Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 12-10-2009, 10:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: N of Denver & S of Sanity
Posts: 12,218
IS UPS Ground really ground?

I have some computer parts coming from Illinois via UPS Ground. Will it really be on trucks from Hodgins to Phoenix or does it get on a plane at some time?
#2
Old 12-10-2009, 11:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Orygun forest
Posts: 4,467
The shipper should be able to prvide you wth the UPS tracking number. You can go on the UPS website, enter the number, and watch the package as it arrives and departs destinations along the way.
#3
Old 12-11-2009, 12:29 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: N of Denver & S of Sanity
Posts: 12,218
I know that! I'm just curious if ground means it stays on trucks the whole time
#4
Old 12-11-2009, 12:32 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,433
most of the cross-country stuff is put onto a train IIRC
#5
Old 12-11-2009, 01:53 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
I know that! I'm just curious if ground means it stays on trucks the whole time
No, it's on a train
#6
Old 12-11-2009, 02:13 AM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Staring blankly at my GPS
Posts: 11,874
It goes the cheapest way possible. Pretty unlikely to go on a plane, but you can't say 100%.
#7
Old 12-11-2009, 03:52 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumor_Watkins View Post
most of the cross-country stuff is put onto a train IIRC
Most of the cross country ground goes by truck. Trains would require dock to dock train hubs to connect anything in a timely manner. Not going to happen with 3-day ground. Rail is used for bulk shipments with longer delivery times.

To get an idea of how something would move from Chicago to Phoenix a package would be picked up locally and then moved to a hub. From there it is sorted and grouped with similar destination freight which may move direct to Phoenix or to another hub (say Kansas City) where it is cross-docked. Cross docking would be a container filled with a single destination that does not need to be sorted but can be combined with other containers of the same destination until they have a truck's worth of freight. It then moves to the destination hub where it is resorted for local delivery.

So for a PHX to ORD run it's 1917 miles or about 40 hr drive time with a team. Add in pickup/sort/transit/sort/delivery and you have your 3 day service.
#8
Old 12-11-2009, 03:59 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tapioca Dextrin View Post
It goes the cheapest way possible. Pretty unlikely to go on a plane, but you can't say 100%.
Correct. As a general rule you don't want to back-fill a plane with ground freight because it is a sign that the plane is underutilized. If it's ground freight that was bumped a day due to overloads then it's a delivery commitment but otherwise it's a bad idea.

Prior to scanning/database technology it was difficult to judge aircraft loads if ground was allowed to mix. And you'd be surprised how crappy some of the carrier’s tracking abilities are. If freight isn't specifically linked to a container or a vehicle then it "jumps" through the tracking system based on arrival scans.
#9
Old 12-11-2009, 08:42 AM
Registered User
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Soplicowo
Posts: 2,083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
Most of the cross country ground goes by truck. Trains would require dock to dock train hubs to connect anything in a timely manner. Not going to happen with 3-day ground. Rail is used for bulk shipments with longer delivery times.
UPS Ground takes longer and is cheaper than 3 Day Select. From San Jose to Boston a package will be 3 days in transit for 3 Day Select, but 5 days for UPS basic ground. I don't think even 5 days is long enough to ship by rail, though.
#10
Old 12-11-2009, 09:16 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: America's Wing
Posts: 27,090
Did anyone else think this thread was going to be about electrical safety for uninterrupted power supply units?
#11
Old 12-11-2009, 10:11 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: N of Denver & S of Sanity
Posts: 12,218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
So for a PHX to ORD run it's 1917 miles or about 40 hr drive time with a team. Add in pickup/sort/transit/sort/delivery and you have your 3 day service.
And I just realized that 3rd day will be Saturday (no delivery)
#12
Old 12-11-2009, 10:32 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Naugatuck, CT
Posts: 6,760
I believe both FedEx and UPS only use air as part of their hub-spoke system. The hubs are at Worldport in Kentucky for UPS and in Memphis for FedEx, and all air packages go through there.
#13
Old 12-11-2009, 12:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
Most of the cross country ground goes by truck. Trains would require dock to dock train hubs to connect anything in a timely manner. Not going to happen with 3-day ground. Rail is used for bulk shipments with longer delivery times.
You are incorrect. I place orders with my main vendor on a regular basis. They are located in Chicago. The ground packages go to Palatine, IL for sorting, and then to Hodgkins, IL, to get put on a BNSF train (actually, they're already in UPS feeder trailers (picture: http://rogerradio.org/Images/pho...er%20truck.jpg) and the train comes to Vernon, CA, where it will either go into the sort or will be directly assigned for transport to the hub.

