. Pretty young, I guess, but I'm never around children.
#9
Old 07-21-2008, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbawlmer
I've had what was supposedly sticky rice, but it wasn't so sticky that I could make it work very well!
In Thailand, sticky rice is strictly finger food. You roll it into a ball, make a little dent in it with your thumb and scoop up a morsel from a communal dish with it. The lower-quality sticky rice is annoying, because little bits of it stick to your hands and fingers. The good-quality stuff peels right off the skin without sticking, like Teflon.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 07-21-2008 at 03:09 PM.
#10
Old 07-21-2008, 03:09 PM
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That's the other thing, as Siam Sam mentions - be aware tat saying "Asian
when asking such a broad question is not useful. All of the Asian cultural groups are different. They use chopsticks at different ages. And some Asians don't even use chopsticks - witness Indians. We're Asian, too!

Everybody hears Asian and thinks "Chinese".
#11
Old 07-21-2008, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Helena
I've seen little kid chopsticks that are joined together at the top.
Those are common here, too, but they're not for children, at least not here. You're supposed to break them apart and then use them. They're cheapie chopsticks handed out in the lower-priced places.
#12
Old 07-21-2008, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam
Those are common here, too, but they're not for children, at least not here. You're supposed to break them apart and then use them. They're cheapie chopsticks handed out in the lower-priced places.
There are two different kinds of joined chopsticks. There are children's training chopshicks, where the join is flexible, and makes the chopsticks work like a pair of tongs, and there are the disposable chopsticks that you break apart and use like ordinary chopsticks.
#13
Old 07-21-2008, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giles
There are two different kinds of joined chopsticks. There are children's training chopshicks, where the join is flexible, and makes the chopsticks work like a pair of tongs, and there are the disposable chopsticks that you break apart and use like ordinary chopsticks.
Ah, that's right. Well, like I said, I'm never around children.
#14
Old 07-21-2008, 03:23 PM
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I do realize that India is part of Asia, and no offense was intended. I didn't mean to imply that ALL Asian children necessarily use chopsticks, but I was guessing that the overwhelming majority of very small children who are taught to use chopsticks are in fact from various Asian ethnic backgrounds. I used "Asian" in the thread title as shorthand more than anything; in the OP I wrote, "In cultures where chopsticks are the primary or only eating utensil, at what age do kids learn to use them well?"

Last edited by cbawlmer; 07-21-2008 at 03:25 PM.
#15
Old 07-21-2008, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam
Ah, that's right. Well, like I said, I'm never around children.
This is what they look like: http://goodcookshop.com/view/product.do?id=709 (the chopsticks, not children)
#16
Old 07-21-2008, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Manduck
This is what they look like: http://goodcookshop.com/view/product.do?id=709 (the chopsticks, not children)
I've still not seen those very often, but then like I said, I'm not around childen. But they don't seem very common in the stores here. When I read "joined together at the top," I immediately thought of the disposable kind.
#17
Old 07-21-2008, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbawlmer
I do realize that India is part of Asia, and no offense was intended. I didn't mean to imply that ALL Asian children necessarily use chopsticks, but I was guessing that the overwhelming majority of very small children who are taught to use chopsticks are in fact from various Asian ethnic backgrounds. I used "Asian" in the thread title as shorthand more than anything; in the OP I wrote, "In cultures where chopsticks are the primary or only eating utensil, at what age do kids learn to use them well?"
None taken, just a little pout at always being left out.
#18
Old 07-21-2008, 03:44 PM
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My own, fairly Americanized half-Chinese kids only learned to use chopstick after the age of 5. I admit, I'm giving my son a hard time about it now and he's 4-1/2. I'm not a very good teacher as I don't remember learning how to use them myself, though I do remember not being able to use them very well, so I figure it's a matter of forcing them to use it and they'll get better at it with practice. I never had those "rubber ball" versions as a kid either, just ones that were shorter in length.

