Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 09-21-2008, 01:35 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Taint of creation
Posts: 33,150
Taco Bell vs authentic Mexican food - What are the real differences?

Many of us are pretty familiar with Taco Bell offerings. All I have ever had is in the way of Mexican(ish) food is Taco Bell and Tex-Mex sit down restaurant food, which seems to be better quality but is really not wildly different.

What is real Mexican food like?
#2
Old 09-21-2008, 02:05 AM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 10,746
Hopefully someone who has lived in Mexico will answer you. I only know from what is served at Mexican restaurants in Chicago. The main difference is - no hard shell tacos. That appears to be a US invention. Tacos are served on soft tortillas. There is a wide variety of meats available. The Mexican fast food place on our block (which caters mainly to a Hispanic clientele) serves not just ground beef and shredded beef, chicken and pork but beef brains, beef tongue and beef cheek (yum!). Taco Bell doesn't have any equivalent of the crusty bread sandwiches or huge bowls of soups served in most of the places I've been to.

Taco Bell is to real Mexican food what McDonalds is to a big, juicy hamburger made on the grill in your back yard.
#3
Old 09-21-2008, 02:11 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wakayama, Japan
Posts: 3,177
Never been to Mexico, but can offer this:

In Mexico, a "taco" is anything that's wrapped in a tortilla, and is no more specific a food item than a sandwich is. So burritos are tacos.
#4
Old 09-21-2008, 02:40 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: In my own little world...
Posts: 12,185
Quote:
Originally Posted by cckerberos View Post
Never been to Mexico, but can offer this:

In Mexico, a "taco" is anything that's wrapped in a tortilla, and is no more specific a food item than a sandwich is. So burritos are tacos.
So they don't have any differential between names and ingredients, like, say, different types of sushi in Japan are named different things?
#5
Old 09-21-2008, 03:07 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Staring blankly at my GPS
Posts: 11,874
Mexican food is incredibly diverse. You can get burritos, but they aren't much like Taco Hell's. It's a speciality of Northern Mexico, so the taco will be flour and the filling will som meat (no lettuce, guacamole, sour cream etc. If you're poor and live in central Mexico, Menudo would be an everyday food. If you live on the coast, you might chow down on some ceviche. Down south, they are particularly partial to pozole.
#6
Old 09-21-2008, 03:59 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wakayama, Japan
Posts: 3,177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaper View Post
So they don't have any differential between names and ingredients, like, say, different types of sushi in Japan are named different things?
Like I said, it's a vague descriptor like sandwich is in English. "Sandwich" just means something between two pieces of bread, "taco" just means something wrapped in a tortilla. And just as we have ham sandwiches and roast beef sandwiches, they have tacos al pastor, tacos de pescado, etc.
#7
Old 09-21-2008, 04:07 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: In my own little world...
Posts: 12,185
I see.

Come to think of it, what's supposed to be the difference between a burrito and an overstuffed soft taco?
#8
Old 09-21-2008, 04:19 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Wakayama, Japan
Posts: 3,177
In Tex-Mex cuisine? The filling, I'd imagine. I don't think I've ever had a soft taco with rice or beans in it.
#9
Old 09-21-2008, 10:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: In the Dreaming
Posts: 21,600
There are only three words difference between Taco Bell and Authentic Mexican Food.

"Authentic", "Mexican" and "Food".

#10
Old 09-21-2008, 10:37 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 10,130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapioca Dextrin View Post
Mexican food is incredibly diverse. You can get burritos, but they aren't much like Taco Hell's. It's a speciality of Northern Mexico, so the taco will be flour and the filling will som meat (no lettuce, guacamole, sour cream etc. If you're poor and live in central Mexico, Menudo would be an everyday food. If you live on the coast, you might chow down on some ceviche. Down south, they are particularly partial to pozole.
Ceviche sounds delicious!
#11
Old 09-21-2008, 10:38 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
"Real" Mexican food is incredibly diverse.
There's: Seafood, slow-cooked Pork, Mole (bitter chocolate sauce), Tomatillo sauces, Steak, many kinds of chili sauces, etc.

