View Poll Results: Would you want a cooling blanket (like an electric heating blanket, but to keep cool)?
Yes. 97 70.80%
No. 40 29.20%
Goddamnit, Diosa, you forgot _________!!!! 0 0%
Voters: 137. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 05-04-2010, 01:24 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: California
Posts: 9,408
Heating blankets = popular. Cooling blankets = non existent commercially. Would you buy one?

Just last night, I was laying in my bed with the windows open, fans on, thinking about how it is barely May and I am already goddamn warm while sleeping. I'm the kind of person who has to be frozen while I sleep, so I can wrap myself up in a blankie and sleep. If it is too hot while I am trying to sleep, I'll get migraines and just can't sleep. So, all summer my AC blows, cooling my entire house, wasting energy, etc.

Now, during the winter, instead of running my heat (hey, I live in California), I use an electric warming blanket on my bed. I love it.

But last night, while thinking of all of these things, I came to wonder why there isn't a cooling equivalent of the heating blanket? It'd be a great idea- I could run my AC a little warmer, but keep my bed nice and cool. Save energy, be more comfortable, everybody is happy. The only thing I can think of is that cooling is harder than heating, so it just isn't economical to produce such a thing. Is this on the right track? I also thought that maybe there wouldn't be a market for such an item, hence the poll above.

Of course, it's entirely possible that there's a whole world of such devices out there that I have stupidly overlooked.

Last edited by DiosaBellissima; 05-04-2010 at 01:27 PM.
#2
Old 05-04-2010, 01:29 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 21,500
Here you go - not a cooling blanket but....

http://secure-bedfan.com/The_Bed...j.htm&click=17
__________________
One day, in Teletubbie land, it was Tinkie Winkie's turn to wear the skirt.
#3
Old 05-04-2010, 01:31 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: California
Posts: 9,408
Dangerosa, that's pretty nifty, but I imagine it isn't too different from throwing the three fans around my bed like I do in summer. It's an interesting idea, though! Know of anyone who has used one?
#4
Old 05-04-2010, 01:39 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Bama
Posts: 10,747
Well, you'd need to be able to run coolant through your blanket, which would require a heat exchanger somewhere, which means that the heat your blanket is sapping from your body would have to be lost somewhere. That would require a lot more hardware, plus the coolant itself, and would be expensive. Also, you'd end up heating your house more because you'd be adding the heat output of another electric motor to your house (unless you exhausted it to the outside somehow.

Also, you would probably be in considerable danger of hypothermia and death. Your body temperature is lower when you sleep anyway, and constantly bleeding off body heat during the night is probably not a very healthy idea.
#5
Old 05-04-2010, 01:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiosaBellissima View Post
But last night, while thinking of all of these things, I came to wonder why there isn't a cooling equivalent of the heating blanket? It'd be a great idea- I could run my AC a little warmer, but keep my bed nice and cool. Save energy, be more comfortable, everybody is happy. The only thing I can think of is that cooling is harder than heating, so it just isn't economical to produce such a thing. Is this on the right track? I also thought that maybe there wouldn't be a market for such an item, hence the poll above.
It's easy to heat something: just run electrical current through resistors, or burn fuel.

It's more difficult to cool something because the energy you take from that thing (along with the energy used to drive the cooling cycle) has to be dumped somewhere else. Your car has a condenser coil out in front of the engine, dumping the heat that was collected from the car's cabin. Your room AC has a condenser coil dangling outside the window, dumping heat to the great outdoors. Your refrigerator has a condenser coil on its rear surface, dumping heat from the fridge's interior into your kitchen.

If you want a cooling blanket, not only do you need the blanket itself with its cooling element, you need a place to dump all the heat it collects from your body. That makes it a much more complicated (and costly) proposition than a simple heating blanket. If you want to avoid having a separate heat-dumping element on the floor next to the bed, it could be integrated into the top surface. The blanket would have a cold side and a hot side with a layer of insulation between the two, and a pump somewhere circulating coolant between the two layers. Again, much more costly, complicated, and cumbersome than a simple electric heating blanket.

