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#51
Old 09-16-2009, 12:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorgon Heap View Post
All I'm saying is for toothless waterfowl, ducks sure have a reputation for being mean bastards.
Yeah, it seems that way. I like ducks, I don't think they're mean. Geese on the other hand.....
#52
Old 09-16-2009, 12:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Claire Beauchamp View Post
I said something to my boss's boss (formerly my direct boss) the other day that lately work was like being "bit to death by ducks." She's a very smart person, older than me, and had never heard it before.
I know this is egotistical, but: If I haven't ever heard of your phrase, it is not in any common usage in American English.

I used to break apart the Summer Reading Goals for kids. I have read more books than I can count. I have watched probably 300 hours of British TV. I am considered a local Answer Man.

I have never heard of your phrase.
#53
Old 09-16-2009, 12:46 AM
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'Flat battery', which just cropped up in another thread. I assume it's a British-English vs. American-English idiom. Incidentally how is it expressed in the USoA?
#54
Old 09-16-2009, 01:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Captain_Awesome View Post
'Flat battery', which just cropped up in another thread. I assume it's a British-English vs. American-English idiom. Incidentally how is it expressed in the USoA?
Dead battery, since it is dead and not live or shorter than it was, or less bumpy. . .
#55
Old 09-16-2009, 01:36 AM
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"I don't have a dog in this fight".

I thought it was a phrase everyone knew, until I used it at a party (in the City) and no one knew what I meant. Once I explained it, they were all delighted by my quaint country turn-of-phrase.

I still think I must have been in a room full of halfwits. Everyone's heard "I don't have a dog in this fight", right? It's not even an Aussie expression! It's travelled internationally to get here, I hardly think it bypassed the metro areas and only caught on in these rural parts.
#56
Old 09-16-2009, 02:01 AM
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I'd never heard 'I don't have a dog in this fight' until I came to the SDMB. No one I know in real life uses it. Except me.

There are a few expressions I've read here than I wasn't able to quite figure out. If only I could remember what they were, this'd be the ideal thread to have my ignorance fought.
#57
Old 09-16-2009, 02:27 AM
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I have used two expressions the last couple of weeks that have been met with puzzlement: "Stickybeak" and "Long in the tooth"

Are these really such obscure phrases?
#58
Old 09-16-2009, 07:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardinal View Post
I know this is egotistical, but: If I haven't ever heard of your phrase, it is not in any common usage in American English.

I used to break apart the Summer Reading Goals for kids. I have read more books than I can count. I have watched probably 300 hours of British TV. I am considered a local Answer Man.

I have never heard of your phrase.
Re: 'being bitten/pecked/nibbled to death by ducks." I've heard this phrase for years. I don't know how common it is, but people use it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cazzle View Post
"I don't have a dog in this fight".

I thought it was a phrase everyone knew, until I used it at a party (in the City) and no one knew what I meant. Once I explained it, they were all delighted by my quaint country turn-of-phrase.

I still think I must have been in a room full of halfwits. Everyone's heard "I don't have a dog in this fight", right? It's not even an Aussie expression! It's travelled internationally to get here, I hardly think it bypassed the metro areas and only caught on in these rural parts.
I'm in the US, and I've heard this phrase for years and years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake View Post
I have used two expressions the last couple of weeks that have been met with puzzlement: "Stickybeak" and "Long in the tooth"

Are these really such obscure phrases?
I wouldn't say "long in the tooth" is obscure. I've heard it and read it in books.
#59
Old 09-16-2009, 08:03 AM
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I always thought "The bee's knees" was how a hep cat might pronounce "the business," e.g. "That song's the business!" would become "That crazy tune is the bee's knees!"
#60
Old 09-16-2009, 08:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cardinal View Post
I know this is egotistical, but: If I haven't ever heard of your phrase, it is not in any common usage in American English.

I used to break apart the Summer Reading Goals for kids. I have read more books than I can count. I have watched probably 300 hours of British TV. I am considered a local Answer Man.

