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#1
Old 11-08-2009, 01:12 PM
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Manor House/Edwardian Country House

I watched this years ago and then rewatched it on DVD. Loved it again, and I know we had a thread but that was years ago and I wanted to start one up again. Hope it goes over well...

I really enjoyed it again and was considering watching some of the others. I'm a bit wary because Colonial House and Frontier House sound like there's a lot of emphasis on the elements and the weather and how hard pioneering was and all that, and I was more into the psychological social class elements of Manor House.

Loved Mr. Edgard and M. Dubiard. And Hall boy Kenny. And yes, the family was just as obnoxious as I remembered them. Though I wonder, would anyone sound that obnoxious being put in that role or were they particularly bad?
#2
Old 11-08-2009, 02:32 PM
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No, most people are not that breed of asshole. Seriously, they got pissed off because they got a real Edwardian meal.
#3
Old 11-08-2009, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
No, most people are not that breed of asshole. Seriously, they got pissed off because they got a real Edwardian meal.
Well, I mean, maybe we'd enjoy it more than we thought. Like, I wonder, if you took the most socialist, socially conscientious, very serious feminist type and put her in a Manor House and had her pampered and waited on, wouldn't she enjoy it a bit? I don't know. Maybe the creators of the show did try to find as assholish a couple as possible.

Love when M. Dubiard told off Sir John at the end for being a fake and not really living Edwardian life. It was a bit much that they felt "betrayed" over the authentic meal. Lame!

I'm wondering how dopers felt about Mr. Raj Singh. I liked him but I know a lot of people hated him and found him racist. I mean, he was genuinely in a bad position--between up and downstairs. And I don't know if he was saying that the family was racist exactly in the way he was treated. Though I think it is a bit naive to pretend race didn't matter back then. Yes, even if the tutor had been a white governess, she would have been treated that way...but at the same time, there was this huge amount of racism back then that had to be noted.

I liked when that Carribean guy--the TV host--showed up and basically called Sir John pompous. He was great.
#4
Old 11-08-2009, 02:54 PM
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Oh I adore this series and I watch it every couple of years. I love the companionship between the two housemaids, the constant difficulty keeping the scullery maids (the first two were such brats! what the hell did they expect?), Mr. Edgar's dedication to his role and the arc of his approval then disappointment in Charlie the footman, adorable Kenny, the genteel Scots lady's maid who was so sentimental about her grandmother the former housemaid, the priggish tutor, the hilariously stereotypical fussy French chef M. Dubiard, the adorable little boy, and the growing frustration on the part of the sister-in-law. Oh, and everyone's reactions to the September 11 tragedies.

IIRC it was 'Lord' Oliff-Cooper who was pissed off about the Edwardian meal, mainly because he'd expressly asked for a lighter menu; the rest of the family didn't seem to care as much, although the mom and kid were probably not keen on the huge pig's head staring at them. Oliff-Cooper was pretty insufferable, but I must admit he did have a point in his snotty, to-the-manner-born behavior--acting like a typical 20th/21st century enlightened, "we're all equals" family wouldn't have been in keeping with the experiment. Though as Lady Oliff-Cooper and her sister both remark, Oliff-Cooper definitely took to the Lord of the Manor role very easily.

I watched Colonial House and it was enjoyable and frustrating, but not nearly as engaging as this. Edwardian Country House really felt like Upstairs, Downstairs brought to life. (I actually cried at the end when Edgar left the house. Brought back memories of Mr. Hudson and Rose leaving Eaton Place.) And Derek Jacobi's narration sold the whole thing to perfection.

My big disappointmetn was in Regency House Party. I've never seen it but according to reviews I've read, it was just a fancy dating show, instead of a real attempt to live in Jane Austen's era. Bummer. Anyway, if you like this series, you might also enjoy 1900s House.

Edited to add: I did feel sorry for Singh, because that was a difficult position to be in, not quite family and not quite member of the servants' corps. But his behavior toward the rest of the staff bugged me. Nothing to do with race -- I've read / seen plenty of literary governesses and know that he was definitely acting above his station for someone in his role.

