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#1
Old 01-28-2009, 03:05 PM
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Old dog suddenly attacking cats.

So I have an older dog. She's about 12 years old and a shepherd mix. That's getting up there in age for her size. I've had her since she was 3 and for the longest time she was nice to my four cats. But as time went on she started getting well...bitchier with them. At first she would just growl if they came too close. Then about a couple years ago she'd randomly snap at them but let it go at that. Well recently, within the past week or so she's suddenly started attacking them full force. I've had to break up three fights where she was just going after the cat. Luckily she hasn't hurt them yet but I'm worried about what should happen if I'm not there to break it up. There's been no changes in the house so I'm not sure what's instigated this.

What's worse is, she's been growling at my daughter who's only 10 months old. Not just a low growl either. A menacing growl that gets louder if my daughter gets closer. She doesn't even have to be touching the dog. Just within like a foot of her gets the growling started. I'm worried about the cats and I'm worried a lot about my daughter but I'm doing major supervising with her. Never alone with the dog and if she starts looking like she's going near the dog, I move her away.

Don't know what to do since I can't figure out what's causing this outside of her getting crochety in her old age. I don't want to do anything drastic but if she continues to go after the cats like this or god forbid do something even close to that with my daughter I might not have a choice. Any suggestions or insight?
#2
Old 01-28-2009, 03:07 PM
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Well, if the daughter is ten months old, the dog has been bumped down the family heirarchy recently. That might have an effect.
#3
Old 01-28-2009, 03:12 PM
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If you could make one thing clear, is the dog RESPONDING TO or ACTIVELY going after the cats.

Like would the dog ignore the cats unless they bother her, THEN she attacks with full force. Or is the dog seeking out the trouble.

If the cats are full grown and can get away from her (and have claws) a good swipe is all it usually takes to teach the dog a lesson.

I am thinking the dog is jealous of the baby and sees the cats as an extension of the baby.

Sounds like a shifting of the postions within the pack
#4
Old 01-28-2009, 03:23 PM
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Have you taken her to the vet? There's the possibility that there's something going wrong which is causing neurological/behavioral changes. You should probably do this sooner rather than later - my husband knows of a dog who started getting aggressive in his later years, and ended up biting the family's young daughter. I can't recall if they bothered with an actual postmortem exam or if they just assumed it was some kind of brain tumor or other problem that triggered it.
#5
Old 01-28-2009, 03:36 PM
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Growling at your infant. Get rid of the dog immediately. Once it attacks the child it's too late for your baby.
#6
Old 01-28-2009, 03:36 PM
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I haven't actually seen the beginning of a fight yet but if it's like her old habit of snapping, it's when they get too close to her. Most of the time she completely ignores the cats.
As for the pack thing, I had thought maybe she was jealous of the baby or something but assumed it would have shown up before this.

And I haven't taken her to the vet really since she's acting fine anyway. She's due for some routine bloodwork though so if I can get the money together soon I might bring her and bring this up.
#7
Old 01-28-2009, 04:10 PM
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How's her vision and hearing? My dog got snappier as his vision and hearing made him easier to "surprise". I just learned to annouce myself better.
#8
Old 01-28-2009, 04:54 PM
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THat 'growling at the baby' thing would terrify me. Growl at me, no problem, I'll growl back. Snap at me, bite me, I'll give you the back of my hand. Bite the baby...you're gone.
#9
Old 01-28-2009, 06:37 PM
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I'm sure her vision and hearing are fine. I just find myself in a bad situation. I don't want the cats to get hurt but I've had her almost her entire life. I just feel like I should try something to correct the situation, that I owe her that much. She hasn't done anything towards the baby that makes me scared for her safety. It's more of an "oh that's not good.." feeling.

Someone suggested trying to get her to associate the baby with good things like food. But that's not practical because she gets so excited when she sees a treat she'd trample the poor baby. I've tried verbally reprimanding her when she growls but it's done nothing. She just stops for a second and gives me a look that seems to say "What did I do wrong?".

It's a shitty situation...
#10
Old 01-28-2009, 08:58 PM
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Do you suppose it's some sort of senile dementia?
#11
Old 01-28-2009, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by AngelSoft View Post
Someone suggested trying to get her to associate the baby with good things like food. But that's not practical because she gets so excited when she sees a treat she'd trample the poor baby.
Can you train her on the leash? We have an excitable dog who we've trained to not be so aggressive to the vacuum cleaner by doing the training while on a leash. We can control the situation that way.

