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#1
Old 10-05-2009, 01:22 PM
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Most Humane Way to Get Rid of Rats?

For the past couple of weeks we have been watching rats skitter about in the porch/yard area of a church next door to us and saying, "I really wish they would deal with that rat problem before it becomes our problem." but not really doing anything because it wasn't cold enough for us to be too concerned about an infestation. Well, today it has become our concern. I am at home sick today with the head cold that will not die and all of the sudden both of my cats ran to the kitchen and started staring at the pantry and then a few moments later canned goods started falling off the shelf. I went over and moved some things around and, lo and behold, there are a few pellets back there indicating a recent creature moving in without paying a dime in rent.

I do not want to call the exterminator because it is very difficult to find a place to board the cats (and we recently had a horrible and expensive experience with that that makes us weary of doing it again) and I don't like having strange people in my home if I can help it. So far I have moved all the non-canned food into the fridge and taken out the trash. All the dishes are clean and the catfood is in airtight containers so they can't really get to it. I have laid out glue traps where the obvious rodent activity has been happening and my boyfriend is bringing home some additional glue traps and hopefully also some of the snapping traps as well for the outside of the house.

My biggest concern is that when that rat feels like it is okay to come back to the pantry and gets himself caught in that glue trap what the hell do I do with it? I don't want to leave it there trying to gnaw off his arms or something but I also am not going to club him over the head or anything either. Should I just put him in a plastic bag and hope that he suffocates quickly? And how do I prevent his little friends from following him into our place?
#2
Old 10-05-2009, 01:40 PM
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I won't address the humanity question but all the traps and cleaning in the world aren't going to help much unless you block up all of the entry points. I had roof rats and had to go through that. Depending on where you live your county government may be able to send someone over who will check around your house and point out what needs to be done (for me it was the local "vector control" lady, she's responsible for pests and health hazards of all kinds). Expect to trim back vegetation, repair vent holes (hardware cloth aka heavy wire mesh) and look for any other openings (I spent a lot of time in my attic sealing up holes with hardware cloth, plywood and expanding foam).
#3
Old 10-05-2009, 01:48 PM
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Bucket of water is faster.
#4
Old 10-05-2009, 01:57 PM
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The most humane thing to do is just to put on some old shoes, lay the rat out on a hard surface, and stomp it as hard as you can on the head. Death is instantaneous but a little gory. I have done that with lots of rats, mice, and voles caught in glue traps. Lots of people don't like the idea but it is the kindest and most rational thing to do.
#5
Old 10-05-2009, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
The most humane thing to do is just to put on some old shoes, lay the rat out on a hard surface, and stomp it as hard as you can on the head. Death is instantaneous but a little gory. I have done that with lots of rats, mice, and voles caught in glue traps. Lots of people don't like the idea but it is the kindest and most rational thing to do.


While I am sure this is very accurate I am looking for the most humane way to kill a rat that won't give me crazy nightmares for the next month.
#6
Old 10-05-2009, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by pbbth View Post
Well close your eyes then silly! Look at them, as wide open as they go.

Aim for this:

Eyes closed, mouth open taking in a deep breath before you "complete the mission".
#7
Old 10-05-2009, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by pbbth View Post


While I am sure this is very accurate I am looking for the most humane way to kill a rat that won't give me crazy nightmares for the next month.
I used to do animal research on rats and have killed hundreds of them if not more. We used the guillotine when we needed the brains for later study and a CO2 chamber just for sacrificing them otherwise. There is no non-messy way to kill small animals unless the goal is just to make yourself feel better. You could put it in a grocery bag full of rocks and throw it off a bridge or use hundreds of other creative ideas. When it comes down to it though, you still have to kill it and the fastest and most swift way of doing that is the most ethical even if it seems a little gory. The end result is the same.
#8
Old 10-05-2009, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
The most humane thing to do is just to put on some old shoes, lay the rat out on a hard surface, and stomp it as hard as you can on the head. Death is instantaneous but a little gory. I have done that with lots of rats, mice, and voles caught in glue traps. Lots of people don't like the idea but it is the kindest and most rational thing to do.
This is also my preferred method of killing fish when I decide to keep a few while fishing. One good hit on the head will kill them instantly. I don't get much sympathy for it though since it looks cruel and gory.
#9
Old 10-05-2009, 03:24 PM
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This is why you do not use 'glue traps' - invest in some good spring traps - death is (usually) instant, usually non-gory and you can dispose of it all without having to do anything.

