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#1
Old 03-26-2009, 05:12 PM
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What is the longest one syllable word?

How many syllables in the word squirrelled?
#2
Old 03-26-2009, 05:19 PM
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I've thought it's "strengths" but I could be wrong.

I say "squirreled" as two syllables: skwuhr-uld. But I hear skwuh-ruld, too. Even skwi-ruld or skwir-uld. But I guess it might be slurred to skwurld or skwirld to sound like one syllable. But I've also heard some pretty fucked up ways of saying it where the kw sound is after the r sound.
#3
Old 03-26-2009, 05:31 PM
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Noooooooooooooooooooooooo!
#4
Old 03-26-2009, 05:32 PM
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Smiles.

It's two ss with a mile between them.
#5
Old 03-26-2009, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by King Solomon Hill View Post
I have to say Khaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan! beats that.
#6
Old 03-26-2009, 05:38 PM
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A Collection of Word Oddities and Trivia, Page 4

SCRAUNCHED (10 letters) and SCROONCHED (plus several others from the OED 2)

Also MWCD10 shows a one-syllable pronunciation of squirrel which presumably would apply to the 11-letter squirrelled.

MWCD10 = Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, Tenth Edition
OED2 = the Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition
#7
Old 03-26-2009, 06:08 PM
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The French word for smurfs is schtroumpfs (11 letters).

I wonder what is the longest one syllable word in any language.
#8
Old 03-26-2009, 06:12 PM
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Are we looking at how many letters it has or how long it takes to say? I don't know the answer either way, but same letter length words can take longer to say than other words of the same length so it could lead to an entirely different answer (albeit a rather complicated one what with dialects and such).
#9
Old 03-26-2009, 06:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnold Winkelried View Post
SCRAUNCHED (10 letters) and SCROONCHED
Both of which suffer from being well outside normal usage and thus appearing highly contrived. Neither "straights" nor "strengths" has this defect.

Last edited by Xema; 03-26-2009 at 06:31 PM.
#10
Old 03-26-2009, 08:09 PM
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"Stretched" has the same length as "strengths". Both are standard English.
#11
Old 03-26-2009, 08:22 PM
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AskOxford:
Quote:
The one most commonly cited is screeched (nine letters). However, one ought to mention also scratched, scrounged, scrunched, stretched, and the plural nouns straights and strengths (all with nine letters).

The complete Oxford English Dictionary also indicates the existence of scraughed, scrinched, scritched, scrooched, sprainged, spreathed, throughed, and thrutched.

The OED also cites a single instance of the ten-letter word scraunched, from the 1620 English translation of Don Quixote.
#12
Old 03-26-2009, 09:08 PM
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Worchestershire.

#13
Old 03-26-2009, 09:26 PM
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Duuuuuuuuuuuuuuude.
#14
Old 03-26-2009, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chez Guevara View Post
The French word for smurfs is schtroumpfs (11 letters).

I wonder what is the longest one syllable word in any language.
French doesn't count; they always stop pronouncing after the first 5 letters.
#15
Old 03-26-2009, 10:54 PM
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This page suggests another borderline eleven-letter contender, broughammed (transported by brougham, akin to "trucked", "carted", etc.)
#16
Old 03-27-2009, 12:11 AM
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"Time" goes on forever.
#17
Old 03-27-2009, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
Smiles.

It's two ss with a mile between them.
Taut

An AU (Astronomical Unit =~ 93 million miles) between the Ts
#18
Old 03-27-2009, 04:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Sternvogel View Post
This page suggests another borderline eleven-letter contender, broughammed (transported by brougham, akin to "trucked", "carted", etc.)
This is my favorite - mostly because it looks like it should be prononced with two or three syllables.
#19
Old 03-27-2009, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by dtilque View Post
Taut

An AU (Astronomical Unit =~ 93 million miles) between the Ts
My hat's off to you.
#20
Old 03-27-2009, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Reply View Post
I have to say Khaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan! beats that.
What is that scene about? (I've never seen the movie.) Spoiler it if you must.
#21
Old 03-27-2009, 07:00 PM
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Gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooal
#22
Old 03-31-2009, 01:18 PM
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Thanks for the help. Worcestershire is my fave!
The dictionaries I have checked always have the word squirrel with two syllables. But why not girl and curl, etc? AND, by virtue, of the suffix -led, does it get drawn into a single syllable?