As for eating rice with chopsticks -- it's not hard to do, because to eat rice Chinese style, you eat it out of a bowl that's lifted to your mouth, shoveling it in with sweeping motions. I sometimes see people picking up rice off of a plate and lifting it to one's mouth by using them sideways, but only if for some reason the rice was not served in a bowl (an oddity already) and if there is no spoon on hand.
#19
Old 07-21-2008, 03:44 PM
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This is an easier way to make chopsticks with "training wheels". It's cheaper than buying the joined kind and works better than using a rubber band.
#20
Old 07-21-2008, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam
I've still not seen those very often, but then like I said, I'm not around childen. But they don't seem very common in the stores here. When I read "joined together at the top," I immediately thought of the disposable kind.
The rubber band trick seems to be more common than trainers - and the "sink or swim" method more common yet (which is how my kids learned) - at least among Asian immigrants in the U.S. But a generic Asian market (which is, by the way, almost never an Indian market in at least this part of the U.S. - those are different) will generally carry children's chopsticks.
#21
Old 07-21-2008, 04:04 PM
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Also be mindful that different cultures have different etiquette regarding chopsticks...

I started using chopstick around 5 or 6 (Chinese)

Most of the time, if eating rice with chopsticks, you actually hold up the bowl of rice and scoop the rice in using the chopsticks (which is a no-go, as someone has pointed out, in other cultures).
#22
Old 07-21-2008, 04:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weirddave
This is an easier way to make chopsticks with "training wheels". It's cheaper than buying the joined kind and works better than using a rubber band.
My son and I went to Pick up Stixx recently and he was offered a little specially wrapped plastic dohicky to refasten his chopsticks together so they would be springy. That was the first time I'd seen that.

Relevant to the OP, though, a while ago we went out to a popular dim sum place in a heavily Asian part of the San Diego area. Among the families we saw, quite a few young children were using chopsticks.
#23
Old 07-21-2008, 04:13 PM
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It's hard to glean what's authentic for a particular culture from observing people around here. Houston is very diverse, so there's a lot of mixing and adapting among all the various cultures. Many of our "Chinese" restaurants are actually run by Vietnamese immigrants, so the Vietnamese food might be fairly authentic but the Chinese dishes often are more Americanized. I never have seen anyone eat rice from the bowl in a restaurant here -- it's usually served in a small bowl on the side with a serving spoon so you can put the rice on your plate, then mix it with the meat/vegetables/sauce, so picking it up and eating it from the bowl really isn't a good option. Sometimes the sauce is sticky enough that you can dip a piece of meat or veggie into the rice with chopsticks and make some stick, but you usually have to finish with a fork.

I usually see little kids eating with a spoon (or their fingers).

I know that different cultures have different chopstick rules, but I think things are pretty lax here. If I was visiting another country, I would try to be as inoffensive as possible, but possibly fail.

Last edited by cbawlmer; 07-21-2008 at 04:15 PM.
#24
Old 07-21-2008, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbawlmer
I know that different cultures have different chopstick rules, but I think things are pretty lax here. If I was visiting another country, I would try to be as inoffensive as possible, but possibly fail.
Not to worry in Thailand. They may think your using chopsticks with rice is cute and quaint, but they're not being mean. And as long as it's obvious that foreigners are not trying to be boorish oafs, they cut them a lot of slack here and don't get offended -- too much slack in some cases actually, from some foreigners I've seen.
#25
Old 07-22-2008, 12:34 AM
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In Japan, kids start using chopsticks around 2. The more precocious ones start at as young as 18 months. As has been mentioned, they usually start out with trainer chopsticks that are tied at the top. Here's one example, but there are many different designs. Here's another system, by Combi. However, it's not uncommon to see tiny children eat with regular (but tiny) chopsticks. From what I hear, young children will often insist on using them quite early, to do like the grown-ups.

As for eating rice, if it's the plain white gohan that accompanies almost every meal here, everyone eats it with chopsticks. Fried rice, or any kind of rice that doesn't hold itself together is always eaten with spoons. This, or this: chopsticks. This, or this: spoon.
#26
Old 07-22-2008, 01:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbawlmer
I do realize that India is part of Asia, and no offense was intended. I didn't mean to imply that ALL Asian children necessarily use chopsticks, but I was guessing that the overwhelming majority of very small children who are taught to use chopsticks are in fact from various Asian ethnic backgrounds. I used "Asian" in the thread title as shorthand more than anything; in the OP I wrote, "In cultures where chopsticks are the primary or only eating utensil, at what age do kids learn to use them well?"
Asia reaches all the way to Turkey, Russia and Egypt. "East Asia" would be a better term for the area you are referring to.
#27
Old 07-22-2008, 01:41 AM
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My kids (half Japanese, living in Japan) began using chopsticks at about 18 months old - or rather they were on the table or highchair for them to muck about with! Mostly they ate with their hands like every other toddler!