Everything at Taco Bell is made from the same handful of ingredients:
Cat food, cheese, tomatoes, beans.
#12
Old 09-21-2008, 10:43 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 14,292
Real Mexican food has a lot of pork, pork, PORK! It is generally easier to raise pigs than to raise cattle, and the "authentic" food of any given ethnicity is typically going to be the working-class, common people's food. It's relatively easy for a family to keep a few pigs around because they're not very discriminating when it comes to their feed. (Goats, for the same reason.) The same can't be said of cattle. America, Argentina, and Brazil are really the only North American countries with a lot of beef in their diets, because the geography makes it easy to raise cattle. Out of all the European countries, I think the one that eats the most beef is probably Hungary, likewise because they have a lot of plains to raise cattle on.

Americans are used to beef being in everything. But in most other countries, pork and lamb are more common.
#13
Old 09-21-2008, 10:55 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NoWA
Posts: 57,508
Speaking of fillings, I used to like to go to Tito's Tacos in Culver City. Their menu was very limited, unlike the former Lucy's next door where you could get lenguas and brains and pretty much anything else. Tito's has tacos, burritos ('little donkeys'?), tostadas, chili, beans, and rice.

Anyway, if you ordered chili you got a cup of beef chunks in a red sauce. That's it; meat and sauce. If you ordered a beef burrito you got the same stuff wrapped in a large flour tortilla.

Their tacos are not soft. But neither are they those pre-made 'shells' that Taco Bell uses. As in most Mexican restaurants I've been to, the meat is put into a soft corn tortilla and then the tortilla is fried in oil. So the edges are crispy and the middle is soft (and greasy). Strangely, Jack-In-The-Box tacos seem more authentic than Taco Bell's -- at least in that respect. (JITB tacos are crap. But there are times when you just have to have a couple.)

I haven't been to Mexico since I was a kid, so I only know from California Mexican food. But there are a lot of Mexicans in SoCal, and a lot of restaurants. Most of them offer rice and refried beans as side-dishes. Many offer a choice of different kinds of bean preparations. They all offer the basic taco/burrito/enchilada/etc. fare. Others offer steak, lobster, grilled fish, and other dishes that are not considered 'Mexican food' except for the beans and rice. Some of the menus say 'For Gringos' or something like that; but I've been told by Mexicans and people who go there that indeed, Mexicans do eat steaks and lobsters and such. ISTM that what we Americans think of as 'Mexican food' is pretty much just 'everyday food' like we would eat burgers and fries, meat loaf and mac'n'cheese or mashed potatoes, or the like. Cheap and easy. But there's much more variety than (I'll wager) most Americans think of.



EDIT:

Wow. I've been lollygagging, getting coffee, doing other things, and taking my time posting. Didn't realise I took THAT long! Anyway, what Argent Towers said:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argent Towers
the "authentic" food of any given ethnicity is typically going to be the working-class, common people's food.

Last edited by Johnny L.A.; 09-21-2008 at 10:59 AM.
#14
Old 09-21-2008, 11:21 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,345
Here's Texas food writer Robb Walsh's take on The Authenticity Myth.

Quote:
In the good old days, Texans went to "Mexican restaurants" and ate "Mexican food." Then in 1972 The Cuisines of Mexico, an influential cookbook by food authority Diana Kennedy, drew the line between authentic interior Mexican food and the "mixed plates" we ate at "so-called Mexican restaurants" in the United States. Kennedy and her friends in the food community began referring to Americanized Mexican food as "Tex-Mex," a term previously used to describe anything that was half Texan and half Mexican. Texas Mexican restaurant owners considered it an insult.
Mexico has numerous culinary regions. Mexicans came to different regions of the USA (sometimes before those regions were the USA) & started cooking. And cooks in every region are glad to steal good ideas from other cooks. Thus, "fusion" cuisine.

Here in Houston, we're lucky. We've got upscale Mexican, Mexican-style seafood places (sometimes run by Chinese), all kinds of Tex-Mex & humble joints serving dishes to recent immigrants. I don't eat at Taco Bell because I don't care for the food--not because it isn't "authentic."

Last edited by Bridget Burke; 09-21-2008 at 11:23 AM.
#15
Old 09-21-2008, 11:59 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 41,718
My God, I don't even know where to start.

