#1
Old 05-02-2011, 04:50 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 14,962
What Does This Listing In An Obit Mean?

I was reading this obituary I came across online, (from a newspaper) and it reads,

Quote:
Jane Smedley nee Hanson 72. Longtime Matteson resident formerly of Roseland. Mother of Patricia (Jason) White, Chris Smedley, Nicholas Smedley and Judy Forester...
I am reading it as June Smedley died. She was the mother of Patricia, Chris, Nicholas and Judy.

It looks like Judy got married and changed her name to Forester. OK fine. And Chris is either a male or an unmarried female.

My question is what is JASON and why is it in parentheses?
#2
Old 05-02-2011, 04:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Face down in the dirt.
Posts: 2,559
Jason is her husband.
#3
Old 05-02-2011, 04:54 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 27,361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
I was reading this obituary I came across online, (from a newspaper) and it reads,



I am reading it as June Smedley died. She was the mother of Patricia, Chris, Nicholas and Judy.

It looks like Judy got married and changed her name to Forester. OK fine. And Chris is either a male or an unmarried female.

My question is what is JASON and why is it in parentheses?

It means that Patricia White is married to Jason. It's a way to acknowledge the relationship between the decedent and her children-in-law in the slightest possible space. Many newspapers charge by the line on obituaries.

ETA: Stop typing faster than me, SurlyChick!

Last edited by Skald the Rhymer; 05-02-2011 at 04:55 PM.
#4
Old 05-02-2011, 04:58 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 28,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
Many newspapers charge by the line on obituaries.
Guess the Bin Ladens are screwed then.
#5
Old 05-02-2011, 05:03 PM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: The Hub of the Universe
Posts: 5,021
NM

Last edited by Winston Smith; 05-02-2011 at 05:04 PM.
#6
Old 05-02-2011, 05:26 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 1999
Posts: 2,845
I think it's fairly traditional for the paper to list them that way, even when they don't charge for the obit. Although it might have become standard because of charges. I don't know. As for Judy, she's probably divorced. If she were a widow, it likely would have said 'Judy (the late Fred) Forester'. Gives everybody the connections without having to string it out.
#7
Old 05-02-2011, 05:41 PM
BANNED
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Chicago,IL
Posts: 14,962
Thanks, I don't recall ever reading an obit written like that before.
#8
Old 05-03-2011, 08:25 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Face down in the dirt.
Posts: 2,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
ETA: Stop typing faster than me, SurlyChick!
I'm just less verbose.
#9
Old 05-03-2011, 09:39 AM
Guest
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Hampshire, England
Posts: 13,340
Never seen that before (although I don't read obits much). I'd have read that as meaning that Patricia was born as a man, man.
#10
Old 05-03-2011, 09:47 AM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,644
I've noticed that areas of the country write obits differently. I grew up in Chicago, and the obit posted by the OP was all I ever saw until I moved to Wisconsin, where things were written differently. Now in southern Illinois, people are called home to Jesus, have dogs and cats listed, along with hobbies, friends, and every job since they were 12. It's not good, nor bad, just common to the area in which I live. When I die, my obituary in the Chicago Tribune will be like the one in the original post, but mine down here will be folksier.
#11
Old 05-03-2011, 10:58 AM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 15,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markxxx View Post
Thanks, I don't recall ever reading an obit written like that before.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colophon View Post
Never seen that before (although I don't read obits much). I'd have read that as meaning that Patricia was born as a man, man.
Maybe I read too many obits for a 29 year old, but this is how I've always seen it done.
#12
Old 05-03-2011, 11:20 AM
Charter Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Alamo City
Posts: 4,443
In the older times, Patricia would have been listed as Mrs. Jason White. A style which makes tracking down details about female ancestors via obits very annoying!
#13
Old 05-03-2011, 12:15 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The Middle of Puget Sound
Posts: 21,021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin_Bailey View Post
Maybe I read too many obits for a 29 year old, but this is how I've always seen it done.
Let me guess, you grew up in Sunnydale?
#14
Old 05-03-2011, 12:21 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 3,394
I've only noticed that change recently in these parts. Is it really that difficult to list the relationship of each person named? If they don't want the construct of "and his/her husband/wife/spouse/partner" following each child's name, they could just put "son-in-law Jason White" or whatever.
#15
Old 05-03-2011, 03:57 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 1999
Posts: 2,845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pai325 View Post
I've noticed that areas of the country write obits differently. I grew up in Chicago, and the obit posted by the OP was all I ever saw until I moved to Wisconsin, where things were written differently. Now in southern Illinois, people are called home to Jesus, have dogs and cats listed, along with hobbies, friends, and every job since they were 12. It's not good, nor bad, just common to the area in which I live. When I die, my obituary in the Chicago Tribune will be like the one in the original post, but mine down here will be folksier.
It may be more regional that I realized. It's pretty much all I've seen, but then I've lived here nearly my whole life. I do wish they'd list grandchildren with the children, rather than in a group after.
The ones with all the jobs and hobbies are a lot more fun to read, that's for sure.
#16
Old 05-03-2011, 04:00 PM
Guest
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 15,738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemur866 View Post
Let me guess, you grew up in Sunnydale?
The school paper was kind of depressing, but I did usually go straight to the obits.
#17
Old 05-03-2011, 05:18 PM
Charter Member
Join Date: Apr 1999
Posts: 22,189
Those little bulletin-style obituaries are actually written by the funeral homes and placed in the paper like a classified ad. Over the years they've come up with their own set of code words.

