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#1
Old 12-08-2010, 07:56 PM
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What are your most delicious but time-consuming recipes?

A few days ago I tried making Beef Bourguignon from the Simply Recipes website. It took me almost three hours (!) to make it but it was sooooooooooo worth it - the broth was amazing and totally eclipses any other stew I've ever made.

From the same site, I've also made this Berry Tart which also is very time consuming (mostly because of the crust) but divine as well.

There is something satisfying about spending hours on a dish and producing something amazing. I fall into a sort of zen-like state where I am completely absorbed in the cooking, and when it's done I feel a sense of triumph. Yay! I produced something yummy! It was totally worth it!

So please share your own ridiculously time-consuming but absolutely delicious recipes!
#2
Old 12-08-2010, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee View Post
A few days ago I tried making Beef Bourguignon from the Simply Recipes website. It took me almost three hours (!) to make it but it was sooooooooooo worth it - the broth was amazing and totally eclipses any other stew I've ever made.
Is that 3 hours of actual working time or just start-to-finish?

edit: If you're counting start-to-finish time, I'm making this French onion soup right now (just about to cut the onion.) It takes about 4 hours, with attention throughout, although the actual work is maybe 30 minutes. Then there's barbecue which takes up to 12 hours (the way I do it--others do it up to nearly 24 hours.) But, depending on your set-up, that may only require intermittent attention.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-08-2010 at 08:06 PM.
#3
Old 12-08-2010, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Is that 3 hours of actual working time or just start-to-finish?
Start to finish - starting with a pile of ingredients and ending up with a plate of food. It wasn't quite 3 hours - I started around 7:45 and we ate about 10:30 I think.

To be fair, I also made mashed potatoes at the same time. Still, anything that takes over an hour is long in my book.
#4
Old 12-08-2010, 08:42 PM
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Vegetable Biryani. Its one of my favortie dishes, but there's a lot of prep work. The last time I made it I did some of the prep work the night before but it still took a long time.
#5
Old 12-08-2010, 08:42 PM
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Cioppino (recipe later if/when I toddle upstairs to find it), although a lot of the time comes from making a fumet first. The biggest time commitment for this recipe, though, is driving all the way across town (45 min each way) to the one good fish monger in the area...
#6
Old 12-08-2010, 08:58 PM
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I make Julia Child's boeuf bourguignon sometimes - takes more like four or five active hours. Delicious.
#7
Old 12-08-2010, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee View Post
Start to finish - starting with a pile of ingredients and ending up with a plate of food. It wasn't quite 3 hours - I started around 7:45 and we ate about 10:30 I think.
You should talk to my SO. It's become kind of a joke around here that I start cooking at 6 p.m. and dinner isn't plated until 10 p.m. or later. Since I've discovered the wonders of a pressure cooker, though, dinner has been greatly expedited. That said, it doesn't help with French onion soup.

The most labor intensive recipes I have are often the pasta ones. Like pierogi or manti or whatnot. Just takes for fucking ever to roll out the dough and stuff it. (Pierogi are a pain, as you cut them into circles and are forever rerolling and cutting the leftover dough. Manti are a pain because they're tiny.) Or I have a completely from scratch lasagna recipe that I pull out for special occasions, which has a slow simmered bolognese, a bechamel, and homemade spinach lasagna sheets. That takes a while.
#8
Old 12-08-2010, 11:10 PM
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I've been meaning to try making my own pasta . . . can you make it ahead of time and freeze it?
#9
Old 12-08-2010, 11:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee View Post
I've been meaning to try making my own pasta . . . can you make it ahead of time and freeze it?
I have no clue. I've never attempted it. Checking online, it seems to be possible.
#10
Old 12-09-2010, 12:03 AM
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OK...Four hours later and the onions are starting to look really, really good. They've been on the stovetop for the last hour. I'm not always a big fan of Cook's Illustrated recipes, but they have a lot of useful tips. The recipe they built this off of I read in an old issue of CI. They had some French chef show them the way he makes French onion soup, and it just involves cooking down the onions, and constantly adding water a quarter cup at a time, and letting it boil off, for the last hour or hour and a half of cooking, until they turn a deep brown. The broth is then built with only water (!), no beef or chicken stock. I'm meeting that French recipe halfway, cooking the onions down more than the linked-to recipe, and adding just 2 cups of homemade beef broth and making up the rest of the liquid with water. We'll see how it goes. The onions taste amazingly sweet and deep at this point.
#11
Old 12-09-2010, 12:04 AM
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I have a recipe for Lumpia that is absolutely delicious, but very labor intensive. It's basically little eggrolls made with wonton wrappers that are filled with pork, shrimp and veg, that are fried and served with a homemade sweet and sour sauce. I've made them twice, and even as good as they are, I may never make them again.