Thermoelectric cooling is another technology that could work. Glossing over the details: when you apply a voltage to move electrical current around a circuit composed of two dissimilar wires, one junction gets hot, the other gets cold. Build a blanket composed of many such circuits - with the "cold" junctions on one side of the blanket, and the "hot" junctions on the other side - and you've got your cooling blanket. CPU coolers are available that operate on this principle, as are a number of other devices. Not terribly cheap or efficient, but much more reliable than the more common gas/liquid/compressor refrigerant cycles.

Bottom line? A cooling blanket is likely to be much more expensive, heavy, complicated than a plain old electric heating blanket.
#6
Old 05-04-2010, 01:42 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Bama
Posts: 10,747
I suppose you could use cool water as your coolant, lacing your blanket with a light hose to circulate it. You could hook one end to the faucet and the other to a drain. Of course, then you'd be spending a mint on water every month, and you still have the problem of hypothermia.
#7
Old 05-04-2010, 01:44 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 27,085
Back when I had a water-bed, by shutting off its heater it would cool. Big-time. I would wake up freezing during a heat wave.
#8
Old 05-04-2010, 01:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: The Dueling Grounds
Posts: 10,129
Technical issues aside, I'm not sure a cold blanket is going to give you what I think you want.

I'm the same way; ideally I want the room to be cold so I can be warm under the blanket. Having a cold blanket is not going to provide that. You'll just end up shivering on a cold bed. It's the air that I want cold, not the bed.

What I have is a window AC unit in the bedroom blowing right at the bed, with the house central air off, and that works perfectly. Not wasting energy cooling the whole house, but being able to sleep comfortably in a nice icy cold room.
#9
Old 05-04-2010, 02:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,417
I don't know why folks are so concerned about hypothermia. We're not talking about multi-ton cooling capacities here; just a smidge of cooling, probably also utilizing a thermostat to maintain a particular temperature.
#10
Old 05-04-2010, 02:10 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Bama
Posts: 10,747
You don't need multi-ton cooling capacity for hypothermia. All you need is to drop the resting body temperature below 95 degrees fahrenheit to have health consequences.
#11
Old 05-04-2010, 02:14 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 948
I would have to wonder how such a blanket or bed specific cooling system would deal with high humidity environments. Waking up with a cold, wet blanket isn't likely to be good for anyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
Back when I had a water-bed, by shutting off its heater it would cool. Big-time. I would wake up freezing during a heat wave.
My experience is similar. Lying on a bladder of 80 degree F water is a remarkably efficient way of shedding heat.
#12
Old 05-04-2010, 02:49 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Within
Posts: 11,673
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Technical issues aside, I'm not sure a cold blanket is going to give you what I think you want.

I'm the same way; ideally I want the room to be cold so I can be warm under the blanket. Having a cold blanket is not going to provide that. You'll just end up shivering on a cold bed. It's the air that I want cold, not the bed.

What I have is a window AC unit in the bedroom blowing right at the bed, with the house central air off, and that works perfectly. Not wasting energy cooling the whole house, but being able to sleep comfortably in a nice icy cold room.