Why would MWCD10 have it as a single syllable? Is it a typo?
#23
Old 03-31-2009, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Ronald C. Semone View Post
Gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooal
No a.
#24
Old 03-31-2009, 01:30 PM
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My last name has 7 letters, five vowels, and one syllable.

And yet I'm not ruler of the world.
#25
Old 03-31-2009, 01:57 PM
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What is that scene about? (I've never seen the movie.) Spoiler it if you must.
Short version, Khan has just done something very unpleasant to Kirk, and Kirk is upset with him. Which is really all you need to know about the scene.
#26
Old 03-31-2009, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duggie99 View Post
But why not girl and curl, etc?
FWIW, Garrison Keillor pronounces bowl as two syllables. Drives me nuts.
#27
Old 03-31-2009, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
duggie99
Thanks for the help. Worcestershire is my fave!
But "Worcestershire" is never a one syllable word. Indeed, in its primary use as the name of the English county it has three syllables: wuh-ster-sheer.

Presumably iamthewalrus(:3= was making a little joke based upon the odd fact that in England, where the stuff originated (and Wikipedia tells me, in South Africa and "parts of" the U.S.), when the word is used to name the well known sauce, the "shire" inexplicably becomes silent. However, even then the word has two syllables: wuh-ster, or perhaps wuh-stuh. This is pronounced the same as the county town of Worcestershire, Worcester, where the stuff actually originated (and is still made).

It is also pronounced the same as the last name of Bertie Wooster.

My American (Californian) wife insists on saying Wuh-ster-shyuh sauce, though. Of course, Wuh-ster-sheer is one of the shire (pronounced shyuh) counties, and the hobbits also live in the Shire (shyuh), but I guess that is a whole different can of worms. Where are these fabled parts of the U.S, where people know how to pronounce "Worcestershire sauce" right?
#28
Old 03-31-2009, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duggie99 View Post
Thanks for the help. Worcestershire is my fave!
I'm really not sure how much of this post is a joke. But Worcestershire has three syllables.


Quote:
The dictionaries I have checked always have the word squirrel with two syllables. But why not girl and curl, etc?
Again, not sure if I'm being whooshed, but girl and curl have only one vowel sound, hence only one syllable. Squirrel has two distinct vowel sounds, hence two syllables.

I appreciate that in some US accents it is (mis)pronounced as a single syllable, but if that sort of regionalism is allowable then we're opening the door to Australians (strines with regional mispronunciation) forecastles (foxls with regional mispronunciation) and a million other 11 letter "single syllable" words produced by lazy pronunciation.


Quote:
Why would MWCD10 have it as a single syllable? Is it a typo?
Because there are regional pronunciations, mispronunciations as far as I can see, that produce a single syllable, But if we allow regionalisms of this kind then we're going to get all sorts of oddities in the list that have no reflection at all on the actual structure of the word.
#29
Old 11-20-2010, 07:44 AM
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Squirrelled

The word squirrel rhymes perfectly with the single syllable words "girl", "swirl" and "pearl". I respectfully submit that the word squirrel therefore, has only one syllable.

The word Squirrelled rhymes perfectly with the single syllable words "world", "whirled", "curled"and "hurled". I respectfully submit that the word squirrelled therefore, has only one syllable.
#30
Old 11-20-2010, 07:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rasmus11 View Post
The word squirrel rhymes perfectly with the single syllable words "girl", "swirl" and "pearl". I respectfully submit that the word squirrel therefore, has only one syllable.

The word Squirrelled rhymes perfectly with the single syllable words "world", "whirled", "curled"and "hurled". I respectfully submit that the word squirrelled therefore, has only one syllable.
In your world, perhaps. Over here (where we invented the damn language ) it has two syllables, and rhymes with "Wirral".

Squirl? Is that really the proper American pronunciation?
#31
Old 11-20-2010, 08:34 AM
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SKWI-rəl
#32
Old 11-20-2010, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by NurseCarmen View Post
Duuuuuuuuuuuuuuude.
The nice thing about Duuuuuuuuuuuude is that the more pot you smoke, the longer the word gets.
#33
Old 11-20-2010, 08:55 AM
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'Featherstoneshaugh' this word is actually pronounced 'Fanshaw' - thats two syllables of course, but I have to mention it because it is so silly.