I have never heard of your phrase.
My neighbor bought a little plaque that says "being a mom is like being pecked to death by ducks". Christmas tree shops- doesn't much more middle America than that!
#61
Old 09-16-2009, 08:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cazzle View Post
"I don't have a dog in this fight".

I thought it was a phrase everyone knew, until I used it at a party (in the City) and no one knew what I meant. Once I explained it, they were all delighted by my quaint country turn-of-phrase.

I still think I must have been in a room full of halfwits. Everyone's heard "I don't have a dog in this fight", right? It's not even an Aussie expression! It's travelled internationally to get here, I hardly think it bypassed the metro areas and only caught on in these rural parts.
I'm well aware of the expression and its variation, "I don't have a dog in this hunt". I'm pretty sure it's an English term originally.

What's interesting is that Australian English employs a bit of Cockney Rhyming Slang which can often confuse people, too. The ones I hear the most often are "Dog & Bone" (Telephone) and "Trouble & Strife" (Wife), but there's a few others that pop up from time to time that are fairly easy to work out from context (or an understanding of how CRS works), but they still seem to baffle a lot of younger people.

I've also been known to use "Tally Ho!" too, but I've also been accused of being born in the wrong century several times so that's probably to be expected.
#62
Old 09-16-2009, 08:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don't ask View Post
Years ago someone used the, I presume Aussie, phrase "black catter" to describe someone. I had never heard it, even though he assumed it was in common use, but because the explanation was so perfect I started using it. I don't think I have ever used it when anyone has known what it means.

The meaning: he's the kind of guy that if you have a big house his house is bigger; if you have a fast car his car is faster; if you have a black cat.....
Australian here also. Never heard this one.
#63
Old 09-16-2009, 08:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake View Post
I have used two expressions the last couple of weeks that have been met with puzzlement: "Stickybeak" and "Long in the tooth"

Are these really such obscure phrases?
I've only ever heard 'stickybeak' on Monty Python. 'Long in the tooth' is an old standard.
#64
Old 09-16-2009, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
I always thought "The bee's knees" was how a hep cat might pronounce "the business," e.g. "That song's the business!" would become "That crazy tune is the bee's knees!"
It's much more likely a reference/comparison to dancer, Bee Jackson's legs/knees.
#65
Old 09-16-2009, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake View Post
I have used two expressions the last couple of weeks that have been met with puzzlement: "Stickybeak" and "Long in the tooth"

Are these really such obscure phrases?
I'd call "long in the tooth" downright common. I've heard it all my life, and even know the etymology.

"Stickybeak," on the other hand, is a new one to me. What does it mean?
#66
Old 09-16-2009, 03:16 PM
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I get strange looks when asked "How ya doin'?" and I reply either "Peachy" or "Just ducky".

I also tend to use a lot of jive slang from the 40's. Cab Calloway's autobiography had a copy of his "Hepster's Dictionary" in the back and I took it to heart. I still can't take any one named Jeff seriously. That used to be a term for an unhip person.
#67
Old 09-16-2009, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martini Enfield View Post
I'm well aware of the expression and its variation, "I don't have a dog in this hunt". I'm pretty sure it's an English term originally.
I've never heard "I don't have a dog in this hunt" but I've heard, "That dog won't hunt" as in, "Your idea is ridiculous" or "That will never work" or "Ain't no freakin' way."
#68
Old 09-16-2009, 06:59 PM
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My first girlfriend, back in high school circa 1992, used to sit there quietly on our dates. It was like trying to have a conversation with the wind. One day, I said, "Every time we go out and you sit there, not giving a rat's ass." She responded, "That doesn't even make any sense!" I explained that "to give a rat's ass" means "to care," or "to give a shit," as it were.
#69
Old 09-16-2009, 07:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiblioCat View Post
I've always heard it as 'nibbled to death by ducks.'
AH-HA!