I like the air on my face outside the bed to be cool so that my body heat under the comforter is warm and cozy but not hot. A cooling blanket would not achieve that for me.
#13
Old 05-04-2010, 02:51 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
You don't need multi-ton cooling capacity for hypothermia. All you need is to drop the resting body temperature below 95 degrees fahrenheit to have health consequences.
Fine. Turn the dial from "smidge" to "half a smidge" of cooling.
#14
Old 05-04-2010, 02:53 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Metrowest MA
Posts: 979
I have awful circulation so I'm cold most of the time. Even on hot days, I need something heavy on my mid-section to fall asleep. Fan on face and feet uncovered. I don't think I could sleep in a cooling blanket.
#15
Old 05-04-2010, 03:01 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 12,082
I'd like a seat cooler for my car; my back gets hot on sunny/hot days.
#16
Old 05-04-2010, 03:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Challenger Deep
Posts: 10,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by control-z View Post
I'd like a seat cooler for my car; my back gets hot on sunny/hot days.
I rented a Lincoln LS five years ago that had this feature. Handy in the desert southwest of the US.
#17
Old 05-04-2010, 04:05 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 5,194
Why not combine them to make a blanket with climate control? If it senses part of the body is too warm it turns on the coolant, if too cold it turns on the heat.
#18
Old 05-04-2010, 05:58 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 16,445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
You don't need multi-ton cooling capacity for hypothermia. All you need is to drop the resting body temperature below 95 degrees fahrenheit to have health consequences.
except for those of us who's normal basal temp is 94 =) I am running a fever at 98.
#19
Old 05-04-2010, 06:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 21,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiosaBellissima View Post
Dangerosa, that's pretty nifty, but I imagine it isn't too different from throwing the three fans around my bed like I do in summer. It's an interesting idea, though! Know of anyone who has used one?
Nope, just one of those weird internet things. I suspect its a little better than a fan since it would run between the sheets - I also suspect I wouldn't like it.
#20
Old 05-04-2010, 08:04 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: At long last, home
Posts: 11,043
Well sometimes I want the bed cold. Not the room cold so that I can enjoy a warm bed. Sometimes it's muggy as fat man balls, and I'm hot, and want to cool the hell down without running the a/c all day. I need a cooling blanket. <Opens wallet and hands Diosa money> Make this happen. Post haste!
#21
Old 05-04-2010, 08:16 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Liverpool NY USA
Posts: 9,475
I'm hot. All the time, and summers are nigh unbearable for me. I would sell my firstborn for a cooling blanket if it existed.

I'm thinking of getting a Chillow, basically a water filled plastic insert you stuff into your pillow, but the reviews I've read are definitely mixed, ranging from "It saved my sanity" to "Uncomfortable and prone to leaks".

My home-made version is keeping two of those little quilted looking picnic basket cooling things (each smaller than a pillowcase, sold in the "Summertime FUN!!!" displays in a drugstore) in the freezer. When I'm about to die of heat stroke, I put one behind my back and one on my chest, and in about 10 minutes I feel much better.
#22
Old 05-05-2010, 01:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 13,557
There are such cooling blankets available. They are used in medical situations, for cooling of patients suffering from hyperthermia, heat stroke, after some surgeries, or patients with severe burns.

Search for "patient cooling blankets" to find them. Some brand names are EmCool, Medi-Therm, CoolMedics.

These are designed for medical use, they are pretty expensive.
#23
Old 05-05-2010, 03:26 AM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: DC
Posts: 19,401
Living in an extremely hot climate (100+ at night) with no AC, I've been pretty successful with the "wet sheets and a fan" method. A good variation is to drape wet sheets like a tent- I put them over my mosquito net- and then point a fan at that tent, creating a cool little chamber.
#24
Old 05-05-2010, 07:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 5,051
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
Technical issues aside, I'm not sure a cold blanket is going to give you what I think you want.

I'm the same way; ideally I want the room to be cold so I can be warm under the blanket. Having a cold blanket is not going to provide that. You'll just end up shivering on a cold bed. It's the air that I want cold, not the bed.

What I have is a window AC unit in the bedroom blowing right at the bed, with the house central air off, and that works perfectly. Not wasting energy cooling the whole house, but being able to sleep comfortably in a nice icy cold room.
I agree with this. That bed fan looks awful, because I can't stand having drafts coming in under my covers. I would just cool the bedroom with a window unit, leaving the house A/C off at night.