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/ec...advice/twain1/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley...ehaugh_Ukridge
#34
Old 11-20-2010, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duggie99 View Post
How many syllables in the word squirrelled?
Two.

Squi-rrelled.
#35
Old 11-20-2010, 09:37 AM
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Can I propose "Featherstonehaugh's Law"*, which states that any thread on unusual pronunciations will include a mention of said surname before the end of Page 1?


Edit: * or should that be "Featherstonehaugh's Laugh"?

Last edited by Colophon; 11-20-2010 at 09:38 AM.
#36
Old 11-20-2010, 10:02 AM
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Regarding "squirrel" and "girl" similarities: I think they rhyme phonologically. However, "squirrel" has the extra vowel to show a syllabic division. To my ears, it would not sound any differently if it were spelled 'squirl.' I don't have a strong enough linguistic background to articulate it, but there's something about that "dark l" that approximates an extra syllable, but it would look really ridiculous to see a dictionary dividing "girl" into "gir-l." So, my opinion: "squirrel" has two syllables and "girl" has one by convention. YMMV.
#37
Old 11-20-2010, 11:03 AM
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Smiles.


Becasue there is a mile betw, .....Oh you heard it already?
#38
Old 11-20-2010, 11:20 AM
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n/m

Last edited by pulykamell; 11-20-2010 at 11:20 AM. Reason: Point already made.
#39
Old 11-20-2010, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Lanzy View Post
Smiles.


Becasue there is a mile betw, .....Oh you heard it already?
Slightyears.
#40
Old 11-20-2010, 11:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chez Guevara View Post

I wonder what is the longest one syllable word in any language.
Depending how you define language SCRAUNCHED in ASCII Binary is
01010011010000110101001001000001010101010100111001000011010010000100010101000100
#41
Old 11-20-2010, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by jjimm View Post
Slightyears.
Sparsecs.
#42
Old 11-20-2010, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Rasmus11 View Post
The word squirrel rhymes perfectly with the single syllable words "girl", "swirl" and "pearl".
Only if you're from somewhere where people eat them regularly.
#43
Old 11-20-2010, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by friedo View Post
Only if you're from somewhere where people eat them regularly.
Nah, "squirrel" and "girl" rhyme in my dialect, too. It's debatable whether you want to consider those words one or two syllables, though.
#44
Old 11-20-2010, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Squirl? Is that really the proper American pronunciation?
No. It's squi-rel. Two syllables.
#45
Old 11-20-2010, 03:34 PM
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Nah, "squirrel" and "girl" rhyme in my dialect, too.
Do you regularly eat girls?
#46
Old 11-20-2010, 04:01 PM
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Hell some people pronounce girl "girdle".
#47
Old 11-20-2010, 04:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Can I propose "Featherstonehaugh's Law"*, which states that any thread on unusual pronunciations will include a mention of said surname before the end of Page 1?


Edit: * or should that be "Featherstonehaugh's Laugh"?
Or you could call it the Cholmondeley* dictolmonde.

* "Chumley"
#48
Old 11-20-2010, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
In your world, perhaps. Over here (where we invented the damn language ) it has two syllables, and rhymes with "Wirral".

Squirl? Is that really the proper American pronunciation?
Well, sort of. The [ɫ] is so short, it can be heard as a triphthong (with the [] being a dipthong of [ɜ] and [ɹ]). The thing is, [ɹ] and [l] go so poorly together, that you hear the same triphthong/extra syllable in words like girl.

In other words, both would be transliterated as ending with [ɝɫ]. Whether you count the [ɫ] as separate syllable is your choice.

Last edited by BigT; 11-20-2010 at 04:45 PM.
#49
Old 11-20-2010, 05:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Malacandra View Post
Sparsecs.
Isn't that what Swedish people have in the sauna?
#50
Old 11-20-2010, 06:29 PM
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I seem to recall a swing era dance called the Skrountch. If one had the opportunity to do it, one could be said to have Skrountched (11 letters).
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