One major point that hasn't been mentioned is that in Mexican cuisine, tortillas are served at the table like bread is at American tables. Homemade tortillas are soft and thicker than the prepackaged soft corn tortillas you get. They're somewhat reminicent of a small, dense crepe and served warm.

Mexico itself has a myriad of cuisines. I couldn't even begin to do it justice in a couple of paragraphs here. You have the famous seven moles of Oaxaca (stews of various complexity made with ingredients as diverse as pumpkin seeds, raisins, and sometimes chocolate); the Yucatan is known for its use of achiote, sour/Seville oranges, and habanero (most famously in a dish called cochinita pibil); Jalisco features birria (goat stew) and tortas ahogadas (Mexican sandwiches "drowned" in a spice tomato-based sauce); in central Mexico, you'll find lots of pozole (hominy stew) and menudo (tripe stew). And, of course, the coasts will feature many seafood dishes, from the battered-and-fried fish tacos of the Baja, to tortillas layered with shark (pan de cazon) of the Yucatan, to the ubiquitous ceviche. Oh, and let's not forget tamales. Corn-wrapped or banana-leaf-wrapped (depending on the region), these can come in both savory (like pork and red sauce) and sweet (raisins and pineapples, for example) variations. When made from fresh masa, these are divine.

It's hard to make accurate generalizations, but I would say the three most commonly used spices in Mexican cuisine are cumin, Mexican oregano (not Mediterranean oregano-it's a different flavor), and true cinnamon (not cassia, which is usually what cinnamon in America is). Roasting peppers, whether fresh or dry, is a technique that is central to most recipes and one that many American cooks forget/skip/don't know about.

If you really want to learn about Mexican cuisine, Zarela Martinez has a wonderful cookbook called Food From My Heart:Cuisines from Mexico Remembered and Reimagined. Rick Bayless and his various shows and cookbooks are also excellent.
#16
Old 09-21-2008, 05:24 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Tottering-on-the-Brink
Posts: 18,706
I don't really know a lot about the diverse cuisine of Mexico. But here in Topeka there's a good sized Hispanic community, many of them descendants of folks who came north to work at the Santa Fe railyards.

Each summer there's a fiesta to support the school that's part of Our Lady of Guadalupe parish. Lot's of homestyle food is served. My observations are that tamales are wrapped in corn shucks, not paper. The beef or pork is shredded, not ground. The ground beef in tacos, burritos, enchiladas and so on has bits of potato and peas mixed in it. And as another poster upthread said, tacos are not (necessarily) hard shelled. Salsas are not all that hot. Chocolate often has cinnamon mixed in, a combo that surprises some folks but is good for a change. The "best" burritos have pork, not beef. And chicken comes with the flesh chopped up, not in big KFC style pieces.

I don't know what region of Mexico the original immigrants came from, but I'd guess that what I saw above(not much) is regional cooking, or adapted to local cuisines. All I know is that home Mexican cooking in this town
#17
Old 09-21-2008, 06:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Naugatuck, CT
Posts: 6,760
Another intersesting thing is agua fresca, which they often just call agua, which makes things very confusing for those who learned Spanish from Sesame Street.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agua_fresca
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
One major point that hasn't been mentioned is that in Mexican cuisine, tortillas are served at the table like bread is at American tables.
I actually felt this was somewhat perplexing. Like, we got tortillas at a nice restaurant in Mexico City, but the dishes we ordered didn't particularly go with them. I think we ate one, and the rest went back to the kitchen, which seemed like a waste.
#18
Old 09-21-2008, 07:34 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,735
It's kind of unfair to compare Taco Bell to the heights of Mexican cuisine. I tried to find an equivalent menu of a restaurant in Mexico that would be an equivalent -- cheap food, quick service, paper napkins, that kind of thing. I failed at that Google mission, but this is the menu of a restaurant that I've been to in New Jersey, one that caters to the tastes of the local Mexican and Central American working people (and is beyond great, or was when I was there last).

The middle of menu is kind of where it is competing with Taco Bell, on menu items and price. But check out the different kinds of tacos and all the stuff that Taco Bell won't do: shrimp, chorizo (spicy sausage), goat, pork. Notice all the different sauces. Taco Bell, now that I think of it, is oddly sauceless for Mexican food. Usually there's a variety of salsas on the table at a Mexican restaurant, not just wan Tabasco in little packets.