As for hypothermia - it's deceptive. I remember seeing an "I survived" story about someone who got dumped out of a kayak or something, off the coast of Hawaii. He could float without any problem, but the problem was hypothermia. You think "Hawaii - nice and hot, great for swimming, not a problem like falling into a frozen lake." But spend enough time in 80 degree water, and you will get hypothermia.
#25
Old 05-05-2010, 08:26 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Egypt
Posts: 666
I'd love one
Then I can sleep in Summer with no noisy air con whirring.


I'm fine until it gets around 38 or 40 degrees ( for my American friends that is 100-104 ) then it gets uncomfortable.
It's 30 / 86 today and cool as a cucumber. Hot but dry. Desert heat is much better than humid heat I have to say.
I hate humidity.
Invent something and sell it here
#26
Old 05-05-2010, 08:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,917
I also like to be cool when I sleep. I have had the misfortune of sleeping on a water bed when the heating element died and it isn't a good feeling to be that chilled to the bones cold. Or cold and clammy cold. Has anyone ever had a water bed element go out? I have a water pillow because of my neck problems and so far I have not gotten that feeling from it as it has insulation over the water.

I keep my room cool with an AC in an opposite window so it's not blowing directly on me. It shuts of at 65 degrees which is my year round temperature for my home. I'm always hot too. Have you tried a light summer weight down comforter? They really keep me warm but cool and breathe. I can't stand blankets but love my duvet. It's puffy and soft and with good linens easy to keep the duvet cover clean. Good Luck

Last edited by Perciful; 05-05-2010 at 08:32 AM.
#27
Old 05-05-2010, 08:34 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Egypt
Posts: 666
Wondering when you switch your air cons on?
What temp?

What setting do you use when it is on?

Here in Cairo we switch on when it gets to 38/100 and set it at around 28-30, damn it hang on I'll convert..... 82-86 degrees.

When we are in our Sinai house because we are right on the Red Sea we switch on at 38 but keep it at 26 or so because we have a bit of humidity being almost on the beach. We have a great breeze year round there so it's great for kite surfing but it does get a bit humid
#28
Old 05-05-2010, 08:37 AM
Guest
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Egypt
Posts: 666
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perciful View Post
I also like to be cool when I sleep. I have had the misfortune of sleeping on a water bed when the heating element died and it isn't a good feeling to be that chilled to the bones cold. Or cold and clammy cold. Has anyone ever had a water bed element go out? I have a water pillow because of my neck problems and so far I have not gotten that feeling from it as it has insulation over the water.

I keep my room cool with an AC in an opposite window so it's not blowing directly on me. It shuts of at 65 degrees which is my year round temperature for my home. I'm always hot too. Have you tried a light summer weight down comforter? They really keep me warm but cool and breathe. I can't stand blankets but love my duvet. It's puffy and soft and with good linens easy to keep the duvet cover clean. Good Luck
OMG!! 65

are you serious? that is 18 degrees

did you make a mistake? Are you in Siberia where 18 is comfortably warm?

I'd be terrified of mixing water and electricity in a bed I have to say so nope no experience of elements in water beds.

Last edited by Marmite Lover; 05-05-2010 at 08:38 AM.
#29
Old 05-05-2010, 12:44 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: detroit, east-side
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmite Lover View Post
OMG!! 65

are you serious? that is 18 degrees

did you make a mistake? Are you in Siberia where 18 is comfortably warm?
My husband and I just spent the first winter in our flat together and we had ours set to 58 degrees (14C). This is because it has no insulation and it was really expensive to heat. We just bundled up.
#30
Old 05-05-2010, 12:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: California
Posts: 9,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marmite Lover View Post
Wondering when you switch your air cons on?
What temp?

What setting do you use when it is on?
Honestly, I'm quite uncomfortable at night if it is below 68 F (20 C) and I don't have fans. In fact, all winter, my roommates wanted the heat on (fair enough, since it was 38-45 F at night), but I was so miserable with the heater set to 68 F that I slept with my windows open.

So, needless to say, the summer here is an ongoing battle. During the day, it's 110-120 (43-48 C) and at night, it rarely drops below 100 F. So, my AC is constantly on but I try to be somewhat reasonable and set it at 72. Sooooo hot though.