Frankly, being unpredictable around the baby way outstrips the reactions to the cats (we have a dog, two cats and kids, so I know where you are coming from).
#12
Old 01-28-2009, 09:07 PM
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Seriously how is this even a question. The dog is growling menacingly at your baby. Get rid of it before it attacks her!
#13
Old 01-28-2009, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
How's her vision and hearing? My dog got snappier as his vision and hearing made him easier to "surprise". I just learned to annouce myself better.
Yeah, I'm thinking it's hearing, vision or chronic pain. I'll smack anything that bugs me when I'm in pain, too.
#14
Old 01-28-2009, 09:35 PM
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You could consult a dog trainer, but if you're having trouble scraping together the money to take her to the vet it seems unlikely that you have the cash to pay a trainer. Your child's safety must be the main question. To wait until she does something to the baby could be disasterous. I'm not saying you have to euthanize her, but definitely separate them until your child is older.

StG
#15
Old 01-28-2009, 09:43 PM
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I definitely don't advocate euthanizing toddlers. There's always someone who can take them until they're older.
#16
Old 01-28-2009, 09:50 PM
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Generally speaking, no dog, of any age or sort, should be unsupervised with an infant. Period. That goes for silly little fluffy ones as well.

Vet check is indicated. One common reason for this exact behavior -- growling and snapping at things that get close or disturb her -- is when a dog is in constant pain.

If you "owe" this dog consideration -- and I believe a dog is a family member -- then IMHO you "owe" her two things here:

1) Constant supervision, and limited exposure period, to the baby. Don't give her the chance to err.

2) Vet diagnosis, second opinion if necessary. If you don't have a good vibe from your current vet, ask around, nearby dog people may have a good recommendation. Like a good mechanic or accountant, a vet you like and trust is well worth considerable trouble to find and keep.

Good luck.
#17
Old 01-28-2009, 11:54 PM
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Well I've made an appointment for her at the vet. I don't have enough for the bloodwork right now but I can at least have a checkup to make sure there's nothing obviously wrong. And as for the pain...I hadn't even thought about that. She's missed out on her groomer visits for about four months now and she's getting a little matted. I'm sure that's not comfortable and the groomer's not too expensive so I'll see about making her an appointment for that tomorrow too.

And for everyone implying that I should get rid of her right away for the safety of my baby, I understand where you're coming from but I know she's not a bad dog. Something's going on with her and I want to give her the chance of getting better and not just toss her out. I'm taking measures to make sure they don't interact anymore to keep anything from happening.
#18
Old 01-29-2009, 07:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Harmonious Discord View Post
Growling at your infant. Get rid of the dog immediately. Once it attacks the child it's too late for your baby.
I am totally with this. Get rid of the dog one attack too early than one attack too late.
#19
Old 01-29-2009, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Cicero View Post
I am totally with this. Get rid of the dog one attack too early than one attack too late.
What they said.

For goodness sakes, why is this even a question in your mind? It's not a matter of punishing your beloved pet...for whatever reason, your dog is not well and needs to be treated immediately. And as much for your dog's sake as for the safety of your child, it is better to treat them proactively...IOW, any signs of aggression need euthanasia, sorry to say.

Please?

#20
Old 01-29-2009, 07:43 AM
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I know why some of you are saying "Get rid of the dog" but you have to realize this is madness. Pets are family members. You might consider kicking out one to protect the other, but only as the absolutely last resort.

I agree with the people who are recommending checking her for physical problems. Pain makes critters grumpy, whether they're people or pets. Also, canine senility can cause this sort of thing. And the problem seems to be getting worse over time, which indicates something pathological.

Please, please keeps us informed about how the vet visit goes.
#21
Old 01-29-2009, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by kambuckta View Post
What they said.

For goodness sakes, why is this even a question in your mind? It's not a matter of punishing your beloved pet...for whatever reason, your dog is not well and needs to be treated immediately. And as much for your dog's sake as for the safety of your child, it is better to treat them proactively...IOW, any signs of aggression need euthanasia, sorry to say.

Please?

That's an unsupportable reaction. Sure, it's easy to say when it's not your dog. You have no emotional ties to this dog whatsoever, and all you know about this dog is that it's become aggressive. But you would not be so quick to proscribe death if it was YOUR pet, whom you'd known and loved for nearly a decade.

After all, if push comes to shove, she can simply give the dog away, to someone without cats or kids, and see how that goes.