Generally, it will only be more economical for one of the major shippers to send parcels via truck exclusively if the leg is 800 miles or less. However, companies like FedEx Ground (which isn't really FedEx, but rather an acquisition they made, Roadway Services, will put shipments on a truck for longer distances (I've seen packages from El Paso come to LA via truck on FedEx).

In case you find this hard to believe, just refer to BNSF's fact sheet: http://bnsf.com/media/bnsffacts.html
Quote:
* In 2007, almost 5 million intermodal shipments (truck trailers or containers) were transported on BNSF's rail lines instead of on the nation's congested highways. That's the equivalent of a truck trailer or container being loaded onto a BNSF intermodal train every 6 seconds.
* The average BNSF intermodal train moves the equivalent of what 280 trucks could move.
* BNSF is among the world's top transporters of intermodal traffic. Major products moved in the trailers and containers BNSF transports include such items as mail, small packaged goods, paper products, clothes, appliances, electronic products and auto parts.
* During peak season between Thanksgiving and Christmas, BNSF ships more than 50 million packages for UPS—on time.
* BNSF's fastest intermodal service moves 760 miles per day—200 miles more than single-driver truck service.
#14
Old 12-11-2009, 12:59 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Location: Location:
Posts: 10,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
Did anyone else think this thread was going to be about electrical safety for uninterrupted power supply units?
You mean it isn't?

Damn, I have to undo a few things now....
#15
Old 12-11-2009, 01:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
By the way, a ground package (at least, for UPS) from Chicago to Phoenix will necessarily travel over UP's TransCon, Chicago, through Kansas City, El Paso and on to the Phoenix.
#16
Old 12-11-2009, 01:33 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saint Cad View Post
I have some computer parts coming from Illinois via UPS Ground. Will it really be on trucks from Hodgins to Phoenix or does it get on a plane at some time?
Ground simply means that you shouldn't be expecting it any time soon.

When I was a youngun back in the early Jurassic, the U.S. Post Office had special "Air Mail" rates. A regular stamp would be about five cents (or six beaver pelts), but for an extra four cents, it would go Via Airmail. They even had a picture of a real life areoplane on it! Or maybe it was an autogyro...

Sometime in the 1960s, word got out that most mail that went more than 500 miles was sent by airplane anyway, and people stopped paying extra for air mail service.

I suspect something similar with UPS and FedEx. Ground and air packages share the same sorting facilities (it would be stupid to build separate facilities for ground vs. air.) I imagine that ground packages might be shipped in a plane if there was room for them and it would be cheaper and easier than getting a truck or van.

I know I sometime see something being shipped via FedEx ground go from California to Tennessee in a day, then take another four days to get from Memphis to my house.
#17
Old 12-11-2009, 03:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 12,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by qazwart View Post
Ground simply means that you shouldn't be expecting it any time soon.
Not necessarily. UPS Ground is gauranteed within a certain time. If you're shipping to the same state or nearby areas of surrounding states, it will be overnight.

This app from UPS will show you a map of Ground shipping times from/to your location.
#18
Old 12-11-2009, 04:02 PM
Robot Mod in Beta Testing
Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 19,687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
Did anyone else think this thread was going to be about electrical safety for uninterrupted power supply units?
I would have been able to contribute something useful to that thread. All I can do is read this one.
#19
Old 12-11-2009, 04:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 357
12 year old information follows. This was what we were told during the brainwashing sessions when I started working at UPS.

After picking up the packages for the day the trucks would be unloaded, and packages sorted by delivery type, NDA, 2DA, 3DS, G. They would then sort the NDA, and get ready for the planes, followed by 2DA, and 3DS. If they had a container that wasn't full at the end they would thow in any ground packages headed that way till full. At this point the planes would be on the way while the rest of the ground packages got sorted, and stuck on trucks. If they loaded all the trucks, and still had ground packages left then they would be the first ones loaded on trucks the next day.