They're usually cheap enough that you dont even have to re-use them.

Glue traps - while effective - allow you to find the still squirming rat/mouse, and those are not friendly at all.

Since you have cats - I would not recomend poison in any way/shape or form.
#10
Old 10-05-2009, 03:59 PM
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Glue traps are horrible. Having dealt with lots of mice, I second the spring trap suggestion; kills 'em before they even have an inkling that the End is coming.
#11
Old 10-05-2009, 04:03 PM
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Now, if you had one of these, problem solved. Rat necks snapped, no questions asked.
#12
Old 10-05-2009, 04:07 PM
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I caught one mouse in a glue trap, and euthanized him by dropping a concrete block onto him. I have never used them again. Spring traps have worked best for me.
#13
Old 10-05-2009, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by simster View Post
This is why you do not use 'glue traps' - invest in some good spring traps - death is (usually) instant, usually non-gory and you can dispose of it all without having to do anything.

They're usually cheap enough that you dont even have to re-use them.

Glue traps - while effective - allow you to find the still squirming rat/mouse, and those are not friendly at all.

Since you have cats - I would not recomend poison in any way/shape or form.
I have requested that the SO stop and pick up some of those on his way home from work. I suppose that I will just pray that no rats come out of hiding before he brings those traps home.
#14
Old 10-05-2009, 04:27 PM
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Come to think of it, a cat that gets into a glue trap is not going to be a happy camper.
#15
Old 10-05-2009, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simster View Post
This is why you do not use 'glue traps' - invest in some good spring traps - death is (usually) instant, usually non-gory and you can dispose of it all without having to do anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocketeer View Post
Glue traps are horrible. Having dealt with lots of mice, I second the spring trap suggestion; kills 'em before they even have an inkling that the End is coming.
This.
Glue traps are sickening, horrifying things, and I say this as someone with a perhaps much lower-than-usual sensitivity to killing small animals (as in, I work in biomedical research and I hunt).
I used to work in a pet store. We had a bunch of feeder rats escape and set up a colony. One night our owner laid out some glue traps without telling anyone, and the next day I came in to open the shop only to find a trap with a rat stuck to it. The rat appeared half-degloved, all four legs were broken, and it was screaming.
I had to kill it right then and there without being able to do it with a proper cervical dislocation technique. I was completely traumatized, even having been mostly inured to the humane dispatching of small animals. This was absolutely and in no-uncertain-terms not a humane method of disposal. I totally lost it, called my boss and screamed at him that if I ever saw one in the shop afterwards I would never be seen in that place again.

Snap traps do occasionally fail, but are designed for a very fast, very efficient kill. Thanks for asking your SO to pick a few up.

I wrote out a whole long paragraph about humane euthanasia techniques for rodents but if you're going with snap traps anyway, you probably don't need the details. Also, though cervical dislocation is absolutely a fast and very humane method of disposal, I'm not sure I would recommend an amateur try it on a rat without having some confidence at handling a rodent.