I made Coq au Vin once and decided the final result didn't merit the effort it took to make it. I didn't really care for it at all.

I make sausage balls every year for the holidays. Easy recipe, but another labor intensive endeavor. One that's totally worth the effort, though, and now that I have a helper hubby to mix them, it's not as bad. Most people don't mix them thoroughly enough. There shouldn't be any bits left in the bottom of the bowl when you are done kneading. It takes A. Long. Time. to achieve that state. Hubby does all of the kneading now and I do the rolling.

I made Martha Stewart's Inside-Out German Chocolate Cake once and it was absolutely amazing. It took forever. I haven't made it again, but mostly because there are only two of us and I couldn't let cake that good go to waste. Who am I kidding...no cake can go to waste. I don't need to be eating whole cakes, so I don't make them unless I know there will be lots of other folks there to eat them.
#12
Old 12-09-2010, 12:53 AM
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Not sure if this counts due to the relative lack of effort, but chili. I don't make my own beans or cook my own tomatoes or anything, but I throw everything together at like 8 AM and let it cook for damn near 10 hours. I do this when I have a day off work, because you do have to stir it every once in awhile, but it's ohhhhh so tasty. Actually, I think that goes for quite a few stew-like recipes--the longer you let it cook, the better it tastes.

I think lasagna should go here too, because I usually make it the day before, and bake it the next evening. The actual prep takes quite a bit of work, too.

The nice thing about these dishes is that they taste even better the next day.
#13
Old 12-09-2010, 01:06 AM
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In Sydney there is an institution known as The Balkan. Has been run by the same Croatian family since the 60's. It's spartanly furnished and reasonably priced. Most of the regulars order the same two dishes: bean soup and pollo pollo.

Pollo pollo is simply a mixed grill that would gladden the heart of any meat lover. The bean soup is just magnificent.

It took me years to fine tune the recipe, based on a ham hock, red kidney beans, cannellini beans, borlotti beans, and lots and lots of paprika with chicken stock, tomato and onion base.

It's still not quite right becase the white tetovac beans it should be made with are rarely available here.

To get the authentic smoky flavour it's got to be s..l..o..w cooked over at least two days in a big, heavy iron pot. I usually do it in 2-3 stints of 3 hours. Served with crusty bread with fresh garlic rubbed into it and the biggest bodied red wine you can get your hands on. It makes several winters cold nights worth waiting on. Always best on the second and third day.
#14
Old 12-09-2010, 01:41 AM
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OK, dinner was plated at 12:20. So 5:20 from start to finish for French onion soup. Was it worth it? Of course. Few things are as good as homemade French onion soup.
#15
Old 12-09-2010, 01:49 AM
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Yeah, but I'd probably die of hunger before I got to taste it.
#16
Old 12-09-2010, 01:52 AM
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In the restaurant biz, the greatest discipline is time... there are only flavorful dishes... you can't use time as an excuse. The CEO wants it now.

Last edited by devilsknew; 12-09-2010 at 01:52 AM.
#17
Old 12-09-2010, 02:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by devilsknew View Post
In the restaurant biz, the greatest discipline is time... there are only flavorful dishes... you can't use time as an excuse. The CEO wants it now.
Sure, but it's not like you cook any of these dishes to order.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee
Yeah, but I'd probably die of hunger before I got to taste it.
Oh, you snack on stuff or plan ahead--as I mention barbecue takes even longer. If I'm doing an afternoon barbecue and want to make brisket, I have to wake up around 4:30 a.m. to start the coals and get things ready. It's actually a lot of fun if you're into that sort of thing.
#18
Old 12-09-2010, 02:23 AM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Sure, but it's not like you cook any of these dishes to order. .
Shit, all my time on the grill was special order. I took more crAazy requests at Mc D's. Our grill guys wat the hilton, were some of the best though. The sous chefs promoted the best steak and best sauce competition through pride. I would give "big black" a 10 for his "special steak".