How acurate that is I don't know. I was on the computer support help desk, and did not normally speak to the package guys. This overview was given to us along with other random company info like why they paint all their trucks brown, and the official name of the specific brown they use.

-Otanx
#20
Old 12-11-2009, 05:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAmNotSpartacus View Post
You are incorrect. I place orders with my main vendor on a regular basis. They are located in Chicago. The ground packages go to Palatine, IL for sorting, and then to Hodgkins, IL, to get put on a BNSF train (actually, they're already in UPS feeder trailers (picture: http://rogerradio.org/Images/pho...er%20truck.jpg) and the train comes to Vernon, CA, where it will either go into the sort or will be directly assigned for transport to the hub.

Generally, it will only be more economical for one of the major shippers to send parcels via truck exclusively if the leg is 800 miles or less. However, companies like FedEx Ground (which isn't really FedEx, but rather an acquisition they made, Roadway Services, will put shipments on a truck for longer distances (I've seen packages from El Paso come to LA via truck on FedEx).

In case you find this hard to believe, just refer to BNSF's fact sheet: http://bnsf.com/media/bnsffacts.html
No, I don't think you understand. Looking at your own quote the best time for a train is 760 miles per day. That would mean 2.5 days of pure transit time from Chicago to PHX not including pickup, sorting, transfer,transit,transfer, and delivery. 3 day service pretty much depends on trucks with teams which can travel 1000 miles per day. When you go past 3-day ground then inter-modal would work but that is generally done with large shipments and not individually delivered freight. I've worked in the operations or route planning of air/truck freight for 26 years and have a fair idea of transit times.
#21
Old 12-11-2009, 05:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by qazwart View Post

I suspect something similar with UPS and FedEx. Ground and air packages share the same sorting facilities (it would be stupid to build separate facilities for ground vs. air.) I imagine that ground packages might be shipped in a plane if there was room for them and it would be cheaper and easier than getting a truck or van.
Air hubs will also have truck connections but companies such as UPS and FedEx will have separate ground hubs independent of air.

While you would think it makes sense to top off an airplane with ground freight it is an expensive habit to get into. It's not the cost savings of the truck, but the excess cost of empty space on the plane. If it's a consistent empty space then the aircraft or route is changed to better utilize the plane.

The other problem with this is that ground freight moved on an aircraft shouldn't be delivered next day or customers will quickly realize they don't have to pay for air and will switch service. This is a very expensive lesson that all carriers have learned over time.
#22
Old 12-11-2009, 05:52 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
No, I don't think you understand. Looking at your own quote the best time for a train is 760 miles per day. That would mean 2.5 days of pure transit time from Chicago to PHX not including pickup, sorting, transfer,transit,transfer, and delivery. 3 day service pretty much depends on trucks with teams which can travel 1000 miles per day. When you go past 3-day ground then inter-modal would work but that is generally done with large shipments and not individually delivered freight. I've worked in the operations or route planning of air/truck freight for 26 years and have a fair idea of transit times.
it's ~1580 miles by what i estimate to be BNSF's railway from Chicago to Phoenix

You drop it off Monday.
It will get there Thursday
Monday night it's already left the city on a train - 48 hours later (Wed PM) it's in Arizona.

I've had things overnighted to me that are 200+ miles away the night before they are to be delivered by noon - it's only a 3hr truck drive in the middle of the night to get from the train depot to wherever they need to get in arizona

Taking a look at UPSs ground map out of chicago, there must be some hub in arizona that allows them to get packages in that state in 3 days - closer states like New Mexico take 4 days by ground.