Anyway, at the very least, please steer clear of glue traps. They are no bueno.
#16
Old 10-05-2009, 09:33 PM
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Besides the horrible effects on rodents, I can confirm that glue traps are no bueno for a house with cats. My parents used to use them for crickets in the basement when the population became excessive, and even when they are placed under furniture the cats found ways to get stuck in them. Imagine a completely panicked, freaked out cat running through the house at 90 miles an hour going *thwappa thwappa thwappa ktik ktik ktik*. When you finally manage to catch them on their third pass, you can not get all of the sticky stuff off of their paws -- you trim off as much hair as you can, ruining your good scissors, and the cat goes *schlorpa ... schlorpa...* walking through the house until it finishes wearing off. I suppose we could have tried mineral oil or something similar, but have you ever tried dealing with a cat who has just been caught in a glue trap? You're lucky to finish getting the trap off and snipping the worst of it off before the cat takes off again to hide under the bed for the rest of the evening.
#17
Old 10-05-2009, 09:52 PM
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Okay, we have gotten rid of the glue traps and replaced them with these and these though I don't know how I feel about the second one because they appear to be for smaller mice and this is New York so the rodents here tend to be Godzilla sized but since we haven't seen them they might be smaller than they are in my imagination. The other ones should do the job quickly and humanely though.
#18
Old 10-05-2009, 09:58 PM
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Cat's can't set off the snap traps?
#19
Old 10-05-2009, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by tr0psn4j View Post
Cat's can't set off the snap traps?
They can and I won't lie and say I'm not worried about that. We have them behind canned goods and put in such a way that it would be kind of difficult for cats to get to them though and we bought the rat bait paste that comes from the store instead of using human food (which they will eat simply because they know they aren't supposed to) so hopefully they will be smart enough to leave them alone.
#20
Old 10-05-2009, 10:54 PM
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I wouldn't have poison in the house with cats.
The trap I killed a deer mouse with was in a closed drawer safe from the cats. I'd rubber band the cabinet doors closed.
This is a rat trap.
#21
Old 10-05-2009, 11:04 PM
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The paste that goes inside is not poison, just tasty rat bait apparently. The traps are high enough and far enough back in the pantry that I'm not worried about the cats getting into them.
#22
Old 10-05-2009, 11:12 PM
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Get Rexi!
#23
Old 10-05-2009, 11:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbbth View Post
Okay, we have gotten rid of the glue traps and replaced them with these and these though I don't know how I feel about the second one because they appear to be for smaller mice and this is New York so the rodents here tend to be Godzilla sized but since we haven't seen them they might be smaller than they are in my imagination. The other ones should do the job quickly and humanely though.
the first looks like a mouse trap too.

a mouse trap will make you have discomfort if it snaps on your finger. a rat trap will cause a serious bruise and broken blood vessels. so using rat traps need caution in placement. death is most instant with the trap for the appropriate animal.

rats and mice like to run along walls that is good placement. on the path to food is good.
#24
Old 10-05-2009, 11:30 PM
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the anticoagulant baits i've seen are peanut based so grain loving animals are attracted to it. cats and dogs seem to show no interest in it, though instructions caution against using it in the open with pets and little kids about. though these baits can be used in bait stations (enclosures with holes just big enough for the target animal), these also keep the animal from stealing the bait chunks and caching them, they have to eat their fill (a fatal dose).
#25
Old 10-06-2009, 12:02 AM
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Have you tried snakes?
#26
Old 10-06-2009, 01:51 AM
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Well, I've had to dispose of a rat in a glue trap before...he was big enough that it wasn't so much "putting him out of his misery," as "making sure he couldn't escape." I'm not kidding—he was moving the trap around just by hopping, and looked to be close to breaking free.

I used a snow shovel (I guess bringing one of those to coastal northern california really was a good call). He was probably dead after the first blow, and definately was after the second and third. The rat received a Viking* funeral shortly afterward.

But really, the best way of cutting off the rat problem is to cut off their access to food. Metal garbage cans, and seal up that pantry—enough metal flashing to seal out martian brain transmissions and a few new floorboards seals up mine.

*Strictly speaking, I think it was a Roman funeral. He got his own pyre, in any case.
#27
Old 10-06-2009, 01:20 PM
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Find the external entry point, or you won't ever be rid of them... as long as they can get out for food, they may just ignore the trap bait entirely. Also, getting rid of the ones currently in the house won't prevent new ones from coming in unless you plug up the entry holes. If you're renting, find the entry holes and get your landlord to fix them; otherwise, stuff the hole with steel wool (they won't chew it, it hurts their mouths) and cover it with wire mesh and/or foam. Keep vegetation away from the exterior walls of the house, as that gives them hiding places, and makes it harder to find potential entry holes. Cutting off their interior access to food won't prevent them coming in - they like warm, dark places to nest, and will be quite happy to live inside and just go back outside when they're hungry.