Last edited by choie; 11-08-2009 at 02:58 PM.
#5
Old 11-08-2009, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Freudian Slit View Post
Well, I mean, maybe we'd enjoy it more than we thought. Like, I wonder, if you took the most socialist, socially conscientious, very serious feminist type and put her in a Manor House and had her pampered and waited on, wouldn't she enjoy it a bit? I don't know. Maybe the creators of the show did try to find as assholish a couple as possible...
Well the wife on in The 1900 House was got so uncomfortable with having a maid-of-all-work that she dismissed her. She just felt so bad for exploiting another human being like that. The narrator helpfully pointed that 100 yrs ago a young women in her maid's position likely would've ended up turning to prostitution if she couldn't find domestic work.
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#6
Old 11-08-2009, 03:55 PM
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I liked the Manor House pretty well, would like to watch it again. The Colonial House nearly drove me mad with the annoying, snotty people.
#7
Old 11-08-2009, 04:25 PM
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I remember wanting to kick that one woman's teeth in on Colonial House. Grr.

Of course that's part of it, and I think you're not doing your job if you don't take your social role in an experiment like this. That's not at all in the spirit of the thing. But you don't have to be a jackass! I'd love to see somebody do Antebellum Plantation House, but they never would.

My boyfriend and I would do just about anything to be on a show like this, but I know at least on one of them they said they don't want anybody who knows a thing about the time period. Which is probably why they end up with so many morons, but I digress.
#8
Old 11-08-2009, 04:33 PM
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I liked Frontier House a lot, but my favorite part was the kids and how they adapted.

Probably my favorite "house" was the one that represented WWII-era suburban London during the Blitz. 1940s House.

Last edited by Hello Again; 11-08-2009 at 04:33 PM.
#9
Old 11-08-2009, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
I remember wanting to kick that one woman's teeth in on Colonial House...
I'm both gay and an atheist and I was bothered with the way some of the participants were casually skipping services and not observing the Sabath.

I agree that The Antebellum Plantation House would be facinating to watch for so many reasons, but nobody would ever produce it.
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Last edited by alphaboi867; 11-08-2009 at 04:40 PM.
#10
Old 11-08-2009, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
I'm both gay and an atheist and I was bothered with the way some of the participants were casually skipping services and not observing the Sabath.

I agree that The Antebellum Plantation House would be facinating to watch for so many reasons, but nobody would ever produce it.
Like it was a surprise that there'd be, gasp, religion? And the preacher guy was so freaking nice about the whole thing and was as inclusive as possible, as I recall. Hell, I wouldn't be surprised at all to be on there and get Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God for hours and hours on end on Sundays, The Witch of Blackbird Pond style.
#11
Old 11-08-2009, 04:55 PM
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Yeah, it was so aggravating how they signed up for this "live like a Pilgrim" project and then refused to live in the least like Pilgrims. We won't wear head coverings, it's unfeminist! I was amazed that one woman's hair didn't catch on fire--headcaps were practical for many reasons.

And they should have let them all starve for not ever working in the fields.
#12
Old 11-08-2009, 04:56 PM
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I liked 1900's House, Frontier House and Manor House very much. On Frontier House, the spoiled California family who couldn't understand why the other family wanted them to get their cows out of their barn. The Tennessee mom was such a bitch, but that strong will probably would've kept them going through the winter if the experiment had gone on that long. On 1900's House, the daughter sneaking shampoo, and the mother deciding that this was the time to make her family vegetarian. And their maid-of-all-work trying so hard. I always wonered why they didn't just bath in the copper boiler they used to do laundry. And Manor House - "Lord" Oliff-Cooper falling so easily into the role of Lord of the Manor, and Lady Oliff-Cooper talking about how full her days had become, and how she had so schedule time with the children, or she'd never fit them in. And dear, dear Mr. Edgar. What a great guy.

I only saw a couple eps of Colonial House. I don't know why it didn't engage me like the others.

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#13
Old 11-08-2009, 05:02 PM
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I spent the whole Manor House show wanting to give Mr. Edgar a hug. He was trying so damned hard to act in the real spirit of the thing, even when it wasn't easy, and he was so disappointed in that footman!

I can just imagine being on Colonial House and spending the whole time snarling under my breath and wanting to kill every last goddamned one of them because here I am out in the fields and where are they and we should have a real winter and then we'd see what happens to the stupid grasshopper and so on and so forth. I probably would have had a stroke.
#14
Old 11-08-2009, 05:09 PM
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I kind of wanted to see more of Mrs. Davies and Tristan--I wanted to know more about how they were getting on.

