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#1
Old 09-10-2008, 08:30 AM
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Littering pre-1970: was it really like Mad Men?

The recent episode of Mad Men (a show set in the early 1960s) has a family having a picnic (episode discussion here). One of the great things about this show is that they hit you with societal norms that are very different than today - pregnant women smoking/drinking, men in the office being very sexual towards the female secretaries, etc. etc. In this particular episode, at the end of the picnic, the man stands up and throws his beer can off into the woods. The woman, while gathering up the picnic gear, takes the blanket they'd been sitting on and gives it a shake, leaving all the disposables (napkins, etc) on the ground in the park.

Mr. Athena, who was born in the 50s, said that would have NEVER happened in his family. He clearly remembers his Dad getting on him for littering.

So, all you people old enough to have been first-person in the 60s, how accurate was that? I'm too young for the 60s, but I remember the early 70s, and the "throw the beer can into the woods" didn't seem so far off to me, but leaving piles of dirty napkins and paper plates in the middle of the park didn't strike a true cord. In other words, I remember littering being OK as long as nobody saw it.
#2
Old 09-10-2008, 08:37 AM
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I remember throwing garbage out car windows without a second thought. The picnic thing doesn't ring a bell, but I'd guess it was done by some -- more indicative of the picnickers' values, than the general culture.
#3
Old 09-10-2008, 08:48 AM
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Even in the early 1960s there were trash cans in public parks with "Don't Be a Litter Bug!" written on them, with a cartoon of a villanous-looking bug throwing trash on the ground. I was always taught to throw garbage in the trah containers. So:


1.) There was certAinly an effort to teach people to dispose of trash properly. Which implies:

2.) a lot of people were still throwing stuff on the ground. This continues to be true today.

3.) I can easily believe a guy tossing a beer can into th woods, but just dropping paper plates, napkins, and other picnic waste directly on the ground doesn't ring true. It's too much stuff, all at once, in one place.


I was five by the end of 1960.
#4
Old 09-10-2008, 09:03 AM
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What Cal said.

In the early-mid 60s, littering didn't count if it was one or two things & hidden in the bushes.

Eating fast food while driving was rare, but tossing a finished paper coffee cup out the window when empty was normal. I can remember getting through a burger & fries and sending each wrapper out the window as it was fininshed. The fact cars didn't have A/C & so most windows were open most of the time in warm weather certainly helped people to think of the outside as an available trash receptacle.

So my botton line recollection is at that time gross littering (dump a trash can by the roadside) was unacceptable to all but unwashed yokels, yet onesy-twosey littering was pretty universal. It died out pretty quickly as the "don't be a litterbug" campaign took off in the late 60s, so I suspect a lot of people did it out of unthinking habit but regretted it a moment later. Retraining that habit to think a few seconds earlier wasn't very hard.

In a lot of ways, I think we may be backsliding now as uber-selfishness becomes more common.

Last edited by LSLGuy; 09-10-2008 at 09:04 AM.
#5
Old 09-10-2008, 09:04 AM
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It was the same as it is now for individuals littering. Some people are assholes and there will always be those people.

There is more disposable eating trash around than back then. You didn't see chain fast food packaging blowing all over.
#6
Old 09-10-2008, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
It was the same as it is now for individuals littering. Some people are assholes and there will always be those people.

There is more disposable eating trash around than back then. You didn't see chain fast food packaging blowing all over.
No, neither of these square with my own observations. I've been around a sizeable chunk of America and throwing crap out the window of a moving vehicle just isn't done, and you don't find large amounts of crap along the roadside.
#7
Old 09-10-2008, 09:30 AM
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Around 1960 (I was 7) I went fishing with my Uncle Al on Long Island Sound. I ate an apple and asked my uncle where the trash went.

He said, "where do you think?"

I looked around for a trash can.

He said, "Think."

I shrugged. Then I threw the apple core in the ocean.