You can tell by the size of the pellets if they're rats or mice. If the pellets are between the size of a hamster pellet and a jelly belly, you have rats and should get rat-sized traps. If the pellets are more like the size of a fennel seed, it's mice and mouse-sized traps will be fine. Although, if they're knocking canned goods off the shelf, they're probably not mice. Peanut butter, by the way, is a great lure if you find the stuff you're using doesn't work. If you do end up with a still-living rat in a trap, put the trap in plastic bag, place it in front of your car tire, and just drive over it; it should be effective for finishing the thing off without having it be quite as personal as a shovel.

If you want to tackle the outside problem once the inside is settled, look into bait boxes; they're designed so only rodents will be able to get in (i.e., entrance holes are too small for cats). Rats go in, eat the poison inside, and then go back to their dens to die. Secure the bait box(es) near a wall (rats like to run along walls because it feels more safe) and just check periodically to recharge the poison if needed. If you get the blue poison discs, the area around the box will be nicely decorated with bright blue pellets, so you'll know they're going for the poison, heh. I wouldn't want to use bait boxes inside the house, because then you don't know where they'll decide to die - at least snap traps inside mean you can get the bodies out of the house.

Ugh, writing this has my senses on hyper-alert and jumping at every house-settling noise. I really wish I didn't have the experience to offer advise on this.
#28
Old 10-06-2009, 01:42 PM
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We have been dealing with a rat problem lately as well. We are pretty sure they are coming from our next door neighbors house. He is pretty much a hermit, that we have only laid eyes on 2 or 3 times in 11 years. His house if falling down around him. Every year we seem to get more and more rodents in our house...the more his place falls apart, the more critters we notice around our. And, this year it was a RAT! UGH.

We don't have any pets right now, so finally went with poison, when the traps didn't work. We found one dead rat just outside of our porch, and probably have/had another one under our house. That is the bad part about using poison. We smelled "death" for quite a few weeks, and had to have windows open and a fan blowing constantly. It is getting damn cold in Wisconsin, so we can't do this forever.

We are not seeing signs of any others right now, but are also thinking about getting more traps. I can't deal with the smell again. We used glue traps that were never touched, and will try snap traps next time.

In the mean time, my husband has been going around the house patching like a mad man. It is something we should have done a long time ago. We just never thought we would have this problem in this nice quiet, fairly clean little town.

We also alerted the folks down at the town hall, to the problem. We were told to call our county's health department and "Rat" out our neighbor. We may do that, but haven't yet. Other people have since told us, that when you go that route, they will be sending out people to check over his house, our house, and probably other houses on the block.
The woman who is our town clerk stopped me on the street the other day to say that a letter was sent to our neighbor about cleaning up his place. But I am not going to hold my breath. He has apparently got many letters to do the same thing, every year.

Also...I have heard there is a poison, shaped like a cigar, that will kill a rat, and also stop it from smelling bad when it dies. I need to do more research on this, because if there is a product like that, I am going to stock up on it! Anyone ever heard of this?
#29
Old 10-06-2009, 01:46 PM
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The question in the OP confuses me. Why would you want to get rid of rats humanely? Mithra gave us rats so we would have vermin we could sadistically massacre without suffering the twinges of conscience.
#30
Old 10-06-2009, 01:47 PM
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like others have said, the next step is proper placement - along the walls, behind things - rats/mice avoid the open floor/counters most of the time - they run with thier side up against the wall. - so place the bait portion torward the wall.

as for the cats getting to them - put them in places that you have found pellets and that the cats cant generally get to. Behind/under stoves, refigerators, in the cabinet that you had the evidence, etc.