As a kid, I wanted to die because my dad NEVER turns his AC on, so I never could sleep, had constant migraines, and was generally miserable due to lack of sleep.

For me, it isn't just a cool room thing, it's a cool bed thing, too. Plus, it just seems like it would be cheaper to cool a bed instead of an entire room.
#31
Old 05-05-2010, 01:17 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 16,587
I'll third or 4th the waterbed will chill you down good just being at ambient room temp. Its not as good as having the air in the room nice and chilly, but even an 80 degree waterbed will suck the heat out of you quite well. Most people I know who have waterbeds have to run the heaters in them even in mid summer so the water doesnt get "too cold".
#32
Old 05-05-2010, 04:23 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: NE Ohio (the 'burbs)
Posts: 39,366
I'd love to have a "cooling" blanket just for my feet.
#33
Old 05-05-2010, 04:28 PM
I'm nice, dammit!
Charter Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Southern Merrylande
Posts: 37,912
I voted no because I'm almost always cold. Even in summer, I have a sheet over me.

My husband, on the other hand, would love a cooling blanket.
#34
Old 05-05-2010, 06:40 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: B.C.
Posts: 476
I think I'd rather a cooling mattress. A blanket would likely have to be stiffer than I like if it had any sort of cooling system in it. And it would have to be plugged in and I just move around too much when I sleep for that to work.

I make due with 3-5 ice packs wrapped in towels in my bed when it's else wise too hot to sleep.
#35
Old 05-05-2010, 08:30 PM
Guest
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Memphis
Posts: 5,762
I keep my A/C unit set to 62 degrees in the summer in the evening. I can stand heat all day but at night I like it cold, and I only use a sheet. Freezes my SO but he loves me enough to wrap up without complaining.

I would love a way to keep cooler without wasting so much electricity. I've always been this way, even as a kid I remember putting my feet on the wall to cool them off at night and I never used a blanket.
#36
Old 05-05-2010, 08:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: California
Posts: 9,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rushgeekgirl View Post
I would love a way to keep cooler without wasting so much electricity. I've always been this way, even as a kid I remember putting my feet on the wall to cool them off at night and I never used a blanket.
Absolutely. One of us needs to start a creative cooling solutions thread! I think the idea of wrapped up ice packs is a neat one I hadn't thought of before.
#37
Old 05-06-2010, 12:13 AM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,699
Quote:
Originally Posted by even sven View Post
Living in an extremely hot climate (100+ at night) with no AC, I've been pretty successful with the "wet sheets and a fan" method. A good variation is to drape wet sheets like a tent- I put them over my mosquito net- and then point a fan at that tent, creating a cool little chamber.
Wow, that's a great idea! I wish I would have known about this method when I lived in Spain. The inconvenience of rigging the tent would have so been worth it. I don't think I slept all summer from the heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiosaBellissima View Post
So, needless to say, the summer here is an ongoing battle. During the day, it's 110-120 (43-48 C) and at night, it rarely drops below 100 F. So, my AC is constantly on but I try to be somewhat reasonable and set it at 72. Sooooo hot though.
Yuck! Where do you live in California? The climate is why I stick to the city in Los Angeles, and I will never, ever move to the Valley.

What I do during the summer since I don't have air-conditioning is get my eye-cooling pack and lay with it behind my neck at night. Mine is filled with rice and holds heat or cold really well. (Plus it smells pleasantly rice-y.) Cooling the neck region really helps bring down the body temperature.
#38
Old 05-06-2010, 12:31 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: California
Posts: 9,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyper View Post


Yuck! Where do you live in California? The climate is why I stick to the city in Los Angeles, and I will never, ever move to the Valley.