Come to think of it, TB also goes pretty light on the rice and beans, too, don't they? Most people probably go in and out without consuming any rice and beans at all.

Mexican cheese is not much like cheese in the U.S. I don;t know how to explain it but Taco Bell is clearly made from American-type cheeses.

Damn, I want to eat at that place in Jersey right now!
#19
Old 09-21-2008, 08:20 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
Out here we have a bizarre psudo-chain of fast-food Mexican restaurants. They are all more-or-less identical, but they all have different prefixes for their names. Off the top of my head I can think of:
Rolbertos
Rolfbertos
Fillibertos
Aribertos
Eribertos

They are also quite good, for basic Mexican fast food (much, much better than that Taco Bell swill).

Last edited by beowulff; 09-21-2008 at 08:21 PM.
#20
Old 09-21-2008, 08:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 10,130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
Real Mexican food has a lot of pork, pork, PORK! It is generally easier to raise pigs than to raise cattle, and the "authentic" food of any given ethnicity is typically going to be the working-class, common people's food. It's relatively easy for a family to keep a few pigs around because they're not very discriminating when it comes to their feed. (Goats, for the same reason.) The same can't be said of cattle. America, Argentina, and Brazil are really the only North American countries with a lot of beef in their diets, because the geography makes it easy to raise cattle.
The last time I consulted a globe Argentina and Brazil were in South America.
#21
Old 09-21-2008, 08:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Chattanooga
Posts: 14,037
Whereas Canada, another beef-eating country, is North American.
#22
Old 09-21-2008, 09:13 PM
Shouting Grasshopper
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Meridian/280
Posts: 12,762
In honor of this thread, I had Taco Bell for lunch. Volcano tacos and a burrito with salsa verde...YUM!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Argent Towers
the "authentic" food of any given ethnicity is typically going to be the working-class, common people's food.
Well, when you think of TB's clientèle, it consists of lots of common working-class people. Does that mean it qualifies as "authentic" fast food?
#23
Old 09-21-2008, 09:30 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Naugatuck, CT
Posts: 6,760
Ironically, Pizza Hut and Dominos both seemed very popular in Mexico City, and even have stores inside the metro stations.
#24
Old 09-21-2008, 10:55 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: St.Louis MO.
Posts: 1,821
Just anecdotal but my ex and her new hubby said the Mexican food sucked when they were at a resort on the Yucatan. And Yes, even out of the hotel grounds.

She was a Fajitas type of gal so take this post with a huge grain of salt.

Last edited by gravitycrash; 09-21-2008 at 10:56 PM.
#25
Old 09-21-2008, 11:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: High Desert, California
Posts: 4,454
Quote:
Originally Posted by gravitycrash View Post
Just anecdotal but my ex and her new hubby said the Mexican food sucked when they were at a resort on the Yucatan. And Yes, even out of the hotel grounds.

She was a Fajitas type of gal so take this post with a huge grain of salt.
She's crazy. Yucatecan food is awesome. It's the home of the habanero! Pok chuuc and pollo pibil and sincronizadas...mmm.
#26
Old 09-21-2008, 11:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Naugatuck, CT
Posts: 6,760
Even if you leave the resort, it still doesn't make tacos and fajitas the local speciality.

And honestly, you have to get pretty far from Cancun to get outside the tourist zone.
#27
Old 09-21-2008, 11:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,181
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Out here we have a bizarre psudo-chain of fast-food Mexican restaurants. They are all more-or-less identical, but they all have different prefixes for their names. Off the top of my head I can think of:
Rolbertos
Rolfbertos
Fillibertos
Aribertos
Eribertos

They are also quite good, for basic Mexican fast food (much, much better than that Taco Bell swill).
You forgot Humbertos! That's my favorite. It's fun to see them close down for health violations and reopen under another -Bertos a few weeks later.

True story.
#28
Old 09-21-2008, 11:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 10,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Queen Bruin View Post
She's crazy. Yucatecan food is awesome. It's the home of the habanero! Pok chuuc and pollo pibil and sincronizadas...mmm.
I loved the sincronizadas the little Mexican place around the corner from my apartment made. A tortilla, folded over and filled with ham and melted cheese. But you have to order carefully. Mention any meat filling and forget to specify what you want it to fill, you get (filling) taco. My Spanish is pretty bad. I wanted to order a sincronizadas. When I got home, I discovered I had accidentally ordered cinco asada.