Now that one I have heard!
#70
Old 09-16-2009, 08:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InvisibleWombat View Post
"Stickybeak," on the other hand, is a new one to me. What does it mean?
It means to be curious or inquisitive. From the Macquarie Dictionary:
Quote:
verb (i) 1. to pry; meddle.
ľnoun 2. someone who pries.
3. an inquisitive inspection: have a bit of a stickybeak. [from the phrase stick one's beak in]
The shortened form "to have a sticky" is also common in Australia e.g. I had a sticky at that new building yesterday as I walked past.
#71
Old 09-16-2009, 08:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
Until a few months ago, I would have thought more people would know what "teabagging" is.
I had never heard the phrase until John Waters came to the university where I teach and used it a few times in his Q&A session. My friend and I, both around 50 y.o., rushed home afterwards to google it and were--well, not surprised that it was racy, because Waters had used it in the kind of context you'd expect--but surprised that neither of us had heard of it before, since we're readers and voracious Internet surfers.
#72
Old 09-16-2009, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorgon Heap View Post
All I'm saying is for toothless waterfowl, ducks sure have a reputation for being mean bastards.
Speaking of ducks, I was in a business meeting once and an older gentleman repeated over and over that he really wanted to accomplish a lot at the meeting because getting everyone together was "like making duck soup". Actually, I have no idea if that's what he said. He may have said that getting us together was "not like making duck soup". It could have gone either way and made as much sense to me.

His point was that it was hard to get us together but as far as I remember he may have said getting us together is "like making duck soup, because duck soup is incredibly hard to make" or getting us together is "not like making duck soup, because duck soup is a great example of something easy to do". I have no idea.

Has anyone ever heard the expression? Is duck soup easy to make or hard to make?
#73
Old 09-16-2009, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzzy Dunlop View Post
....because getting everyone together was "like making duck soup".

Has anyone ever heard the expression? Is duck soup easy to make or hard to make?
Never heard that one, but I've heard "getting all your ducks in a row."
#74
Old 09-16-2009, 09:16 PM
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"Duck soup" was once a common enough expression that it became the title of a Laurel and Hardy short film and a much more famous Marx Brothers feature. It means "piece of cake."

ETA: I admit I had to look up the meaning. But I knew it was once a common expression!

Last edited by TWDuke; 09-16-2009 at 09:17 PM.
#75
Old 09-16-2009, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiblioCat View Post
I've never heard "I don't have a dog in this hunt" but I've heard, "That dog won't hunt" as in, "Your idea is ridiculous" or "That will never work" or "Ain't no freakin' way."
Just yesterday, Michel Martin of NPR's "Tell Me More," made great use of "That dog won't hunt," in her weekly commentary about Joe Wilson's outburst during the President's speech.

http://npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=112810126

Quote:
Some conservatives argue Democrats did the same thing during President Bush's term, but that dog won't hunt. While it is true that booing and cheering are now and have always been heard in the House chamber, no one can point to a Democrat who, during a public address, verbally attacked or personally vilified President Bush during a public occasion despite intense disagreement over his policies, especially on national defense.
I had to bring it up because I just love what she said.

On another note, I like to use, "For the love of Pete," and often get weird looks about it. I think it's funny and I plan to keep using it when appropriate.
#76
Old 09-16-2009, 10:12 PM
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Born and raised in the midwest, I had never heard of any dogs unwilling to hunt nor any dogs in fights until my new supervisor was a transfer from S. Carolina. He had all kinds of these quaint phrases that only sound good with a suth'n drawl.
#77
Old 09-17-2009, 12:30 AM
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So, have "we" heard "That dog won't hunt"?

I'm really wondering, considering the usage of phrases a very well read person has never heard.
#78
Old 09-17-2009, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heckity View Post
My youngest son was blessed with abundantly curly hair. He also went through a phase of dyeing said locks in outrageous (unnatural) colours. Apparently one of his grade 7 buddies called him a sno-cone. My suggested response, "Well I may be a sno-cone, but I can lick you".