I'm telling you, one of those uncrossable divides seems to be between "animal people" and non.
#22
Old 01-29-2009, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
I know why some of you are saying "Get rid of the dog" but you have to realize this is madness. Pets are family members. You might consider kicking out one to protect the other, but only as the absolutely last resort.
.
Are you serious...that you would possibly put your human family members at risk (particularly little kids) of a grumpy pet? At what point would YOU consider it a 'last resort'......after it had attacked your toddler?

Fer fuck's sake......animals are great and wonderful assets to family dynamics. There comes a time though when they are a liability, and a direct threat to the safety and health of that family, and the OP here is exemplifying that.

Comes a time for all things to die, and in this case, it's the dog. Now, before it does any damage to the toddler.

Last edited by kambuckta; 01-29-2009 at 07:54 AM. Reason: Misappropriated apostrophe!
#23
Old 01-29-2009, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
That's an unsupportable reaction. Sure, it's easy to say when it's not your dog. You have no emotional ties to this dog whatsoever, and all you know about this dog is that it's become aggressive. But you would not be so quick to proscribe death if it was YOUR pet, whom you'd known and loved for nearly a decade.

After all, if push comes to shove, she can simply give the dog away, to someone without cats or kids, and see how that goes.

I'm telling you, one of those uncrossable divides seems to be between "animal people" and non.
A baby is totally defenseless against a dog. I'm saying get rid of the dog for this reason, because the child's safety should be the number one concern here. It's not because I'm against having pets. I default to the children's safety first above all pets. This dog has attacked the cats and is growling at the baby. It's an easy next step to attack the baby.
#24
Old 01-29-2009, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
That's an unsupportable reaction. Sure, it's easy to say when it's not your dog. You have no emotional ties to this dog whatsoever, and all you know about this dog is that it's become aggressive. But you would not be so quick to proscribe death if it was YOUR pet, whom you'd known and loved for nearly a decade.

After all, if push comes to shove, she can simply give the dog away, to someone without cats or kids, and see how that goes.

I'm telling you, one of those uncrossable divides seems to be between "animal people" and non.
What? Are you a moron? It's not a divide between 'animal people' and 'non' as you are so quick to ascribe.

I've had pets for many years, some that I have had to put down for various behavioural problems, but more that I have seen through to ancient ages who then died of natural causes or were euthanazed in the last hours to alleviate pain and suffering. My kids have lived harmoniously with all of these pets (except the ones who showed any signs of aggression) and are now here to tell the stories......there are many little kids who do not have that privilege, who's parents think that the dog has as much of a 'right to life' as they do, or who minimise the risk that the dog poses: they're either dead now, or severely maimed because of the attack by the dog.
#25
Old 01-29-2009, 08:27 AM
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My first thought was old age related pain or senility. I hope it turns out that it's something you can manage with extra supervision and maybe pain medication.

Let us know how the vet visit goes.
#26
Old 01-29-2009, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by kambuckta View Post
What? Are you a moron? It's not a divide between 'animal people' and 'non' as you are so quick to ascribe.

I've had pets for many years, some that I have had to put down for various behavioural problems, but more that I have seen through to ancient ages who then died of natural causes or were euthanazed in the last hours to alleviate pain and suffering. My kids have lived harmoniously with all of these pets (except the ones who showed any signs of aggression) and are now here to tell the stories......there are many little kids who do not have that privilege, who's parents think that the dog has as much of a 'right to life' as they do, or who minimise the risk that the dog poses: they're either dead now, or severely maimed because of the attack by the dog.
Why euthanize the "signs of aggression" ones? Why not give them away to someone without kids? Revenge?
#27
Old 01-29-2009, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by kambuckta View Post
Are you serious...that you would possibly put your human family members at risk (particularly little kids) of a grumpy pet? At what point would YOU consider it a 'last resort'......after it had attacked your toddler?

Fer fuck's sake......animals are great and wonderful assets to family dynamics. There comes a time though when they are a liability, and a direct threat to the safety and health of that family, and the OP here is exemplifying that.

Comes a time for all things to die, and in this case, it's the dog. Now, before it does any damage to the toddler.
Again, why kill the dog? Why not give it away to someone with no kids?

There's plenty of older people who would love a companion.
#28
Old 01-29-2009, 08:49 AM
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I am as big of a dog lover as you will find around here. I have three dogs and no kids and I wouldn't have it any other way. However, if one of my dogs ever growled at a toddler she would never be unrestrained around kids again. You must separate your dog from your child.

