Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 01-20-2001, 02:25 PM
Guest
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Decatur, Illinois, USA
Posts: 14,041
I was sitting on the couch watching Bugs Bunny with two of the little Gooses, and it was the cartoon with the two gangster guys, the short little one with the hat over his eyes, and the tall fat one. And I was trying to explain to the two little Gooses how this was a take-off or "satire" on certain gangster movies from the 30s and 40s, but I couldn't think of which ones, offhand.

So in order to educate my children about this essential component of American culture, I need to go down to the public library and look in their extensive video collection for the movies that comprise the genre known as "gangster movies from the 1930s and 1940s". What titles should I look for? All that springs to mind is Little Caesar, but I know there must have been more. Scarface? The original one, not the Al Pacino remake.

And does anyone know precisely which characters in which movie this cartoon is parodying?
#2
Old 01-20-2001, 02:46 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 677
I always liked The Roaring Twenties. Checking IMDB seems to confirm my opinion...http://us.imdb.com/Title?0031867
#3
Old 01-20-2001, 02:59 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Schenectady, NY, USA
Posts: 40,699
Rocky (in the Bugs Bunny film) was just a general parody of a gangster.

Now, where to start. There were a lot of great gangster movies in the 30s & 40s, so it's hard to know where to begin. Here are a few of the best:

"Scarface" -- Great performance by Muni, as well as a fascinating subtext on incest (i.e., Scarface and his sister).

"The Public Enemy" -- made James Cagney a star. Great performance, good story, nice death scene (a must in any good gangster film).

"Little Caesar" -- not quite as good as the two above, but Robinson's performance it top notch. Great final line.

"The Roaring Twenties" -- Cagney and Bogart as good and bad gangsters. Second best death scene of all (dying on the steps of a church).

"High Sierra" -- a different type, with Bogart as a gangster whose past catches up with him. (BTW, this was the first film Bogart ever filmed on location.)

"White Heat" -- Cagney again, as a psychopath with a mother fixation. Best death scene yet. "Top of the world, ma!"
__________________
"East is East and West is West and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like prunes than rhubarb does."
Purveyor of fine science fiction since 1982.
#4
Old 01-20-2001, 03:21 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,530
Just about any of the James Cagney and some of the Humphrey Bogart films. "Public Enemy" comes to mind.
Also check into films with Peter Lorre and Sidney Greenstreet.

As to the second part of your question, I don't know who the two cartoon characters as suppose to be. James Cagney was short, and he did usually wear his hat slouched over one eye, and Sidney (Sydney?) Greenstreet was a big guy, so maybe....
#5
Old 01-20-2001, 03:32 PM
Guest
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: 3000 miles from home
Posts: 6,209
Quote:
Originally posted by RealityChuck
Rocky (in the Bugs Bunny film) was just a general parody of a gangster.

Very true. And gangsters and gangster movies were soooo common in the '30-'40's. Like action-adventure heros now.

But I think Rocky- the voice anyway- was particularly Edward G. Robinson. So "Little Casear" would be good.

(RE: Parody of Edward G. Robinson, see also Chief Wiggum)
#6
Old 01-20-2001, 04:22 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 667
I'll gladly second "White Heat." Cagney's role was probably the most twisted and disturbing portrayal in American cinema of the Thirties. Not only is the final scene memorable, but the prison cafeteria scene when he's informed of his mother's death is unforgettable. The guy absolutely short-circuits.

At least in the Thirties and Forties, the psychotic nature of that character is rivaled only by Richard Widmark's psycho hitman (can't recall the movie, late 40's) who pushes a screaming, pleading, wheelchair-bound old lady down a staircase.
#7
Old 01-20-2001, 05:35 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Posts: 10,316
Quote:
Originally posted by OrcaChow
I'll gladly second "White Heat." Cagney's role was probably the most twisted and disturbing portrayal in American cinema of the Thirties. Not only is the final scene memorable, but the prison cafeteria scene when he's informed of his mother's death is unforgettable. The guy absolutely short-circuits.

At least in the Thirties and Forties, the psychotic nature of that character is rivaled only by Richard Widmark's psycho hitman (can't recall the movie, late 40's) who pushes a screaming, pleading, wheelchair-bound old lady down a staircase.

That movie was Kiss of Death (1947). Widmark's debut!

There's The Big Sleep (1946) or Angels with Dirty Faces (1930), too
#8
Old 01-20-2001, 08:04 PM
Charter Member
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 15,242
Sorry, boys. ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES was 1938, WHITE HEAT was 1949.

The former is a good one for kids...you get Cagney as a gangster, Bogart as a shyster lawyer, and Pat O'Brien as a sanctimonious priest, all in one flick.

The latter is a bit too disturbing for the wee ones; that guy who catches the live steam in the face is a bit tough to forget at bedtime.
#9
Old 01-20-2001, 08:50 PM
Guest
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Posts: 10,316
You're right, 1938...... I was looking at my database and misread it.
#10
Old 01-20-2001, 09:05 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Buford, Georgia
Posts: 8,011
"Brother Orchid" with E.G. Robinson and Bogart is a great gangster movie to watch with children. If any of you have ever seen it, you know why "Heartwarming" and "Gangster" are not mutually exclusive. I was able to obtain it through my (King County, WA) library system, so it's possible your library may have it as well.

Sorry if this is a hijack - but are there any good 30's & 40's gangster movies that were made by a studio other than Warner's? That would explain why you didn't see them parodied as much in MGM cartoons like Tom & Jerry.
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:03 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: pp for pages breathing nitrogen hemlock poisoning crispen glover letterman 3.5 psion misdelivered mail the graduate analysis teresa wright nude chew toothpicks advil milligrams richard speck tape navy dress khakis car feelers tng clues halloween motors battery drained dicks peeing tank guns dvd stand for gl 70 milkshake definition michner novels b connectors tout sweet definition best krumblor aura ballin meaning wapsi square review alabama dildo no prize hulu episodes expire klingon devil hot peppers hiccups how much does a round bail of hay cost how big would a human wingspan have to be sea monkey in vodka can you make quiche ahead of time wiring duct home depot getting a lot of wrong number calls furnace starts then shuts off pc radio tuner card race to escape game show alice in wonderland vs through the looking glass what do chinese people call china how is christopher related to tony the purpose of defibrillation is to emt toast pecans for pecan pie why cant some people whistle why doesn't curious george have a tail where did the term knocked up come from william mckinley bacon number can a helicopter do a roll parcel select or priority mail can bent rims be fixed no way out spoilers wide ruled vs college ruled paper how to get gallium off your hands simpsons tapped out rail yard petticoat junction water tower why would irs send certified mail ace key copy price do wolverines attack humans lyrics to star wars theme song aclu not tax deductible