Peanut butter is a great bait - it requires effort for the rat/mouse to get off of the trap, giving more time for the trap to work. (Hint: bait the trap before setting it!)

I litterally meant spring traps - http://acehardwareoutlet.com/(e3...aspx?SKU=70736 - simple, effective and cheap - all that extra plastic stuff can get in the way.
#31
Old 10-06-2009, 01:49 PM
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Be careful with poison though--not all will "go back to their dens" to die,* and the smell of rotting rats in the walls is... less than pleasant. Also, should a cat find the dead rat and eat it, also no bueno.



*true story: one chose to do it wedged between a 200g display aquarium and the wall, so that his little rat paws pressed to the glass and rat face with this expression: was on prominent display as a backdrop to a gorgeous cichlid setup.
#32
Old 10-06-2009, 01:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
Mithra gave us rats so we would have vermin we could sadistically massacre without suffering the twinges of conscience.
I believe you are thinking of Haflings, Sir. They are somewhat difficult to tell apart.

Last edited by carnivorousplant; 10-06-2009 at 01:51 PM.
#33
Old 10-06-2009, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
I believe you are thinking of Haflings, Sir. They are somewhat difficult to tell apart.
No they're not. Rats are inedible.
#34
Old 10-06-2009, 02:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Words on the Interweb View Post
You can tell by the size of the pellets if they're rats or mice. If the pellets are between the size of a hamster pellet and a jelly belly, you have rats and should get rat-sized traps. If the pellets are more like the size of a fennel seed, it's mice and mouse-sized traps will be fine. Although, if they're knocking canned goods off the shelf, they're probably not mice.
Based on the pellet size I would say these are probably small mice then, though I have no idea how a small mouse would manage to toss about canned goods like this. We have the traps set up along the walls so hopefully we will come home to traps that have been set off and mouse corpses and no more pellets. I will start finding entrances into our place and filling them as well.
#35
Old 10-06-2009, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by NajaNivea View Post
Be careful with poison though--not all will "go back to their dens" to die,* and the smell of rotting rats in the walls is... less than pleasant.
Which is why I suggested making sure the external entry points are closed up before using exterior bait boxes, and only use spring traps inside (so the dead are "contained").
#36
Old 10-06-2009, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Words on the Interweb View Post
You can tell by the size of the pellets if they're rats or mice. If the pellets are between the size of a hamster pellet and a jelly belly, you have rats and should get rat-sized traps. If the pellets are more like the size of a fennel seed, it's mice and mouse-sized traps will be fine. Although, if they're knocking canned goods off the shelf, they're probably not mice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbbth View Post
Based on the pellet size I would say these are probably small mice then, though I have no idea how a small mouse would manage to toss about canned goods like this. We have the traps set up along the walls so hopefully we will come home to traps that have been set off and mouse corpses and no more pellets. I will start finding entrances into our place and filling them as well.
i agree that if they are moving canned goods they are not mice. a mouse would climb obstructions like that effortlessly and are not heavy or strong enough to push over.
#37
Old 10-06-2009, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by NajaNivea View Post
Be careful with poison though--not all will "go back to their dens" to die,* and the smell of rotting rats in the walls is... less than pleasant. Also, should a cat find the dead rat and eat it, also no bueno.
the anticoagulant baits cause them to get real thirsty and they go seek a source of water which is often outside a building.

cats i've seen like hot meals. i suppose if starving they might resort to corpses.
#38
Old 10-06-2009, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by NajaNivea View Post
Be careful with poison though--not all will "go back to their dens" to die,* and the smell of rotting rats in the walls is... less than pleasant. Also, should a cat find the dead rat and eat it, also no bueno.
Worse is when they manage to get holed up in the walls, but not well enough to keep flies from getting to them. (Though they might have just had fly eggs on them before death, I suppose)

Even worse is when they do this above the ceiling level of the first floor.

Even worse still is when they do this, right above the kitchen. A kitchen in the middle of remodeling, so it's not really sealed up.