I've seen old dogs who became blind and deaf a long time before their owners realized it. They can get around amazingly well on familiar turf, but react aggressively to encounters like the ones you are describing.

For those who are suggesting re-homing the dog, that is a good theory that suffers a bit in practice. I work with dog rescue groups, and finding a home for a young healthy non aggressive dog is hard enough. Finding someone to take in an old dog who has shown aggression towards a human may well nigh be impossible. The best idea may be to crate the dog, or otherwise restrain her, while the kid is moving about the house.

Last edited by Contrapuntal; 01-29-2009 at 08:53 AM.
#29
Old 01-29-2009, 08:54 AM
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animal people versus non

Animal people think of their animals as people.

The non do not.

To animal people, there is never (or almost never) a time when it is acceptable to say "It's just an animal!".

This is not negotiable.

Sure, the non types might have pets, be fond of them, enjoy them, treat them well, and never hurt them. But to them, it's still just an animal.

If you're an animal person, a critter lover, saying "Kill the dog before it hurts the baby!" is like saying "Kill one child to protect another". It's that simple.

The non tend to think we animal lovers are nuts. That's fine. I think the same about the non. Fair's fair.

But if anyone ever says to me, "For crying out loud, it's just an animal!", then they have failed a very important test and I will never trust them.
#30
Old 01-29-2009, 08:55 AM
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I'll join the amen chorus on the vet check. I have personal experience with a dog that developed old age aggression from a brain tumor.

Neurologic problems can cause aggression directly; chronic pain can cause it indirectly by creating a psychological overload.

Also, count me in with the 'juice the dog' crowd. Either situation I described above means the critter is terminally ill. If the dog mauls the toddler, it'll get the needle anyway, plus you'll get a criminal conviction for endangering the kid.
#31
Old 01-29-2009, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Contrapuntal View Post
I am as big of a dog lover as you will find around here. I have three dogs and no kids and I wouldn't have it any other way. However, if one of my dogs ever growled at a toddler she would never be unrestrained around kids again. You must separate your dog from your child.
See, now you're talking sense. I never said "no, let the dog eat the child, it's the only way". I just object to people immediately rushing to "KILL THE DOG".

We're not cavemen protecting our precious young ones from a wolf in the night. There's a lot more options than just KILL KILL KILL.
#32
Old 01-29-2009, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
See, now you're talking sense. I never said "no, let the dog eat the child, it's the only way". I just object to people immediately rushing to "KILL THE DOG".

We're not cavemen protecting our precious young ones from a wolf in the night. There's a lot more options than just KILL KILL KILL.
Now? When was I not talking sense?

And to be clear, I was responding to the OP, not to you. Sorry if it seemed that way.
#33
Old 01-29-2009, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Contrapuntal View Post
Now? When was I not talking sense?

And to be clear, I was responding to the OP, not to you. Sorry if it seemed that way.
Woops, sorry, I meant that in the sense of "Here is a person who is talking sense!", not "For once, you're talking sense!"

Mea maxima culpa! Sorry.
#34
Old 01-29-2009, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
Animal people think of their animals as people.

The non do not.

To animal people, there is never (or almost never) a time when it is acceptable to say "It's just an animal!".

This is not negotiable.

Sure, the non types might have pets, be fond of them, enjoy them, treat them well, and never hurt them. But to them, it's still just an animal.

If you're an animal person, a critter lover, saying "Kill the dog before it hurts the baby!" is like saying "Kill one child to protect another". It's that simple.
This is not a difference between animal people and non-animal people. It's a difference between retarded people and non-retarded people. A dog is not a child. If you can't see that, then you need significant psychological intervention.

The dog is growling menacingly at a 10 month old child. Growling menacingly is a very short step away from attacking. A shepherd type dog attacking a 10 month has a good chance to kill the child in one bite, and will almost certainly disfigure it for life. There is no other option. The dog needs to be removed immediately. It's a danger to the child, and a child's safety is the parents' first and foremost responsibility.
#35
Old 01-29-2009, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by kambuckta View Post
What? Are you a moron? It's not a divide between 'animal people' and 'non' as you are so quick to ascribe.
Easy with the rhetoric, this isn't the Pit. Personal insults are against the rules of IMHO.
#36
Old 01-29-2009, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by treis View Post
The dog is growling menacingly at a 10 month old child. Growling menacingly is a very short step away from attacking. A shepherd type dog attacking a 10 month has a good chance to kill the child in one bite, and will almost certainly disfigure it for life. There is no other option. The dog needs to be removed immediately. It's a danger to the child, and a child's safety is the parents' first and foremost responsibility.
Remove? Certainly. The issue is not "do something or do nothing".