My Japanese friend taught me to only ever place the chopsticks on their upturned palms for them to grasp, and to never let them pick them up overhand, as then you begin with the wrong posture right from the beginning.

I was really pissed off about nine months into my elder son's daycare experience when I happened to go in to pick him up at lunch time and saw that every single other kid in the three year old group was eating with chopsticks and he was using a spoon. I asked what the hell was going on and they said that they had assumed he wouldn't be able to use chopsticks because he was a "foreigner" and had from the beginning gone out and bought him his own special spoon. No wonder his manners weren't improving at home! It was hard to know how to react, they were being utterly racist and "othering" towards him but it had been done with good and kind intentions and it was a treasure of a place, so I just carefully and calmly said that from the next day he'd be eating with chopsticks just like everyone else, thank you.

Both my kids have horrible chopstick holds, so that the points cross. MIL gets on to them every time she sees it and I confess to being a bit ashamed of them but at 8 and 12 it's a habit by now. We do keep at them to mind their chopstick manners (don't lick them, don't stick them into food and leave them there, don't pass stuff to other's chopsticks, dont put your chopsticks into communal food etc.)
#28
Old 07-22-2008, 01:50 AM
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Hokkaido Brit has it nailed. Kids start playing with chopsticks in China at the same time they start playing with spoons, forks or sporks. In pre-school, which can start at 2 years old (mandatory at 3), kids definately start using chopsticks at school along with a spoon. I think it's peer pressure. My kids all just gradually started using chopsticks. China doesn't use kiddie sticks with the ends connected type thing, but they do use a shortened and easier to grip pair.
#29
Old 07-22-2008, 02:54 AM
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To add to jovan, Hokkaido Brit and China Guy, my son (half-Japanese, living in Japan) is just under 2 and is starting to use chopsticks to eat rice. He began a few months back trying to imitate us, so we got him kid-sized chopsticks of his own.
#30
Old 07-22-2008, 04:41 AM
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Egg on my face

This seems to be a good place to relate this story. A couple of years ago, my family and I were in a Chinese restaurant eating. I was giving my son (about 10 at the time, 14 now and he can use chopsticks just fine) a little bit of a hard time because he was having difficulty using chopsticks, he wanted to use a fork. I went on and on about eating food with the utensils it had been designed for, explaining about sticky rice and eating it with the bowl before your face, food with chunks that chopsticks could easily handle, the whole nine yards. Suddenly, a group of the cooks, Asians all, the very people who had prepared this authentic Chinese food, came out of the kitchen and sat down to eat their dinner. To a man they used forks. Matthew looked at them, looked at me, raised his eyebrow and picked up his fork and started eating. What could I say? I was cut off at the knees quite nicely.
#31
Old 07-22-2008, 04:48 AM
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What pisses me off is that if I, the gaijin, pick something up with chopsticks and drop it, it is noticed and commented on because "Gaijin can't use chopsticks". But if any Japanese in the group drop something, that's because everyone drops things occasionally. Grrr!

Also, "Can you use chopsticks?" is a standard ask-the-gaijin line even if you've just said you've lived here 20 years. When I was having my son by cesarean here 12 years ago, I was very frightened and began to cry. The nurses were very taken aback by this and one kind, kind soul took my hand, and asked "Is there anything I can do to help you feel better?" I said yes, just to talk to me to take my mind off the ripping and tugging going on down there. So she took a deep breath, stared deeply into my eyes and asked, "Can you use chopsticks????"
#32
Old 07-22-2008, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika
Everybody hears Asian and thinks "Chinese".
Not all of us - in the UK you would refer to people from western Asia (India, Mongolia, Pakistan, Bangladesh etc) as Asian and people from eastern Asia as oriental.
#33
Old 07-22-2008, 12:47 PM
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Background: We have 4 Chinese daughters. They were 10 months, 20 months, 6 years, and 23 months old when we adopted them. They are now 7 years, 6 years, 9 years and 2.5 years old respectively.

How early do they learn?