I live in beautiful Bakersfield
#39
Old 05-06-2010, 07:05 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: NH
Posts: 21,833
I wouldn't buy one. I'm comfortable sleeping in temps up to 80F, and here it's rarely warmer than that at night; I think there were two nights last summer when it got to be around 90F in my bedroom and I had trouble sleeping. I find it much more difficult sleeping when it's cold than hot, which is why I have two comforters on my bed during the winter.
__________________
Stalk follow me on Twitter
#40
Old 05-06-2010, 10:29 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,917
Quote:
Originally Posted by zweisamkeit View Post
My husband and I just spent the first winter in our flat together and we had ours set to 58 degrees (14C). This is because it has no insulation and it was really expensive to heat. We just bundled up.
58 is too cold for me but I like 65 year round. I'm just always warm no matter what season. Humidity bothers me more then the heat. Most people like it warmer then 65.
#41
Old 05-06-2010, 10:39 AM
SDSAB
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 71,825
I voted no. I'd just throw back the blankets, strip down, set up a fan, or turn on the A/C. If I'm hot, I don't want something else on top of me.
#42
Old 05-06-2010, 10:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 27,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
If I'm hot, I don't want something else on top of me.
No. Too easy.
#43
Old 05-06-2010, 10:51 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: 50 miles NW of Chicago
Posts: 1,071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
I voted no. I'd just throw back the blankets, strip down, set up a fan, or turn on the A/C. If I'm hot, I don't want something else on top of me.
I'm in the middle of a lovely little thing called perimenopause. When I have one of those lovely little nighttime hot flashes, I throw back the covers and cool off under the ceiling fain. And even though it works, I hate the sensation of being uncovered. I need that bit of weight on top of me to feel comfortable.

So if there were a way of avoiding hypothermia, I'd take a cooling blanket in a heartbeat.
#44
Old 05-06-2010, 11:05 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Dutch in the Netherlands
Posts: 8,959
Can anyone tell us what indigenous people of hot climates do about this problem?

For instance, there are incredible low-tech solutions to cooling problems available, like this refrigerator consisting of two clayware pots.

So what do people do when they live in Yemen or Mexico and they can't sleep from the heat and don't have an airco?
Sleep outside, on cool windy roofs or under trees? Sleep in a cool thickwalled cellars? Sleep near a stream under a moquito net? In a hammock that allows the wind to circulate around your body?

We might learn from them.
#45
Old 05-06-2010, 01:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: DC
Posts: 19,401
In North Cameroon, where hot season nights often don't dip below 100, people sleep outside through the worst of it. Most families simply lay out woven mats over their gravel yards (which usually has a metal or thatch overhang, or at least some trees), which is surprisingly comfortable. Some people took it a step further and slept on local stick beds, with small sticks stacked like Lincoln logs to provide support while still allowing air to circulate.

It's not a perfect system. You don't get great sleep that way, but a hot season was not an important agricultural time, so most people could afford to be a bit sluggish and nappy during hot season days. Another draw back is that you are going to wake up the moment the sun rises and be forced out of bed when the real heat starts, whether you like it or not. there is no sleeping in during hot season. Finally, security was always an issue. Since people live in multi-family compounds and everyone sleeps outside, it was somewhat safe. But it could still be pretty freaky.

In Mali, pretty much everyone sleeps on the roof- in my experience they'd just haul a foam mattress up there. They can pull their ladders up for security. It's pretty scary because they are just flat roofs and there really isn't much to keep you from rolling right off!
#46
Old 05-06-2010, 02:56 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maastricht View Post
Can anyone tell us what indigenous people of hot climates do about this problem?

For instance, there are incredible low-tech solutions to cooling problems available, like this refrigerator consisting of two clayware pots.

So what do people do when they live in Yemen or Mexico and they can't sleep from the heat and don't have an airco?
Sleep outside, on cool windy roofs or under trees? Sleep in a cool thickwalled cellars? Sleep near a stream under a moquito net? In a hammock that allows the wind to circulate around your body?