It was actually okay (biodegradable and all that) but he made it sound like the ocean was obviously a gigantic trash can, and anyone with any sense could see that.
#8
Old 09-10-2008, 09:37 AM
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The scene described in the OP rings somewhat true, if exaggerated. Littering was much more common. It became such a problem, and the litter became such an eyesore, that a national ad campaign to stop the littering was initiated.

Surely some of you are old enough to remember the crying Indian ad campaign launched on Earth Day in 1971?

And states started producing their own campaigns to stop littering. Growing up near Chattanooga, we had the memorable Tennessee Trash ads launched in 1976.

The ad campaigns worked, to a large extent. People started thinking twice about throwing fast food bags out the windows of their cars, and the roadsides became a lot less cluttered. If you traveled much it became noticeable that there was more trash on the roads in other countries.

Lately, I'm sorry to say I've seen a return to old patterns, with a lot more trash accumulating on the roadsides. I think maybe we could use a new ad campaign.
#9
Old 09-10-2008, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
It was the same as it is now for individuals littering. Some people are assholes and there will always be those people.

There is more disposable eating trash around than back then. You didn't see chain fast food packaging blowing all over.
Even in my lifetime, this isn't true. I remember a LOT more littering in the 70s than there is now (but not anything like they portrayed on Mad Men). I especially remember fast food packaging. Pop cans in the woods were so ubiquitous that I remember a few times my Dad would organize a cleanup of the dirt road that led to our cabin - he'd drive his pickup slowly and make the kids walk alongside picking up the litter (mostly cans) and throw into the truck bed for disposal.

I also use to make necklaces out of the can tabs (y'know, the things that opened the cans back before they stayed attached to the can) when we were at softball games at the local park.
#10
Old 09-10-2008, 09:42 AM
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Surely some of you are old enough to remember the crying Indian ad campaign launched on Earth Day in 1971?
Sure, but it's not as if that kicked it off. Remember Lady Bird Johnson's campaign to clean up the trash (as well as get rid of the billboards)? Or all those "Don't be a Litter Bug" pictures I referred to above? The "Crying Indian" was neither the first nor the last, but one of a continuing series of announcements to try and deal with the problem.


Heck, this one was earlier:



"Hi! I'm Louis Nye, the Trash guy. Everyone tells me "Business is picking up!" it's not funny -- my business is too good! ...." etc.
#11
Old 09-10-2008, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Derleth View Post
No, neither of these square with my own observations. I've been around a sizeable chunk of America and throwing crap out the window of a moving vehicle just isn't done, and you don't find large amounts of crap along the roadside.
You are lucky, then. Or not looking very closely. I've been around a sizeable chunk of America too, and have noticed the opposite. Most offenders seem to be the truckers. They throw out crap even when trash cans are available a short walk away. These guys pull off the road, sleep, wake up and toss crap out rather than get out of the truck to walk to a dumpster. Seen it all over.

Any major truck route is festooned with crap (and Trucker Bombs) on the side of the road.
#12
Old 09-10-2008, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by spoke- View Post

Lately, I'm sorry to say I've seen a return to old patterns, with a lot more trash accumulating on the roadsides. I think maybe we could use a new ad campaign.
I've been thinking that too--I can remember the littering ads working, and now it's been 30 years and it's getting more common again. Though I still don't see nearly as much litter as there used to be when I was a wee tot.
#13
Old 09-10-2008, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Athena View Post
The recent episode of Mad Men (a show set in the early 1960s) has a family having a picnic (episode discussion here). One of the great things about this show is that they hit you with societal norms that are very different than today - pregnant women smoking/drinking, men in the office being very sexual towards the female secretaries, etc. etc. In this particular episode, at the end of the picnic, the man stands up and throws his beer can off into the woods. The woman, while gathering up the picnic gear, takes the blanket they'd been sitting on and gives it a shake, leaving all the disposables (napkins, etc) on the ground in the park.