The 6 year old (20 months at the time) could eat with chopsticks quite well. She didn't have any technique, she just grabbed them about 2" from the tip and wiggled her fingers and stuff got picked up and she would eat it.

When we adopted the 9 year old (then 6), during our first meal in a restaurant the staff noticed that VeryCoolSpouse was struggling with chopsticks and brought her a fork. ThenNewDaughter insisted on a fork as well and did at every restaurant we were in from then on. She uses chopsticks now, but infrequently.

Our baby, just less than 2 when adopted, didn't seem to have any chopstick skills at all, but maybe that was because the local Child Welfare Institute didn't encourage it--dunno about that.

I don't have any trouble using chopsticks for even non-sticky rice/fried rice, and I was born in Los Angeles, California of European-stock parents with no cross-cultural leanings of any sort. Tried off-and-on for years and never got good, but with the multiple trips to China (starting when I was 50) got fairly competent.
#34
Old 07-22-2008, 12:54 PM
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I'm living in Sichuan Province with a Chinese family right now.....

Kids seem to learn at about the same time American kids learn to use forks. It's really not THAT much more complicated a thing to be doing.

I've been surprised at how chopsticks are used for EVERYTHING. It'd never occur to people to bring out a knife and fork for anything- now and then if they serve something extremely soupy they will bring out a spoon for me. I've eaten pizza, whole slices of white bread, cocktail franks, tiny kernals of corn, and of course rice with chopsticks.

As has been mentioned before the rice is sticky and it's okay to bring your bowl up to your mouth and shovel it in. After the first day or two I could clean my bowl no problem, though it helps if I pat down the rice when I scoop it in.

The eating style is extremely different than in American Chinese restaurants (though I was surprised to find some dishes were familiar- mostly kung pao chicken and ma po tofu.) You start out eating small bits from the communal dishes. In a restaurant they will be brought out one at a time. You can rest a bit in your bowl if you want, but honestly everyone ends up eating straight from the communal dishes. The rice comes towards the end of the meal and you may rest some food on it so the sauce can flavor it, but it's nothing like the way we serve food "over rice" in America.
#35
Old 07-22-2008, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Illuminatiprimus
Not all of us - in the UK you would refer to people from western Asia (India, Mongolia, Pakistan, Bangladesh etc) as Asian and people from eastern Asia as oriental.
Yes, so I've heard. You guys eat more curry than I do. As Russell Peters says, 400 YEARS!!!
#36
Old 07-22-2008, 02:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Illuminatiprimus
Not all of us - in the UK you would refer to people from western Asia (India, Mongolia, Pakistan, Bangladesh etc) as Asian and people from eastern Asia as oriental.
Over here, I've always heard the rule is that people are Asian, and only objects should be referred to as Oriental (rugs, vases, etc.).

I agree that "East Asian" is more accurate for what I was asking, though I would be surprised if most non-Asian people over here knew the difference. I feel confident that a good many of them would assume East Asia is a country.
#37
Old 07-22-2008, 02:43 PM
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Oh yeah, we all hate being called oriental. We are not rugs!
#38
Old 07-22-2008, 11:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbawlmer
Over here, I've always heard the rule is that people are Asian, and only objects should be referred to as Oriental (rugs, vases, etc.).
Oh no, not this debate again.

From west to east, the people are all Asians and all Oriental, just like I'm an Occidental. I've never encountered an Asian who took offense at the term Oriental, even if it's not as common these days to use it.

Last edited by Siam Sam; 07-22-2008 at 11:32 PM.
#39
Old 07-23-2008, 12:21 AM
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IN THE U.S. Oriental is an old fashioned term that a few people take offense at. Asian is a "safer" word to use. Safer still is to use words like Thai, Korean, Vietnamese, Hmong, Chinese or Indian. But that can be tricky in itself, since you usually don't know the country of origin, and its easy to insult someone who is Hmong by referring to them as Laotian or Vietnamese. (Indians in the U.S. are less commonly lumped into Asian than they are in England - where Asian is a broader term that can include Middle Eastern....it isn't wrong, but it isn't common to refer to Indians as Asian.)

But its easy in a conversation like this to just never refer to race - "at what age did your kids learn to use chopsticks" is a valid question - my white kid learned around three or four, just like my Korean one.
#40
Old 07-23-2008, 12:37 AM
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I twitch when someone refers to me as Oriental, although I won't take offense unless it's obviously meant. My advice would be to avoid the term if possible.