Luckily, most of the things on the upper shelves were just pots and pans. The plop-ping! noise pelting on metal, not unlike the first heavy drops of coming rain, gave a much appreciated warning.
#39
Old 10-06-2009, 05:20 PM
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Luckily, most of the things on the upper shelves were just pots and pans. The plop-ping! noise pelting on metal, not unlike the first heavy drops of coming rain, gave a much appreciated warning.
When you look up "TMI" in the dictionary, you find this post.




#40
Old 10-07-2009, 09:58 AM
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Hhhuuuurrrrrrrrrpp!
#41
Old 10-07-2009, 10:55 AM
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Speaking hypothetically, one of the most humane (or rather least inhumane) ways to euthanize vertebrates is to use an inert gas such as such as argon or nitrogen (though not CO2) to induce anoxia. Conceivably it would be possible to invent a trap that utilised this method.
#42
Old 10-07-2009, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by NajaNivea View Post
Be careful with poison though--not all will "go back to their dens" to die,* and the smell of rotting rats in the walls is... less than pleasant. Also, should a cat find the dead rat and eat it, also no bueno.



*true story: one chose to do it wedged between a 200g display aquarium and the wall, so that his little rat paws pressed to the glass and rat face with this expression: was on prominent display as a backdrop to a gorgeous cichlid setup.
Thank you from the bottom of my heart for sharing that story. I got the whole mental picture - the eek smiley really helped! - and it's pretty much made my day. Now I have the giggles.
#43
Old 10-07-2009, 05:15 PM
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If you have indoor cats then take the battle outdoors with something like this. Bait it with with peanut butter first with the trap off.
#44
Old 10-08-2009, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Words on the Interweb View Post
Which is why I suggested making sure the external entry points are closed up before using exterior bait boxes
Uh huh, because rats are well known for a lack of stealth and canniness, and a serious ineptitude at ratting their way into places we humans don't want them to go

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Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
the anticoagulant baits cause them to get real thirsty and they go seek a source of water which is often outside a building.
Or just as often inside a building, like with condensation on pipes, leaks, etc. Rats and mice (and cockroaches and ants and...) can and do live perfectly happy on the water sources inside the walls of a house.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost
cats i've seen like hot meals. i suppose if starving they might resort to corpses.

Where ever did you get this idea? On a purely absurd point, I have never in my life met anyone who nukes a can of 9-lives or bowl of Friskies before plopping it down. My cats eat corpses on a twice-daily basis--everything from frozen/thawed rodents and chicks to pork and beef and mackerel and lamb. Meat is meat.
Cats are obligate carnivores and opportunists. Cats who were socialized to "manufactured" dry/canned food during the food-imprint stage as kittens often don't recognize "dead animal" as equating to food without some purposeful resocialization, but I assure you any hunting cat worth its salt knows what a dead rat is and I've seen far more feral and farm cats than I can count eat all manner of dead stuff. They even routinely cache stuff they come across, like dead squirrels or crows, for later perusal. In any case, even a cat not well-socialized to hunting may very likely have its predatory instinct kicked on by a flailing, dying animal whose insides are being liquefied by rat poison.

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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
Thank you from the bottom of my heart for sharing that story. I got the whole mental picture - the eek smiley really helped! - and it's pretty much made my day. Now I have the giggles.

We were fortunate to have discovered the unfortunate Mr. Rat before any customers did. Ten years later it still gives me fits of the giggles. Like now, in fact

Last edited by NajaNivea; 10-08-2009 at 01:55 PM.
#45
Old 10-08-2009, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost
cats i've seen like hot meals.
...Hell, if I don't protect it well enough, they'll rob frozen ratcicles right out of the ziplock bag and water-filled sink.
Your average cat is probably a lot more motivated to go after a warm, moving meal, but the idea that a cat won't eat a corpse is, frankly, absurd.
#46
Old 10-08-2009, 02:27 PM
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Try "You're very nice, but it's not working out. I don't feel a connection between us. It's not you; it's me. You deserve someone better."