Mr. Athena, who was born in the 50s, said that would have NEVER happened in his family. He clearly remembers his Dad getting on him for littering.

So, all you people old enough to have been first-person in the 60s, how accurate was that? I'm too young for the 60s, but I remember the early 70s, and the "throw the beer can into the woods" didn't seem so far off to me, but leaving piles of dirty napkins and paper plates in the middle of the park didn't strike a true cord. In other words, I remember littering being OK as long as nobody saw it.
For what it's worth I've seen people do all of the things you've described. They're not my norms of behaviour but they still do seem pretty prevalent. There are anti-littering laws and smoking bans and anti-harrassment legislation etc. but alot of people are just assholes.
#14
Old 09-10-2008, 09:48 AM
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The people I've noticed littering the most are either adults in their late 50s and up, or the hood/gangsta' crowd.

When I was a kid growing up in the 1970s, I always noticed how much cleaner Canadian cities were than those on the US side of the border. Today, outside of poor inner city neighborhoods, there's not much difference; cities in the US have gotten a lot cleaner, while those in Canada are a little bit dirtier.

I do notice that in Rust Belt cities and suburbs, cigarette filters are everywhere around signalized intersections, and there's far more untrimmed weeds growing through curbs and in sidewalk cracks. That is, except for Grand Rapids. That is one clean city;. Seriously, it's cleaner than I remember of 1970s Toronto. Must be the Dutch influence.
#15
Old 09-10-2008, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Sure, but it's not as if that kicked it off. Remember Lady Bird Johnson's campaign to clean up the trash (as well as get rid of the billboards)? Or all those "Don't be a Litter Bug" pictures I referred to above? The "Crying Indian" was neither the first nor the last, but one of a continuing series of announcements to try and deal with the problem.
The Litterbug was the product of the Pennsylvania Resources Council. In other words, a state campaign.

Keep America Beautiful, Inc. has been around since the 1950s, but as the linked article says, the effort first began to bloom in the 1960s, and it was the crying Indian ad in 1971 that really succeeded in raising the nation's awareness of the problem.
#16
Old 09-10-2008, 10:02 AM
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The people I've noticed littering the most are either adults in their late 50s and up, or the hood/gangsta' crowd.

When I was a kid growing up in the 1970s, I always noticed how much cleaner Canadian cities were than those on the US side of the border. Today, outside of poor inner city neighborhoods, there's not much difference; cities in the US have gotten a lot cleaner, while those in Canada are a little bit dirtier.

I do notice that in Rust Belt cities and suburbs, cigarette filters are everywhere around signalized intersections, and there's far more untrimmed weeds growing through curbs and in sidewalk cracks. That is, except for Grand Rapids. That is one clean city;. Seriously, it's cleaner than I remember of 1970s Toronto. Must be the Dutch influence.
Untrimmed weeds etc. don't bother me in the slightest. I think they can add charm to a place but the level of littering in this country just disgusts me, absolutely. I brought the better half on a tour of the wilds of the West Of Ireland. We were in a remote mountain valley probably a dozen miles from the nearest town. We got out to take some pictures and on the ground were the lids off latte cups or whatever they're called. I wanted to hunt down the culprits and moiderise them. My (quiet suburban) street gets littered all the time, beer cans, McDonalds wrappers, soda bottles, all sorts of shit like that. The culprits I suspect are generally younger men but there's a hell of a lot of littering going on around here.
#17
Old 09-10-2008, 10:08 AM
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[slight hijack]

Straight Dope article on the crying "Indian."

[/ slight hijack]
#18
Old 09-10-2008, 10:30 AM
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Athena and Derleth:

I don't get what your point is.

I see garbage all over the place. People throw it all over the place around here currently and they did back then. The fast food joints have paper and plastic blowing out of their dumpsters into all the property around them. I've cleaned up roadsides and parks since the 70's and the amount of trash dumped is about the same as ever.
#19
Old 09-10-2008, 10:32 AM
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In other words, a state campaign.
1.) Why is this relevant?