Last edited by devilsknew; 12-09-2010 at 02:28 AM.
#19
Old 12-09-2010, 02:26 AM
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Originally Posted by devilsknew View Post
Shit, all my time on the grill was special order.
We're not talking about those dishes in this thread. ETA: I think we may be talking across each other, here. You're talking about your experience on the grill. Most of us are talking about low-and-slow dishes that take time to prepare. And the restaurant biz has plenty of room for those types of dishes, too.

Last edited by pulykamell; 12-09-2010 at 02:28 AM.
#20
Old 12-09-2010, 02:30 AM
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(I mean I would give him 10$ for a steak.... special employee dinner)
#21
Old 12-09-2010, 03:48 AM
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Time consumed with labor, or just overall time between beginning and end?

answer A might be matzo, just because I have to stand over a blistering stove and open and close and mess with it constantly until it's all done. (but it's DELISHUS.... I call it shiksa matzo)

For pure start-finish, it's probably turkey, which I first brine, then dry before it ever goes near an oven. About 4 days.

Last edited by Stoid; 12-09-2010 at 03:49 AM.
#22
Old 12-09-2010, 03:51 AM
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Somewhere, I have a recipe for moussaka that isn't difficult at all, but it is super time-consuming and it gets every dish in the house dirty in the process.

The end result is very tasty, though. Even if it doesn't at all resemble the moussaka I've eaten in Bulgaria. (I am pathetically unable to recreate the original.)
#23
Old 12-09-2010, 04:05 AM
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Hazelnut praline semi fredo (lots of beating & stirring, I beat by hand for this), homemade ravioli (mostly cranking the machine) and risotto (20 min of fast stirring) are about the most demanding things I cook.
#24
Old 12-09-2010, 06:02 AM
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proper french onion soup, Julia Child's Boeuf Bourguinon, cassoulet d'isigney [which I have posted the recipe for on the dope a couple of times] homemade glace de viande, and I won't repeat them again, but I made garum once [roman fish sauce, blecch] and kimchee once [double blecch]
#25
Old 12-09-2010, 07:30 AM
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My chillis and pasta sauces tend to involve about 40 minutes slow sautéing, and then two or three hours of simmering down. Once the meat and onions are cooked, I tend to add a few pints of stock and let all the flavours mix in while the excess liquid bubbles off.

It's a great way to be able to find time to do the dishes; I'm already in the kitchen, so it doesn't feel like such a chore, and I can break it up with the odd bout of stirring and tasting.
#26
Old 12-09-2010, 08:34 AM
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Martha Stewart's bolognese sauce is a huge pain in the ass to make, but tastes really, really, really good. Unlike anything else I've ever had. You need to set aside a whole afternoon or evening to get it done.

The recipe is pretty surreal, too. You start with like a pound each of carrots, celery, and onions... cook for a blue age... add a pound each of about three different ground meats... cook for a blue age... add a whole bottle of wine etc... add a whole quart of milk etc...
#27
Old 12-09-2010, 09:04 AM
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Remember the movie Big Night with Stanley Tucci? I've made Tucci's timpano recipe and it takes, like, two days. Making just the ragu sauce takes longer than most normal meals, then you've got the pastry, the pasta, the meatballs, the eggs, assembly time, cooking time... I haven't made it in years; maybe I should try again this christmas.

ETA: Here's a description in someone's blog (with photos!) of them making timpano a la Big Night. Yummy!

Last edited by Skammer; 12-09-2010 at 09:07 AM.
#28
Old 12-09-2010, 09:44 AM
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Dice a carrot, a stalk of celery, and an onion. Sweat with half a stick of butter in a frying pan until softened. Add enough white flour to make roux. When roux starts to dry out, add just enough chicken stock to moisten. Repeat until you have a decent quantity of thick white sauce.

Add 6 chicken cutlets to the pan. Spoon the sauce over them, adding more stock as needed. When chicken is almost done, remove it from the pan and refrigerate. Strain sauce and set aside.

Dice a carrot, a stalk of celery, and an onion. Sweat with half a stick of butter in a frying pan until softened. Add enough white flour to make roux. When roux starts to dry out, add just enough chicken stock to moisten. Repeat until you have a decent quantity of thick white sauce. Strain. Transfer to a sauce pan. Add reserved sauce and heat. Add the juice of one lemon. Season with salt and white pepper.