Was I the only one who thought Mrs. Morrison reminded them of Mrs. Danvers, a bit? Okay, that's a bit harsh, but her whole sort of stiff not very warm persona...and after she told tales to the master. Though she wasn't QUITE as bad as Mrs. Danvers.

Did you guys think Antonia should have been "sacked" for speaking out to Sir John, after he denied them the chance of seeing their families? In real life she likely would have but I'm glad she stayed--I did like her, even though she was technically out of order.

I love seeing really into the roles the people get. Like when Rob is talking about how the family laughs at the servants, and seeing that really made him want to put a knife in their backs--especially, I think, seeing the elder son, Jonty--I think it was worse to see someone their own age who wasn't doing backbreaking labor. Like, through what accident of birth is he having so much fun while we're working our asses of?

Oh, and I liked seeing Mrs. Whinney, a former maid at Manderston back in the day. That was cool when she visited. And I liked that a lot of them seemed to relate to their grandparents who were in service now--Mr. Edgar and Rebecca.
#15
Old 11-08-2009, 05:20 PM
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Too late to edit, but the part where the socialists come to the bazaar--the Clarion people, was that arranged by producers? Or was that just some people from the area who figured, "Let's be on TV by being Edwardian era socialists!"?
#16
Old 11-08-2009, 05:24 PM
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I remember this show! And I remember thinking it was like the Stanford Prison Experiment, the way the "upstairs" folk took so quickly to their roles and even started believing it was real (like when the wife forgot for a moment that her son wouldn't inherit the estate). Weird, and fascinating.
#17
Old 11-08-2009, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alphaboi867 View Post
Well the wife on in The 1900 House was got so uncomfortable with having a maid-of-all-work that she dismissed her. She just felt so bad for exploiting another human being like that. The narrator helpfully pointed that 100 yrs ago a young women in her maid's position likely would've ended up turning to prostitution if she couldn't find domestic work.
I had real issues about 1900 house, as I *thought* they were supposed to do life as it was at that time, in that situation and so forth ... so they dismiss the maid of all work, and go trolloping around in a music hall

You know what seriously sucks? I know 3 different re-enactor families who put in resumes for it and were deemed unsuitable to appear. In one, the mum actually worked in the kitchen of a similar house at a reconstruction village, and knew how to cook on a coal stove already ...

I guess they werent as interested in portraying life in the 1900 as providing a trainwreck of people mucking stuff up.
#18
Old 11-08-2009, 05:36 PM
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Well, the whole thing is supposed to be about how modern people learn to live like that, and what it does to them, and all that. Reenactors wouldn't give you that window into what it would be like for you, the viewer, generally speaking - I get why they did it.

Most of the problems with 1900 House stemmed from them being the only 1900 house on the block! Of course it's boring - there aren't any other kids to play with, there aren't any clubs for Mom to join, church bazaars to do, plays to attend, etc. 1900 Neighborhood would have been much, much easier to live in than just one isolated house - you're missing most of the 1900 experience.
#19
Old 11-08-2009, 05:43 PM
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We had an extensive Manor House thread, enjoy.

http://boardstest.straightdope.com/s...ht=manor+house

Last edited by Icerigger; 11-08-2009 at 05:44 PM.
#20
Old 11-08-2009, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Icerigger View Post
We had an extensive Manor House thread, enjoy.

http://boardstest.straightdope.com/s...ht=manor+house
Yes, I referred to that in the OP, and I read it before starting this one, but I didn't want to revive it because of the whole zombie thread issue.

Last edited by Freudian Slit; 11-08-2009 at 05:46 PM.
#21
Old 11-08-2009, 05:51 PM
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I think I remember this show. Was it the one in which the chef served a whole boar's head to the family, knowing it would gross them out?

And I find this sort of stuff interesting, and like watching movies like The Remains of the Day and Gosford Park. I realize those were set a couple of decades after Edwardian Country House, but still the whole look at the upstairs people vs the downstairs people is fascinating.
#22
Old 11-08-2009, 06:29 PM
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Cool- there's a Manor House thread... I'll have to get it from Netflix so I can watch it again and go over the thread. I watched it a few years ago and really enjoyed it.
#23
Old 11-08-2009, 07:13 PM
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Manor house Unclviny-style.

http://flixxy.com/motorcycle-manor-house.htm

Unclviny
#24
Old 11-08-2009, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freudian Slit View Post
I kind of wanted to see more of Mrs. Davies and Tristan--I wanted to know more about how they were getting on.