As for chopsticks, I've been forced to use them as far back as I can remember. I recall using them to spear stuff when I was a kid, and having one in each hand to rip kimchee apart. My parents were not amused.
#41
Old 07-23-2008, 12:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
What pisses me off is that if I, the gaijin, pick something up with chopsticks and drop it, it is noticed and commented on because "Gaijin can't use chopsticks". But if any Japanese in the group drop something, that's because everyone drops things occasionally. Grrr!
Gaijin's revenge: complement effusively on their rad spoon skilz.
#42
Old 07-23-2008, 01:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by China Guy
Gaijin's revenge: complement effusively on their rad spoon skilz.
Unfortunately irony or sarcasm is Not Got here - it gets me into deep water with my husband very often as I tend to forget when I am pissed off about something, which leads to ever more convoluted misunderstandings.....
#43
Old 07-23-2008, 03:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by even sven
The eating style is extremely different than in American Chinese restaurants (though I was surprised to find some dishes were familiar- mostly kung pao chicken and ma po tofu.) You start out eating small bits from the communal dishes. In a restaurant they will be brought out one at a time. You can rest a bit in your bowl if you want, but honestly everyone ends up eating straight from the communal dishes. The rice comes towards the end of the meal and you may rest some food on it so the sauce can flavor it, but it's nothing like the way we serve food "over rice" in America.
Er, the 'one at a time' method is the one I've seen in American American-Chinese restaurants, if you mean just bringing out individual dishes of food for each guest as opposed to massive platters or what have you? IME those are the ones that have become more Westernized to fit into American ideas of Asian cuisine, for the most part, while more strongly Chinese restaurants stick with the communal dish method you describe.

man, now I'm hungry for a good Chinese feed.
#44
Old 07-23-2008, 05:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hokkaido Brit
What pisses me off is that if I, the gaijin, pick something up with chopsticks and drop it, it is noticed and commented on because "Gaijin can't use chopsticks". But if any Japanese in the group drop something, that's because everyone drops things occasionally. Grrr!

Also, "Can you use chopsticks?" is a standard ask-the-gaijin line even if you've just said you've lived here 20 years. When I was having my son by cesarean here 12 years ago, I was very frightened and began to cry. The nurses were very taken aback by this and one kind, kind soul took my hand, and asked "Is there anything I can do to help you feel better?" I said yes, just to talk to me to take my mind off the ripping and tugging going on down there. So she took a deep breath, stared deeply into my eyes and asked, "Can you use chopsticks????"
Well, it certainly took your mind off, I guess.
#45
Old 07-23-2008, 06:06 AM
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Originally Posted by puppygod
Well, it certainly took your mind off, I guess.
Well, yes! That and Abba's "Honey Honey" playing as all this went on. It's one of the more bizzarre memories of my life!
#46
Old 07-23-2008, 12:18 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
I twitch when someone refers to me as Oriental, although I won't take offense unless it's obviously meant. My advice would be to avoid the term if possible.
This is how both me and my Chinese SO feel. So Siam Sam, you have met at least three who don't like it.

I really don't get why it's necessary - it's just an awkward sounding title at best. Oriental meaning...from the Orient? eh?
#47
Old 07-23-2008, 02:07 PM
Elephant Whisperer
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika
This is how both me and my Chinese SO feel. So Siam Sam, you have met at least three who don't like it.

I really don't get why it's necessary - it's just an awkward sounding title at best. Oriental meaning...from the Orient? eh?
I assure you it's a non-issue in Thailand.
#48
Old 07-23-2008, 02:16 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Van Nuys, CA
Posts: 11,663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika
None taken, just a little pout at always being left out.
How about I make it up to you by starting a thread asking at what age Indian children learn to do tech support.

Ouch! Stop hitting me!!!!
#49
Old 07-23-2008, 02:20 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 31,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siam Sam
I assure you it's a non-issue in Thailand.
Well, that's good. I didn't think Thai were the only Asians, either, though!
#50
Old 07-23-2008, 02:34 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 38,421
As in the other threads on the same subject, I just asked my Thai wife what she thought about "Oriental," and she suggested people who take offense at it may be a bit too sensitive.
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