2.) It may have originated in Pennsylvania, but I saw it all over New Jersey and New York in the early 1960s.

3.)
Quote:
Keep America Beautiful, Inc. has been around since the 1950s, but as the linked article says, the effort first began to bloom in the 1960s, and it was the crying Indian ad in 1971 that really succeeded in raising the nation's awareness of the problem.
This is entirely consistent with what I wrote beforre, although I note that Lady Bird made it a priority of hers
#20
Old 09-10-2008, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
Athena and Derleth:

I don't get what your point is.

I see garbage all over the place. People throw it all over the place around here currently and they did back then. The fast food joints have paper and plastic blowing out of their dumpsters into all the property around them. I've cleaned up roadsides and parks since the 70's and the amount of trash dumped is about the same as ever.
I have never seen people dump a whole picnic's worth of trash on the grass in the middle of the park. Thus my OP.

Also, it seems in my lifetime that littering has gone down. The road to our cabin, for example, rarely has trash on it anymore.

Trash blowing out of dumpsters isn't really what I'm talking about - in that case, someone at least attempted to throw stuff away.
#21
Old 09-10-2008, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by pseudotriton ruber ruber View Post
...he made it sound like the ocean was obviously a gigantic trash can, and anyone with any sense could see that.
Sadly, that is becoming literally true.
#22
Old 09-10-2008, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Derleth View Post
No, neither of these square with my own observations. I've been around a sizeable chunk of America and throwing crap out the window of a moving vehicle just isn't done, and you don't find large amounts of crap along the roadside.
Guess you're not a bicyclist. Traveling along the shoulders of busy roads, you get to see just how much they're treated like trash cans.

I'm also a (hobbyist) photographer and I frequently pull over to the side of the road to take pictures. It's staggering how much crap people have thrown over embankments or into the underbrush.
#23
Old 09-10-2008, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by LSLGuy View Post

In a lot of ways, I think we may be backsliding now as uber-selfishness becomes more common.
I was reading a Mommy board recently and they were talking about the kids fighting in the car. The number of women who said they take away whatever the kids are fighting over and throw it out the window astounded me. And when called on it, they saw nothing wrong with it - couldn't see why it was a problem - EVERYONE throws trash out their car window - and it wasn't like they were throwing Gameboys - it was just the McDonald's toys or cheap stuffed animals or baseball caps or.....

There were more women admitting to and defending the behavior than people saying "wow, that's screwed up."
#24
Old 09-10-2008, 11:07 AM
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Thinking about it, it seems like the type of littering today is much different. In the 1970s, there was a lot more trash on the roads and shoulders, in parks, on sidewalks, and so on. Today, such locales are much cleaner; not always litter-free, but not as bad as 30+ years ago. However, there's a lot more street spam, such as plastic corrugated signs advertising "work at home", "lose weight fast - ask me how", "finally, affordable health insurance", "I buy ugly homes" and other such schemes; stickers on light poles and parking meters advertising bands, raves and other events appealing to hipsters; guerrilla advertising; and so on.

Graffiti also seems to have changed since the 1970s. Then, it was seen on and in mass transit vehicles, in bathroom stalls, and carved onto wooden restaurant tables. Today, there's spray-painting on buildings and public infrastructure, and tagging of utility poles and boxes.
#25
Old 09-10-2008, 11:20 AM
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In "defense" of the large amounts of litter still found in certain areas, not all of it is heaved out of windows. Where I live, between rampaging raccoons and the gale-force winds that often blow through my wind-tunnel of a townhouse complex on trash day, it's hellaciously difficult to secure trash. My garage is too small for those big plastic dumpsters.
#26
Old 09-10-2008, 11:23 AM
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I believe that scene was more about the Drapers and how they live their lives than it was about social norms. Dan, in particular, throws semen around just as carelessly as he threw that can.
#27
Old 09-10-2008, 11:45 AM
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Roadside litter is rare around here -- rare enough so that you'll notice just one small item, like a beer can. Plus, it's like throwing that dime bottle deposit out the window.