Last edited by Skammer; 10-08-2009 at 02:27 PM.
#47
Old 10-08-2009, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
cats i've seen like hot meals. i suppose if starving they might resort to corpses.
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Originally Posted by NajaNivea View Post

Where ever did you get this idea? On a purely absurd point, I have never in my life met anyone who nukes a can of 9-lives or bowl of Friskies before plopping it down. My cats eat corpses on a twice-daily basis--everything from frozen/thawed rodents and chicks to pork and beef and mackerel and lamb. Meat is meat.
Cats are obligate carnivores and opportunists. Cats who were socialized to "manufactured" dry/canned food during the food-imprint stage as kittens often don't recognize "dead animal" as equating to food without some purposeful resocialization, but I assure you any hunting cat worth its salt knows what a dead rat is and I've seen far more feral and farm cats than I can count eat all manner of dead stuff. They even routinely cache stuff they come across, like dead squirrels or crows, for later perusal. In any case, even a cat not well-socialized to hunting may very likely have its predatory instinct kicked on by a flailing, dying animal whose insides are being liquefied by rat poison.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NajaNivea View Post
...Hell, if I don't protect it well enough, they'll rob frozen ratcicles right out of the ziplock bag and water-filled sink.
Your average cat is probably a lot more motivated to go after a warm, moving meal, but the idea that a cat won't eat a corpse is, frankly, absurd.
i was speaking to the eating of live animals and not to the temperature of store bought cat food.

cats i've seen don't seem to show an interest in eating corpses. these cats feed on store bought food and are mousers (birds, chipmunks, rabbits, squirrels, voles, moles) but turn away from cold corpses. maybe they weren't hungry enough at the times i've seen them. maybe the number of individuals i've seen hasn't been large enough.
#48
Old 10-08-2009, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by carnivorousplant View Post
When you look up "TMI" in the dictionary, you find this post.




I live to please.
#49
Old 10-08-2009, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
the anticoagulant baits i've seen are peanut based so grain loving animals are attracted to it. cats and dogs seem to show no interest in it, though instructions caution against using it in the open with pets and little kids about. though these baits can be used in bait stations (enclosures with holes just big enough for the target animal), these also keep the animal from stealing the bait chunks and caching them, they have to eat their fill (a fatal dose).
Dogs will eat anything and judging by the number of dogs we see that have eaten rat poison I'd say they like peanut flavored stuff just fine. A lot of people even use peanut butter as a dog treat. You can buy peanut butter flavored dog biscuits. Dogs will most definitely eat peanut flavored things. I have had dogs that we made throw up the peanut flavored rat poison try to eat it again if we didn't get it away from them fast enough so not only do they like peanut flavors, they also don't mind vomit flavored peanutty stuff.

Never assume that your pet won't eat something.
#50
Old 10-08-2009, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
i was speaking to the eating of live animals and not to the temperature of store bought cat food.
Then, clearly, it's not a "temperature" issue, but more likely a "chasing moving prey" issue.

Quote:
cats i've seen don't seem to show an interest in eating corpses. these cats feed on store bought food and are mousers (birds, chipmunks, rabbits, squirrels, voles, moles) but turn away from cold corpses. maybe they weren't hungry enough at the times i've seen them. maybe the number of individuals i've seen hasn't been large enough.
I would strongly suggest either or both of these to be the case . It doesn't surprise me that a well-fed house cat may hunt opportunistically just for the fun of killing stuff without being terribly interested in the remains as "food", but that certainly doesn't mean they "won't", just that those ones didn't, right at that moment. I assure you, most carnivores, including cats, absolutely do eat carrion. Meat is meat, and to a hungry predator, meat you don't have to expend energy to kill is even better. Maybe a particular pet cat is well-fed and low-drive enough to ignore the poisoned rats, and maybe not... with carnivorous pets around, I personally wouldn't take the risk.

I like JThunder's suggestion best: hire a couple bullsnakes to hang around under the house .

Last edited by NajaNivea; 10-08-2009 at 05:16 PM.
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