It was perfectly acceptable back in the forties. Clearly not so advisable in the school yard now.

It doesn't take much to move it to today's times. "You think I'm a sno-cone... why don't you just lick me."
#79
Old 09-17-2009, 12:37 PM
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Oh! I'd heard of and I think even seen the Marx Brothers' "Duck Soup" film, but just thought it was nonsense. Nice to know it actually was a phrase.
#80
Old 09-17-2009, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake View Post
I have used two expressions the last couple of weeks that have been met with puzzlement: "Stickybeak" and "Long in the tooth"

Are these really such obscure phrases?
Is a "stickybeak" anything like a "nosy parker"?
#81
Old 09-17-2009, 01:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TWDuke View Post
"Duck soup" was once a common enough expression that it became the title of a Laurel and Hardy short film and a much more famous Marx Brothers feature. It means "piece of cake."

ETA: I admit I had to look up the meaning. But I knew it was once a common expression!
While living in Ohio, I heard "that's sheer fruit" used in the same way as "that's a piece of cake."

That's also where I heard "too wet to plow" and "can't dance" - phrases said with a shrug in response to a suggestion to do something and meaning something like "I'm not really enthusiastic about your suggestion, but I don't have anything better to do so I might as well go along."
#82
Old 09-17-2009, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stretch View Post
I am trying to bring back "Oh my stars and garters!" ... Won't someone jump on my bandwagon with me?
My 22-year-old daughter uses "Oh my stars and garters". In high school, she went through a phase where she would say things like, "Holy Crap! For the love of Pete! Sweet mother-of-pearl!"

Poor kid didn't have very many friends.
#83
Old 09-17-2009, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by BiblioCat View Post
Never heard that one, but I've heard "getting all your ducks in a row."
Ha! I'm much more likely to use "aligning my waterfowl" after hearing a coworker use it years ago. Not having your ducks in a row would be a "waterfowl alignment issue."

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobArrgh View Post
My 22-year-old daughter uses "Oh my stars and garters". In high school, she went through a phase where she would say things like, "Holy Crap! For the love of Pete! Sweet mother-of-pearl!"

Poor kid didn't have very many friends.
I use "egad" more than anyone I know. I'm also quite fond of "crimeny."
#84
Old 09-17-2009, 06:13 PM
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Neither one of my sons (early thirties) knew what the hell I was talking about when I asked them "Are you a turtle?". I always thought that was a universal inside joke that transcended all generational lines.

Last edited by Peanuthead; 09-17-2009 at 06:15 PM. Reason: YBYSAIA
#85
Old 09-17-2009, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by picunurse View Post
Is a "stickybeak" anything like a "nosy parker"?
See post #70.
#86
Old 09-17-2009, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by BobArrgh View Post
My 22-year-old daughter uses "Oh my stars and garters".
"Oh my sainted aunt!".

No idea where I first heard that.
#87
Old 09-17-2009, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Peanuthead View Post
Neither one of my sons (early thirties) knew what the hell I was talking about when I asked them "Are you a turtle?". I always thought that was a universal inside joke that transcended all generational lines.
You bet your sweet ass I am
#88
Old 09-17-2009, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by picunurse View Post
Is a "stickybeak" anything like a "nosy parker"?
I've heard both 'Nosy Parker' and 'Nosy Nellie.'

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingspades View Post
Ha! I'm much more likely to use "aligning my waterfowl" after hearing a coworker use it years ago. Not having your ducks in a row would be a "waterfowl alignment issue."
I like that!
#89
Old 09-17-2009, 08:40 PM
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Originally Posted by picunurse View Post
Is a "stickybeak" anything like a "nosy parker"?
Can be. Someone described with one could be described with the other -- although I'd suggest (NZ older usaged at least) that Nosy Parker is slightly more pejorative. "Take a stickybeak" or "have a nosy" would have similar meanings and not be pejorative -- if only because one could be describing ones self. (BTW, haven't heard it shortened to "sticky" in NZ -- must be that fast-paced Oz lifestyle).