Do other states have Adopt A Highway programs? Families, churches, community organizations take responsibility for a mile or so of roadside.

We didn't leave trash behind at picnics because there wasn't any to leave. We didn't have paper plates, cups, napkins. Picnic dishes and food containers were reuseable plastic, or even the regular dinnerware. Leftover food went home with us.
#28
Old 09-10-2008, 11:54 AM
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I grew up on the Louisiana/Texas border in the 70's and 80's and even respectable people littered like a mo fo. We threw out just about any junk but especially fast food containers. Everyone did it and then the Boy Scouts and other groups cleaned it up. It was a big deal in the 1980's when Texas rolled out its "Don't mess with Texas." anti-littering program with increased charges.
#29
Old 09-10-2008, 12:06 PM
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Unfortunately I have seen people take their meal trash and throw it all over as they finished that item. It was someplace I'd just cleaned up too. It was hard not to do something that would have had police arresting me.

I've also been to a park were somebody threw their meal garbage to the ground, and a reporter for the local rag, took a picture. The reporter was walking ahead of our party, so we saw what the reporter did. The reporter then walked away and drove off. We picked up the bags wrappers and cups, and put them in the trash can which the reporter and trash had been right next to. The next day this picture and the story about the horrible people that threw the trash on the ground leaving an unsightly mess was in the paper. What a hypercritical person. They left the trash there after photographing it and then wrote up an article on it.
#30
Old 09-10-2008, 12:23 PM
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WRT tossing trash out car windows - I believe the true culprit is the increased prevalence of automatic windows, for the simple reason that cars lack the window cranks from which to hang those plastic trash bags. Remember them?

I have no doubt Americans' failure to manually crank their windows is also a significant contributor to the obesity epidemic as well...
#31
Old 09-10-2008, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Sure, but it's not as if that kicked it off. Remember Lady Bird Johnson's campaign to clean up the trash (as well as get rid of the billboards)? Or all those "Don't be a Litter Bug" pictures I referred to above? The "Crying Indian" was neither the first nor the last, but one of a continuing series of announcements to try and deal with the problem.


Heck, this one was earlier:



"Hi! I'm Louis Nye, the Trash guy. Everyone tells me "Business is picking up!" it's not funny -- my business is too good! ...." etc.
I came by to say I remembered Ladybird's efforts to clean up the highways. Here is a nice piece about her: http://america.gov/st/washfile-e...0.4314386.html
#32
Old 09-10-2008, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Dinsdale View Post
WRT tossing trash out car windows - I believe the true culprit is the increased prevalence of automatic windows, for the simple reason that cars lack the window cranks from which to hang those plastic trash bags. Remember them?
Yes! There might be space for a litter bag in an SUV or a van, but there's no place to hang one in my car and there's no room in the front for a little trash bin either.
#33
Old 09-10-2008, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
I've also been to a park were somebody threw their meal garbage to the ground, and a reporter for the local rag, took a picture. The reporter was walking ahead of our party, so we saw what the reporter did. The reporter then walked away and drove off. We picked up the bags wrappers and cups, and put them in the trash can which the reporter and trash had been right next to. The next day this picture and the story about the horrible people that threw the trash on the ground leaving an unsightly mess was in the paper. What a hypercritical person. They left the trash there after photographing it and then wrote up an article on it.
Hypercritical or hypocritical? In either case, I disagree. The reporter was reporting on a societal ill. And one of the standards of a photojournalist is to just observe, and not get involved in the the scene that being photographed.
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Old 09-10-2008, 07:23 PM
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My folks have land in rural UP Michigan. It's where my grandparents lived as well.
It was very common to take your large trash items and dump them over the nearest embankment, where you couldn't see it any more. Out of sight, out of mind.