Heat 1/2 inch of vegetable oil in a frying pan. Beat 3 eggs and set in a wide, shallow pan. Put a cup of bread crumbs in another wide, shallow pan. Dip chicken into eggs, then breadcrumbs, then eggs, then breadcrumbs. Fry until golden and brown.

Heat 1/2 inch of vegetable oil in a small pan. Add 1/4 cup chopped sage. Fry until crispy. Drain on paper towels.

Add a splash of dry white wine and heavy cream to sauce. Heat through.

Serve chicken. Pass sauce in a gravy boat and sage for sprinkling.

Serves six.

Total cooking time: About 3 hours.

Active cooking time: About 3 hours.

Total cleanup time: About 4 hours.

Total angioplasty time: About 4 hours.
#29
Old 12-09-2010, 10:32 AM
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I start dinner for the family at 2:30 every day and we eat between 6 and 7, when my wife gets home from work. I do bake bread almost every day, so that takes up alot of the time. I spend alot of that time farting around during that time too. Its been really great staying at home the last few years. I've been able to build up quite an arsenal for when I start up a new food operation.
#30
Old 12-09-2010, 10:33 AM
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i can't do the linky thing worth a damn, so i just copied off my recipe. leave yourself a good hour to two hours for this one. it's seriously tasty and worth even fighting with the prosciutto strips. use the prescribed ingredients, which means don't cheat with the low-fat stuff. trust me on this!


Champagne chicken

4 boneless chicken breasts
1 t fresh-ground black pepper
2 t butter
2 t olive oil
1 cup dry champagne (or a bit more)
2 cups heavy cream (or a bit more)
2 ½ cups fresh-sliced mushrooms
6 slices prosciutto, paper-thin


Soak chicken breasts at least overnight in salt water (cover chicken with cold water and sprinkle liberally with salt. Refrigerate). Rinse chicken well and pat dry with paper towels. Trim fat, etc, then cut chicken into ¼-inch wide slices.

Melt butter and olive oil in large heavy skillet. Sauté chicken for 4 to 5 minutes. Add mushrooms, champagne and pepper.

Cook over medium/medium low heat for about 30-45 minutes. Remove chicken and mushrooms from skillet and keep warm. Add cream and prosciutto to remaining skillet contents.

Simmer about 5 minutes until slightly thickened.

Return chicken and mushrooms to skillet and bring just to a simmer. Serve over fettuccini or angel hair pasta bed.

Serves 4 - 6
#31
Old 12-09-2010, 01:11 PM
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I have a cake recipe that takes at least 2 days. First you have to make a custardy rum filling, and it has to chill overnight. Then the next day you make the 2-layer cake, probably about a half hour or so active measuring and mixing. Bake. While it's still warm you poke holes it the top of each layer and pour a coffee and rum mixture over them. Wait until the layers are completely cool. Take most of the filling and put it on the bottom layer. Take the remaining filling, combine with whipping cream and some other stuff (I forget the rest of the ingredients) and beat until it's as stiff as you can get it without it becoming butter. All the ingredients must be very cold. Put the top layer on the cake and cover over all with the whipped cream/butter rum custardy stuff.

Deeelicious. I haven't made it in years.
#32
Old 12-09-2010, 01:46 PM
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My own sambhar recipe takes about 2 hours - you have to chop all kinds of veggies, make all the masalas from scratch, toasting some, but not others, then you have to temper, then cook, etc.

I also have an awesome yeast roll recipe that has a cold proofing time of 48 hours, though it's not much actual work.

I just remembered - my lasagne recipe takes a long time to make, too. I make my own red sauce and my own bechamel. If I'm doing a shortcut version, it takes about an hour start to finish; if I'm doing the whole nine yards, closer to two hours. I only remember because my husband asked for it this weekend.

Last edited by overlyverbose; 12-09-2010 at 01:49 PM.
#33
Old 12-09-2010, 02:00 PM
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I also have a Martha Stewart cake recipe that is pretty time-consuming. The cake itself is just an orange-flavored poundcake, but you're supposed to slice it and layer it with this pastry cream that you have to cook very very slowly lest it scorch. And it really likes to scorch. And then you top it with a fresh berry sauce. It's really delicious. If you don't scorch the pastry cream and have to start all over again. Not that that's ever happened to me.
#34
Old 12-09-2010, 02:02 PM
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I made a chicken alfredo lasagna last Saturday that was rather time intensive. Cooked/sliced the chicken, cooked the vegetables, made the bechamel, par-cooked the pasta, sliced/shredded all the cheeses, and then built the damn thing.