Quote:
Originally Posted by An Gadaí
Ceviche sounds delicious!
It is. But you have to be very confident of the food handling standards of the particular restaurant. One bad ceviche tostada gave me a week of intestinal Hell that I wouldn't wish on anyone except Dick Cheney.
#29
Old 09-21-2008, 11:56 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: NoWA
Posts: 57,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaffa View Post
I loved the sincronizadas
There used to be a Mexican restaurant called Casa Miguel (not Case de Miguel) at Montgomery Field in San Diego. Maybe it's still there. Maybe they changed their name. Anyway, they had a sincronizada that was a flour tortilla with refried beans, then a layer of ham, then a layer of cheese, then another tortilla. It was served with guacamole and sour cream, with some diced tomatoes and shredded cheese. MAN, I loved those when I was a kid!

If I knew how to make guacamole, I'd be inclined to make one. (Or maybe I could find some good pre-made guac. Not hopeful.)
#30
Old 09-22-2008, 12:24 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Mesa, Ariz.
Posts: 3,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Out here we have a bizarre psudo-chain of fast-food Mexican restaurants. They are all more-or-less identical, but they all have different prefixes for their names. Off the top of my head I can think of:
Rolbertos
Rolfbertos
Fillibertos
Aribertos
Eribertos

They are also quite good, for basic Mexican fast food (much, much better than that Taco Bell swill).
They all used to be Filibertos until a couple years ago when the chain imploded, or something, and the other 'bertos sprang up in the same locations. Kind of like Vinchell's Donuts in Mesa. Same yellow-and-brown color theme as Winchell's, and when I was stopped at the light, I studied the sign closely -- you could make out the faint traces of the left half of a W.

Filiberto's is head and shoulders above TB for authenticity, but DesertRoomie says the food is too greasy for her.
#31
Old 09-22-2008, 08:35 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 16,451
A real Mexican taco is small and made with two corn tortillas, a scoop of filling, and sometimes a small wedge of lime, lemon or a roasted green onion. That's it. No lettuce, no beans, etc. The tortillas are not folded over but rather left open for you to add salsa.
#32
Old 09-22-2008, 09:40 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 7,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapioca Dextrin View Post
If you're poor and live in central Mexico, Menudo would be an everyday food.
Every day? That hasn't been my experience. I worked in a Mexican restaurant for four years when I was a kid (it's my stepmother's restaurant, and she's from DF). Menudo wasn't on the menu, but the cooks would make it for themselves--only on Saturday or Sunday morning. And around L.A., when a (real) Mexican restaurant puts a hand written sign that says "Today we have menudo," it's always on a weekend morning.
#33
Old 09-22-2008, 10:25 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: ATX
Posts: 6,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
If I knew how to make guacamole, I'd be inclined to make one.
Nothing could be simpler.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
(Or maybe I could find some good pre-made guac. Not hopeful.)
You might as well go to Taco Bell.

Folks, please keep in mind that Taco Bell is not mexican food. It is a fast food brand. Just the fact that there are not fresh ingredients involved just about completely disqualifies it as food anyhow. The fast food selections at TB were invented not to be authentic recreations of actual mexican dishes, but for their ease and speed of preparation.

Well made Cerviche is indeed the food of the gods. If you want fantastic cerviche and happen to be in Austin, check out Manuel's.
#34
Old 09-22-2008, 10:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Staring blankly at my GPS
Posts: 11,874
Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleRojelio View Post
Nothing could be simplerWell made Cerviche is indeed the food of the gods. If you want fantastic cerviche and happen to be in Austin, check out Manuel's.
I'm more of a Fonda San Miguel, but there's nothing wrong with your choice at all
#35
Old 09-22-2008, 10:46 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Elgin IL
Posts: 8,540
Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot View Post
"Today we have menudo," it's always on a weekend morning.
That's because there is nothing in this world that can cure a hangover faster than a big steaming bowl of menudo.
#36
Old 09-22-2008, 10:57 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: ATX
Posts: 6,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapioca Dextrin View Post
I'm more of a Fonda San Miguel, but there's nothing wrong with your choice at all
The food is always great but it is always so loud at Fonda San Miguel and everyone is packed in there like sardines. Try a "310" margarita with some cerviche out on the patio at Manuel's and you'll never go back.
#37
Old 09-22-2008, 11:12 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 17,865
The moles of Oaxaca do not appear to have any fast-food analogue here in North America. Indeed, I've not actually eaten any outside of Oaxaca.