When my folks decided to build on that land, they had to have someone come in and clean out a hillside. A piano, a refrigerator, lots of tires and cement chunks and other misc. junk.
#35
Old 09-10-2008, 07:43 PM
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they made a lot of improvements in the 70s. I think it was the movie inconvenient truth where they showed rings in permafrost of where the air pollution dropped significantly in the 70s after catalytic converters were implemented on cars.
#36
Old 09-10-2008, 07:44 PM
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I was a teenager (mid 1970s) before I realized that you weren't supposed to leave your trash on the floor of a movie theater. I also thought you were supposed to throw your candy wrappers out of the car window - Mom did it, so it must be OK, right?

Blatant littering like the picnic blanket thing? Never saw that personally though it wouldn't have surprised me.
#37
Old 09-10-2008, 07:56 PM
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Sometime in the early sixties, my dad threw a piece of trash out the window, and my grandpa pulled over, backed up, and made him get out and pick it up. So not everyone was a litterer back then.

One issue is that, until after WWII, almost everything was biodegradable. There were no styrofoam burger containers or plastic straws, etc. Littering wouldn't be viewed the same by someone born around the time Don Draper was.
#38
Old 09-10-2008, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Tastes of Chocolate View Post
My folks have land in rural UP Michigan. It's where my grandparents lived as well.
It was very common to take your large trash items and dump them over the nearest embankment, where you couldn't see it any more. Out of sight, out of mind.

When my folks decided to build on that land, they had to have someone come in and clean out a hillside. A piano, a refrigerator, lots of tires and cement chunks and other misc. junk.
Yeah, but they're a bunch of uneducated redneck hillbillies up there. You can't expect them to act like normal upright folk.
#39
Old 09-10-2008, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Athena View Post
The recent episode of Mad Men (a show set in the early 1960s) has a family having a picnic (episode discussion here). One of the great things about this show is that they hit you with societal norms that are very different than today - pregnant women smoking/drinking, men in the office being very sexual towards the female secretaries, etc. etc. In this particular episode, at the end of the picnic, the man stands up and throws his beer can off into the woods. The woman, while gathering up the picnic gear, takes the blanket they'd been sitting on and gives it a shake, leaving all the disposables (napkins, etc) on the ground in the park.
Well, I wouldn't depend on Mad Men to get anything right about the time period. They'll jettison any actual facts so the audience can feel smug and superior to life in the early 60s.
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#40
Old 09-10-2008, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
Well, I wouldn't depend on Mad Men to get anything right about the time period. They'll jettison any actual facts so the audience can feel smug and superior to life in the early 60s.
I'd be interested in hearing the specifics of Mad Men that make you say this. So far, a lot of the stuff they portray rings true to me, based on Mr. Athena's memories of the time and from talks with my parents. Not everything, but a lot of it.

Heck, some of it from my own experience. Like Don Draper's daughter, I could make a mean Manhattan at about 8 years of age.

Last edited by Athena; 09-10-2008 at 08:08 PM.
#41
Old 09-10-2008, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Athena View Post
Yeah, but they're a bunch of uneducated redneck hillbillies up there. You can't expect them to act like normal upright folk.
Watch it honey, that's my neck your describing!

From what I've seen in other very rural areas, dumping your garbage over behind the hill wasn't all that uncommon in other places either.
#42
Old 09-11-2008, 12:06 AM
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There was an article about the creator/writer of Mad Men in the NY Times Sunday Magazine a few months ago. It stressed -- using examples -- how much of an obsessive stickler he is over getting the period facts right. You can be sure that if MM describes a fatal plane crash at LaGuardia Airport taking place on such and such a date, that's when the crash took place.