It was out of this world. Totally worth it.
#35
Old 12-09-2010, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee View Post
I've been meaning to try making my own pasta . . . can you make it ahead of time and freeze it?
First, yes you can absolutely freeze fresh pasta dough. I make fresh pasta once a week or so and always freeze half the batch. The frozen half is just as good as the "fresh" half.

I love to make stews, braises, and soups on the weekends and then freeze them for weekday eating. I find the key to making most of those dishes awesome is simply to let them simmer longer. So I usually do some recipe on Sundays that "takes" five or six hours, but the truth of it is that usually I can get all the active work done in half an hour to an hour, and the rest of the time it's just sitting on the stove. Beef Bourginon, Flemish beef stew, chili...these all fall into that category. The first time they take longer, but once you know what you're doing, the prep work is simple.
#36
Old 12-09-2010, 02:35 PM
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Oh yeah, I make that Cook's Illustrated French onion soup. It's AMAZING. Takes forever.
#37
Old 12-09-2010, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zsofia View Post
Oh yeah, I make that Cook's Illustrated French onion soup. It's AMAZING. Takes forever.
It's on our roster for upcoming things we wanna make soon - Mr. Horseshoe brought it up the other night. And I came into the thread to say that I made the Cook's Illustrated (sheeee, they're getting a lot of shout-outs in this thread!) chicken pot pie once - it starts with a whole raw chicken that you take apart yourself, so it's very much a from-scratch deal. Delicious, but with the pie crust and everything it took me the whole damn day to make it.

I know make a streamlined version based on the best/most useful segments of their recipe - they direct you to brown the chicken and then build the sauce in that fond, and that part of the recipe builds great flavor, definitely. But I knock a coupla hours off the total recipe time by pulling a Pillsbury pie crust outta the freezer.

Mr. Horseshoe loves enchiladas so he occasionally makes a batch with homemade sauce that he's made the day before 'specially for it. So technically, there's a 24-hour turnaround time on his enchilada recipe!

Last edited by purplehorseshoe; 12-09-2010 at 03:56 PM.
#38
Old 12-09-2010, 04:48 PM
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I used to make some really good steamed dumplings. It took half the day and all of the countertops, but they were the best I've ever had.
#39
Old 12-09-2010, 04:56 PM
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My Christmas cookies are a pain in the neck.

The recipe is a chocolate butter cookie, it's not terrible for cut-outs, but you do have to be somewhat mindful with each and every cookie (it's not like a sugar cookie recipe where you can really crank them out).

Then, the decorating. Jesus. I use Martha's pipe and fill method with Royal icing. You can do colors, but a few years ago I hit on this awesome idea of making them white on white to save time on changing colors.

Final decorating piece is dusting with sugar.

I think the cookies are about two hours, and then the decorating is another four, at least. And I'm used to doing the pipe and fill, it definitely took longer the first few times I did it.

I will say the final product is MAGNIFICENT, in both taste and looks.
#40
Old 12-09-2010, 05:24 PM
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I don't have an ounce of Italian blood but I have a recipe for a pretty authentic red sauce or "gravy" that I make maybe twice a year. Involves cooking down a chuck steak, a few pork ribs, and a piece of veal until falling apart, then adding tomatoes and everything else until it's a a bubbling pot of red lead. My kitchen looks like a crime scene when all is said and done but I get enough to freeze for quite a while.
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#41
Old 12-09-2010, 05:44 PM
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Mole
#42
Old 12-09-2010, 05:53 PM
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+1 for dumpings. folding is boring and labor intensive.
#43
Old 12-09-2010, 06:04 PM
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I make cassoulet every year for a large party and I have to start three days in advance.*

The first day is butchering and meat prep.
The second day is the start of beans and a ragu.
The third day is assembly and a final cooking.

In all, it is upwards of six or eight hours of work which is well worth it.



* Technically, I start six months in advance because sometimes I make my own duck confit and the best confit is at least six months old...
#44
Old 12-09-2010, 06:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HazelNutCoffee View Post
A few days ago I tried making Beef Bourguignon from the Simply Recipes website. It took me almost three hours (!) to make it but it was sooooooooooo worth it - the broth was amazing and totally eclipses any other stew I've ever made.