Not saying you're wrong or anything, but it doesn't have to go by air.
#23
Old 12-11-2009, 06:19 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Otanx View Post
This overview was given to us along with other random company info like why they paint all their trucks brown, and the official name of the specific brown they use.
Okay, I'll bite. Why do they, and what is it?
#24
Old 12-11-2009, 07:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumor_Watkins View Post
it's ~1580 miles by what i estimate to be BNSF's railway from Chicago to Phoenix
They cut over 300 miles by rail (versus highways)? That seems like a high number since they go through a mountain range. How did you calculate that? I couldn't find a good rail calculator on the web.
#25
Old 12-11-2009, 10:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
No, I don't think you understand.
I understand perfectly. You said "Most of the cross country ground goes by truck." I refuted that and claimed that most cross country ground goes by train. I haven't seen anything from you that refutes my claim, I think a single rail carrier moving 50 million boxes during the holiday period for UPS is a good indication of how ground shipping is done these days. In fact you have it completely backwards-- shorthaul ground shipments (<800-1000 miles) will generally go by truck, anything past that it's more economical by train.
Quote:
Looking at your own quote the best time for a train is 760 miles per day. That would mean 2.5 days of pure transit time from Chicago to PHX not including pickup, sorting, transfer,transit,transfer, and delivery. 3 day service pretty much depends on trucks with teams which can travel 1000 miles per day. When you go past 3-day ground then inter-modal would work but that is generally done with large shipments and not individually delivered freight. I've worked in the operations or route planning of air/truck freight for 26 years and have a fair idea of transit times.
There is nothing unreasonable about being able to make that distance on a train. BNSF is able to get a train from Chicago to Vernon in ~3 days and have the boxes our for delivery at the local hub by 0600 on Day 4.

In any event, I don't think UPS would make a habit of putting Orange on a train, I think they will find some space in a backhaul 2DA flight on day 1 or 2.

Also note that there are only two days per week where a 3 day shipment is going to be constrained by time-- Monday and Tuesday shipments. They can lollygag all they like with shipments on any other day, since they get the 2 weekend days and those don't count as in-transit days.

Last edited by IAmNotSpartacus; 12-11-2009 at 10:50 PM.
#26
Old 12-11-2009, 10:55 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
They cut over 300 miles by rail (versus highways)? That seems like a high number since they go through a mountain range. How did you calculate that? I couldn't find a good rail calculator on the web.
According to BNSF's rail mileage calculator, it's 1821 miles from Chicago to Phoenix. Union Pacific's calculator says their route takes 1804 miles. By highway, it's 1711 miles (per UPRR).

http://bnsf.com/bnsf.was6/RailMi...tralController
http://c02.my.uprr.com/mlg/mileageca...eage_query.jas
#27
Old 12-11-2009, 10:58 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumor_Watkins View Post
I've had things overnighted to me that are 200+ miles away the night before they are to be delivered by noon - it's only a 3hr truck drive in the middle of the night to get from the train depot to wherever they need to get in arizona
heh heh

Once upon a time, FedEx required that all next-day packages go through Memphis. So we shipped a letter overnight to a customer near downtown, about 15 miles from the office. It went to their facility at LAX, to Memphis, back to LAX, and then to local hub for delivery. Now they'll just route it by truck to the appropriate local hub and save the hassle and time of sending it to Memphis.
#28
Old 12-11-2009, 11:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by IAmNotSpartacus View Post
According to BNSF's rail mileage calculator, it's 1821 miles from Chicago to Phoenix. Union Pacific's calculator says their route takes 1804 miles. By highway, it's 1711 miles (per UPRR).

http://bnsf.com/bnsf.was6/RailMi...tralController
http://c02.my.uprr.com/mlg/mileageca...eage_query.jas
Thanks, I was using Rand McNally for my figure.
#29
Old 12-12-2009, 02:07 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 3,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver View Post
They cut over 300 miles by rail (versus highways)? That seems like a high number since they go through a mountain range. How did you calculate that? I couldn't find a good rail calculator on the web.
i did a very crude google earth calculation - 2 or 300 miles isn't really going to change the feasibility of transporting things transcontinentally by rail
#30
Old 12-12-2009, 06:53 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Dayton Ohio USA
Posts: 26,868
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumor_Watkins View Post
i did a very crude google earth calculation - 2 or 300 miles isn't really going to change the feasibility of transporting things transcontinentally by rail
you've never had to decide whether to hold up a sort operation for a late truck.