The chocolate mole is just the most famous (in fact, not my favourite).
#38
Old 09-22-2008, 12:50 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
A real Mexican taco is small and made with two corn tortillas, a scoop of filling, and sometimes a small wedge of lime, lemon or a roasted green onion. That's it. No lettuce, no beans, etc. The tortillas are not folded over but rather left open for you to add salsa.
True, but the hard corn tortilla was used. And, lettuce is used on other similar dishes.

Taco bell isn't that far off from border Mexican food. The bean burrito and the simple taco are both recogonizable.

The Tabo Bell taco is a taco like the McDonalds burger is a hamburger. My home made all-american burgers aren't even close to anything served at McD's.
#39
Old 09-22-2008, 01:43 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 9,345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malthus View Post
The moles of Oaxaca do not appear to have any fast-food analogue here in North America. Indeed, I've not actually eaten any outside of Oaxaca.

The chocolate mole is just the most famous (in fact, not my favourite).
Moles are definitely slow food, but can be found in the USA. Check out Pico's Mex-Mex (here in Houston). The menu also includes other regional specialties. Including the meat-heavy cuisine of the North so popular here in Texas. And seafood--hey, if we can suffer hurricanes, it's only fair that we can enjoy the good stuff that comes out of the Gulf. Plus a few exotic "Tex-Mex" items.

Nachos were invented just across the Border (our Southern Border, that is!) & can be wretched fast food; but Pico's has some topped with cochinita pibil & pickled onions--specialties from the Yucatán. Plus crawfish enchiladas!

And awesome Mexican breakfasts. Not to forget truly excellent margaritas. Hmmm.... Time to visit Pico's again.

(By the way--Mexico is in North America too. Somos todos Americanos.)

Last edited by Bridget Burke; 09-22-2008 at 01:48 PM.
#40
Old 09-22-2008, 07:02 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: An East Hollywood dingbat
Posts: 7,641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cluricaun View Post
That's because there is nothing in this world that can cure a hangover faster than a big steaming bowl of menudo.
Right. Also, it takes a while to make, and doesn't lend itself to the schedule of people who have a full day of work.
#41
Old 09-22-2008, 07:26 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 2,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Out here we have a bizarre psudo-chain of fast-food Mexican restaurants. They are all more-or-less identical, but they all have different prefixes for their names. Off the top of my head I can think of:
Rolbertos
Rolfbertos
Fillibertos
Aribertos
Eribertos

They are also quite good, for basic Mexican fast food (much, much better than that Taco Bell swill).
Oh dear me. The chips and guacamole and the carne adasa burritos? To. Die. For.

I would also recommend Federicos for amazing fast mexican food 24 hrs/day. Yum yum.

Having vacationed in Puerto Penasco, MX (basically Rocky Point) several times, I can tell you that they have a lot of taco stands which serve pork, beef or chicken tacos and allow you to add your own extras (guacamole, lemon, salsa, etc).

The only mexican food sit down restaurant I've been to there offered stuff like chorizo, burritos, chili rellenos (yumYUMYUM) etc.

I'd say the big difference is that Taco Bell doesn't offer enchiladas sauces on anything that I've found and whomever mentioned that all Taco Bell items consist of the same few ingredients is right on the money. I've also been told (from an ex who moved here from Indiana) that our Taco Bell food tastes different than the one back home.
#42
Old 09-22-2008, 07:30 PM
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 24,869
The difference between Taco Bell and authentic Mexican food?

One is made by undereducated, underpaid, oppressed wage-slaves with little hope of social or economic advancement in poor conditions with poor ingredients and poor quality control.