From the same site, I've also made this Berry Tart which also is very time consuming (mostly because of the crust) but divine as well.

There is something satisfying about spending hours on a dish and producing something amazing. I fall into a sort of zen-like state where I am completely absorbed in the cooking, and when it's done I feel a sense of triumph. Yay! I produced something yummy! It was totally worth it!

So please share your own ridiculously time-consuming but absolutely delicious recipes!
My mom's rum cake....but it's always worth it.
#45
Old 12-09-2010, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
And I came into the thread to say that I made the Cook's Illustrated (sheeee, they're getting a lot of shout-outs in this thread!) chicken pot pie once - it starts with a whole raw chicken that you take apart yourself,
That's the revised version. In the original one, first you had to steal the chicken.
#46
Old 12-09-2010, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winnie View Post
I don't have an ounce of Italian blood but I have a recipe for a pretty authentic red sauce or "gravy" that I make maybe twice a year. Involves cooking down a chuck steak, a few pork ribs, and a piece of veal until falling apart, then adding tomatoes and everything else until it's a a bubbling pot of red lead. My kitchen looks like a crime scene when all is said and done but I get enough to freeze for quite a while.
Mine is about the same except that I also make meatballs to go with it. It's pretty much an all-day affair, although it doesn't require constant attention. Sort of like Thanksgiving turkey dinner in that regard.

Hockey Monkey: I've made literally thousands of lumpia in my life, but I never use eggroll or wonton wrappers, as they're too thick. I use lumpia wrappers, made for the purpose, and they are one class-A beeyatch to peel apart. Once you get the hang of it (after 300-400 or so), it goes pretty fast.

I also make something that my mother called "perushka", known in different parts of Europe as different things (pirogi, peroshki, etc.). This version is made with a raised dough that is then rolled out, cut into rectangles, and made into packets filled with a meat/veggie mixture with rosemary. Then they raise again and are deep-fried. They're to die for, but it's another all-day affair, it seems.
#47
Old 12-09-2010, 07:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: 'burbs of Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 13,993
Goetta. It's a German peasant dish made of oatmeal, ground beef/pork, and spices. You have to stir it for several hours while the water boils down and it thickens. If you don't give it a stir every 2 or 3 minutes, the oatmeal will stick to the bottom and burn. Royal pain to make. Personally, I don't care for goetta very much but my family loves it.

Next would have to be Buckeyes - delicious peanut butter/butter/confectionary balls dipped in chocolate. It's not hard to make them, but very time consuming. You have chill the dough overnight and then roll out the dough into balls, which are supposed to be the size of buckeyes (duh). I always get sick of rolling midway through and they gradually get bigger and bigger.

Last edited by PunditLisa; 12-09-2010 at 07:53 PM.
#48
Old 12-09-2010, 08:42 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: land of soju & kimchii
Posts: 9,274
All these recipes have me drooling. I'll have to take note of some of them for a free weekend!
#49
Old 12-10-2010, 09:36 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: By the Caloosahatchee
Posts: 11,446
Jambalaya is my most labor intensive. But this is mostly due to my usually poor preparation procedures. Once, I actually made sure that everything was properly cut, chopped, opened or uncorked and it went really smoothly and quickly.

I could never put up with all the effort you guys go through just for a meal.
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#50
Old 12-10-2010, 11:16 AM
Just Lovely and Delicious
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Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 23,731
This is kind of stupid but I think that making tacos for one takes an awful fucking long time for the amount of time you spend eating them afterwards. And I'm not talking anything fancy here, just the boxed shells and packet of seasoning.

Cook meat, drain meat, season meat. Chop lettuce, chop tomatoes. Drain olives. Shred cheese or fiddle with the "easy open" bag. Heat shells.

Put leftover meat in a container. Put leftover lettuce and tomatoes in a container. Find a container small enough for olives.

Clean meat pan. Clean cutting board and knife.

Figure out a way to shove all that meat and toppings into the tiny shell which I think get tinier every time I buy them.

Then finally you manage to eat two or three little tacos and it takes like 10 mins and you think about how, really, you could have gone to Taco Bell twice in the time this took and spent $3 and had your tacos.

Ok sorry that didn't really fit with the thread. But I think tacos are my favorite way to eat ground beef but I never eat them and it makes me sad.
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