We might learn from them.
In Southern Spain, where the summer temperature averages 100-110 degrees, houses are constructed with the heat in mind. They are usually built with at least one story underground, and the floors and walls are lined with marble. The houses are whitewashed to repel heat. The lower level of a traditional house stays so cool it's almost like it was air-conditioned.
#47
Old 05-06-2010, 03:41 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 764
Count me in the crowd that loves a cool sheets to climb under, but wants them warm after a certain period of time.

Generally, I just turn the air up. I have central air *and* a window unit in the bedroom. I'll turn the central air off at night, but turn on the window unit to keep the bedroom extra cool. Works like a charm.

I would, however, love to have a pillow that stays cool-- or at least, cycles into "cooling phase" every so often. There is nothing in life quite like that cool side of the pillow.
#48
Old 05-07-2010, 08:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,917
Quote:
Originally Posted by davekhps View Post

I would, however, love to have a pillow that stays cool-- or at least, cycles into "cooling phase" every so often. There is nothing in life quite like that cool side of the pillow.
My water pillow is a "Chiroflow Premium Water based Pillow". I bought it at my chiropractors office but they may sell them onilne. The cool thing about this pillow is you can adjust the amount of water inside the pillow to make it firmer or softer. if you want it cool you just turn it and it plumps the pillow and cools it.
#49
Old 05-07-2010, 06:38 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 4,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
Well, you'd need to be able to run coolant through your blanket, which would require a heat exchanger somewhere, which means that the heat your blanket is sapping from your body would have to be lost somewhere. That would require a lot more hardware, plus the coolant itself, and would be expensive. Also, you'd end up heating your house more because you'd be adding the heat output of another electric motor to your house (unless you exhausted it to the outside somehow.

Also, you would probably be in considerable danger of hypothermia and death. Your body temperature is lower when you sleep anyway, and constantly bleeding off body heat during the night is probably not a very healthy idea.
Wait, you're using the assumption the cooling blanket would be on all night.

Do people leave heating blankets on all night? I'd be way too scared. I let mine run on top of my bed for a while before bed, then turn it off when I crawl in. The heat that's in there is enough. Aren't heating blankets a huge source of fires?
#50
Old 05-07-2010, 09:12 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: detroit, east-side
Posts: 4,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by kushiel View Post
Wait, you're using the assumption the cooling blanket would be on all night.

Do people leave heating blankets on all night? I'd be way too scared. I let mine run on top of my bed for a while before bed, then turn it off when I crawl in. The heat that's in there is enough. Aren't heating blankets a huge source of fires?
But why would you treat a cooling blanket like a heating blanket? You'd pretty much have to keep it on all night, because otherwise your body heat would just warm it all up to where it would be before you turned the blanket on.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:42 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: cf stands for illegal cable coconut rum mixers cartoon factory music ghost world seymour ironing paper substitute oliver's army meaning onion comics car drafting lawrence welk accent t3 receptor melting pearls ellen pompeo lisp kid hurt bulb filaments marines d day amish inbreeding serigraph lithograph monopoly significance blended metal bullet profiles xt cheers vera navy etymology window symbol salt joke don't like sports grand money meaning muad'dib pronunciation splinted armor ass spelunker lennie briscoe dr dre phd dove gestation amatuer hooker bennie and the jets lyrics meaning crime scene body tape where is riverboat gambling legal in missouri? dog ate salt water taffy love them little mousies how to flatten a poster that has been folded why are blunts called l abandon all hope ye who enter here italian drano for shower drain how to tie down a tarp on a truck bed how much benadryl can kill you how long does it take for food to move out of the stomach can you eat your crocs longest running character on tv how to set a reserve on ebay broken bone pain years later calling in sick migraine sex clubs in houston blue eyed asian baby take used car to mechanic before buying well butter my biscuit and call me sally why is hank so mean to marie can i put drano in dishwasher small car big engine add hand pump to electric well cost of opthamologist visit without insurance does target sell scrubs in their stores cat bugs not fleas steel wool windshield scratches constant leg shaking while sitting what is sch 40 hydrochloric acid and sugar what does car mean in albania