Was I the only one who thought Mrs. Morrison reminded them of Mrs. Danvers, a bit? Okay, that's a bit harsh, but her whole sort of stiff not very warm persona...and after she told tales to the master. Though she wasn't QUITE as bad as Mrs. Danvers.
OMG, not at all! I thought Morrison was a charmer. She was so touched by memories of her grandmother and by 9/11 and the visit by the original maid from Manderston. I also sympathized with her getting snubbed when she told on the staff for being idiots in the hotel restaurant. She (like Raj Singh) was in a strange purgatory of a position in the household; a servant but also a close companion of the mistress of the house. Unlike Singh, she didn't put on airs and expect to be waited on.

Quote:
Did you guys think Antonia should have been "sacked" for speaking out to Sir John, after he denied them the chance of seeing their families? In real life she likely would have but I'm glad she stayed--I did like her, even though she was technically out of order.
Loved Antonia! She was a pistol and I loved her feisty back-and-forth with M. Dubillard. Also her flirty relationship with Rob, heh. She probably should've gotten sacked (or at least she probably would have, in a real household), but I'm definitely glad she wasn't. She got into the true spirit of the project. I think back in the day, she'd be one of the suffragettes for sure.

I have to admit my soft spot for Charlie. He was just lovely, and aside from that hangover morning when he disappointed Edgar, I thought he had a terrific attitude and proper work ethic. Awesome when he offered to do the scullery work to see what the maids were going through.

Now that I see the other posts, I don't think I ever saw Colonial House -- it was Frontier House I saw. I can't forget the kids having to accept the slaughtering of the animals, shudder.
#25
Old 11-08-2009, 09:57 PM
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I felt like Singh put on those airs because he really had no one. It's like the only way he could make waves was by constantly ringing for the servants. Even Morrison had the other upper servants to socialize with. Mr. Raj Singh had no one. No, he wasn't worked as hard as the other servants, and in terms of that, he had a more enviable role. Still, it's like...when Rob had a surprise party and the other servants were all joining in and he knew he couldn't--that was painful.

Yeah, Antonia was a lot of fun. She seemed really hard working and got into the spirit of things but at the same time, she didn't seem to get too broken down. I could so see her as a suffragette as well.

Charlie and Rob were both quite sweet. As, of course, was old Mr. Edgar. I totally wanted to hug him and carry him around in my pocket.

I've netflixed the 1900 house, 1940s house, and Regency House Party (though that one isn't as good, I've heard--oh well, I'll give it a whirl!).
#26
Old 11-08-2009, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Freudian Slit View Post

Oh, and I liked seeing Mrs. Whinney, a former maid at Manderston back in the day. That was cool when she visited. And I liked that a lot of them seemed to relate to their grandparents who were in service now--Mr. Edgar and Rebecca.
I enjoyed that very much as well.

Was it the 1900's house where the girl said "This house is killing me..." We got a laugh out of that and we say it every so often.
#27
Old 11-08-2009, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
I'd love to see somebody do Antebellum Plantation House, but they never would.
Me too. I know, people would feel WAY too uncomfortable, but I think it's something really fascinating. We wonder why there's racism and how these things happened. But look at Sir John and Lady Oliff-Cooper. You go to great lengths to justify your own comfort. Stuff like, "Well, it's how life was" and "At least they were employed" and "We treat them well." Now add race into the mix. Okay, it's heavy for a reality show. But if you can treat someone so badly even though they're your fellow countrymen just because of an accident of birth, imagine how much worse you can treat them if they look differently and you can tell yourself it's because they really are primitive and you're just looking after them.

I also loved how one guy mentioned that history is written by the rich so we don't see a lot of what life was like for the servants, but there was probably a lot of interesting stuff going on back in the day below stairs. Plus they knew a lot more about their masters--WAY more than their masters thought, I'm sure. I mean, even back in the day I'm sure a lot of people were aware that their servants were smarter than they thought--like Jeeves and Bertie Wooster. But real life was quite a bit darker than that.