The other ...

oh, forget it, you know where I'm going.
#43
Old 09-22-2008, 07:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 14,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bridget Burke View Post
Moles are definitely slow food, but can be found in the USA.
Very slow - you would not believe how long it takes to lure those damn things out of their holes. You need a lot of patience. The chocolate ones are especially difficult to coax out.
#44
Old 09-22-2008, 07:40 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The Middle of Puget Sound
Posts: 21,022
Remember that Tex-Mex IS authentic Mexican food. It's the cuisine of the region of Mexico called Texas. If Oaxaca declared independence from Mexico and became part of Guatemala, would Oaxacan cuisine stop being Mexican food?
#45
Old 09-22-2008, 07:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 17,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
Out here we have a bizarre psudo-chain of fast-food Mexican restaurants. They are all more-or-less identical, but they all have different prefixes for their names. Off the top of my head I can think of:
Rolbertos
Rolfbertos
Fillibertos
Aribertos
Eribertos

They are also quite good, for basic Mexican fast food (much, much better than that Taco Bell swill).
I wouldn't call them much, much better than Taco Bell . . . let's be honest with ourselves here. They're twice as expensive, 10 times as dirty, and a little bit better. Try Carolina's on the NW corner of Cave Creek & Cactus for a Mexican fast food alternative that's better, cheaper, and family owned.
#46
Old 09-22-2008, 08:05 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Scottsdale, more-or-less
Posts: 14,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cisco View Post
I wouldn't call them much, much better than Taco Bell . . . let's be honest with ourselves here. They're twice as expensive, 10 times as dirty, and a little bit better. Try Carolina's on the NW corner of Cave Creek & Cactus for a Mexican fast food alternative that's better, cheaper, and family owned.
That's 2 miles from where I work...
#47
Old 09-22-2008, 09:07 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 17,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulff View Post
That's 2 miles from where I work...
And you haven't been there? I'm looking into my crystal ball . . . I see . . . I SEE! . . . your last 'bertos visit in your past!

#48
Old 09-22-2008, 09:10 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 33,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argent Towers View Post
Very slow - you would not believe how long it takes to lure those damn things out of their holes. You need a lot of patience. The chocolate ones are especially difficult to coax out.
Or- you can make chili out of them, but you have to carefully get rid of the poison molar first.

Or- no, they are no good at all- the rocks are too hard and too salty.

Or- ewww, but I suppose the dermatolgists have to do something with them.

I cannot think of anything with the chemical meaning of the word.
#49
Old 09-22-2008, 09:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 17,208
By the way, beowulff, do you know about this thread?
#50
Old 09-22-2008, 09:38 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 1,409
Mamacita's restaurant, a chain in Texas, that started in my old hometown of Kerrville...with restaurants now in San Antonio, Fredericksburg, and San Marcos. Tortilla chips always fresh and warm, a tortilla machine that makes fresh tortillas (like someone mentioned earlier, they resemble a soft, fluffy, but heavy crepe), and I swear they put cocaine in their iced tea...
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:41 AM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: deuce poop cereal box size visiting compton sexy roomba evrika meaning freedieting calculator oglaf archive sennight fortnight baseball weekly magazine 2 seat cars home shopping forums autozone nut splitter non biological my ruthschris orange tom cat anywho or anyhoo refundable deposits nelly nickname 30000 miles service deadwood seasons synthetic endorphins do goats smell h2ocean cvs creative mp3 player pumpernickel joke pronounce calzone prefix for during cute mantis clumping litter ww2 zeppelins redwood lumber lowes ck2 usurp title submersible battleship jet powered beer cooler mediacom channels without cable box steve young pass to himself air force vs navy swollen taste bud turned white let freedom ring god save the queen what is the rich purnell maneuver non spicy curry recipe what does taliban mean average size of a horse penis surge protector plugged into extension cord small size condoms for sale kissing with cold sores ice cream cones at walmart bit my tongue how to heal dog bleeding from nose after death late growth spurt male how do you pronounce vauxhall lovers or losers the game show what is a basket fuck sorcerer prestige classes 3.5 how much ejaculate is needed for pregnancy what time of day is mail delivered the life of david gale ending difference between chai and tea pipe tobacco for cigarettes cost to replumb a house how to open purell pump bottle library of babel analysis sleeping on a waterbed dresie and casie wikipedia