Last edited by Magiver; 12-12-2009 at 06:54 AM.
#31
Old 12-12-2009, 02:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8
Background: worked for FedEx Express as a package handler for both the morning and evening sorts at a local station for 6 years starting in 2000.

From what I know of the FedEx network, any FedEx Ground package is shipped primarily by truck. In those 6 years, I never once saw a Ground package get shipped in one of Express' (air) containers. I can't speak to packages being shipped by train, but if it was the quickest/cheapest way to get it to its destination, train will probably be used.

Express, Ground, Custom Critical, Freight, etc all tended to operate as completely separate companies with a similar logo. This may have changed now, but I doubt it.

I can confirm that if a package was being shipped across town it would be trucked on a regular delivery truck from station A to station B (without being put on a plane or sent to one of the 3 major hubs) where it would be delivered (most likely) the next day. Most packages do go through Memphis, but there are also large hubs in Oakland and Indianapolis.

I can also confirm that if a package isn't associated with a truck or container, the only time you'll see updates to its location is when it gets an arrival scan.

It is possible for a package to make it all the way through the network without being scanned (except on pickup where its destination address/routing is captured), but extremely unlikely. I believe the percentages we had to make every night as handlers was 99.25% of all packages that left our facility. Most nights we were above 99.8%.

There's your FedEx lesson for the day
#32
Old 12-12-2009, 09:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 589
My husband works in Revenue Accounting for the Union Pacific Railroad, so he is extremely familiar with who ships what on the railroad and what the requirements are.

According to him, they have a huge contract with UPS to bulk-deliver container traffic from the Ports of Los Angeles to Chicago. The contract is very strict and has built in specific time requirements. These trains get top priority on the rails over all other traffic - 'super expedited', as he puts it. Other freight gets pulled off so the UPS rail deliveries can get through. And they make it through on time about 99% of the time; the UP is -very- good at this, as a good chunk of their revenue depends on it.

He doesn't know what the contract time specification is, though I did ask.
#33
Old 12-13-2009, 01:36 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by control-z View Post
Not necessarily. UPS Ground is gauranteed within a certain time. If you're shipping to the same state or nearby areas of surrounding states, it will be overnight.

This app from UPS will show you a map of Ground shipping times from/to your location.
But, there's no service guarantee. If I ship a two day air package, it will get there in two days. If I ship by ground, there is no service guarantee except for UPS best effort. It might take a week, but it could take two weeks.
#34
Old 12-13-2009, 01:41 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,944
Quote:
Originally Posted by qazwart View Post
But, there's no service guarantee. If I ship a two day air package, it will get there in two days. If I ship by ground, there is no service guarantee except for UPS best effort. It might take a week, but it could take two weeks.
Untrue, UPS has a service guarantee and I believe the maximum delivery timeframe is 5 business days in the CONUS. If they don't deliver by the commitment, the shipper can get a refund of shipping charges. I believe FedEx offers the same commitment for ground service but don't quote me because I don't ship out with them very often.

Note that UPS doesn't extend this guarantee from December 11 to 24 for ground packages. Cite: http://compass.ups.com/uploadedFiles...EAK_SEASON.pdf (pdf)

Last edited by IAmNotSpartacus; 12-13-2009 at 01:41 AM.
#35
Old 12-13-2009, 01:55 AM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystick Phoenix View Post
Background: worked for FedEx Express as a package handler for both the morning and evening sorts at a local station for 6 years starting in 2000.

From what I know of the FedEx network, any FedEx Ground package is shipped primarily by truck. In those 6 years, I never once saw a Ground package get shipped in one of Express' (air) containers. I can't speak to packages being shipped by train, but if it was the quickest/cheapest way to get it to its destination, train will probably be used.
FedEx originally didn't have ground operations. They bought Caliber systems and RPS, so it could be that FedEx ground had separate sorting facilities.

But consider what that means. If a FedEx truck picks up a package for delivery, it might have to go to either the ground sorting facility or the air sorting facility. And, from each of these facilities, they're trucked to regional facilities for more sorting and handling. Even worse, any package that is shipped to a destination that is with in 500 miles of a facility, it would be quicker and easier to bring it by truck rather than air.