What were the top five or ten best moments of Manor House? I think I'd vote serving the pig's head as number one. (Yes, Dewey, that was the episode.)

I also seem to remember the hunting party episode where they serve another pig but no one seemed to balk at that. Guess they were used to it.
#28
Old 11-09-2009, 05:49 AM
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My favorite part of Manor House is when the Socialists showed up, it really expresses how important the labor movements were to improvement of the middle class.
#29
Old 11-09-2009, 09:32 AM
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I went to the PBS website to learn more. There's a page on what the people felt/reflected after doing the show. Holy roasted pig heads, Batman, I officially loathe Sir John even more.

http://pbs.org/manorhouse/thepeo...tthoughts.html

Quote:
Do you think that the 21st century can learn anything from the Edwardian era?
Yes. It can learn loyalty, duty, service, honour, and fineness of character. It can learn about quality and design, and about building for posterity, rather than for the moment. The privileged could learn that with that privilege should come duty. The under-privileged could learn that resentment offers no improvement to their lot. That list may sound a bit pompous, and I offer no apology for it.
#30
Old 11-09-2009, 03:06 PM
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For those of you who have seen the other ones (Colonial, Frontier, 1900, etc.), which would you recommend next? I haven't seen anything but Manor House but I'm debating which one to get from Netflix next.
#31
Old 11-09-2009, 03:13 PM
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I really liked Frontier House- with the two families it was interesting, especially since they came from very distinctly opposite backgrounds, to see how each group handled the challenges.
#32
Old 11-09-2009, 03:25 PM
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We've been slowly watching them in the order they aired, because it's interesting to see how the show concept evolved (especially between the US and the UK).
#33
Old 11-09-2009, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
We've been slowly watching them in the order they aired, because it's interesting to see how the show concept evolved (especially between the US and the UK).
What is that order? Did they start with 1900 House?
#34
Old 11-10-2009, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Freudian Slit View Post
What is that order? Did they start with 1900 House?
Yes, 1900 house was the first:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_1900_House#Sequels

Gosh, the Germans are keen on the format!
#35
Old 11-10-2009, 09:23 AM
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I wish we could get those series from other non-UK countries. I'd love to watch Outback House.
#36
Old 11-10-2009, 09:47 AM
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I hated the one in Texas -- the woman was harridan, and her two daughters were the laziest spoiled brats I've ever seen. They couldn't be bothered to harvest the food from their garden. They'd rather suffer from hoards of flies than clear away the dishes full of rotting food lying around everywhere.

And then they got all snooty about how the cowboys didn't give them the proper respect. Hey, you're running around in what would have been a scandalous state of undress, and doing shit. You didn't deserve any respect.
#37
Old 02-01-2015, 04:36 AM
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Originally Posted by gallows fodder View Post
I remember this show! And I remember thinking it was like the Stanford Prison Experiment, the way the "upstairs" folk took so quickly to their roles and even started believing it was real (like when the wife forgot for a moment that her son wouldn't inherit the estate). Weird, and fascinating.
I'm know I'm pretty late to this thread, but I totally agree!
The time when Lady Oliff Cooper briefly thinks Master Guy will inherit the estate reminded me of how Dr. Zimbardo and the guards tried to foil the rumored escape. It all seemed too real.
#38
Old 02-01-2015, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Hello Again View Post
Probably my favorite "house" was the one that represented WWII-era suburban London during the Blitz. 1940s House.
My mother refused to watch that. She said she lived through it, remembered quite enough, and didn't need a repeat.



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Freudian Slit
Well, I mean, maybe we'd enjoy it more than we thought. Like, I wonder, if you took the most socialist, socially conscientious, very serious feminist type and put her in a Manor House and had her pampered and waited on, wouldn't she enjoy it a bit? I don't know. Maybe the creators of the show did try to find as assholish a couple as possible...
I seem to remember (and it could be a faulty memory) that the unmarried sister on Manor House was driven bonkers by the enforced idleness.

Me, I would have learned to ride and been out and about as much as possible.

BTW, an interesting quiz -- You in 1905. I live alone and have a private income. Hm, not much different than today, really.
#39
Old 02-01-2015, 02:38 PM
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I've rewatched the show again since the thread (I started getting into Downton Abbey a few months ago and figured it was time for a rewatch), and it still really holds up. Mr. Edgar...what a character.
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