It's whether or not killing the animal is the only solution. I say it is not.
#37
Old 01-29-2009, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
Remove? Certainly. The issue is not "do something or do nothing".

It's whether or not killing the animal is the only solution. I say it is not.
Realistically euthanasia is the only option. No one is going to take a 12 year old dog that is showing signs of being people aggressive. And that can not be used as an excuse to keep the dog in the house. Supervision and separation are fundamentally flawed ideas, and shouldn't be risked. The dog needs to be removed this minute, and likely the only option is to take it to the pound where it will be euthanized.
#38
Old 01-29-2009, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by treis View Post
Realistically euthanasia is the only option. No one is going to take a 12 year old dog that is showing signs of being people aggressive. And that can not be used as an excuse to keep the dog in the house. Supervision and separation are fundamentally flawed ideas, and shouldn't be risked. The dog needs to be removed this minute, and likely the only option is to take it to the pound where it will be euthanized.
The dog could be kept outside, in a separate, childproofed enclosure.

It need not be killed.

Even taking it to the pound might work. So far, it's only been aggressive toward one human being. It might be that the dog would be fine in a different environment.

But no, everyone leaps up to say "KILL THE DOG!".
#39
Old 01-29-2009, 11:10 AM
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Don't you people ever watch The Dog Whisperer?

I've read the OP and skimmed the thread, I didn't see anybody mention that the dog needs a little training here. Sounds to me like the dog has taken over. If the dog considers herself the leader of the pack, she'll growl at and bite anybody she damn well pleases.

And it doesn't matter that she's 12. She can be re-trained to be a follower and not a leader. The dog just needs to learn to be submissive.

I don't see this situation as an automatic "get rid of the mutt" deal. If the training is too much to handle -- and I see how it might be what with dealing with an infant, etc. -- or if there's some physical condition (as others have surmised) that's irreversibly causing her to be this way ... then consider giving her away.
#40
Old 01-29-2009, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Jack Batty View Post
Don't you people ever watch The Dog Whisperer?

I've read the OP and skimmed the thread, I didn't see anybody mention that the dog needs a little training here. Sounds to me like the dog has taken over. If the dog considers herself the leader of the pack, she'll growl at and bite anybody she damn well pleases.

And it doesn't matter that she's 12. She can be re-trained to be a follower and not a leader. The dog just needs to learn to be submissive.

I don't see this situation as an automatic "get rid of the mutt" deal. If the training is too much to handle -- and I see how it might be what with dealing with an infant, etc. -- or if there's some physical condition (as others have surmised) that's irreversibly causing her to be this way ... then consider giving her away.
Thank you! Another voice of restraint amidst the blood and thunder.
#41
Old 01-29-2009, 11:28 AM
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On the other hand, I do have a fine recipie for Shitzu Bolagnese.





I kid ... I kid.
#42
Old 01-29-2009, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by MichaelJohnBertrand View Post
The dog could be kept outside, in a separate, childproofed enclosure.

It need not be killed.

Even taking it to the pound might work. So far, it's only been aggressive toward one human being. It might be that the dog would be fine in a different environment.

But no, everyone leaps up to say "KILL THE DOG!".
One person said euthanize the dog.

It's an impractical suggestion to keep the dog separated. A ten month old isn't very mobile, but an 18 month year old is. It's unlikely that you can keep the two apart with a 100% success rate. What's even worse, is that if the child gets into the dog's area, now the child is invading the dog's territory, which increases the likelihood of an attack.
#43
Old 01-29-2009, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by treis View Post
One person said euthanize the dog.
Actually, no. One person said it and a lot of people agreed with it.