I take it that FedEx will (if it hasn't already) start combining duplicate facilities and merging their operations.
#36
Old 12-13-2009, 11:58 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by qazwart View Post
But consider what that means. If a FedEx truck picks up a package for delivery, it might have to go to either the ground sorting facility or the air sorting facility. And, from each of these facilities, they're trucked to regional facilities for more sorting and handling. Even worse, any package that is shipped to a destination that is with in 500 miles of a facility, it would be quicker and easier to bring it by truck rather than air.

I take it that FedEx will (if it hasn't already) start combining duplicate facilities and merging their operations.
I never saw any indications that Ground would combine with Express, but I certainly won't consider it out of the question. Also, when I worked for Express, the Express trucks would not pick up Ground packages and vice versa. They truly operate(d) like independent companies.

I do believe, however, that if you go to a drop off location (Kinkos, an Express or Ground facility, etc), you can ship through either Express or Ground. The courier probably just treats it like another pickup on their route.

The "life cycle" of a package is as follows (at least, this was what it was when I was a package handler in Denver, other places may vary):
-Picked up by station-level trucks (the ones you see all over the place)
-Taken to a local station. Denver, for instance, has 4 sort facilities if I remember correctly.
-Package is sorted for its destination according to regional hub (oakland, indy, memphis). Each hub has its own set of containers at each station.
-All containers are taken to the airport
-Containers are loaded onto their respective aircraft.
-At each hub, the process is reversed, all containers are broken down and packages are sorted by what plane they have to leave on and loaded back into containers. I've heard that this is a sorting operation to behold!
-Containers fly back to the local airports and are distributed to local facilities by semi.
-Each station then breaks down the containers and sorts them by delivery truck, drivers go out, and you get your package on time.

This process takes ~12 hours or so. It's efficient enough that you can ship a package at 6pm and have it arrive at its destination (for most destinations) by 8am (First Overnight priority).

All packages that have a destination that's within the local airports area of service are generally trucked to that specific station. Ex: package is picked up in Denver, CO, destination Boulder, CO. It never goes to the airport, it's separated out at the Denver facility, put on a "shuttle" to the Boulder facility and arrives there either that evening or the next morning.

Pretty amazing when you think about it...
#37
Old 12-14-2009, 01:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: N of Denver & S of Sanity
Posts: 12,218
Update:
The packages arrived in Hodgkins 12 hours apart but arrived in Phoenix at the same time about 72 hours after the 2nd one arrived at the Hodgkins terminus
#38
Old 12-14-2009, 10:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 12,048
I get a lot of UPS packages, and they're usually very reliable and the tracking works great. But every once in a while the tracking will get stalled and you won't see much activity between the first entry and the delivered entry. And I've seen a few packages go way out of the way and bounce around from state to state, winding up 4 or 5 days late.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:50 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: versa latin dented rim repair bistro music cabbage core edible translated japanese porn septicemia amputation plagiarize yourself bare toenails gloryhole reddit frequent urination period next thursday date purity eyeglass cleaner vertical limit definition ancient restaurants mo duinne vasectomy appointment botanic gardens dinnerware fencing dagger farting fish pigeons nests beef corral mythbusters hindenburg rotating testicles police courtesy shield printing own checks jungle fever origin pilot sayings braveheart torture scene funny papers turntable slows down lying to meps wet back diabetic freezer meals is a lot two words taxes on mobile homes new kitten won t eat peripheral neuropathy life expectancy what do they put on boxers faces grandfather clock won't chime eye gets red after wearing contacts spot in my vision won't go away does captain america come back to life how to make corian look new again mortar and pestle marble vs granite knights of columbus secret ceremony how much does a garmin map update cost google photos select all pictures sell walnut tree for lumber national sunday law book mail what happens when you drink sour milk what do little toads eat how long will post office hold certified mail part time jobs two days a week bob seger fire lake meaning how is little caesars pizza made playa del carmen nudist stun gun on dog can you get pneumonia from allergies homemade anti static wrist strap how to get darker skin permanently a little song a little dance a little seltzer down your pants homemade chewing tobacco alternatives why are artists tortured souls humane traps for lost cats limo driver opening door