Fortified with the sacrements of Holy Mother Church - Catholic
Called to Jesus - fundamentalist Protestant
Asleep in Jesus - non-specific Protestant
Entered into eternal rest - Jewish, or family didn't want to mentin religion
Died peacefully - it was expected
Died suddenly - it wasn't expected

Some families want the whole treatment, including listing grandkids, pets, all the clubs the deceased belong to, etc. Occasionally the family actually does write the obituary notice themselves, and those are the more folksy ones you see. But most of the time they just give the funeral director basic information.
#18
Old 05-03-2011, 05:41 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 3,644
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddlesticks View Post
In the older times, Patricia would have been listed as Mrs. Jason White. A style which makes tracking down details about female ancestors via obits very annoying!
I have a copy of my husband's grandmother's obituary from a south side Chicago paper in 1941. The daughters are listed as Mrs. Christian Name - Last Name, although none were divorced. My great grandfather's obituary in the Chicago Tribune in 1934 lists his daughter as Christian Name - Last Name (not even with a Mrs.) but his sister as Mrs. Husband's Name - Last Name. Spouses of the children aren't listed at all.
#19
Old 05-03-2011, 07:38 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: On the cusp, also in SF
Posts: 5,640
Typically the mortuary will offer to post the funeral notice for the bereaved family, and pass through the charge to them (mortuaries get a 15% discount from the paper and charge the family at full rate, in my market). Or the family can take care of it for themselves. If the mortuary does it, they will include whatever facts and people the family wants to include, but the style will tend to be more uniform. If the family does it, that's when you might get some rather unusual stylistic variations.

Maybe some newspapers are more restrictive than others. We pretty much allow anything that isn't defamatory, libelous or in "bad taste" (whatever that is; it's not usually a problem).


Roddy
#20
Old 05-03-2011, 09:26 PM
Guest
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: The Land of Grundo
Posts: 1,443
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisacurl View Post
I've only noticed that change recently in these parts. Is it really that difficult to list the relationship of each person named? If they don't want the construct of "and his/her husband/wife/spouse/partner" following each child's name, they could just put "son-in-law Jason White" or whatever.
That's what we did when we wrote my mother's obituary. We even put in the hometowns of the surviving family members.

It had to be done right - my mother was a stickler for clear, concise writing with proper grammar and spelling, as are the obituary writers. I've always disliked the parenthetical significant others format.
#21
Old 05-03-2011, 10:20 PM
Guest
Join Date: Nov 2000
Posts: 1,275
Many years ago I used to set type for a printer in California. One of our clients was a local weekly rag. We would set the type, compose the paper and print it for them. They got lazier and lazier as time went on and got to where they would just send us a form and expect us to write the obituary for them. One day I got annoyed and wrote a really good one containing, among other things:

"Mrs. Velda Nurd kicked the bucket last Tuesday much to the immense relief of her unloving husband George and her three ungrateful children."

My boss let me send it to them on proof, and when they called to complain, he said "That's our way of telling you we aren't your writers!"
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:49 PM.

Copyright © 2017
Best Topics: trailer park stereotypes ss boat names martin n20wn d20 dimensions floating holiday meaning pointless quotes funny hagar pronunciation equine bovine martine bartlett define reservoir dogs philboyd studge darwin fish symbol removing landscape rock marron italian piers anthony firefly kosher capitalized monique jeffries papa grandfather propaganda fist songs for losers opposite of hoarding curing leather son of moses indie girl singer painfreetweezers com motorola dch3416 hack robitussin bottle submarine emergency blow holey water sambo book lipozene wiki schick shadel reviews removing nipples smells behind ears unclogging toilet with drano thomas english muffins outlet stores don't step on cockroaches musha rain dum a doo, dum a da roundup weed killer how long does it take to work compact fluorescent bulbs flicker remove neck and giblets from chicken does oxycodone make you drowsy what do austrians speak my name is luka meaning wax male facial hair walgreens ear wax removal cost is curdled milk bad chinese vs japanese vs korean writing went right over your head bands similar to weezer wilma flintstone maiden name 38 inch waist male poison ivy rash on penis words for friends with benefits english words to la bamba the rage of a thousand white hot suns red and green should never be seen how to rack pool balls correctly how to pronounce yolk how does rat poison work largest bottle of vodka how much does a teener weigh hunter s thompson oscar zeta acosta who sang can t live without you how long does it take to get life insurance money hbo late night adult round the corner chain restaurant do you tip a piercer what is japanese quartz movement