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It's an impractical suggestion to keep the dog separated. A ten month old isn't very mobile, but an 18 month year old is. It's unlikely that you can keep the two apart with a 100% success rate. What's even worse, is that if the child gets into the dog's area, now the child is invading the dog's territory, which increases the likelihood of an attack.
I think it's a fairly simple thing to keep a child out of a dog's enclosure. A tall fence without handholds, a latch too complex and/or requiring too much strength for little hands to manipulate. Simple.
#44
Old 01-29-2009, 11:40 AM
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Actually, no. One person said it and a lot of people agreed with it.
No. One person said that every other person agreed it needs to go.
#45
Old 01-29-2009, 11:44 AM
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I think it's a fairly simple thing to keep a child out of a dog's enclosure. A tall fence without handholds, a latch too complex and/or requiring too much strength for little hands to manipulate. Simple.
This requires a pre-existing dog enclosure. If there isn't one, waiting for one to be built is unacceptable. The dog needs to be out of the house immediately.
#46
Old 01-29-2009, 11:47 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treis View Post
It's an impractical suggestion to keep the dog separated. <snip>
That's a personal judgement call. I know a lot of people who manage all kinds of behavioral issues (including aggression) successfully using a number of methods and means. There are a lot of options in between the extremes of euthanasia and don't change a thing.
#47
Old 01-29-2009, 11:49 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland of the NW
Posts: 1,656
Well took her to the vet early this morning and the poor thing has a nasty ear infection. I feel horrible that I didn't notice it more so because I don't really have an excuse for it. But she's got some meds and I'm going to get her to the groomer asap to help with those mats. I really hope this is going to help the situation because my family is really pressuring me to get rid of her.

Right now she's kept away from the baby when she's out and about. I gave her a bone to keep her happy and make sure she doesn't think she's in trouble or anything. It's hard on her though since she's always at my feet no matter what. That's also an issue with the 'rehome' option should it come to that. This dog is the absolute most clingy, attached dog I've ever seen. When I leave the house to run errands, she sits by the window for me and never moves. Hell, I can't even take a vacation or anything without her because she becomes so depressed she stops eating and drinking. So I'm afraid that rehoming her would be inhumane for her. But I'm not going to think about it right now. I'm going to work on the ear and such and see how things go.
#48
Old 01-29-2009, 11:50 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by treis View Post
This requires a pre-existing dog enclosure. If there isn't one, waiting for one to be built is unacceptable. The dog needs to be out of the house immediately.
Again, the issues is not "Do something" versus "do nothing".

It's "Kill the dog" versus "not kill the dog".

I agree, something has to be done. Just, not necessarily euthanasia.

Finding someplace to put the dog for the time it takes to put up some fencing does not seem like an insurmountable logistics problem to me.
#49
Old 01-29-2009, 11:53 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelSoft View Post
Well took her to the vet early this morning and the poor thing has a nasty ear infection. I feel horrible that I didn't notice it more so because I don't really have an excuse for it. But she's got some meds and I'm going to get her to the groomer asap to help with those mats. I really hope this is going to help the situation because my family is really pressuring me to get rid of her.

Right now she's kept away from the baby when she's out and about. I gave her a bone to keep her happy and make sure she doesn't think she's in trouble or anything. It's hard on her though since she's always at my feet no matter what. That's also an issue with the 'rehome' option should it come to that. This dog is the absolute most clingy, attached dog I've ever seen. When I leave the house to run errands, she sits by the window for me and never moves. Hell, I can't even take a vacation or anything without her because she becomes so depressed she stops eating and drinking. So I'm afraid that rehoming her would be inhumane for her. But I'm not going to think about it right now. I'm going to work on the ear and such and see how things go.
Oh, I am so glad you kept us informed!

I bet the ear infection is the problem. Don't feel too bad about not noticing it... pets can't tell us when they are sick, and it's easy to miss things.

I hope the medication fixes her right up and she can go back to being the sweet dog you've known for all these years.
#50
Old 01-29-2009, 12:19 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: The Astral Plane.
Posts: 14,317
AngelSoft, the more I read the more I stand by the training idea. Your update sounds like it would make a perfect lead-in for an episode of The Dog Whisperer. I don't mean to flog this show as though I had stock in it, but Cesar Milan really does seem to know his shit.

The first thing that struck me is when you said:

Quote:
I gave her a bone to keep her happy and make sure she doesn't think she's in trouble or anything.
The thing is ... she is in trouble. You do not want her to act aggressively, or be clingy, or go through seperation anxiety ... and yet you reward her for doing precisely those things. I'm not trying to cast blame on you -- I do hope you understand that -- but I think your situation could be fixed well with some training. One thing you really have to buy into is that your dog is a dog -- and treating her as a dog will make her happy. You can't reason with her and hope she isn't mad at you for being a meanie. She doesn't understand that.

What she seems to understand right now is that you are hers and everything else is either a bother or an enemy and since she is in charge that's the way it's going to be ... unless you as pack leader change that.

I hope this makes sense and you don't take it as a denigration or condemnation or anything.
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