I hadn't heard "honest to Pete" -- but would have guessed its meaning as a bowdlerized oath.

"Black catter" is new to me.
#90
Old 09-17-2009, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by doreen View Post
You bet your sweet ass I am
Given the thread title, how about, "You bet your sweet bippy I am"?
#91
Old 09-17-2009, 09:49 PM
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Until recently I was not aware of the phrase "to get one's goat" -- how it completely bypassed me, I don't know. The first time I heard it, in context of "He really gets your goat, doesn't he?", I was somewhat confused and the only thing that came to mind was "... Mr. Handlebars?"

A friend of mine, a graduate student, somehow lived her entire life without encountering the phrase "gives me pause". She refused to believe me this was not something I just made up until we looked it up.

Another friend was astonished by the phrase "picking the low-hanging fruit" -- and found it somewhat obscene. How do you get to adulthood without hearing "low hanging fruit" at least once?

Last edited by groman; 09-17-2009 at 09:51 PM.
#92
Old 09-17-2009, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by groman View Post
How do you get to adulthood without hearing "low hanging fruit" at least once?
You certainly can't avoid it in some kinds of business meetings that's for sure... the same kind that are likely to feature: things in ballparks, being run up flagpoles, having their paradigms shifted, moving forward, and looking for win-wins and synergy.

*BINGO*
#93
Old 09-17-2009, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by BiblioCat View Post
I've heard both 'Nosy Parker' and 'Nosy Nellie.'
I call my wife a nosy parker all the time because it sounds funny, but the only reason I know the phrase and have heard it no where else is from 9 1/2 Weeks.
#94
Old 09-17-2009, 11:10 PM
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I've used the phrase "I told (one of my students) how the cow ate the cabbage" and gotten weird looks from other doctoral students.

I think the phrase "the straight dope" might be obscure today. I told some friends the other day that I'm a member of this message board, and about the book series, and people thought it had something to do with drug legalization.
#95
Old 09-17-2009, 11:19 PM
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Originally Posted by InvisibleWombat View Post
Given the thread title, how about, "You bet your sweet bippy I am"?
Yeah, that works for the thread. But you ain't no turtle.
#96
Old 09-18-2009, 12:37 AM
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Since moving to Texas, there are all kinds of things I saw that people just look at my like I'm crazy. To my surprise, it appears the people I socialize with have never heard of "booking it," when you need to get moving fast. Another one is a "patsy" like a fall guy, and also "hunker down," meaning to take shelter. Those are just a few of the ones I can remember off hand, but this stuff happens all the time.
#97
Old 09-18-2009, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by groman View Post
Until recently I was not aware of the phrase "to get one's goat" -- how it completely bypassed me, I don't know.
*sigh* SeptemberDay permanently has my goat. Every once in awhile she lets me see a hoof.

Quote:
Originally Posted by statsman1982 View Post
I've used the phrase "I told (one of my students) how the cow ate the cabbage" and gotten weird looks from other doctoral students.
I'm-a givin' you a weird look right now. What on earth does that one mean?
#98
Old 09-18-2009, 02:54 PM
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I'm-a givin' you a weird look right now. What on earth does that one mean?
It means to give someone a stern lecture about something, similar in meaning to "read the riot act", but less severe.

ETA: I searched for the origin of this phrase and found this, although it doesn't explain why the phrase means what it does.

Last edited by statsman1982; 09-18-2009 at 02:56 PM.
#99
Old 09-18-2009, 03:00 PM
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Whoops! Missed the edit window to add the linky: here.
#100
Old 09-18-2009, 03:05 PM
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I'm in Texas. "That dog won't hunt" is pretty commonly heard around here.

I once told a student that something wasn't a big deal to him because his "ox wasn't being gored," and he immediately told me that he didn't own any livestock. I then asked a number of students if they'd heard the phrase - none had. Only older adults. This was 1998 or so in Central Coast California.
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