That said, I actually think they got the picnic scene wrong. Not because no one would leave a pile of picnic trash at a park in 1962 (?), but because a family that so fiercely clung to its identity as members of the affluent, suburban, white country club set, like the Drapers, would not do so. I think they would have thought it too messy and lowbrow -- something that poor people who were not raised with good manners did. Sure, Don might toss that beer can into the weeds -- boys will be boys -- but mom would make sure that the kiddies tidied up the picnic area before they left, like she makes sure they clean up their toys before bed every night.

Just because littering was common and not publicly stigmatized until the late '60s, doesnt mean it was practiced by the entire population. After all, I'm pretty sure that there were anti-littering laws back then, even if they were not strictly enforced or carried a heavy fine, so the practice had to have been frowned upon in certain, probably somewhat upper-crusty, circles.
#43
Old 09-11-2008, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Tastes of Chocolate View Post
Watch it honey, that's my neck your describing!

From what I've seen in other very rural areas, dumping your garbage over behind the hill wasn't all that uncommon in other places either.
pssst... chocolate... check out my location tag....
#44
Old 09-11-2008, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by acsenray View Post
Hypercritical or hypocritical? In either case, I disagree. The reporter was reporting on a societal ill. And one of the standards of a photojournalist is to just observe, and not get involved in the the scene that being photographed.
Bullshit. It amounted to about 5 pieces of trash picked up in a few seconds. The person was just a pompous ass.
#45
Old 09-11-2008, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Cisco View Post

One issue is that, until after WWII, almost everything was biodegradable. There were no styrofoam burger containers or plastic straws, etc. Littering wouldn't be viewed the same by someone born around the time Don Draper was.
Glass bottles are not biodegradable. I have a friend who lives in an old house where the inhabitants apparently used the back hill as a dumping ground. As a result, you can't walk out there without scuffing up broken glass from 50-100 years ago.
#46
Old 09-11-2008, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
Bullshit. It amounted to about 5 pieces of trash picked up in a few seconds. The person was just a pompous ass.
So what? The story was about people who throw crap on the ground. That's a societal ill. There's nothing pompous or assish about that.

And it isn't actually bullshit. Changing a scene that has been photographed is actually a hotly debated ethical issue for photojournalists.

Last edited by Acsenray; 09-11-2008 at 10:18 AM.
#47
Old 09-11-2008, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by stuyguy View Post
so the practice had to have been frowned upon in certain, probably somewhat upper-crusty, circles.
It seems to me that you're stereotyping in a manner that isn't really relevant to the creation of characters as specific individuals. I'd actually dispute the stereotype of (1) it being unrealistic for specific individuals in upper-crusty circles throwing trash around and (2) the Drapers actually being "upper crusty," but taking your assumption as given, the important character point of this scene is that the Drapers are the type of people who throw trash around.
#48
Old 09-11-2008, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
I was a teenager (mid 1970s) before I realized that you weren't supposed to leave your trash on the floor of a movie theater.
I am 35 and still have never realized that to this day. I am pretty sure that you are supposed to leave your trash on the floor of a movie theater. It is possible to throw away your own trash but the trash cans are usually in odd and inconvenient locations which leads me and almost everyone I know to just leave it where it is. I never see lines of people leaving the theater mostly with their own trash ready to be disposed of.
#49
Old 09-11-2008, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
I am pretty sure that you are supposed to leave your trash on the floor of a movie theater.
What, your theatres aren't running the "please dispose of all waste in the designated receptacles" announcement along with the "turn off your cellphones" and "don't talk" announcements? Ours have been for years.
#50
Old 09-11-2008, 11:51 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
I am 35 and still have never realized that to this day. I am pretty sure that you are supposed to leave your trash on the floor of a movie theater. It is possible to throw away your own trash but the trash cans are usually in odd and inconvenient locations which leads me and almost everyone I know to just leave it where it is. I never see lines of people leaving the theater mostly with their own trash ready to be disposed of.
Really? I've always seen reminders to dispose of your trash ever since I was an usher, back in the mid-80s. And there were always trash receptacles just outside of the theatre doors. I remember this specifically because I was responsible for emptying them.
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